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Sample records for stainless steel compositions

  1. Nano-composite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  2. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 2205 duplex stainless steel composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladayo OLANIRAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Composites of duplex stainless steel were produced by oxide dispersion strengthening with comparatively improved mechanical properties by hot press sintering of partially stabilized Zirconia (PSZ, 3% yttria, mole fraction dispersion in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Ceramic oxide was added as reinforcement, while chromium (Cr and Nickel (Ni were incorporated to maintain the austenitic/ferritic phase balance of the duplex stainless steel. The powders and sintered were characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructural evolution and phase formation during oxide dispersion strengthening of duplex stainless steel composites were investigated. The influence of composition variation of the reinforcements on the microstructural and corrosion behaviour in simulated mine water of the composites were investigated. In this manuscript, it was established that composition has great influence on the structure/properties relationship of the composites developed.

  3. Laser composite surfacing of stainless steel with SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Majumdar, J.; Chandra, B. Ramesh; Nath, A. K.; Manna, I.

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to improve wear resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel by laser composite surfacing with SiC. Laser processing has been carried out by pre-deposition of Fe + SiC powders (in the ratio of 85:15 and thickness of 100 m) on AISI 304 stainless steel substrate and subsequently, melting it using a 2 kW continuous wave CO2 laser. Following laser processing, a detailed characterization and evaluation of mechanical/electrochemical properties of the composite layer were undertaken to study the influence of laser processing on the characteristics and properties of the composite layer. Microstructure of the composite layer consisted of uniformly dispersed SiC particles in grain refined -Fe dendrites. Laser composite surfacing led to a significant improvement in microhardness and wear resistance as compared to as-received substrate. However, pitting corrosion property was marginally deteriorated due to laser composite surfacing.

  4. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenning Shen

    Full Text Available The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel. Keywords: Stainless steel, Carbon steel, Anti-corrosion, Conductivity, Electrochemical, EIS

  5. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Ferraris, S., E-mail: sara.ferraris@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Miola, M.; Vernè, E. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 (Italy); Skoglund, S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden); Blomberg, E. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden); SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, P.O. Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Odnevall Wallinder, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Div. Surface and Corrosion Science, Dr. Kristinas v. 51, SE-100 44 (Sweden)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A silver nanocluster-silica composite coating sputter-deposited onto stainless steel. • Good adhesion and resistance upon cleaning with NaOH, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and detergents. • Low release of silver ions and no release as silver nanoparticles. • Good antibacterial activity against S. aureus even after heating to 450 °C. • Good antibacterial activity shown during cheese production. - Abstract: A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel

  6. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S.; Ferraris, S.; Miola, M.; Vernè, E.; Skoglund, S.; Blomberg, E.; Odnevall Wallinder, I.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A silver nanocluster-silica composite coating sputter-deposited onto stainless steel. • Good adhesion and resistance upon cleaning with NaOH, H 2 SO 4 and detergents. • Low release of silver ions and no release as silver nanoparticles. • Good antibacterial activity against S. aureus even after heating to 450 °C. • Good antibacterial activity shown during cheese production. - Abstract: A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel surface

  7. An esthetic technique for veneering anterior stainless steel crowns with composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenfeld, K R; Draughn, R A; Welford, J B

    1994-01-01

    The restoration of primary anterior teeth presents complicated esthetic and retention problems to the clinician. A technique is described for the chairside veneering of composite resin to stainless steel crowns, which results in well contoured restorations with superior durability and esthetics. A trimmed and fitted stainless steel crown can be veneered in three to five minutes. This provides the adaptability and gingival contour benefits of the stainless steel crown in conjunction with the cosmetics of the composite facings. The technique described produced composite veneers with a mean sheer bond strength of 3520 PSI (24.4 Mpa).

  8. Significance of stainless steel wire reinforcement on the mechanical properties of GFRP composites

    OpenAIRE

    K. Pazhanivel; G.B. Bhaskar; A.Elayaperumal

    2014-01-01

    Investigations on flexural and tensile properties of GFRP laminates influenced by stainless steel wire reinforcement were carried out as a novel approach. Plain GFRP laminates and GFRP laminates reinforced with stainless steel wires at different depth with various pitch distances were fabricated by hand layup method. The composite specimens reinforced with steel wires were exposed to low frequency high amplitude cyclic load by using a cam arrangement. Three point bend test was carried out on ...

  9. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  10. Ferritic stainless steel composite slabs : Experimental study of longitudinal shear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer Ballester, Miquel; Marimón Carvajal, Federico; Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Mirambell Arrizabalaga, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out the procedure described in Eurocode 4 to evaluate the longitudinal shear transfer capability of conventional steel sheeting open-rib profile with embossments, usually rolled in conventional galvanized steel, being rolled now in ferritic stainless steel 1.4003 alloy. Finally, the results of both composite floor slabs are compared. Two methodologies have been used to evaluate the longitudinal shear resistance in composite slabs, the m-k method and t...

  11. On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Akhtar; Guo Shiju

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC-NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core-rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  12. Experimental study of composition and influence factors on fouling of stainless steel and copper in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dazhang; Liu, Jianhua; E, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An increase of seawater temperature deteriorates the fouling and corrosion. • The main compositions of crystals are Mg(OH) 2 , Al(OH) 3 and their complex compounds. • The images of the seawater fouling on stainless steel and copper were shown in the paper. • A higher heat flux and A higher Reynolds number are prone to crystallization fouling accumulation in seawater. - Abstract: Metals and alloys are easily fouled in marine environment. It is a big problem for heat exchangers using cooling seawater in power plants or ships. In the paper, a seawater-fouling dynamic test device was built to investigate the composition and influence factors on fouling of stainless steel and copper in the cooling seawater system. Moreover, the static trials were performed to study the fouling and corrosion of stainless steel and copper in marine environment. The experimental results show that the seawater fouling of stainless steel is crystallization fouling, and the main elements of fouling are magnesium and aluminum. In addition, the results show that the seawater fouling of copper is corrosion fouling. In the dynamic experiments, the effects of heat flux and Reynolds number on stainless steel fouling were studied. The results show that higher heat flux and higher Reynolds number of seawater lead to the accumulation of seawater fouling.

  13. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  14. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  15. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite ...

  16. Processing and temperature-dependent properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten-stainless steel composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějíček, Jiří; Boldyryeva, Hanna

    2009-12-01

    Tungsten-stainless steel (W+SS) composites and functionally graded materials (FGMs) have a potential application as joining material in plasma facing components for nuclear fusion devices. Here, tungsten provides the heat-resistant plasma facing armor, while stainless steel is the main structural material. The composite or FGM can reduce the stress concentration at the interface by providing a gradual transition. In this study, W+SS composites of various compositions were produced by water-stabilized plasma spraying. With the help of in-flight particle and plume diagnostics, powder injection was optimized for each material, and the feed rates were adjusted to account for different deposition efficiencies. The composition, structure, and thermal and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. As these materials are expected to function at elevated temperatures, the evolution of their properties with temperature was also studied.

  17. Processing and temperature-dependent properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten-stainless steel composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejicek, JirI; Boldyryeva, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten-stainless steel (W+SS) composites and functionally graded materials (FGMs) have a potential application as joining material in plasma facing components for nuclear fusion devices. Here, tungsten provides the heat-resistant plasma facing armor, while stainless steel is the main structural material. The composite or FGM can reduce the stress concentration at the interface by providing a gradual transition. In this study, W+SS composites of various compositions were produced by water-stabilized plasma spraying. With the help of in-flight particle and plume diagnostics, powder injection was optimized for each material, and the feed rates were adjusted to account for different deposition efficiencies. The composition, structure, and thermal and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. As these materials are expected to function at elevated temperatures, the evolution of their properties with temperature was also studied.

  18. Effect of metal surface composition on deposition behavior of stainless steel component dissolved in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1988-01-01

    Deposition behavior of corrosion products has been investigated to clarify the effect of metal surface composition on the deposition process in liquid sodium. For the study a sodium loop made of Type 304 stainless steel was employed. Deposition test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, iron, nickel or Inconel 718, were immersed in the sodium pool of the test pot. Corrosion test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, 50 at% Fe-50 at%Mn and Inconel 718, were set in a heater pin assembly along the axial direction of the heater pin surface. Sodium temperatures at the outlet and inlet of the heater pin assembly were controlled at 943 and 833 K, respectively. Sodium was purified at a cold trap temperature of 393 K and the deposition test was carried out for 4.3 x 10 2 - 2.9 x 10 4 ks. Several crystallized particles were observed on the surface of the deposition test pieces. The particles had compositions and crystal structures which depended on both the composition of deposition test pieces and the concentration of iron and manganese in sodium. Only iron-rich particles having a polyhedral shape deposited on the iron surface. Two types of particles, iron-rich α-phase and γ-phase with nearly the same composition as stainless steel, were deposited on Type 304 stainless steel. A Ni-Mn alloy was deposited on the nickel surface in the case of a higher concentration of manganese in sodium. On the other hand, for a lower manganese concentration, a Fe-Ni alloy was precipitated on the nickel surface. Particles deposited on nickel had a γ-phase crystal structure similar to the deposition test piece of nickel. Hence, the deposition process can be explained as follows: Corrosion products in liquid sodium were deposited on the metal surface by forming a metal alloy selectively with elements of the metal surface. (author)

  19. Surface composition effect of nitriding Ni-free stainless steel as bipolar plate of polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yang; Shironita, Sayoko [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nakatsuyama, Kunio [Nakatsuyama Heat Treatment Co., Ltd., 1-1089-10, Nanyou, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-1164 (Japan); Souma, Kenichi [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Hitachi Industrial Equipment Systems Co., Ltd., 3 Kanda Neribei, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0022 (Japan); Umeda, Minoru, E-mail: mumeda@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1, Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: The anodic current densities in the passive region of nitrided SUS445-N stainless steel are lower than those of a non heat-treated SUS445 stainless steel and heat-treated SUS445-Ar stainless steel under an Ar atmosphere. It shows a better corrosion resistance for the SUS445 stainless steel after the nitriding heat treatment. - Highlights: • The nitriding heat treatment was carried out using Ni-free SUS445 stainless steel. • The corrosion resistance of the nitrided SUS445-N stainless steel was improved. • The structure of the nitrided SUS445-N stainless steel changed from α-Fe to γ-Fe. • The surface elemental components present in the steels affect the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In order to increase the corrosion resistance of low cost Ni-free SUS445 stainless steel as the bipolar plate of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, a nitriding surface treatment experiment was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere under vacuum conditions, while an Ar atmosphere was used for comparison. The electrochemical performance, microstructure, surface chemical composition and morphology of the sample before and after the electrochemical measurements were investigated using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDS) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements. The results confirmed that the nitriding heat treatment not only increased the corrosion resistance, but also improved the surface conductivity of the Ni-free SUS445 stainless steel. In contrast, the corrosion resistance of the SUS445 stainless steel decreased after heat treatment in an Ar atmosphere. These results could be explained by the different surface compositions between these samples.

  20. Compositional homogeneity in a medical-grade stainless steel sintered with a Mn–Si additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahinejad, E.; Hadianfard, M.J.; Ghaffari, M.; Mashhadi, Sh. Bagheri; Okyay, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemical composition uniformity in amorphous/nanocrystallization medical-grade stainless steel (ASTM ID: F2581) sintered with a Mn–Si additive was studied via scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that as a result of sintering at 1000 °C, no dissociation of Mn–Si additive particles embedded in the stainless steel matrix occurs. In contrast, sintering at 1050 °C develops a relatively homogeneous microstructure from the chemical composition viewpoint. The aforementioned phenomena are explained by liquation of the Mn–Si eutectic additive, thereby wetting of the main powder particles, penetrating into the particle contacts and pore zones via capillary forces, and providing a path of high diffusivity. - Highlights: ► Local chemical composition in a sintered stainless steel was studied. ► Due to sintering at 1000 °C, no dissociation of additive particles occurs. ► Sintering at 1050 °C provides a uniform chemical composition.

  1. Structure and composition of phases occurring in austenitic stainless steels in thermal and irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction techniques coupled with quantitative x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phases which develop in austenitic stainless steels during exposure to thermal and to irradiation environments. In AISI 316 and Ti-modified stainless steels some thirteen phases have been identified and characterized in terms of their crystal structure and chemical composition. Irradiation does not produce any completely new phases. However, as a result of radiation-induced segregation, principally of Ni and Si, and of enhanced diffusion rates, several major changes in phase relationships occur during irradiation. Firstly, phases characteristic of remote regions of the phase diagram appear unexpectedly, and dissolve during postirradiation annealing (radiation-induced phases). Secondly, some phases develop with their compositions significantly altered by the incorporation of Ni or Si (radiation-modified phases). In addition, several phases develop at significantly lower temperaures during neutron irradiation (radiation-enhanced phases). 18 figures, 9 tables

  2. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding/carburizing of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge residual ...

  3. Torsional Failure of Carbon Fiber Composite Plates Versus Stainless Steel Plates for Comminuted Distal Fibula Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William K; Morris, Randal P; Ward, Adam J; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite implants are gaining popularity in orthopedics, but with few independent studies of their failure characteristics under supra-physiologic loads. The objective of this cadaveric study was to compare torsional failure properties of bridge plating a comminuted distal fibula fracture with carbon fiber polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite and stainless steel one-third tubular plates. Comminuted fractures were simulated in 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen human fibulas with 2-mm osteotomies located 3 cm proximal to the tibiotalar joint. Each fibula pair was randomized for fixation and implanted with carbon fiber and stainless steel 5-hole one-third tubular plates. The constructs were loaded in external rotation at a rate of 1-degree/sec until failure with a materials testing system. Torsional stiffness and mode of failure, as well as displacement, torque, and energy absorption for the first instance of failure and peak failure, were determined. Statistical analysis was performed with paired t tests and chi-square. There were no significant differences among the 12 pairs for torsional stiffness, first failure torque, peak failure displacement, peak failure torque, or peak failure energy. Stainless steel plates exhibited significantly higher displacement (P fibula fracture fixation model, carbon fiber implants exhibited multiple pre-peak failures at significantly lower angles than the first failure for the stainless steel implants, with some delamination of composite layers and brittle catastrophic failure rather than plastic deformation. The torsional failure properties of carbon fiber composite one-third tubular plates determined in this independent study provide novel in vitro data for this alternative implant material. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  5. Changes in structure and phase composition of chromium diffusion layer on stainless steels after long annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyazev, E.V.; Voshedchenko, B.M.; Voskresenskij, Yu.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of elevated temperatures UU and long holdings at heat on structure, phase composition and properties of chromium diffusion layer on austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steels 10Kh18N10TVD, 10Kh15N30M4B, 10Kh11N23T3MR, 10Kh21N28V6M3. The following mechanism of processes taking place in diffusion chromium layer is presented. The steady drop of chromium concentrations is observed after diffusion saturation. Chromium redistribution related with system transformation to more equilibrium state and simultaneous decarburization of steel surfaces takes place in diffusion layers of 10Kh15N30M4B and 10Kh21N28V6M3 steels after annealing at different temperatures and holdings at heat. Decarburization of steel surface layers is practically excluded in diffusion layers of 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels. Diffusion chromium-saturated layer stays effective only on 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels on heating up to 1000 deq C with holding up to 250 h

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings on stainless steel

    KAUST Repository

    Seuß, Sigrid

    2012-03-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been successfully used to deposit composite coatings composed of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanoparticles on 316L stainless steel substrates. The suspensions of TiO2 nanoparticles and PEEK microparticles for EPD were prepared in ethanol. PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings were optimized using suspensions containing 6wt% PEEK-TiO 2 in ethanol with a 3:1 ratio of PEEK to TiO 2 in weight and by applying a potential difference of 30 V for 1 minute. A heat-treatment process of the optimized PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings was erformed at 335°C for 30 minutes with a heating rate of 10°Cmin -1 to densify the deposits. The EPD coatings were microstructurally evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that EPD is a convenient and rapid method to fabricate PEEK/TiO 2 coatings on stainless steel which are interesting for biomedical applications. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  7. Stiffness Analysis of the Sarafix External Fixator based on Stainless Steel and Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Pervan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a structural analysis of the CAD model three versions fixators Sarafix which is to explore the possibility of introducing composite materials in the construction of the connecting rod fixators comparing values of displacement and stiffness at characteristic structure points. Namely, we have investigated the constructional performance of fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod formed from three different composite materials, the same matrix (epoxy resin with three different types of fibers (E glass, kevlar 49 and carbonM55J. The results of the structural analysis fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod made of composite materials are compared with the results of tubular connecting rod fixators made of stainless steel. After comparing the results, from the aspect of stiffness, we gave the final considerations about composite material which provides an adequate substitution for the existing material.

  8. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    V Shankar et al. Although much research experience exists on the nature of hot cracking in stainless steels ... that crack-resistant weld deposits could be produced if the composition is adjusted to result in 5–35% fer- .... A large volume of literature is devoted to the prediction and measurement of δ-ferrite in stainless steel ...

  9. Microstructure, Hardness, and Corrosion Behavior of TiC-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shicheng; Chen, Hua; Ran, Xu

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steel composites with various weight fractions of TiC particles are prepared by spark plasma sintering. Ferritic 434L and austenitic 316L stainless steel powders are premixed in a 50:50 weight ratio and added with 3-9 wt.% TiC. The compacts are sintered in the solid state under vacuum conditions at 1223 K for 5 min. The effects of TiC content on the microstructure, hardness, and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel composites fabricated by powder metallurgy are evaluated. The results indicate that the TiC particulates as reinforcements can be distributed homogeneously in the steel matrix. Densification of sintered composites decreases with increasing TiC content. M23C6 carbide precipitates along grain boundary, and its neighboring Cr-Mo-depleted region is formed in the sintered microstructure, which can be eliminated subsequently with appropriate heat treatment. With the addition of TiC, the hardness of duplex stainless steel fabricated by powder metallurgy can be markedly enhanced despite increased porosity in the composites. However, TiC particles increase the corrosion rate and degrade the passivation capability, particularly for the composite with TiC content higher than 6 wt.%. Weakened metallurgical bonding in the composite with high TiC content provides the preferred sites for pitting nucleation and/or dissolution.

  10. Stainless steel surface biofunctionalization with PMMA-bioglass coatings: compositional, electrochemical corrosion studies and microbiological assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floroian, L; Samoila, C; Badea, M; Munteanu, D; Ristoscu, C; Sima, F; Negut, I; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihailescu, I N

    2015-06-01

    A solution is proposed to surpass the inconvenience caused by the corrosion of stainless steel implants in human body fluids by protection with thin films of bioactive glasses or with composite polymer-bioactive glass nanostructures. Our option was to apply thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) which, to the difference to other laser or plasma techniques insures the protection of a more delicate material (a polymer in our case) against degradation or irreversible damage. The coatings composition, modification and corrosion resistance were investigated by FTIR and electrochemical techniques, under conditions which simulate their biological interaction with the human body. Mechanical testing demonstrates the adhesion, durability and resistance to fracture of the coatings. The coatings biocompatibility was assessed by in vitro studies and by flow cytometry. Our results support the unrestricted usage of coated stainless steel as a cheap alternative for human implants manufacture. They will be more accessible for lower prices in comparison with the majority present day fabrication of implants using Ti or Ti alloys.

  11. Stainless steel matrix composites reinforced with AlCr{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.M. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (Brazil); Velasco, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of AlCr{sub 2} intermetallic addition to austenitic stainless steel powder on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of sintered specimens has been investigated. It has been recognised that loss of chromium at the grain boundaries of sintered stainless steel decreases its corrosion resistance. With the objective of decreasing this effect and to keep a stable passivity, the intermetallic AlCr{sub 2} in the form of powder was mixed with AISI 316L in different proportions. Samples of these materials were compacted at 700 MPa and sintered at 1120 C for 30 minutes in dissociated ammonia and vacuum. The mechanical properties, the corrosion resistance and the microstructure were studied. Composite materials sintered in dissociated ammonia achieve higher mechanical properties than sintered in vacuum. Studies realised by SEM suggest that metal matrix composites present an increase in the content of chromium, but in the grain boundaries exhibit a transient liquid phase produced by diffusion of aluminium from AlCr{sub 2}. (orig.) 13 refs.

  12. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    crack growth (FCG) test (ASTM E 647-95a) - square bar specimen of 0.4x0.4x2.8 in. in L-orientation with a Charpy notch at the mid- length for SCC...Hydrogen Embrittlement in Steel by the Increment Loading Technique. Fractography: After the stress-life fatigue tests , the fracture surface morphology...NAWCADPAX/TR-2011/162 HIGH NITROGEN STAINLESS STEEL by E. U. Lee R. Taylor 19 July 2011 Approved for

  13. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  14. Wear resistance of WCp/Duplex Stainless Steel metal matrix composite layers prepared by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Melt Injection (LMI) was used to prepare metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 0.7 mm and approximately 10% volume fraction of WC particles in three kinds of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels (CDSSs). WC particles were injected into the molten surface layer using Nd:YAG high power

  15. Microstructure of reaction zone in WCp/duplex stainless steels matrix composites processing by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    The laser melt injection (LMI) process has been used to create a metal matrix composite consisting of 80gm sized multi-grain WC particles embedded in three cast duplex stainless steels. The microstruture was investigated by scanning electron microscopy with integrated EDS and electron back-scatter

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel/calcium silicate composites manufactured by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeng; Wang, Lianfeng; Jia, Min; Cheng, Lingyu; Yan, Biao

    2017-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is raised as one kind of additive manufacturing (AM) which is based on the discrete-stacking concept. This technique can fabricate advanced composites with desirable properties directly from 3D CAD data. In this research, 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and different fractions of calcium silicate (CaSiO 3 ) composites (weight fractions of calcium silicate are 0%, 5%,10% and 15%, respectively) were prepared by SLM technique with a purpose to develop biomedical metallic materials. The relative density, tensile, microhardness and elastic modulus of the composites were tested, their microstructures and fracture morphologies were observed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the addition of CaSiO 3 particles influenced the microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens significantly. The CaSiO 3 precipitates from the overlap of adjacent tracks and became the origin of the defects. The tensile strength of specimens range 320-722MPa. The microhardness and elastic modulus are around 250HV and 215GPa respectively. These composites were ductile materials and the fracture mode of the composites was mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. The 316L SS/CaSiO 3 composites can be a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Microstructure and composition of 304 stainless steel implanted with Ti and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Pope, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of surface alloys formed by implanting Ti and C into 304 stainless steel are examined for a range of Ti fluences, both with and without additional implanted C. The resulting amorphous layers are found to contain TiC precipitates, apparently with some Cr on Ti lattice sites, when the metal-atom fraction of Ti+Cr exceeds 55%. The depth profiles of Ti and C are measured, and the amounts of C incorporated into the alloys during Ti implantation are determined. Small amounts of H are also incorporated during the high-fluence Ti implantations. Thicker amorphous layers than those resulting from Ti implantation alone can be formed when additional C is implanted either before or after the Ti. (orig.)

  18. Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber composite foams with low percolation for efficient electromagnetic interference shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Aboutaleb; Nofar, Mohammadreza; Wang, Sai; Park, Chul B

    2014-07-23

    Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber (PP-SSF) composites with 15-35% density reduction were fabricated using foam injection molding. The electrical percolation threshold, through-plane electrical conductivity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the PP-SSF composite foams were characterized and compared against the solid counterparts. With 3 wt % CO2 dissolved in PP as a temporary plasticizer and lubricant, the fiber breakage was significantly decreased during injection molding, and well-dispersed fibers with unprecedentedly large aspect ratios of over 100 were achieved. The percolation threshold was dramatically decreased from 0.85 to 0.21 vol %, accounting for 75% reduction, which is highly superior, compared to 28% reduction of the previous PP-carbon fiber composite foam.1 Unlike the case of carbon fiber,1 SSFs were much longer than the cell size, and the percolation threshold reduction of PP-SSF composite foams was thus primarily governed by the decreased fiber breakage instead of fiber orientation. The specific EMI SE was also significantly enhanced. A maximum specific EMI SE of 75 dB·g(-1)·cm(3) was achieved in PP-1.1 vol % SSF composite foams, which was much higher than that of the solid counterpart. Also, the relationships between the microstructure and properties were discussed. The mechanism of EMI shielding enhancement was also studied.

  19. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  20. Fracture behavior of stainless steel-toughened NiAl composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Vincent C.

    1992-02-01

    Analysis of the tensile and fracture behavior of a composite system consisting of boron carbide particulate-reinforced NiAl with continuous 304 stainless steel toughening regions was performed. The composite was fabricated by extrusion, with the toughening regions extending along the length of the plate in the extrusion direction. Mechanical properties were determined as a function of orientation. Tensile testing revealed that the composite modulus varied only slightly as a function of testing direction, the strength was approximately 25 pct greater in the longitudinal relative to the transverse orientation, and the transverse failure strain was only 0.3 pct compared to values in excess of 10 pct for longitudinal testing. Notched Charpy impact testing indicated that the energy absorption values varied significantly as a function of specimen location and crack growth direction, ranging from 2 to 40 Joules. In addition, K IC values measured on subsize compact tension samples were found to range from 17 to 27 MPa ṡ m1/2. It was also established that the K max values determined from the maximum load measured during compact tension testing were similar to the K Q values calculated from instrumented notched Charpy impact testing. Finally, the fatigue crack growth characteristics of the composite were determined as a function of orientation.

  1. Foam injection molding of polypropylene/stainless steel fiber composites for efficient EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Wang, S.; Park, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber (PP-SSF) composites with 15-35% density reduction were fabricated using foam injection molding and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). The electrical percolation threshold, through-plane electrical conductivity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the PP-SSF composite foams were characterized and compared against the solid samples. The effects of the plasticizing gas and the void fraction on fiber breakage and orientation were also investigated. Microstructure characterization showed that the presence of dissolved CO2 decreased fiber breakage by about 30%, and together with foaming action, contributed to less preferential orientation of fibers. Consequently, the percolation threshold decreased up to four folds from 0.85 to 0.21 vol.% as the void fraction increased from 0 to 35%. The specific EMI SE was also significantly enhanced. A maximum specific EMI SE of 75 dB.g-1cm3 was achieved in PP-1.1 vol.% SSF composite foams, which was highly superior to 38 dB.g-1cm3 of the solid PP-1.0 vol.% SSF composites. The results reveal that light and efficient products with a lower fiber content can be developed by foam for EMI shielding applications.

  2. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the bond strength of a composite resin adhered to stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Robleto, Selene J; Villa-Negrete, Dulce M; García-Contreras, René; Scougall-Vílchis, Rogelio J; Guadarrama-Quiroz, Luis J; Robles-Bermeo, Norma L

    2013-01-01

    A technique whereby the practitioner could improve the esthetic appearance of anterior stainless steel crowns (SSC) could provide a cost-effective alternative to more expensive commercially available preveneered SSCs, which may not be uniformly available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the metal crown surface on the shear bond strength of composite resin adhered to stainless steel crowns. Seventy extracted anterior bovine teeth randomly divided into 2 groups (n=35/group), were restored with primary maxillary left central incisor SSCs. Surface roughening with a green stone was performed on the labial surfaces, and the crowns of the experimental group were exposed to UV irradiation for 80 minutes. All samples were treated with metal-composite adhesive, followed by composite opaquer. Standardized composite blocks were bonded on the treated surfaces, and the shear bond strength was tested at 1 mm/minute. The values were recorded in MPa and statistically analyzed. The mean value of shear bond strength was significantly higher for the experimental group (19.7 ± 4.3 MPa) than the control group (16.3 ± 4.5 MPa). Ultraviolet irradiation of primary tooth stainless steel crowns significantly increased the shear bond strength of composite resin adhered to the facial surface.

  3. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydiner, C.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B.; Hanan, J.C.; Winholtz, R.A.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Peker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs

  4. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  5. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, A; Nandlal, B

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM, size R4), embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply) was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN). Independent sample 't' test revealed a nonsignificant (P resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  6. Application of TiN/TiO2 coatings on stainless steel: composition and mechanical reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, M. P.; Genov, A.; Valkov, S.; Yankov, E.; Dechev, D.; Ivanov, N.; Bezdushnyi, R.; Petrov, P.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on the effect of the substrate temperature (350 °C, 380 °C and 420 °C) during reactive magnetron sputtering of a TiN film on the phase composition, texture and mechanical properties of TiN/TiO2 coatings on 304L stainless steel substrates. Pure Ti was used as a cathode source of Ti. The texture and unit cell parameters of both TiN and TiO2 phases of the coating are discussed in relation with the tribological properties and adhesion of the coating. The scratch tests performed showed that the nitride deposited at 380 °C, having the highest unit cell parameter and a predominant (111) texture, possessed the lowest friction coefficient (μ), tangential force and brittleness. The anatase-type TiO2 with predominant (101) pole density and increased c unit cell parameter showed the highest stability on the nitride deposited at 420 °C. The results indicated that the friction coefficient, tangential force and critical forces of fracture could be varied by controlling the coating deposition temperature.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Stainless-Steel Structures Fabricated by Composite Extrusion Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Lieberwirth

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite Extrusion Modelling (CEM is a new additive manufacturing process for metal that uses Metal Injection Moulding (MIM materials. The MIM material is printed on a build plate using a moveable extruder. Subsequently, the printed greenparts are debinded and sintered in a two-step oven process. In contrast to beam-based additive processes, the microstructure of the part is not generated layer-wise by melting and solidifying small areas, but in a steady manner during sintering from the outside of the part to the inside, in order to create dense metal parts. In this study, various structures were printed and sintered in order to investigate the mechanical properties and dimensional properties of the resulting stainless-steel structures, and their dependence on the infill percentage. The measured density of the dense sintered parts is 7.47 g/cm3 and the sintering shrinkage is in the range from 14.6 to 16.8%. The compressive strength (σdm50 of the specimens varies in the range from 1220 to 2345 MPa dependent on the infill percentage. The measured density and the sintering shrinkage are very close to the values specified by the manufacturer of the MIM material.

  8. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  9. Experimental Determination of the Primary Solidification Phase dependency on the solidification velocity for 17 different austenitic stainless steel compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birthe Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Yardy, John

    1997-01-01

    When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state to the aust......When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state...

  10. Functionalized Antimicrobial Composite Thin Films Printing for Stainless Steel Implant Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Floroian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we try to address the large interest existing nowadays in the better understanding of the interaction between microbial biofilms and metallic implants. Our aimed was to identify a new preventive strategy to control drug release, biofilm formation and contamination of medical devices with microbes. The transfer and printing of novel bioactive glass-polymer-antibiotic composites by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation into uniform thin films onto 316 L stainless steel substrates of the type used in implants are reported. The targets were prepared by freezing in liquid nitrogen mixtures containing polymer and antibiotic reinforced with bioglass powder. The cryogenic targets were submitted to multipulse evaporation by irradiation with an UV KrF* (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns excimer laser source. The prepared structures were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and profilometry, before and after immersion in physiological fluids. The bioactivity and the release of the antibiotic have been evaluated. We showed that the incorporated antibiotic underwent a gradually dissolution in physiological fluids thus supporting a high local treatment efficiency. Electrochemical measurements including linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of the coatings in physiological environments. The in vitro biocompatibility assay using the MG63 mammalian cell line revealed that the obtained nanostructured composite films are non-cytotoxic. The antimicrobial effect of the coatings was tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains, usually present in implant-associated infections. An anti-biofilm activity was evidenced, stronger against E. coli than the S. aureus strain. The results proved that the applied method allows for the fabrication of implantable biomaterials which shield metal ion release

  11. Composition design of superhigh strength maraging stainless steels using a cluster model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition characteristics of maraging stainless steels were studied in the present work investigation using a cluster-plus-glue-atom model. The least solubility limit of high-temperature austenite to form martensite in basic Fe–Ni–Cr corresponds to the cluster formula [NiFe12]Cr3, where NiFe12 is a cuboctahedron centered by Ni and surrounded by 12 Fe atoms in FCC structure and Cr serves as glue atoms. A cluster formula [NiFe12](Cr2Ni with surplus Ni was then determined to ensure the second phase (Ni3M precipitation, based on which new multi-component alloys [(Ni,Cu16Fe192](Cr32(Ni,Mo,Ti,Nb,Al,V16 were designed. These alloys were prepared by copper mould suction casting method, then solid-solution treated at 1273 K for 1 h followed by water-quenching, and finally aged at 783 K for 3 h. The experimental results showed that the multi-element alloying results in Ni3M precipitation on the martensite, which enhances the strengths of alloys sharply after ageing treatment. Among them, the aged [(Cu4Ni12Fe192](Cr32(Ni8.5Mo2Ti2Nb0.5Al1V1 alloy (Fe74.91Ni8.82Cr11.62Mo1.34Ti0.67Nb0.32Al0.19V0.36Cu1.78 wt% has higher tensile strengths with YS=1456 MPa and UTS=1494 MPa. It also exhibits good corrosion-resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution.

  12. Assessment of elemental composition, microstructure, and hardness of stainless steel endodontic files and reamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabara, Myrsini; Bourithis, Lefteris; Zinelis, Spiros; Papadimitriou, George D

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elemental composition, microstructure, and hardness of commercially available reamers, K files, and H files. Five instruments of each type from different manufacturers (Antaeos, FKG, Maillefer, Mani, and Micromega) were embedded in epoxy resin along their longitudinal axis. After metallographic grinding and polishing, the specimens were chemically etched and their microstructure investigated under an incident light microscope. The specimens were studied under a scanning electron microscope, and their elemental compositions were determined by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The same surfaces were repolished and X-ray diffraction was performed. The same specimen surface was used for the assessment of the Vickers hardness (HV200) by using a microhardness tester with a 200-g load and 20-s contact time. The hardness results were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 0.05). All files demonstrated extensively elongated grains parallel to longitudinal file axis because of cold drawing. The elemental composition of Maillefer and Mani reamers, Antaeos K files, and Mani H files were found in the range of AISI 303 SS, whereas all the rest were determined as AISI 304 SS. Two different phases (austenite SSt and martensite SSt) were identified with X-ray diffraction for all files tested. The results of hardness classified reamers in the following decreasing order (HMV200): Micromega = 673 +/- 29, Mani = 662 +/- 24, Maillefer = 601 +/- 34, Antaeos = 586 +/- 18, FKG = 557 +/- 19, and the K files (HV200): FKG = 673 +/- 16, Mani = 647 +/- 19, Maillefer = 603 +/- 41, Antaeos = 566 +/- 21, Micromega = 555 +/- 15, and the H files (HMV200): Mani = 640 +/- 12, FKG = 583 +/- 31, Maillefer = 581 +/- 5, Antaeos = 573 +/- 3, Micromega = 546 +/- 14. Although only two stainless steel alloys were used for the production of endodontic files, the differences in hardness are independent to the alloys used, implying that

  13. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  14. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of microstructure of stainless steel matrix composites containing up to 25 vol% NbC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Wen Hao; Ye, Zi Jie; Zhu, Yue; Bhatia, Vijay Kumar; Dolman, Kevin; Lucey, Timothy; Tang, Xinhu; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Cairney, Julie

    2016-01-01

    AISI 440 stainless steels reinforced with various volume fractions of niobium carbide (NbC) particles of up to 25 vol% were fabricated in-situ using an argon arc furnace and then heat-treated to produce a martensitic matrix. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to analyze the microstructure, phases and composition of these composites. Interestingly, it was found that Chinese-script NbC could nucleate on existing primary NbC particles creating NbC clusters with complex microstructures. Additionally, hardness tests were used to evaluate viability in mining and mineral processing applications. The increase in NbC content resulted in an overall increase in the hardness of the composites while causing a marginal decrease in the amount of Cr in solid solution with the matrix, which could be a concern for corrosion resistance. The latter was due to the fact that the NbC lattice could dissolve a minor amount of Cr. Thermodynamic simulations also attributed this to a slight increase in M 7 C 3 precipitation. Nonetheless, these novel composites show great promise for applications in wear and corrosive environments. - Highlights: •Stainless steels reinforced with NbC particles of up to 25 vol% were fabricated. •NbC was formed in-situ in the steels using an arc melter. •Martensitic transformation of the matrix of each sample was achieved. •NbC reinforcements increased the bulk hardness values of the steels. •Dissolved Cr in the matrix of each sample was sufficient for passivity in theory.

  16. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  17. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  18. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  19. Evaluation of stainless steel reinforcement construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Stainless steel reinforcement has greater corrosion resistance than that of the conventional reinforcement. In this project, bridge A6059, the first in Missouri utilizing stainless steel reinforcement in the deck, was constructed, along with bridge A...

  20. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  1. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  2. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same reaction to the DMG test (negative result), which shows again its lack of sensitivity. In contrast, the HNO3 spot test distinguished AISI 303 from the non-resulfurized grades. Clinical patch tests again showed that some patients (4%) were intolerant to AISI 303, while none were

  3. Colorimetric values of esthetic stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Omachi, Koichi; Staninec, Michal

    2002-01-01

    The colorimetric values of two different kinds of esthetic stainless steel crowns were measured and compared with the colorimetric values of primary anterior teeth in Japanese children. The colorimetric values of resin composite-faced stainless steel crowns (Kinder Krown) and epoxy-coated stainless steel crowns (White Steel Crown) were measured with a color difference meter. The Commission Internationale de Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and delta E*ab values and Munsell value, chroma, and hue were calculated. The data were compared with previously reported colorimetric values of Japanese primary anterior teeth measured with the same color difference meter used in this study. Compared to Japanese primary anterior teeth, Kinder Krown Pedo I and Pedo II showed much higher L* values and lower hue; on the other hand, White Steel Crown showed much higher L*, a*, b* values, much higher value and chroma, and much lower hue. Color analysis revealed that the colors of the White Steel Crown and Kinder Krown Pedo I were substantially different from the color of Japanese primary anterior teeth. The color difference between Pedo II crowns and Japanese primary anterior teeth was relatively high, but the color of Pedo II might be acceptable for clinical use.

  4. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  5. Investigation of the Microstructural, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Grade A Ship Steel-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Produced via Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin; Durgutlu, Ahmet; Gülenç, Behçet

    2017-08-01

    Grade A ship-building steel-AISI 2304 duplex stainless steel composite plates were manufactured via explosive welding. The AISI 2304 plates were used to clad the Grade A plates. Optical microscopy studies were conducted on the joining interface for characterization of the manufactured composite plates. Notch impact, tensile-shear, microhardness, bending and twisting tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the surfaces of fractured samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neutral salt spray (NSS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to examine corrosion behavior. Near the explosion zone, the interface was completely flat, but became wavy as the distance from the explosion zone increased. The notch impact tests indicated that the impact strength of the composites decreased with increasing distance from the explosion zone. The SEM studies detected brittle behavior below the impact transition temperature and ductile behavior above this temperature. Microhardness tests revealed that the hardness values increased with increasing distance from the explosion zone and mechanical tests showed that no visible cracking or separation had occurred on the joining interface. The NSS and potentiodynamic polarization tests determined that the AISI 2304 exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the Grade A steel.

  6. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available of austenitic solidification. Table 4 - Chemical composition of the laser cladded martensitic stainless steel in the dendritic and interdendritic areas Material Area C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Dendritic 0.3 12.8 0.15 0.7 0.65 0.02 Fe211-1 (420) Off... alloy steels and are shown in Table 4. Ms (ºC) = 550 – 350C – 40Mn - 20Cr – 10Mo – 17Ni – 8W – 35V – 10Cu + 15Co + 30Al (Eq 3) Table 5 - Ms temperatures of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel Material Ms Dendritic area (ºC) Ms...

  7. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objective: To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods: Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the

  8. Hybrid Stainless Steel Girder for Bridge Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuya Yabuki; Yasunori Arizumi; Tetsuhiro Shimozato; Samy Guezouli; Hiroaki Matsusita; Masayuki Tai

    2017-01-01

    The main object of this paper is to present the research results of the development of a hybrid stainless steel girder system for bridge construction undertaken at University of Ryukyu. In order to prevent the corrosion damage and reduce the fabrication costs, a hybrid stainless steel girder in bridge construction is developed, the stainless steel girder of which is stiffened and braced by structural carbon steel materials. It is verified analytically and experimentally that the ultimate stre...

  9. Stainless steel fibre reinforced aluminium matrix composites processed by squeeze casting: relationship between processing conditions and interfacial microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C.; Marchal, Y.; Boland, F.; Delannay, F.

    1993-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of some processing parameters on the extent of interfacial reaction in squeeze cast aluminium matrix composites reinforced with 12 μm diameter, continuous stainless steel fibres. The average thickness of the reaction layer at fibre/matrix interfaces was measured by image analysis. When casting was made in a die at room temperature, the thickness of the reaction layer was affected on a distance of several mm from the lateral surface or from the bottom of the preform. The results indicate that the major part of the reaction occurs before solidification of the liquid metal. The control of the extent of interfacial reaction can be achieved through optimization of both infiltration parameters and features of the preform such as the volume fraction of the fibres. (orig.)

  10. Anelasticity in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent anelastic deformation mechanisms arise in austenitic stainless steel when load is removed during a high-temperature creep test. This phenomenon is investigated by conducting creep tests, with intermittent load removal, on AISI Type 316H austenitic stainless steel at 550 and 650 °C, supported by in situ measurement of creep-induced intergranular residual strains by neutron diffraction. All the cyclic tests exhibit anelastic behaviour on unloading and develop substantially lower load-on creep strain rates, reduced ductility and longer rupture times than baseline steady-load creep tests at similar conditions. The mechanisms underlying the observed anelastic behaviour and changes in macroscopic creep properties are discussed with reference to the development of intergranular strains and dislocation behaviour.

  11. Thermophysical properties of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.

    1975-09-01

    Recommended values of the thermodynamic and transport properties of stainless steels Type 304L and Type 316L are given for temperatures from 300 to 3000 0 K. The properties in the solid region were obtained by extrapolating available experimental data to the melting range, while appropriate correlations were used to estimate the properties in the liquid region. The properties evaluated include the enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, vapor pressure, density, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity. (9 fig, 11 tables)

  12. Investigation on Shielding and Mechanical Behavior of Carbon/Stainless Steel Hybrid Yarn Woven Fabrics and Their Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagatheesan, Krishnasamy; Ramasamy, Alagirusamy; Das, Apurba; Basu, Ananjan

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the shielding characteristics of carbon/stainless steel/polypropylene (C/SS/PP) hybrid woven fabrics and their composites in low frequency (50 MHz-1.5 GHz) and C band (4-6 GHz) regions. The hybrid yarns prepared from carbon and SS filaments using a direct twisting machine have been made into woven fabric samples using a sample loom. The composite has been made by sandwiching a hybrid yarn fabric between the polypropylene films in a compression molding machine at 180°C for 5 min. The shielding behavior of the fabric and the composites has been tested using a coaxial transmission holder for the low frequency range and a wave guide method for the C band frequency range. It has been observed that a 1 end float composite showed a higher SE of 81.4 dB than the 4 end float (76.2 dB) and the 8 end float composites (64 dB) at the low frequency region. However, at the C band frequency, the effect of fabric structures on shielding effectiveness (SE) of fabric composite depends on thread density. For example, at low thread density, (i.e.) 3.93 ppcm, the 8 end float fabric composite showed the highest SE of 22.7 dB than did the 4 end (20.4 dB) and the 1 end float (16.5 dB) fabric composite. However, at high thread density (6.3 ppcm), the case was the reverse. The 1 end float fabric composite showed the highest SE of 29.7 dB rather than 4 end and 8 end float fabric composites (25.9 dB). In addition, all the composites showed less SE than their fabric forms. The increase in thread density also increased the shielding behavior of composites in both frequency ranges. A nonlinear regression model was developed using the Box-Behnken design for predicting the shielding behavior of fabric composites in C band region. In addition to shielding behavior, mechanical strength of C/SS/PP hybrid yarn, the fabric and composite has been tested using a Zwick Roell tensile tester. It has been observed that the work of rupture of C/SS/PP hybrid yarn is higher (6830.3 g

  13. Irradiation embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganuma, K.; Kayano, H.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of the irradiation embrittlement of some ferritic stainless steels were examined by tensile tests. Steels selected in this investigation were classified into three groups: chi phase, precipitation hardened Fe-13Cr steels; tempered martensitic Fe-12Cr steels; and low alloy steels. The latter steels were chosen in order to compare the irradiation embrittlement characteristics with those of stainless steels. The stainless steels were superior to the low alloy steels with regard to the irradiation embrittlement (the changes in both ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and unstable plastic flow transition temperature (UPFTT)), irrespective of whether these stainless steels had chi phase precipitated structures or tempered martensitic structures. The suppression of the DBTT increase owing to irradiation results from low yield stress increase Δσsub(y) and high |[dσsub(y)(u)/dT]|, where u denotes unirradiated, in the stainless steels. The suppression of the UPFTT results from the high work hardening rate or the high work exponent and the low Lueders strain in the stainless steels. These characteristics of irradiation embrittlement in the ferritic stainless steels are thought to be caused by the defect structure, which is modified by Cr atoms. (author)

  14. Stainless steels for cryogenic bolts and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, F.; Rabbe, P.; Odin, G.

    1975-01-01

    Stainless steel for cryogenic applications are generally austenitic steels which, under the effect of cold-drawing, can or cannot undergo a partial martensitic transformation according to their composition. It has been shown that very high ductility and endurance characteristics at low temperatures, together with very high yield strength and resistances values, can be attained with grades of nitrogenous steels of types Z2CN18-10N and Z3CMN18-8-6N. Optimum ductility values are obtained by employing to the best possible, the martensitic transformations which develop during cold-drawing. From the plotting of the rational traction curves, it is possible to analyse very simply the influence of the composition on the martensitic transformations [fr

  15. Properties of nano structured Ag-TiO{sub 2} composite coating on stainless steel using RF sputtering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakar, S. Abu; Jamuna-Thevi, K.; Abu, N.; Mohd Toff, M. R. [Advanced Materials Research Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Berhad, Lot 34, Jalan Hi- Tech 2/3, Kulim Hi-Tech Park, 09000 Kulim (Malaysia)

    2012-07-02

    RF Sputtering system is one of the Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) methods that have been widely used to produce hard coating. This technique is used to deposit thin layers of metallic substrates such as stainless steel (SS). From this process, a good adhesiveness and wear resistance coating can be produced for biomedical applications. In this study, RF sputtering method was used to deposit TiO{sub 2}-Ag composite coatings via various deposition parameters. The parameters are RF power of 350W, gas composition (Ar: O{sub 2}) 50:5 and deposition time at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize surface area of coated samples. The formation of nanocrystalline thin film and the surface morphology were examined using SEM. The crystallite size of TiO{sub 2}-Ag composite coatings were estimated between 20-60 nm based on XRD analysis using Scherer equation and SEM evaluation. The Raman and XRD results suggested that the structure of the TiO{sub 2}-Ag consist of anatase and rutile phases. It also showed that the intensity of anatase peaks increased after samples undergone annealing process at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  16. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  17. Low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel; the role of plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding of austenitic stainless steel transforms the surface zone into expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge......: - plastic deformation of metastable austenitic stainless steels leads to the development of strain-induced martensite, which compromises the uniformity and the homogeneity of the expanded austenite zone. - during low temperature surface engineering composition and stress profiles develop. On numerical...

  18. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Altaf Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets - titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel - using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student′s "t" test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets.

  19. Compresibility and sinterability of HCx PM steel diluted with stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    Gordo, Elena; Khattab, Nermein Hamid; Ruiz-Navas, Elisa María

    2003-01-01

    HCx powder metallurgy steel contains in its composition high contents of Cr and C, and significant quantities of alloy elements typical of tool steels (Mo, V, W), to provide the corrosion resistance of stainless steel with wear resistance of tool steels. HCx appears to be a suitable material for applications in aggressive environments, as valve seat inserts in automotive engines. However, this steel presents a low compressibility leading to high production costs. In this work, some results ca...

  20. Mechanical properties of titanium-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA) composite coating on stainless steel prepared by thermal spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmamuhamadani, R.; Azhar, N. H.; Talari, M. K.; Yahaya, Sabrina M.; Sulaiman, S.; Ismail, M. I. S.

    2017-09-01

    Addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) can enhance the bioactivity of the common metallic implant due to its similarity with natural bones and teeth. In this investigation, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOFT) technique was used to deposit titanium-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA) composite on stainless steel substrate plate with different percentage of HA for biomedical applications. The aim of this research is to investigate the mechanical properties of Ti-HA coating such as hardness, adhesion strength and wear behaviour. The hardness and strength was determined by using SHIMADZU-microhardness Vickers tester and PosiTest AT portable adhesion tester respectively. The wear test was performed by using pin-on-disk equipment and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) used to determine the extent of surface damage. From the results obtained, mechanical properties such as hardness and adhesion strength of titanium (Ti) coating decreased with the increased of HA contents. Meanwhile, the coefficient of friction of Ti-10% HA coating shows the highest value compare to others as three-body abrasion had occurred during the test.

  1. Segregation effects in welded stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Shoaid, K.A.; Ahmed, M.; Malik, A.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Welding of steels causes changes in the microstructure and chemical composition which could adversely affect the mechanical and corrosion properties. The report describes the experimental results of an investigation of segregation effects in welded austenitic stainless steels of AISI type 304, 304L, 316 and 316L using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Considerable enhancement of chromium and carbon has been observed in certain well-defined zones on the parent metal and on composition, particularly in the parent metal, in attributed to the formation of (M 23 C 6 ) precipitates. The formation of geometrically well-defined segregation zones is explained on the basis of the time-temperature-precipitation curve of (M 23 C 6 ). (author)

  2. Effect of chemical compositions and heat treatment on IGSCC resistance for strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Kanasaki, H.; Fujimoto, K.; Taneike, M.; Ooki, S.; Sueishi, Y.; Tezuka, H.; Takamori, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop the highly resistant alternative materials to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for the non-sensitized and strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steel in oxygenated water, the effects of chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions on the IGSCC resistance and stacking fault energy (SFE) values were studied for 33 laboratory melted steels and commercial type 310S stainless steel. The IGSCC resistance for test materials was compared by the maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area in fatigue pre-cracked CT specimens after SCC test in oxygenated high temperature water. SFE values for these test materials were measured by the transmission electron microscopy on the width of isolated extended dislocations under g-3g weak beam condition for thin foils taken from the test materials, in this study. From these experiments, the effects of the chromium, molybdenum, nitrogen, silicon and manganese contents on the SCC resistance for non-aged materials were not so pronounced in this study. It is strongly suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of the aged or non-aged and strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  3. Fabrication of a segmented composite stainless steel-alumina discharge tube for a theta-pinch coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, J.M.; Stoddard, S.D.; Muller, J.F.

    1975-11-01

    An 80-mm-diam segmented discharge tube that simulated in a simplified way the blanket and first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) has been constructed. The segments were fabricated by plasma-arc spraying an alumina coating on tubular stainless steel trapezoids. These were laid up to form a cylinder that was contained in a fully dense alumina vacuum tube. The fabrication processes are discussed in detail

  4. Development of new high-performance stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Soo

    2002-01-01

    This paper focused on high-performance stainless steels and their development status. Effect of nitrogen addition on super-stainless steel was discussed. Research activities at Yonsei University, on austenitic and martensitic high-performance stainless, steels, and the next-generation duplex stainless steels were introduced

  5. Special stainless steels for sea water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Very exacting demands are made on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of materials which in their service come into contact with seawater, and in many cases simultaneously with corrosive process solutions. The demand for higher alloy stainless steels for seawater application is rising in pace with the increasing requirements for safety and operation economy. The corrosion conditions in seawater and the resistance of stainless steels in this medium will be dealt with in the following. Sanicro 28 will then be compared with stainless steels, types AISI 304, 316 and 317, as well as with Alloy 20, Alloy 825 and SANDVIK 2RK65. (Author) [pt

  6. Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides

  7. Plasticity of low carbon stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Kareva, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the temperature range 800-1200 0 C and with strain rates of from 10 -3 to 3 s -1 , austenitic (000Kh18N12) and austenitic-ferrite (000Kh26N6) very low carbon stainless steels containing 0.02-0.03% C exhibit no higher resilience than corresponding ordinary steels containing 0.10-0.12% C. However, the plasticity of such steels (particularly two-phase steels) at 900-1100 0 C is appreciably inferior owing to the development of intergranular brittle fracture. Pressure treatment preceded by partial cooling of the surface to 850 0 C yields rolled and forged products with acceptable indices but is inconvenient technically. At the Zlatoustovsk and Ashin metallurgical plants successful tests have been performed involving the forging and rolling of such steels heated to 1280-1300 0 C without partial cooling; it was necessary to improve the killing conditions, correct the chemical composition (increasing the proportion of ferrite) and take measures against heat loss. (author)

  8. Stainless steel reinforcement as a replacement for epoxy coated steel in bridge decks : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The corrosion resistance of 2304 stainless steel reinforcement and stainless steel clad reinforcement was compared to conventional and epoxy-coated reinforcement (ECR). 2304 stainless steel was tested in both the as-received condition (dark mottled f...

  9. Integrated Computational Modelling of Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükyildiz, Ömer Can; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Thorborg, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method (FDM) based numerical model for the prediction of composition- and stress-depth profiles developing during low temperature gas nitriding (LTGN) of 316 stainless steel is presented. The essential effects governing the kinetics of composition and coupled stress ...

  10. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  11. Current status of stainless steel industry and development of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Chan Soo; Kim Kwang Tae

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel is not only clean and smooth in its surface, but also it is superior in quality in terms of corrosion resistance and strength. So that, it is widely in use in the field of construction, chemical installations, and other industries. Growth of stainless steel industry started since the steel technology was developed for mass production in 1960s. Since then stainless steel industry grew rapidly on account of diversified development in this field and growth rate went up to 5.8% per year comparable to 2.3% of steel growth. The rapid growth is attributed to significant industry developments in Europe and Japan in the years of 1970s and 1980s. In addition to these the expansion of stainless steel industry in Korea and Taiwan. Presently Korea produces about 120,000 tons of stainless steel and occupies about 8% of international market. This means Korea become the second largest single country in world in stainless steel production. Moreover Korea is to reinforce its domestic production line by affiliating production companies, increasing of production capability, and specializing in types of stainless steel. This paper is to describe activity of material development, and types of stainless steel for industry use. (Hong, J. S.)

  12. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Olivera, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests [fr

  13. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  14. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  15. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650 0 C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop

  16. Single pit propagation on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtault, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical characterization of metastable events such as pitting corrosion of stainless steel in chloride electrolyte remains complex because many individual processes may occur simultaneously on the alloy surface. To overcome these difficulties, an experimental setup, the flow micro-device, has been developed to achieve the initiation of a single pit and to propagate the single pit in three dimensions. In this work, we take advantage of such a device in order to revisit the pitting process on a 316L stainless steel in a chloride - sulphate bulk. In a first step, the time evolution of the pit geometry (depth, radius) and the chemical evolution of the pit solution investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy have shown that the pit depth propagation depends on the formation of a metal chloride and sulphate gel in the pit solution, and is controlled by the metallic cations diffusion from the pit bottom to the pit mouth. The pit radius growth is defined by the initial surface de-passivation, by the presence of a pit cover and by the gel development in the solution. all of these phenomena are function of applied potential and chemical composition of the solution. In a last step, it was demonstrated that a critical chloride concentration is needed in order to maintain the pit propagation. This critical concentration slightly increases with the pit depth. From statistical analysis performed on identical experiments, a zone diagram showing the pit stability as a function of the chloride concentration and the pit dimensions was built. (author) [fr

  17. Composite Coatings of Alumina-based Ceramics and Stainless Steel Manufactured by Plasma Spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Ageorges, H.; Neufuss, Karel; Zahálka, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2009), s. 108-114 ISSN 1392-1320 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Cermet * plasma spraying * microstructure * elastic modulus * wear resistance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.299, year: 2009 http://internet.ktu.lt/en/science/journals/medz/medz0-97.html#Composite_Coatings_

  18. Composite Pd and Pd Alloy Porous Stainless Steel Membranes for Hydrogen Production and Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Hua Ma; Nikolaos Kazantzis; Ivan Mardilovich; Federico Guazzone; Alexander Augustine; Reyyan Koc

    2011-11-06

    The synthesis of composite Pd membranes has been modified by the addition of a Al(OH){sub 3} graded layer and sequential annealing at high temperatures to obtain membranes with high permeance and outstanding selectivity stability for over 4000 hours at 450°C. Most of the membranes achieved in this work showed H{sub 2} flux well above 2010 DOE targets and in some case, also above 2015 DOE targets. Similar composite membranes were tested in water gas shift reaction atmospheres and showed to be stable with high CO conversion and high hydrogen recovery for over 1000 hours. The H{sub 2} permeance of composite Pd-Au membranes was studied as well as its resistance in H{sub 2}S containing atmospheres. H{sub 2}S poisoning of Pd-based membranes was reduced by the addition of Au and the loss undergone by membranes was found to be almost totally recoverable with 10-30 wt%Au. PSA technique was studied to test the possibility of H{sub 2}S and COS removal from feed stream with limited success since the removal of H{sub 2}S also led to the removal of a large fraction of the CO{sub 2}. The economics of a WGS bundle reactor, using the information of the membranes fabricated under this project and integrated into an IGCC plant were studied based on a 2D reactor modeling. The calculations showed that without a government incentive to impose a CO{sub 2} tax, application of WGS membrane reactors in IGCC would be not as economically attractive as regular pulverized coal plants.

  19. Surface composition of the Be limiters and the stainless-steel torus wall after operation in UNITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, A.P.; Behrisch, R.; Hammer, H.; Hackmann, J.

    1986-12-01

    The surfaces of two Be limiters and of a test sample from the stainless-steel torus wall used in UNITOR were analyzed by RBS, PIXE, AES, and SEM/EIXE. The main foreign atoms found on the limiters are 0 (2x10 17 to 2x10 18 /cm 2 ), Fe, Ni, Cr and Sn (2x10 15 to 2x10 16 /cm 2 ). There are no large differences in the foreign atom coverage on the different surface areas of the limiters. Generally, the front surfaces of the limiters show slightly lower coverage than the sides. On limiter 2, the Sn coverage is about a factor of 4 larger than on limiter 1, indicating that the Sn source was close to this limiter. The stainless-steel test sample from the torus wall shows islands of BeO, which can be attributed to splashes or droplets eroded from the limiters during disruptions. Major erosion of the limiters occurrd only during the first 100 shots, when many discharges were terminated by disruptions. Redeposited wall material is found on the wall sample which partly covers the BeO deposits. The surface modifications of limiters and wall samples were discussed by taking into account the particle fluxes from and to the walls and limiters. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels in Lithium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in various concentrations of lithium, bromide solution was investigated by using the conventional weight loss measurement method. The results obtained show that corrosion of these steels occurred due to the aggressive bromide ion in the medium. Duplex stainless steel shows a greater resistance to corrosion than austenitic stainless steel in the medium. This was attributed to equal volume proportion of ferrite and austenite in the structure of duplex stainless steel coupled with higher content of chromium in its composition. Both steels produced electrochemical noise at increased concentrations of lithium bromide due to continuous film breakdown and repair caused by reduction in medium concentration by the alkaline corrosion product while surface passivity observed in duplex stainless steel is attributed to film stability on this steel.

  1. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  2. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Campos Bernardes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. Inaddition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The pre-conditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry.

  3. Optimization of the A-TIG welding for stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, M.; Kožuh, Z.; Garašić, I.; Bušić, M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the influence of the activation flux and shielding gas on tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of the stainless steel. In introduction part, duplex stainless steel was analysed. The A-TIG process was explained and the possibility of welding stainless steels using the A-TIG process to maximize productivity and the cost-effectiveness of welded structures was presented. In the experimental part duplex, 7 mm thick stainless steel has been welded in butt joint. The influence of activation flux chemical composition upon the weld penetration has been investigated prior the welding. The welding process was performed by a robot with TIG equipment. With selected A-TIG welding technology preparation of plates and consumption of filler material (containing Cr, Ni and Mn) have been avoided. Specimens sectioned from the produced welds have been subjected to tensile strength test, macrostructure analysis and corrosion resistance analysis. The results have confirmed that this type of stainless steel can be welded without edge preparation and addition of filler material containing critical raw materials as Cr, Ni and Mn when the following welding parameters are set: current 200 A, welding speed 9,1 cm/min, heat input 1,2 kJ/mm and specific activation flux is used.

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  5. Anticorrosion Coating of Carbon Nanotube/Polytetrafluoroethylene Composite Film on the Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite film of carbon nanotube (CNT and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE was formed from dispersion fluids of CNT and PTFE. The composite film showed high electrical conductivity in the range of 0.1–13 S/cm and hydrophobic nature. This composite film was applied to stainless steel (SS bipolar plates of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC as anticorrosion film. This coating decreased the contact resistance between the surface of the bipolar plate and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the PEMFC. The output power of the fuel cell is increased by 1.6 times because the decrease in the contact resistance decreases the series resistance of the PEMFC. Moreover, the coating of this composite film protects the bipolar plate from the surface corrosion.

  6. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Alavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05. The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics.

  7. Analysis of the Enameled AISI 316LVM Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovec, Mitja; Xhanari, Klodian; Lešer, Tadej; Petovar, Barbara; Finšgar, Matjaž

    2018-03-01

    In this work, four different enamels were coated on AISI 316LVM stainless steel and the corrosion resistance of these samples was tested in 5 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature. The preparation procedure of the enamels was optimized in terms of firing temperature, time and composition. First the thermal expansion was measured using dilatometry followed by electrochemical analysis using chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic polarization. The topography of the most resistant sample was obtained by 3D-profilometry. All samples coated with enamel showed significantly higher corrosion and dilatation resistance compared with the uncoated stainless steel material.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  9. Analysis of the Enameled AISI 316LVM Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovec, Mitja; Xhanari, Klodian; Lešer, Tadej; Petovar, Barbara; Finšgar, Matjaž

    2018-01-01

    In this work, four different enamels were coated on AISI 316LVM stainless steel and the corrosion resistance of these samples was tested in 5 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature. The preparation procedure of the enamels was optimized in terms of firing temperature, time and composition. First the thermal expansion was measured using dilatometry followed by electrochemical analysis using chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic polarization. The topography of the most resistant sample was obtained by 3D-profilometry. All samples coated with enamel showed significantly higher corrosion and dilatation resistance compared with the uncoated stainless steel material.

  10. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  11. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450 0 C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450 0 C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  12. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan/h-BN and Chitosan/h-BN/TiO₂ Composite Coatings on Stainless Steel (316L) Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddaha, Namir S; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Roether, Judith A; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-03-04

    This article presents the results of an experimental investigation designed to deposit chitosan/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and chitosan/h-BN/titania (TiO₂) composites on SS316L substrates using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for potential antibacterial applications. The influence of EPD parameters (voltage and deposition time) and relative concentrations of chitosan, h-BN and TiO₂ in suspension on deposition yield was studied. The composition and structure of deposited coatings were investigated by FTIR, XRD and SEM. It was observed that h-BN and TiO₂ particles were dispersed in the chitosan matrix through simultaneous deposition. The adhesion between the electrophoretic coatings and the stainless steel substrates was tested by using tape test technique, and the results showed that the adhesion strength corresponded to 3B and 4B classes. Corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical polarization curves, indicating enhanced corrosion resistance of the chitosan/h-BN/TiO₂ and chitosan/h-BN coatings compared to the bare stainless steel substrate. In order to investigate the in-vitro inorganic bioactivity, coatings were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 days. FTIR and XRD results showed no formation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of chitosan/h-BN/TiO₂ and chitosan/h-BN coatings, which are therefore non bioactive but potentially useful as antibacterial coatings.

  13. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan/h-BN and Chitosan/h-BN/TiO2 Composite Coatings on Stainless Steel (316L Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namir S. Raddaha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of an experimental investigation designed to deposit chitosan/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN and chitosan/h-BN/titania (TiO2 composites on SS316L substrates using electrophoretic deposition (EPD for potential antibacterial applications. The influence of EPD parameters (voltage and deposition time and relative concentrations of chitosan, h-BN and TiO2 in suspension on deposition yield was studied. The composition and structure of deposited coatings were investigated by FTIR, XRD and SEM. It was observed that h-BN and TiO2 particles were dispersed in the chitosan matrix through simultaneous deposition. The adhesion between the electrophoretic coatings and the stainless steel substrates was tested by using tape test technique, and the results showed that the adhesion strength corresponded to 3B and 4B classes. Corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical polarization curves, indicating enhanced corrosion resistance of the chitosan/h-BN/TiO2 and chitosan/h-BN coatings compared to the bare stainless steel substrate. In order to investigate the in-vitro inorganic bioactivity, coatings were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF for 28 days. FTIR and XRD results showed no formation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of chitosan/h-BN/TiO2 and chitosan/h-BN coatings, which are therefore non bioactive but potentially useful as antibacterial coatings.

  14. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  15. HTPro: Low-temperature Surface Hardening of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance.......Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance....

  16. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... merchandise as ``drawn stainless steel sinks with single or multiple drawn bowls, with or without drain boards... finishing the vertical corners to form the bowls. Stainless steel sinks with fabricated bowls may sometimes...

  17. Electrophoretic co-deposition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reinforced alginate–Bioglass® composite coating on stainless steel: Mechanical properties and in-vitro bioactivity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Qiang; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2014-01-01

    PVA reinforced alginate–bioactive glass (BG) composite coatings were produced on stainless steel by a single step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The present paper discusses the co-deposition mechanism of the three components and presents a summary of the relevant properties of the composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different PVA concentrations. Homogeneous composite coatings with compact microstructure and increased thickness, i.e. as high as 10 μm, were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface roughness of coatings with different PVA contents was slightly increased, while a significant increase of water contact angles due to PVA addition was detected and discussed. Improved adhesion strength of coatings containing different amounts of PVA was quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed by pull-off adhesion and cycled bending tests, respectively. In-vitro bioactivity tests were performed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. The decomposition rate of the coatings was reduced with PVA content, and rapid hydroxyapatite forming ability of the composite coatings in SBF was confirmed by FTIR and XRD analyses. According to the results of this study, composite alginate–Bioglass® bioactive coatings combined with PVA are proposed as promising candidates for dental and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • PVA reinforced alginate–bioactive glass composite coating on stainless steel produced by EPD • The co-deposition mechanism was experimentally confirmed. • Homogeneous and compact coating microstructure obtained by the addition of PVA • Improved adhesion strength of PVA reinforced coatings confirmed qualitatively and quantitatively • Controlled degradation rate and rapid HA forming ability of PVA-containing coatings in SBF

  18. Electrophoretic co-deposition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reinforced alginate–Bioglass® composite coating on stainless steel: Mechanical properties and in-vitro bioactivity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Boccaccini, Aldo R., E-mail: aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-07-01

    PVA reinforced alginate–bioactive glass (BG) composite coatings were produced on stainless steel by a single step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The present paper discusses the co-deposition mechanism of the three components and presents a summary of the relevant properties of the composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different PVA concentrations. Homogeneous composite coatings with compact microstructure and increased thickness, i.e. as high as 10 μm, were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface roughness of coatings with different PVA contents was slightly increased, while a significant increase of water contact angles due to PVA addition was detected and discussed. Improved adhesion strength of coatings containing different amounts of PVA was quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed by pull-off adhesion and cycled bending tests, respectively. In-vitro bioactivity tests were performed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. The decomposition rate of the coatings was reduced with PVA content, and rapid hydroxyapatite forming ability of the composite coatings in SBF was confirmed by FTIR and XRD analyses. According to the results of this study, composite alginate–Bioglass® bioactive coatings combined with PVA are proposed as promising candidates for dental and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • PVA reinforced alginate–bioactive glass composite coating on stainless steel produced by EPD • The co-deposition mechanism was experimentally confirmed. • Homogeneous and compact coating microstructure obtained by the addition of PVA • Improved adhesion strength of PVA reinforced coatings confirmed qualitatively and quantitatively • Controlled degradation rate and rapid HA forming ability of PVA-containing coatings in SBF.

  19. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, J. P.; Vite T, J.; Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M.

    2009-01-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  20. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition...

  1. Robustness of steel joints with stainless steel bolts in fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheeskumar, N.; Davison, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The robustness of steel joints in fire is important for steel building structures because of the need to prevent progressive collapse. Stainless steel is widely used in building construction mainly because of its corrosion resistance, but it also possesses improved fire resistance compared with conventional non-alloy, fine grain structural steels. Extensive research performed on the robustness of steel joints in fire has revealed that failure at elevated temperature may be controlled by bolt shear for fin plate and web cleat connections. Hence, this study focussed on the use of stainless steel in experimental tests conducted on fin plate and web cleat connections at high temperatures. In addition, this study investigated the use of a component-based model to predict connection performance at elevated temperature.

  2. Biomaterial Studies on AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Magnetoelectropolishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniewicz, Tadeusz; Rokosz, Krzysztof; Filippi, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    The polarisation characteristics of the electropolishing process in a magnetic field (MEP – magnetoelectropolishing), in comparison with those obtained under standard/conventional process (EP) conditions, have been obtained. The occurrence of an EP plateau has been observed in view of the optimization of MEP process. Up-to-date stainless steel surface studies always indicated some amount of free-metal atoms apart from the detected oxides and hydroxides. Such a morphology of the surface film usually affects the thermodynamic stability and corrosion resistance of surface oxide layer and is one of the most important features of stainless steels. With this new MEP process we can improve metal surface properties by making the stainless steel more resistant to halides encountered in a variety of environments. Furthermore, in this paper the stainless steel surface film study results have been presented. The results of the corrosion research carried out by the authors on the behaviour of the most commonly used material − medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel both in Ringer’s body fluid and in aqueous 3% NaCl solution have been investigated and presented earlier elsewhere, though some of these results, concerning the EIS Nyquist plots and polarization curves are also revealed herein. In this paper an attempt to explain this peculiar performance of 316L stainless steel has been undertaken. The SEM studies, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on 316L samples after three treatments: MP – abrasive polishing (800 grit size), EP – conventional electrolytic polishing, and MEP – magnetoelectropolishing. It has been found that the proposed magnetoelectropolishing (MEP) process considerably modifies the morphology and the composition of the surface film, thus leading to improved corrosion resistance of the studied 316L SS.

  3. The influence of cold work on the oxidation behaviour of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langevoort, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis the study of the interaction of oxygen gas with stainless steel surfaces is described. Thermogravimetry, microscopy and ellipsometry have been used to follow the oxidation in situ, while EDX, AES and XPS have been used to determine the oxide compositions. The aim of this thesis is to reveal the influence on the oxidation behaviour of stainless steel of i) cold work (rolling, drawing, milling, polishing and Ar ion bombardment) ii) the initially formed oxide and iii) the experimental conditions. Two types of stainless steels have been used (AISI 304 (a 18/8 Cr/Ni steel) and Incoloy 800 H (a 20/30 Cr/Ni steel)). (Auth.)

  4. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  5. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  6. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod From India would be likely to lead to continuation or... contained in USITC Publication 4300 (January 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India...

  7. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  8. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanded austenite "layers" on stainless steel are addressed....

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group or stainless steel intended to provide...

  10. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized Tariff... notification of a preliminary determinations by Commerce that imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from China...

  11. No genotoxicity of a new nickel-free stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, L; Cervellati, M; Campoccia, D; Prati, C; Breschi, L; Arciola, C R

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steel is a metallic alloy largely employed in orthopedics, maxillofacial surgery and orthodontic therapy. However, the presence in its composition of a high quantity of nickel, an agent known to trigger toxic, allergic and cancerogenous responses in humans, is cause of some concern. In this study, we have investigated the in vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity of a new nickel-free stainless steel, namely P558, in comparison to the conventional stainless steel AISI 316L. The cytogenetic effects were evaluated by studying the frequency of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations. Ames test was performed to detect the mutagenic activity. Both P558 and AISI 316L did not cause any significant increase in the average number of SCE and in chromosomal aberrations, either with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, the Ames test showed that the extracts of both P558 and of AISI 316L are not mutagenic. Overall, these findings prove that P558 is devoid of genotoxicity and mutagenicity. The present results, together with other previous interesting observations that P558 promotes osseointegration, suggest that this new nickel-free stainless steel can represent a better alternative to other conventional steel alloys.

  12. Chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zuohui; Xue, Yongqiang; Ju, Hongbin

    2018-01-01

    To solve the problems of high temperature and non-uniformity of coloring on stainless steel, a new chemical coloring process, applying ultrasonic irradiation to the traditional chemical coloring process, was developed in this paper. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and power density (sound intensity) on chemical coloring on stainless steel were studied. The uniformity of morphology and colors was observed with the help of polarizing microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), meanwhile, the wear resistance and the corrosion resistance were investigated, and the effect mechanism of ultrasonic irradiation on chemical coloring was discussed. These results show that in the process of chemical coloring on stainless steel by ultrasonic irradiation, the film composition is the same as the traditional chemical coloring, and this method can significantly enhance the uniformity, the wear and corrosion resistances of the color film and accelerate the coloring rate which makes the coloring temperature reduced to 40°C. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation on the chemical coloring can be attributed to the coloring rate accelerated and the coloring temperature reduced by thermal-effect, the uniformity of coloring film improved by dispersion-effect, and the wear and corrosion resistances of coloring film enhanced by cavitation-effect. Ultrasonic irradiation not only has an extensive application prospect for chemical coloring on stainless steel but also provides an valuable reference for other chemical coloring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  14. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  15. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  16. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  17. Austenite stability in the high strength metastable stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Pawlak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present paper was to study the peculiarities of the austenite to martensite phase transformation (A-M), which is an essential step in the production technology of the high strength metastable stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: The desired control over A-M transformation have been achieved by proper design of the steel chemistry, cold working and heat treatment.Findings: For a range of steel compositions, it was shown that severe cold working leads to fully m...

  18. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-02-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  19. Accumulative Roll Bonding of Aluminum/Stainless Steel Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Mohammad Nejad Fard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An Al/Stainless Steel/Al lamellar composite was produced by roll bonding of the starting sheets at 400 °C. Afterward, the roll bonded sheet was cut in half and the accumulative roll bonding (ARB process at room temperature was applied seven times. As a result, the central steel layer fractured and distributed in the Al matrix among different layers introduced by the repetition of roll bonding process. The tensile results showed that the roll bonded sheet has much higher strength and strength to weight ratio compared with the initial aluminum sheet as a result of the presence of continuous steel core. However, poor ductility properties were observed during tensile test, which were ascribed to the increasing deformation resistance and localized thinning of the central stainless steel sheet during the roll bonding process. The ARBed sample exhibited lower strength compared with the roll bonded sheet due to the breakup of stainless steel layer into many small segments. Anyway, an ultrafine grained microstructure with average grain size of 400 nm in the aluminum matrix and 71% strain-induced martensite in the steel segments were detected by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD technique, which were found to be responsible for the enhancement of mechanical properties compared with the initial aluminum sheet.

  20. Granulate of stainless steel as compensator material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.C. van Santvoort (J. P C)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractCompensators produced with computer controlled milling devices usually consist of a styrofoam mould, filled with an appropriate material. We investigated granulate of stainless steel as filling material. This cheap, easy to use, clean and re-usable material can be obtained with an

  1. Stainless steel forgings for nuclear chemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This Specification covers detailed requirements for the supply of austenitic stainless steel forgings used in radioactive and corrosive areas within the Nuclear Industry. With the exception of 316S51 the materials specified are all suitable for contact with nitric acid, 316S51 being included as suitable for use in contact with sodium and other alkali metals at elevated temperatures. (author)

  2. CASE-HARDENING OF STAINLESS STEEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to case-hardening of a stainless steel article by means of gas including carbon and/or nitrogen, whereby carbon and/or nitrogen atoms diffuse through the surface into the article. The method includes activating the surface of the article, applying a top layer on the activated...

  3. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  4. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x , have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni) 23 Zr 6 during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy

  5. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G. D.; Powell, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.008 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.0010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding

  6. Characterization of microstructure, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and toughness of a multipass weld joint of superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, S.S.M.; Pardal, J.M.; Lima, L.D.; Bastos, I.N.; Nascimento, A.M.; Souza, J.A. de

    2007-01-01

    The superduplex stainless steels have an austeno-ferritic microstructure with an average fraction of each phase of approximately 50%. This duplex microstructure improves simultaneously the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Welding of these steels is often a critical operation. In this paper we focus on characterization and analysis of a multipass weld joint of UNS S32750 steel prepared using welding conditions equal to industrial standards. The toughness and corrosion resistance properties of the base metal, root pass welded with gas tungsten arc welding, as well as the filler passes, welded with shielded metal arc welding, were evaluated. The microstructure and chemical composition of the selected areas were also determined and correlated to the corrosion and mechanical properties. The root pass was welded with low nickel filler metal and, as a consequence, presented low austenite content and significant precipitation. This precipitation is reflected in the corrosion and mechanical properties. The filler passes presented an adequate ferrite:austenite proportion but, due to their high oxygen content, the toughness was lower than that of the root pass. Corrosion properties were evaluated by cyclic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl and H 2 SO 4 media

  7. The Effect of Si/Al on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Stainless Steel Mesh/Crp Reinforced Geopolymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jingkun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series stainless steel mesh/Crp reinforced geopolymer composites with different Si/Al molar ratio (N were designed and prepared, where N = 1.75, 2 and 2.25, respectively. The effect of Si/Al molar ratio in the geopolymer matrix on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the geopolymer composites were investigated. The microstructure of geopolymer became more compact when Si/Al increased from 1.75 to 2, which was beneficial to the improvement of geopolymer’s mechanical properties. And continuing to rise to 2.25 for Si/Al, the completely curing of geopolymer composites required more time compared with lower Si/Al, which can be attributed to the different microstructure and chemical composition caused by the different Si/Al. The optimum Si/Al molar ratio was about 2 at which the composites samples present the best mechanical properties with the flexure strength of 115.3 MPa and elastic modulus of 11.0 GPa, respectively. The results of fracture behavior suggested that geopolymer composites with N is 2.25 displayed the behavior characteristics of metal materials, which can be attributed to a poor integrated condition in interface between reinforcements and geopolymer matrix.

  8. Development of nuclear grade type 316 stainless steel for BWR pipings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Nagano, Hiroo; Yoshikawa, Kunihiko; Miura, Minoru; Ota, Kunio.

    1981-01-01

    The countermeasures were established against the grain boundary stress corrosion cracking in the heat-affected zone of 304 stainless steel pipings used for recirculating system and others of BWRs. Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. has engaged in the development of the stainless steel having excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking, substituting for 304 stainless steel. In order to prevent stainless steel from becoming sensitive to the grain boundary stress corrosion cracking, the reduction of carbon content, or the addition of the elements stabilizing carbon in steel are conceivable. 316 L stainless steel was selected as the base for development, because it is a low carbon steel (C <= 0.03%) and contains Mo effective for improving the pitting corrosion resistance and restricting the steel to become sensitive. The requirements for the piping materials for BWRs are the resistance to stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water, excellent strength and weldability, and the possibility of the commercial production of pipes. For the purpose of developing 316 stainless steel pipes, the effects of Mo and trace elements on the stress corrosion cracking resistance, the effects of C, N and grain size on the strength, and the effect of N on the weldability were examined, and the composition design of 316 stainless steel for atomic energy use was carried out. The result is given. (Kako, I.)

  9. Application of k0-based internal mono standard instrumental neutron activation analysis method method for composition analysis of stainless steel clad sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Nair, A.G.C.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Goswami, A.

    2004-01-01

    The k 0 -based internal mono standard instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) method was used for the composition analysis of some irregular shape stainless steel (SS) samples of type SS 316M, which is used as fuel cladding in Indian fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). The method utilizes in situ relative detection efficiency using γ-rays of the activation products present in the sample for overcoming γ-ray self-attenuation. Samples were neutron activated using the thermal column as well as the core position of the reactor and the assay of radioactivity was carried out by high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The elements determined were Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Co, Cu, As and W. Since all the major elements (Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo and Mn) were amenable to NAA, the relative elemental concentrations with respect to Fe, obtained by this method, were converted to their absolute values by mass balance. The results were compared with specified compositions and found to be satisfactory. In order to validate these results obtained by the standard-less approach, sub samples of SS 316M in solution forms were analyzed by prevalent relative and k 0 methods of INAA, and results were found to be in good agreement. The accuracy of the internal mono standard INAA method has been evaluated by analyzing an alloy steel certified reference material, CRM 225/1 of British Chemical Standards (BCS)

  10. Electrophoretic co-deposition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reinforced alginate-Bioglass® composite coating on stainless steel: mechanical properties and in-vitro bioactivity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-07-01

    PVA reinforced alginate-bioactive glass (BG) composite coatings were produced on stainless steel by a single step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The present paper discusses the co-deposition mechanism of the three components and presents a summary of the relevant properties of the composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different PVA concentrations. Homogeneous composite coatings with compact microstructure and increased thickness, i.e. as high as 10 μm, were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface roughness of coatings with different PVA contents was slightly increased, while a significant increase of water contact angles due to PVA addition was detected and discussed. Improved adhesion strength of coatings containing different amounts of PVA was quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed by pull-off adhesion and cycled bending tests, respectively. In-vitro bioactivity tests were performed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. The decomposition rate of the coatings was reduced with PVA content, and rapid hydroxyapatite forming ability of the composite coatings in SBF was confirmed by FTIR and XRD analyses. According to the results of this study, composite alginate-Bioglass® bioactive coatings combined with PVA are proposed as promising candidates for dental and orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intergranular oxidation of austenistic stainless steels in steam at 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersubeno, Johannes Baptista de la Salle.

    1981-11-01

    The oxidation kinetics of a 17.13 bicrystalline and polycrystalline stainless steel was determined at 600 0 C in the presence of steam. The appearance, structure and composition of the oxides at the grain boundaries were particularly studied [fr

  12. Creep embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels with titanium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsen, M.F.

    1983-04-01

    Some cold-worked austenitic stainless steels of the 316 type with titanium addition exhibit a low creep ductility and a notch sensitivity in the temperature range of 550 0 C to 750 0 C and for times to rupture from 10 to 10000 hours. It has been shown that this embrittlement increases highly with cold-work percentage, with solution annealing temperature, and depends on chemical composition because these factors can modify the difference of hardness between grains and grain boundaries

  13. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  14. Studies of stainless steel exposed to sandblasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sandblasting on surface and subsurface of stainless steel is investigated using variable energy positron beam (VEP, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Samples of stainless steel were blasted using 110 μm particles of Al2O3 under different pressure and time duration. In the case of sandblasting for 90 s, the reduction of positron diffusion length depending on the applied pressure was observed. Sandblasting during 30 s leads only to the reduction of positron diffusion length to about 60 nm for all samples. Positron lifetimes close to 170 ps measured using positrons emitted directly from the source point to the presence of vacancies on the dislocation lines. SEM and AFM images show that surface roughness depends rather on pressure of sandblasting than time of exposition.

  15. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  16. State on AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattah-alhosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The passivity and protective nature of the passive films are essentially related to ionic and electronic transport processes, which are controlled by the optical and electronic properties of passive films. In this study, the electrochemical behavior of passive films anodically formed on AISI 304 stainless steel in sulfuric acid solution has been examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. AISI 304 in sulphuric acid solution is characterized by high interfacial impedance, thereby illustrating its high corrosion resistance. Results showed that the interfacial impedance and the polarization resistance (pol initially increase with applied potential, within the low potential passive. However, at a sufficiently high potential passive (>0.4 V, the interfacial impedance and the polarization resistance decrease with increasing potential. An electrical equivalent circuit based on the impedance analysis, which describes the behavior of the passive film on stainless steel more satisfactorily than the proposed models, is presented.

  17. Diffraction study on aging duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Toru; Miura, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hisashi; Torii, Syuuki; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    SUS329J2L duplex stainless steels exhibit high strength and resistance to corrosion, so widely used in piping of industrial plants. However, it is known that they are brought deterioration of strength using for long time. This reason of this deterioration is that ferrite decomposes to Fe-rich α phase and Cr-rich α' phase and, Cr-rich α' phase decreases mechanical properties and resistance for corrosion. In this experiment, we made neutron diffraction experiments on long time aging (625 K, 16000 h) duplex stainless steel to observe the behavior for α phase and α' phase, using Sirius diffractometer at KENS. The result shows, the lattice parameters in α phase were decreased. In contrast to, its in austenite (γ phase) were slightly increased. (author)

  18. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. STRUCTURAL STRESS RELAXATION IN STAINLESS INSTABILITY STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lyabuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the description of conditions of martensitic transformation in austenitic steel is advanced. Transformation induced hardening is the result of Le Chatelier principle in instability alloys. The phase transformation in austenitic instability stainless steel is the cause of reduction of grain refining and increase of strength. It was experimentally shown that physical-mechanical characteristics of the prepared materials were defined by the structure and inhomogeneous distribution of the hardening phase within a grain. The reasons for high thermal stability of inverse austenitic were established. The factors determining the inverse austenitic relaxation resistibility and resources for its increasing were revealed.

  20. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  1. Fatigue fracture modes of a stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, D.J.; Souza e Silva, A.S. de; Monteiro, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of strain hardening and martensite phase transformation on the fatigue fracture regions (pulsative tension) of a Stainless Steel type AISI 316 was investigated. This lead to the conclusion that the greater austenite strain hardening level only favours the occurrence of a brittle fracture. Also, in as much as the static induced martensite is concerned, a direct influence on the failure process was not observed, whereas, apparently, the one transformed under cyclic loading has no contribution to the rupture mechanisms. (author) [pt

  2. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  3. Ferritic stainless steels: corrosion resistance + economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remus, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels provide corrosion resistance at lower cost. They include Type 409, Type 439, 18SR, 20-Mo (1.6 Mo), 18-2 (2 Mo), 26-1S, E-Brite 26-1, 29 Cr-4 Mo, and 29 Cr-4 Mo-2 Ni. Their corrosion and mechanical properties are examined. Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is an advantage compared to austenitic types

  4. Estimation of embrittlement during aging of AISI 316 stainless steel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Nitrogen additions to stainless steels have been found beneficial as it improves austenite stability and thereby ... selected keeping in mind the service conditions in the nuclear reactors where these steels are used. .... increases. δ-Ferrite in austenitic stainless steel weld met- als containing FN4–FN11 decomposes to α + α′ ...

  5. Withdrawal Strength and Bending Yield Strength of Stainless Steel Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas R. Rammer; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that stainless steel nails have superior corrosion performance compared to carbon steel or galvanized nails in treated wood; however, their mechanical fastening behavior is unknown. In this paper, the performance of stainless steel nails is examined with respect to two important properties used in wood connection design: withdrawal strength...

  6. Reliability and performance evaluation of stainless and mild steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reliability and performance of stainless and mild steel products in methanolic and aqueous sodium chloride media have been investigated. Weight-loss and pre-exposure methods were used. There was a higher rate of weight-loss of mild steels and stainless steels in 1% HCl methanolic solution than in aqueous NaCl ...

  7. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a ''total impact energy'' approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper

  8. Computer simulation of sensitization in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, R W

    1983-12-20

    Stainless steel containers are prime candidates for the containment of nuclear waste in tuff rock. The thermal history of a container involves exposure to temperatures of 500 to 600/sup 0/C when it is welded and possibly filled with molten waste glass, followed by hundreds of years exposure in the 100 to 300/sup 0/C range. The problems of short- and long-term sensitization in stainless steels have been addressed by two computer programs. The TTS program uses classical nucleation and growth theory plus experimental input to predict the onset of precipitation or sensitization under complex thermal histories. The FEMGB program uses quadratic finite-element methods to analyze diffusion processes and chromium depletion during precipitate growth. The results of studies using both programs indicate that sensitization should not be a problem in any of the austenitic stainless steels considered. However, more precise information on the process thermal cycles, especially during welding of the container, is needed. Contributions from dislocation pipe diffusion could promote long-term low-temperature sensitization.

  9. Effect of electrolyte composition on the active-to-passive transition behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in H2SO4/HCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, I-H.; Fu Yan; Lin, C.-J.; Tsai, W.-T.

    2006-01-01

    Selective dissolution could occur in duplex stainless steels (DSSs) due to the difference in chemical composition between the two constituent phases. In this study, the effect of H 2 SO 4 /HCl composition on the selective dissolution behavior was investigated. The results indicated that there were two distinct peaks appeared in the active-to-passive transition region in the polarization curve. The peak appeared at a lower potential region was associated with the preferential dissolution of ferrite phase while that for austenite at a higher potential. In the concentration ranges of 0.25-2 M of H 2 SO 4 and 0.25-2 M of HCl, the magnitude of the peak anodic current density and the resolution between these two peaks greatly depended on the composition of H 2 SO 4 /HCl. However, the anodic peaks corresponding to the respective dissolutions of ferrite and austenite became less distinguishable when the concentrations of HCl exceeded 1.2 M. Image analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to confirm the selective dissolution of each constituent phase after potentiostatic polarization at the respective anodic peak potential

  10. Hydrogen transport through stainless steel under plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of gas exchange through stainless steel surface of the plasma chamber under irradiation with hydrogen atoms in oxygen atmosphere or oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasma. Dependence of this process on various irradiation parameters, such as the metal temperature, energy of irradiating ions, gas composition of plasma are studied. It is shown, that desorption from stainless steel is activated with the increase of the plasma chamber walls temperature and energy of irradiating ions. Hydrogen release occurs also under irradiation of the walls by helium and argon plasmas added with oxygen, however the amount of released hydrogen is several times lower than in the case of irradiation with oxygen contaminated deuterium plasma.

  11. SCC-induced failure of a 304 stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Disney, D.J.; Szostak, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    On 1991 January 12, a 304 Stainless Steel (SS) suction line in the AECL-Research NRU reactor failed, shutting down the reactor for approximately 12 months. The pipe, a 32 mm schedule 40 304 stainless steel line exposed to D 2 O at temperatures ≤35 degrees C had been in service for approximately 20 years, although no manufacturing data or composition specifications were available. The failure and resultant leak resulted in a small loss of D 2 O moderator from the reactor vessel. The pipe cracked approximately 180 degrees C around the circumference of a weld. This failure was unexpected and hense a thorough metallographic examination was carried out on the failed section, on the rest of the line (Line 1212), and on representative samples from the rest of the reactor in order to assess the integrity of the remaining piping

  12. Influence of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of stainless steels in lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2008-02-01

    Corrosion behavior of several stainless steels in lithium and lithium with 0.05%H has been examined. Corrosion tests were performed under static conditions at 600 and 700 °C in the austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 304 containers. Intensive formation of σ-phase of the composition Fe 50Cr 43Mo 3Ni 4 on the surface of austenitic stainless steels of the type AISI 316 at 700 °C for 1000 h was established as a result of isothermal mass transfer. Addition of 0.05%H in the form of LiH to lithium resulted in an increase in the quantity of the σ-phase. After corrosion tests of ferritic/martensitic steel in lithium at 700 °C for 1000 h the formation of the γ-phase was observed. In Li + 0.05%H besides the γ-phase was also formed the σ-phase. The features of decarburization of investigated stainless steels were examined using the direct method of activation autoradiography on carbon. Addition of 0.05%H in lithium significantly decreased the carbon content in the decarburization zone of austenitic stainless steel Fe-18Cr-15Ni-0.15C-0.23B without a noticeable change in the thickness of the decarburization zone. Decarburization of ferritic/martensitic stainless steel was less than of austenitic stainless steel using the same corrosion tests.

  13. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging

  14. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed (εeq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided...

  15. Tritium distributing in stainless steel determined by chemical etchin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Yifu; Luo Deli; Chen Changan; Chen Shicun; Jing Wenyong

    2009-01-01

    The depth distribution of tritium in stainless steel was measured by chemical etching. The results show that the method can more quantitatively evaluate the tritium distributing in stainless steel. The maximum amount of tritium which distributed in crystal lattice of stainless steel is limitted by its solubility at room temperature. The other form of tritium in stainless steel is gaseous tritium that are trapped by defects, impurities, fractures, etc. within it. The gaseous tritium is several times more than the solid-dissolved tritium. (authors)

  16. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  17. Complex Protection of Vertical Stainless Steel Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrislamov Radik Zakievich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the problem of fail-safe oil and oil products storage in stainless steel tanks and present the patented tank inner side protection technology. The latter provides process, ecological and fire safety and reducing soil evaporation of oil products, which is a specific problem. The above-mentioned technology includes corrosion protection and heat insulation protection providing increase of cover durability and RVS service life in general. The offered technological protection scheme is a collaboration of the author, Steel Paint GmbH firm and JSC “Koksokhimmontazhproyekt”. PU foam unicomponent materials of Steel Paint GmbH firm provide the protection of tank inner side and cover.

  18. Compositional depth profiles of the type 316 stainless steel undergone the corrosion in liquid lithium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ke, Chuan; Liu, Xiang; Gou, Fujun; Duan, Xuru; Zhao, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Liquid metal lithium cause severe corrosion on the surface of metal structure material that used in the blanket and first wall of fusion device. Fast and accurate compositional depth profile measurement for the boundary layer of the corroded specimen will reveal the clues for the understanding and evaluation of the liquid lithium corrosion process as well as the involved corrosion mechanism. In this work, the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the compositional depth profile analysis of type 316 stainless steel which was corroded by liquid lithium in certain conditions was demonstrated. High sensitivity of LIBS was revealed especially for the corrosion medium Li in addition to the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn by the spectral analysis of the plasma emission. Compositional depth profile analysis for the concerned elements which related to corrosion was carried out on the surface of the corroded specimen. Based on the verified local thermodynamic equilibrium shot-by-shot along the depth profile, the matrix effect was evaluated as negligible by the extracted physical parameter of the plasmas generated by each laser pulse in the longitudinal depth profile. In addition, the emission line intensity ratios were introduced to further reduce the impact on the emission line intensity variations arise from the strong inhomogeneities on the corroded surface. Compositional depth profiles for the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn and the corrosion medium Li were constructed with their measured relative emission line intensities. The distribution and correlations of the concerned elements in depth profile may indicate the clues to the complicated process of composition diffusion and mass transfer. The results obtained demonstrate the potentiality of LIBS as an effective technique to perform spectrochemical measurement in the research fields of liquid metal lithium corrosion.

  19. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Calderon, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate C N /C F e near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  20. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  1. Investigating the Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Coated Stainless Steel in Seawater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kain, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... austenitic stainless steel. Testing in natural seawater has demonstrated that coatings can protect susceptible stainless steel from barnacle related crevice corrosion and localized corrosion at weldments...

  2. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. - Highlights: • 316L-Cu scaffolds were fabricated by using selective laser melting (SLM). • 316L-Cu scaffolds showed satisfied antimicrobial activities. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. • Other properties of 316L-Cu scaffolds were similar to 316L scaffolds. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have the potential to be used in orthopedic applications.

  3. Static strain aging in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The static strain aging effects were investigated in austenitic stainless steels by measuring the yield points developed in tensile tests following the arrest of the crosshead for some period of time. The results appear to indicate that the dragging of dislocations in the interval of temperatures from 100 to 300 0 C, where the strain aging is effective, does not apparently depend on the Cottrell's atmosphere. Moreover the influence of the pre-deformation and time on the yield point intensity displayed the existence of stages. The strain aging mechanics and the reasons for the stages were discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. Electroless Plated Nanodiamond Coating for Stainless Steel Passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Korinko, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Spencer, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stein, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-15

    Tritium gas sample bottles and manifold components require passivation surface treatments to minimize the interaction of the hydrogen isotopes with surface contamination on the stainless steel containment materials. This document summarizes the effort to evaluate electroless plated nanodiamond coatings as a passivation layer for stainless steel. In this work, we developed an electroless nanodiamond (ND)-copper (Cu) coating process to deposit ND on stainless steel parts with the diamond loadings of 0%, 25% and 50% v/v in a Cu matrix. The coated Conflat Flanged Vessel Assemblies (CFVAs) were evaluated on surface morphology, composition, ND distribution, residual hydrogen release, and surface reactivity with deuterium. For as-received Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs, hydrogen off-gassing is rapid, and the off-gas rates of H2 was one to two orders of magnitude higher than that for both untreated and electropolished stainless steel CFVAs, and hydrogen and deuterium reacted to form HD as well. These results indicated that residual H2 was entrapped in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs during the coating process, and moisture was adsorbed on the surface, and ND and/or Cu might facilitate catalytic isotope exchange reaction for HD formation. However, hydrocarbons (i.e., CH3) did not form, and did not appear to be an issue for the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs. After vacuum heating, residual H2 and adsorbed H2O in the Cu and ND-Cu coated CFVAs were dramatically reduced. The H2 off-gassing rate after the vacuum treatment of Cu and 50% ND-Cu coated CFVAs was on the level of 10-14 l mbar/s cm2, while H2O off-gas rate was on the level of 10-15 l mbar/s cm2, consistent with the untreated or electropolished stainless steel CFVA, but the HD formation remained. The Restek EP bottle was used as a reference for this work. The Restek Electro-Polished (EP) bottle and their Sil

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) ... Stress corrosion cracking; chloride; stainless steel; inhibitor. 1. Introduction. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) ..... Xi'an Jiaotong University Press) (in Chinese). Huang Y L, Cao C N, Lu M and Lin ...

  6. Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes-Estimation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes - Estimation of specific capacitances and construction of equivalent circuits. R Ramya M V Sangaranarayanan ... The galvanostatic polymerization of pyrrole is carried out on stainless steel electrodes using -toluene sulphonic acid. The morphology of the film is ...

  7. Stainless steels for seawater desalination plants; Nichtrostende Staehle fuer Meerwasserentsalzungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, G. [ThyssenKrupp Nirosta GmbH, Krefeld (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Seawater desalination plants can be used to produce drinking water with low chloride concentrations. Stainless steels are an elementary component of the various process technologies in such plants. Due to growing demand for drinking water - especially in the Arabian states, but also in southern Europe - seawater desalination plants represent a very interesting area of application with increasing economic importance for stainless steels. (orig.)

  8. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; steel alloys is also disclosed.

  9. Clinical Performance of Indirect Composite Onlays as Esthetic Alternative to Stainless Steel Crowns for Rehabilitation of a Large Carious Primary Molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Goyal, Ashima; Gauba, Krishan; Kapur, Aditi

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performance of indirect resin composite onlays (IRC onlay) compared to stainless steel crowns (SSCs), as an esthetic alternative for rehabilitation of extensively carious primary molars. Fifty pediatric patients each received either IRC onlay or SSC randomly on extensively carious endodontically treated primary molars. All the restorations were evaluated at baseline and then every 6 months till 36 months using 'modified FDI criteria' for retention, marginal integrity, occlusion, proximal contact, secondary caries and gingival health. The dental chair side treatment time and post-operative acceptability were also evaluated for both the groups. The cumulative survival rate of IRC onlays was 82.9% compared to 90.7% for SSCs over a time period of 36 months. The difference between the two study groups at various time intervals in terms of retention, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, occlusion and gingival health was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The IRC onlays required significantly less mean chair side treatment time and were preferred the most by parents and children as per VAS scores compared to SSCs. IRC onlays are an acceptable esthetic alternative to SSCs and may be considered for use in aesthetically conscious children/parents as per their preference.

  10. Preparation of a polyacrylonitrile/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization on a stainless steel wire for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, Isabelle; Hevesi, Laszlo; Azenha, Manuel; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2010-04-23

    We report on the fabrication and performances of a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber based on a stainless steel wire coated with a covalently attached polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite. This new coating is obtained by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylonitrile mixed with MWCNTs. ATRP is initiated from 11-(2-bromo-2-methylpropionyloxy)-undecyl-phosphonic acid molecules grafted on the wire surface via the phosphonic acid group. The extraction performances of the fibers are assessed on different classes of compounds (polar, non-polar, aromatic, etc.) from water solutions by headspace extraction. The optimization of the parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the target compounds was studied as well as the reproducibility and the repeatability of the fiber. The fibers sustain more than 200 extractions during which they remain chemically stable and maintain good performances (detection limits lower than 2 microg/l, repeatability, etc.). Considering their robustness together with their easy and inexpensive fabrication, these fibers could constitute promising alternatives to existing products. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  12. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  13. Carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabal, E.; Molina, C. [Refineria Isla, Curazao, S.A., P.O. Box 3843. Curacao, (Netherlands Antilles); Hau, J.L.; Mayorga, A.G. [PDVSA-Intevep. P.O. Box 76343. Caracas 1070A, Venezuela (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    Stainless steel containing molybdenum are usually recommended to resist naphtenic acid corrosion in vacuum heaters. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316 Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service and just one year after undergoing the last inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 Centigrade. Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023%). Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur produced by asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures. (Author)

  14. Carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabal, E.; Molina, C.; Hau, J.L.; Mayorga, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Stainless steel containing molybdenum are usually recommended to resist naphtenic acid corrosion in vacuum heaters. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316 Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service and just one year after undergoing the last inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 Centigrade. Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023%). Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur produced by asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures. (Author)

  15. Characterization of friction stir welded joint of low nickel austenitic stainless steel and modified ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Mounarik; Das, Hrishikesh; Ahn, Eun Yeong; Hong, Sung Tae; Kim, Moon-Jo; Han, Heung Nam; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar stainless steels, low nickel austenitic stainless steel and 409M ferritic stainless steel, is experimentally investigated. Process responses during FSW and the microstructures of the resultant dissimilar joints are evaluated. Material flow in the stir zone is investigated in detail by elemental mapping. Elemental mapping of the dissimilar joints clearly indicates that the material flow pattern during FSW depends on the process parameter combination. Dynamic recrystallization and recovery are also observed in the dissimilar joints. Among the two different stainless steels selected in the present study, the ferritic stainless steels shows more severe dynamic recrystallization, resulting in a very fine microstructure, probably due to the higher stacking fault energy.

  16. Electropolishing of Stainless Steel Implants for Stable Functional Osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omel’chuk, A.О.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the electropolishing stainless steel for stable functional osteosynthesis has been developed. The polishing of implants was carried out in solutions, based on the ternary system H2SO4—H3PO4—H2O with stepwise decreasing the current density and increasing the orthophosphoric acid concentration. The optimal polishing conditions (current density, solution composition, temperature and duration have been determined. The developed method improves the quality and mechanical properties of the surface.

  17. Microchemical evolution of neutron-irradiated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1980-04-01

    The precipitates that develop in AISI 316 stainless steel during irradiation play a dominant role in determining the dimensional and mechanical property changes of this alloy. This role is expressed primarily in a large change in matrix composition that alters the diffusional properties of the alloy matrix and also appears to alter the rate of acceptance of point defects at dislocations and voids. The major elemental participants in the evolution have been identified as nickel, silicon, and carbon. The exceptional sensitivity of this evolution to many variables accounts for much of the variability of response exhibited by this alloy in nominally similar irradiations

  18. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  19. Comparison of frictional resistance between conventional stainless steel, metal insert ceramic, self ligating stainless steel and self ligating ceramic with stainless steel wire : invitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaram Subbiah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction is an integral part of fixed orthodontic treatment. Several innovations have been made to reduce friction and thereby get predictable and faster tooth movements. Self ligating brackets are one such innovation which is said to offer the possibility of a significant reduction in average treatment times and also in anchorage requirements. Ceramic Self ligating brackets introduce recently have the added advantage of aesthetics. This study was conducted to compare the frictional resistance of conventional stainless steel, metal insert ceramic, Self ligating stainless steel and Self ligating ceramic brackets against a common stainless steel wire. Fifteen premolar in each group (0.022 Roth prescription were tested against 0.019x0.025 stainless steel wire using Lloyd universal testing machine. The conventional stainless steel brackets showed a frictional resistance of 66.47±7.86g metal insert ceramic brackets showed a frictional resistance of 77.52± 8.59g . the Self ligating stainless steel brackets had a frictional resistance of 40.21±7.76g Self ligating ceramic brackets had a frictional resistance of 72.67±5.76 g Self ligating ceramic brackets do have slightly lesser friction than metal insert ceramic brackets but significantly more than metal brackets .

  20. Fireside carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabal, E.; Molina, C. [PDVSA-Refineria Isla, Curayao (Netherlands); Mayorga, A.; Hau, J.L. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1999-11-01

    Most heavy Venezuelan crudes are recognized for having a high total acid number (TAN) that is usually associated with a high tendency to produce naphthenic acid corrosion. To resist this type of corrosion in vacuum heaters, 9Cr-1Mo steel and stainless steels containing molybdenum are usually recommended. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service, and just one year after undergoing the last turnaround inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 C (1250 F). Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023 O/O).Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur due to asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures.

  1. Thermal cycling and electrochemical characteristics of solid oxide fuel cell supported on stainless steel with a new 3-phase composite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaghi, Amir Masoud; Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sun Jae; Kim, Sunwoong; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2017-06-01

    We report design, fabrication method, and fast thermal-cycling ability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that use stainless steel (STS) as a support, and a new 3-phase anode. La and Ni co-doped SrTiO3 (La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-d, LSTN), replaces some of the Ni in conventional Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode; the resultant LSTN-YSZ-Ni 3-phase-composite anode is tested as a new reduction (or decomposition)-resistant anode of STS-supported SOFCs that can be co-fired with STS. A multi-layered cell with YSZ electrolyte (thickness ∼5 μm), composite anode, STS-cermet contact-layer, and STS support is designed, then fabricated by tape casting, lamination, and co-firing at 1250 °C in reducing atmosphere. The maximum power density (MPD) is 325 mW cm-2 at 650 °C; this is one of the highest among STS-supported cells fabricated by co-firing. The cell also shows stable open-circuit voltage and Ohmic resistance during 100 rapid thermal cycles between 170 and 600 °C. STS support minimizes stress and avoids cracking of electrolyte during rapid thermal cycling. The excellent MPD and stability during thermal cycles, and promising characteristics of SOFC as a power source for vehicle or mobile devices that requires rapid thermal cycles, are attributed to the new design of the cell with new anode structure.

  2. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  3. Compresibility and sinterability of HCx PM steel diluted with stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gordo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available HCx powder metallurgy steel contains in its composition high contents of Cr and C, and significant quantities of alloy elements typical of tool steels (Mo, V, W, to provide the corrosion resistance of stainless steel with wear resistance of tool steels. HCx appears to be a suitable material for applications in aggressive environments, as valve seat inserts in automotive engines. However, this steel presents a low compressibility leading to high production costs. In this work, some results carried out to improve the compressibility of HCx are presented. The way to attempt this improvement is the dilution of base material with two stainless steels, the ferritic 430LHC and the austenitic 316L. The powder mixes prepared were uniaxially pressed to study the compressibility. The sinterability was study by determining of density, hardness, transverse rupture strength (TRS and microstructural evolution after vacuum sintering at different temperatures. As a result, better compressibility is observed in the mixes although not all of them present the properties required.

  4. Development of commercial nitrogen-rich stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of nitrogen alloyed stainless steels. Nitrogen alloying of austenitic stainless steels started at an early stage and was to a large extent caused by nickel shortage. However, direct technical advantages such as increased strength of the nitrogen alloyed steels made them attractive alternatives to the current steels. It was not until the advent of the AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) process in the late 1960s that nitrogen alloying could be controlled to such accuracy that it became successful commercially on a broader scale. The paper describes production aspects and how nitrogen addition influences microstructure and the resulting properties of austenitic and duplex stainless steels. For austenitic steels there are several reasons for nitrogen alloying. Apart from increasing strength nitrogen also improves structural stability, work hardening and corrosion resistance. For duplex steels nitrogen also has a decisive effect in controlling the microstructure during thermal cycles such as welding. (orig.)

  5. Low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel; the role of plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding of austenitic stainless steel transforms the surface zone into expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge re...

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of Dissimilar Welding of AISI 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel to 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago AmaroVicente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the weld metal chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of dissimilar weldments between 310S austenitic stainless steel and 2304 duplex steels was investigated by constant load tests and microstructural examination. Two filler metals (E309L and E2209 were used to produce fusion zones of different chemical compositions. The SCC results showed that the heat affected zone (HAZ on the 2304 base metal side of the weldments was the most susceptible region to SCC for both filler metals tested. The SCC results also showed that the weldments with 2209 duplex steel filler metal presented the best SCC resistance when compared to the weldments with E309L filler metal. The lower SCC resistance of the dissimilar joint with 309L austenitic steel filler metal may be attributed to (1 the presence of brittle chi/sigma phase in the HAZ on the 2304 base metal, which produced SC cracks in this region and (2 the presence of a semi-continuous delta-ferrite network in the fusion zone which favored the nucleation and propagation of SC cracks from the fusion zone to HAZ of the 2304 stainless steel. Thus, the SC cracks from the fusion zone associated with the SC cracks of 2304 HAZ decreased considerably the time-of-fracture on this region, where the fracture occurred. Although the dissimilar weldment with E2209 filler metal also presented SC cracks in the HAZ on the 2304 side, it did not present the delta ferrite network in the fusion zone due to its chemical composition. Fractography analyses showed that the mixed fracture mode was predominant for both filler metals used.

  7. The Otto Aufranc Award: Enhanced Biocompatibility of Stainless Steel Implants by Titanium Coating and Microarc Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young Wook; Kwon, Soon Yong; Sun, Doo Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background Stainless steel is one of the most widely used biomaterials for internal fixation devices, but is not used in cementless arthroplasty implants because a stable oxide layer essential for biocompatibility cannot be formed on the surface. We applied a Ti electron beam coating, to form oxide layer on the stainless steel surface. To form a thicker oxide layer, we used a microarc oxidation process on the surface of Ti coated stainless steel. Modification of the surface using Ti electron beam coating and microarc oxidation could improve the ability of stainless steel implants to osseointegrate. Questions/purposes The ability of cells to adhere to grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated stainless steel in vitro was compared with that of two different types of surface modifications, machined and titanium-coated, and microarc-oxidated. Methods We performed energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy investigations to assess the chemical composition and structure of the stainless steel surfaces and cell morphology. The biologic responses of an osteoblastlike cell line (SaOS-2) were examined by measuring proliferation (cell proliferation assay), differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity), and attraction ability (cell migration assay). Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, migration, and adhesion were increased in the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated group compared to the two other groups. Osteoblastlike cells on the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated surface were strongly adhered, and proliferated well compared to those on the other surfaces. Conclusions The surface modifications we used (grit blasting, titanium coating, microarc oxidation) enhanced the biocompatibility (proliferation and migration of osteoblastlike cells) of stainless steel. Clinical Relevance This process is not unique to stainless steel; it can be applied to many metals to improve their biocompatibility

  8. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibo Yao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy (P/M technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  9. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  10. Design and construction of precast piles with stainless reinforcing steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The service life of prestressed concrete piles is, in part, dictated by the time required to corrode the steel once : chloride ions are at the surface of the steel. Stainless steel materials, although limited in availability in strand : form, have a ...

  11. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels.

  12. Electrochemical decontamination of Pu contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.D.; Pottinger, J.S.; Junkison, A.R.

    1983-08-01

    Electrochemical decontamination has been demonstrated to be very effective in removing plutonium nitrate contamination (0.5 μg cm -2 ) on stainless steels. The amount of metal dissolved to achieve a DF of 10 2 to 10 3 was 2 to 7 μm depending on the electrolyte used. In unstirred electrolytes 1M HNO 3 , 1M HNO 3 /0.1M NaF, 5M HNO 3 perform best. Under stirred electrolyte conditions, there is a general marginal fall in effectiveness except for 5M HNO 3 where there is a slight improvement. The optimum performance is a compromise between maximizing the electrolyte throwing power and minimizing substrate surface roughening during decontamination. (author)

  13. Phase identification in neutron irradiated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for the identification of phases which develop in AISI 316 stainless steel which has been modified by the addition of Ti are described. Five major phases were identified in the alloy containing 0.2 wt % Ti after irradation by 7 x 10 22 n.cm -2 at temperatures ranging from 400 to 650 0 C. Once identification was established from diffraction pattern measurements, subsequent identification could be made by observation of the characteristic shape of each phase combined with the observation of certain characteristic features of te x-ray spectrum of each phase. This combination permitted rapid identification of large numbers of particles necessary for the elucidation of the role of phase instabilities in void swelling

  14. Hydrogenation of stainless steels implanted with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ramos, L.E. da.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work the effects of both ion implantation and hydrogenation on the fatigue behaviour of an AISI-304 type unstable stainless steel was studied. The material was tested under the following microstructural conditions: annealed; annealed plus hydrogenated; annealed plus ion-implanted; annealed, ion-implanted and hydrogeneted. The hydrogen induced phase transformations were also studied during the outgassing of the samples. The ion implanted was observed to retard the kinetics of the hydrogen induced phase transformations. It was also observed that the nitrogen ion implantation followed by both natural (for about 4 months) and artificial (100 0 C for 6 hours) aging treatments was beneficial to the fatigue life of both non hydrogenated and severely hydrogenated samples. (author) [pt

  15. [Study on biocompatibility of MIM 316L stainless steel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Yiming; Zhao, Yanzhong; Zhou, Kechao; Huang, Boyun

    2007-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility of metal powder injection molding (MIM) 316L stainless steel. The percentage of S-period cells was detected by flow cytometry after L929 cells being incubated with extraction of MIM 316L stainless steel, and titanium implant materials for clinical application were used as control. In addition, both materials were implanted in animals and the histopathological evaluations were carried out. The statistical analyses show that there are no significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05), which demonstrate that MIM 316L stainless steel has good biocompatibility.

  16. Kinetics of chemical interactions between zirconium alloys and stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frecska, J.; Maroti, L.; Matus, L.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical interaction kinetics of reactor core component zirconium alloys and stainless steels at high temperatures was examined. Interaction of as-received and preoxidized Zr1%Nb with X18H10T stainless steel used in WWER type nuclear reactors, and also that of Zircaloy-4 and AISI-316 stainless steel, for comparison, were investigated. The reaction rate measurements were supplemented with post-test metallographical examinations. Results are presented and evaluated, and compared with literature data. (author). 14 refs., 31 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Systemic hypersensitivity reaction to endovascular stainless steel stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Univers, Junior; Long, Chandler; Tonks, Stephen A; Freeman, Michael B

    2018-02-01

    Endovascular intervention has become the mainstay for treatment of most patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease. We describe a patient with a known nickel allergy who underwent placement of a stainless steel stent for aortoiliac occlusive disease. Despite our attempt to avoid a nickel-containing stent, the patient developed a diffuse rash consistent with a nickel or metal allergy. A review of stainless steel metallurgy revealed that nickel, cobalt, and titanium are frequently used to provide anticorrosive properties to stainless steel. The clinical significance of the use of nickel-alloy stents in the setting of patients with a nickel allergy is discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Structural Analysis of Cavitation for Different Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina-Elena Mânzână

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The cavitation phenomenon is currently approaching all areas of technology and modern industry, where are fluid in motion. In this paper cavitational erosion was conducted on different samples of stainless steels. The cavitation were performed in magnetostrictive vibrating apparatus at Cavitation Laboratory (Polytechnic University of Timisoara. The present paper intends to identify specific structural features in stainless steels. Several investigations were done: macrostructural analysis (Olympus SZX57, scaning electron microscope (Philips SEM and X-ray diffraction (D8 ADVANCE. After quantitative and qualitative investigations structural features were put in evidence on experimental stainless steels.

  19. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ''noble'' nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation

  20. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  1. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  2. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  3. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  4. Improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance for Cr3Si film on stainless steel by double cathode glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongqin; Qiu, Yujiang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, sputter-deposited Cr3Si film was prepared by double cathode glow discharge (DCGD) technique onto 304 stainless steel. The phase constituents, surface microstructure and chemical compositions of the film were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the DCGD process, the hardness of Cr3Si film was 26 GPa, about 10 times of the stainless steel, 2.5 GPa. The cavitation erosion resistance of Cr3Si film and stainless steel were investigated by using an ultrasonic vibration cavitation erosion system. After 30 hours of cavitation tests, the cumulative mass loss of Cr3Si film was only 60% of the stainless steel. Compared with the untreated stainless steel, the cavitation erosion resistance of Cr3Si film was improved. The cavitation mechanism of Cr3Si film is due to the delamination and spalling of local surface layer derived from its inherent brittleness.

  5. Effect of pulse laser parameters on TiC reinforced AISI 304 stainless steel composite coating by laser surface engineering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Chinmaya Kumar; Masanta, Manoj

    2015-04-01

    In this work, TiC reinforced steel composite layer has been produced by laser scanning over the preplaced TiC powder on AISI 304 steel substrate, using a pulse Nd:YAG laser. Depending on the pulse laser parameters, TiC either deposited or dispersed on the surface of steel substrate. Depth and width of laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been deliberated from the SEM images at the transverse cross section of the laser scanned samples. Hardness of the laser processed composite layer has been measured through Vickers micro-hardness tester. Effect of pulsed laser parameters i.e. peak power, pulse duration, overlapping factor (corresponding to scan speed and frequency) on micro-hardness, composite layer profile (depth and width) and microstructure of the laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been studied. From the experimental analysis, it is revealed that, laser peak power and overlapping factor have significant effect on the TiC-steel composite layer profile and its hardness value.

  6. Nonmetallic inclusions in JBK-75 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.W.; Krenzer, R.W.; Doyle, J.H.; Riefenberg, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys that are chemically complex, such as A-286 or JBK-75, are designed to improve such high-temperature properties as strength. This is accomplished by precipitating secondary phases during aging. Such multicomponent systems, however, can also produce undesirable phases that are detrimental to forgeability and final mechanical properties. Cast segregation and numerous nonmetallic inclusions can have a degrading influence on the toughness and ductility of the alloy. Several different heats of A-286 and JBK-75 were studied, and titanium carbide and/or molybdenum carbide [(Ti, Mo)C] plus titanium carbide and/or titanium carbonitride Ti(C,N)-type phases were qualitatively identified as the major nonmetallic constituent in these alloys. The common procedure for rating the microcleanliness of steels does not classify such carbide or carbonitride phases and thus does not provide an appropriate means of controlling in-process inspection. The results of this study are discussed in terms of alternative methods for evaluating the microcleanliness of superalloys

  7. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  8. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution....... In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range...

  9. Corrosion of mild steel and stainless steel by marine Vibrio sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wagh, A.B.

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel and mild steel coupons exposed to media with and without a bacterial culture Vibrio sp. was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Pitting type of corrosion was noticed which was more...

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  11. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  12. Corrosion-free precast prestressed concrete piles made with stainless steel reinforcement : construction, test and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The use of duplex high-strength stainless steel (HSSS) grade 2205 prestressing strand and : austenitic stainless steel (SS) grade 304 spiral wire reinforcement is proposed as a replacement of : conventional prestressing steel, in order to provide a 1...

  13. Property improvement of stainless-steel-base surface composites fabricated by high-energy electron-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Keesam; Lee, Sunghak

    2003-12-01

    This is a study on the fabrication of surface composites of SiC, TiC particulates, and AISI 304 substrate by high voltage electron beam irradiation. Using CaF2 powders as flux, two kinds of surface composites were fabricated for a comparative analysis of the microstructural modification and mechanical properties. Through the employed process, the powders and substrate surface were melted and surface composite layers were successfully formed in both cases. In the specimen fabricated with SiC powders, a volume fraction of Cr23C6 particles (-22 vol.%) were homogeneously distributed along solidification cell boundaries. The large amount of Cr23C6 particles in combination with solid solution hardening of Si in the matrix resulted in the improved hardness and wear resistance of the surface composite layer, that are 2 to 3 times those of the substrate. In the specimen fabricated with SiC and Ti+SiC powders, TiC and Cr23C6 particles were precipitated without precipitation of SiC.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Louthan, M

    1964-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel exposed in dilute chloride solutions is being investigated at the Savannah River Laboratory in attempts to develop a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon...

  15. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Carburized at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F. J.; Natishan, P. M.; Lemieux, E. J.; Newbauer, T. M.; Rayne, R. J.; Bayles, R. A.; Kahn, H.; Michal, G. M.; Ernst, F.; Heuer, A. H.

    2009-08-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of surface-modified 316L austenitic stainless steel and N08367 (a “superaustenitic” stainless steel) were evaluated in 0.6 M NaCl solutions and compared to untreated samples of the same materials. The surface modification process used to treat the surfaces was a low-temperature carburization technology termed “low-temperature colossal supersaturation” (LTCSS). The process typically produces surface carbon concentrations of ~15 at. pct without the formation of carbides. The pitting potential of the LTCSS-treated 316L stainless steel in the NaCl solution substantially increased compared to untreated 316L stainless steel, while the pitting behavior of the LTCSS-treated N08367 was unchanged compared to the untreated alloy.

  16. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized...

  17. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C and long periods (up to 2000 h under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in the material were monitored. It was found that the exposure of the material at 600 °C under load contributes to a strengthening effect on the weld. The phenomenon might be correlated with an accelerated process of second phase precipitation hardening. Keywords: Stainless steel, Weld, AISI 304, Precipitation hardening

  18. Stainless steels in power plant and plant construction. Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference report comprises 14 papers on the corrosion characteristics of stainless steels in power plant and plant engineering. 9 papers are available as separate records in the ENERGY database. (MM) [de

  19. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  20. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  1. Overlaying of type 316 austenitic stainless steel with type 430 ferritic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujith, S.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Overlaying of type 316 austenitic stainless steel vessel with type 430 ferritic stainless is proposed for liquid magnesium service. The interface in this type of bimetallic configuration has been shown to be a cause for concern as it contains a hard and brittle martensite micro constituent which becomes susceptible to cracking under certain conditions. This study was carried out to standardize the welding conditions and characterise the interface in order to obtain sound overlay. Some tests were also conducted to simulate the elevated temperature service. The investigation has shown that the interface hardness approaches 400 VPN when no preheating is employed. However, in the preheated samples, appreciable reduction in the peak hardness was observed. This has been attributed to a decrease in the cooling rate of the clad metal with an increase in the preheating temperature which results in softening of the martensite. The minimum recommended preheat is 473 K. The samples exposed to thermal cycle tests to a peak temperature of 1223 K to simulate the service condition did not show any cracking at the interface after 20 cycles of testing. Therefore, this study has demonstrated the stability of the interface between type 316 and 430 stainless steels at the intended temperature of service. (author)

  2. Stainless steel in contact with food and bevarage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveto Cvetkovski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels are probably the most important materials in the food and beverage industries. The main reason for such broad implementation of stainless steel in contact with food are excellent properties which they possess such as corrosion resistance, resistance to high and low temperatures, very good mechanical and physical properties, aesthetic appeal, inertness of surface, durability, easy cleaning and recycling. Low thermal conductivity of these steels produces steeper temperature coefficient provoking an increased distortion, shrinkage and stresses compared with carbon steel.

  3. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... reason of imports from China of drawn stainless sinks, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the... than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Government of China. \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207...

  4. A Study of Localized Corrosion in Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Weldments

    OpenAIRE

    Enerhaug, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with pitting corrosion in super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) weldments in slightly sour service. Thee main objective with the present thesis has been to find out why pitting corrosion occurs in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at ambient rather than at elevated temperatures and how the corrosion mechanism depends on the welding process. The thesis is divided into six parts. Part I gives a general introduction to martensitic stainless steels, focusing on...

  5. In-vitro bioactivity, biocorrosion and antibacterial activity of silicon integrated hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite coating on 316 L stainless steel implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutha, S.; Kavitha, K.; Karunakaran, G.; Rajendran, V., E-mail: veerajendran@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    A simple and effective ultrasonication method was applied for the preparation of 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.6 wt% silicon substituted hydroxyapatite (HAp) (SH). The Ca/P ratio of the synthesised SH nanoparticles were in the range of 1.58–1.70. Morphological changes were noticed in HAp with respect to the amount of Si from 0 to 1.6 wt%. The morphology of the particles changed from spherical shape to rod-like morphology with respect to the amount of Si which was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction studies confirm the formation of phase pure SH nanoparticles without any secondary phase. Chitosan (CTS) blended SH nanocomposites coating on surgical grade 316 L stainless steel (316 L SS) implant was made by spin coating technique. The surface of the coated implant was characterised using scanning electron microscopy which confirms the uniform coating without cracks and pores. The increased corrosion resistance of the 1.6 wt% of SH/CTS-coated SS implant in the simulated body fluid (SBF) indicates the long-term biostability of SH composite-coated ceramics in vitro than the 0 wt% SH/CTS. The testing of SH/CTS nanocomposites with gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains confirms that the antibacterial ability improves with the higher substitution of Si. In addition, formation of bone-like apatite layer on the SH/CTS-coated implant in SBF was studied through SEM analysis and it confirms the ability to increase the HAp formation on the surface of 1.0 wt% SH/CTS-coated 316 L SS implant. Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite particles are prepared with various silicon concentration • Prepared composites are blended with chitosan and coated on the implant • Corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid improves its stability • Increase in silicon concentration improves the antibacterial activity • Coated plate exhibit high in-vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid.

  6. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  7. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  8. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  9. 76 FR 34964 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-533-810] Stainless Steel Bar From... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India for the period of review February 1, 2010....; Outokumpu Stainless Bar, Inc.; Universal Stainless & Alloy Products, Inc.; and Valbruna Slater Stainless...

  10. The corrosion resistance of composite arch wire laser-welded by NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel wires with Cu interlayer in artificial saliva with protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Sun, Xinhua; Hou, Xu; Li, Hongmei; Sun, Daqian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the corrosion resistance of laser-welded composite arch wire (CoAW) with Cu interlayer between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel wire in artificial saliva with different concentrations of protein was studied. It was found that protein addition had a significant influence on the corrosion behavior of CoAW. Low concentration of protein caused the corrosion resistance of CoAW decrease in electrochemical corrosion and immersion corrosion tests. High concentration of protein could reduce this effect.

  11. The Corrosion Resistance of Composite Arch Wire Laser-Welded By NiTi Shape Memory Alloy and Stainless Steel Wires with Cu Interlayer in Artificial Saliva with Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Sun, Xinhua; Hou, Xu; Li, Hongmei; Sun, Daqian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the corrosion resistance of laser-welded composite arch wire (CoAW) with Cu interlayer between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel wire in artificial saliva with different concentrations of protein was studied. It was found that protein addition had a significant influence on the corrosion behavior of CoAW. Low concentration of protein caused the corrosion resistance of CoAW decrease in electrochemical corrosion and immersion corrosion tests. High concentration of protein could reduce this effect. PMID:23801895

  12. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  13. Microstructure, microhardness, composition, and corrosive properties of stainless steel 304. I. Laser surface alloying with silicon by beam-oscillating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Y.; Shi, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Nakai, H.

    2000-01-01

    Laser surface alloying (LSA) with silicon was conducted on austenitic stainless steel 304. Silicon slurry composed of silicon particle of 5 μm in average diameter was made and a uniform layer was supplied on the substrate stainless steel. The surface was melted with beam-oscillated carbon dioxide laser and then LSA layers of 0.4-1.2 mm in thickness were obtained. When an impinged energy density was adjusted to be equal to or lower than 100 W mm -2 , LSA layers retained rapidly solidified microstructure with dispersed cracks. In these samples, Fe 3 Si was detected and the concentration of Si in LSA layer was estimated to be 10.5 wt.% maximum. When the energy density was equal to or greater than 147 W mm -2 , cellular grained structure with no crack was formed. No iron silicate was observed and alpha iron content in LSA layers increased. Si concentration within LSA layers was estimated to be 5 to 9 wt.% on average. Crack-free as-deposited samples exhibited no distinct corrosion resistance. The segregation of Si was confirmed along the grain boundaries and inside the grains. The microstructure of these samples changed with solution-annealing and the corrosion resistance was fairly improved with the time period of solution-annealing. (orig.)

  14. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu Paulraj; Rajnish Garg

    2015-01-01

    Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic pha...

  15. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  16. New Economical 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zixing; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhao, Junliang; Jiang, Laizhu

    2012-02-01

    New economical duplex stainless steels (DSSs) containing 19Cr-6Mn- xNi-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N ( x = 0.5 to 2.0) were developed, and the microstructure, impact property, and corrosion resistance of the alloys were studied. The ferrite content increases with the solution treatment temperature, but decreases with an increase in nickel. The sigma phase is not found precipitating in the alloys treated with solution from 1023 K to 1523 K (750 °C to 1250 °C). The low-temperature impact energy of the experimental alloys increases first and then decreases rapidly with an increase in nickel, which is mainly due to the martensite transformation with an increase in austenite. The alloys have a better mechanical property and pitting corrosion resistance than AISI 304. Among the designed DSS alloys, 19Cr-6Mn-1.3Ni-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N is found to be an optimum alloy with proper phase proportion, a better combination of mechanical strength and elongation, and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with those of the other alloys.

  17. Comparing creep in two stainless steels AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, T.L. da; Monteiro, S.N.

    1976-07-01

    Two AISI 316 stainless steels, one of Brazilian fabrication (Villares), the other of foreign fabrication (Uddeholm) were submitted to creep tests with temperature ranging from 600 to 800 0 C. Some important differences in the mechanical behaviour of the two steels are pointed out. These differences are due to the particular thermomechanical history of the materials under consideration. (Author) [pt

  18. Damage on 316LN stainless steel transformed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, R.; Burlet, H.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the 316 LN stainless steel elaboration by powder metallurgy. This method allows the realization of structures in austenitic steel less affected by the thermal aging than the cast austenitic-ferritic components. The components are performed by the method of HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing). Mechanical tests are provided to control mechanical properties

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    seashore facilities showed that an acidic chloride solution film formed on the surface of steel and the stainless steel ... of the specimens was single phase auste- nite. After heat treatment, the specimens were pickled for .... metal at the crack tip reacted with the test solution to generate vacancies and the brittle fracture process ...

  20. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  1. Preparation of high-performance ultrafine-grained AISI 304L stainless steel under high temperature and pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Wang; Jinzan Zhang; Yang Zhang; Haitao Wang; Wentao Hu; Dongli Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bulk ultra-fine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with excellent mechanical properties was prepared by a high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) method using nanocrystalline AISI 304L stainless steel powders obtained from ball milling. Samples were sintered in high-pressure conditions using the highest martensite content of AISI 304L stainless steel powders milled for 25 h. Analyses of phase composition and grain size were accomplished by X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. By ...

  2. Microstructural stability of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenzer, R.W.; Sanderson, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to better define parameters for thermomechanical processing of 21-6-9 stainless steel. This steel is one of the nitrogen-strengthened chromium, manganese, and nickel austenitic stainless steels having mechanical properties that can be improved by a combination of plastic deformation and heat treatments. By heat-treating coupons, the time-temperature relationship of the precipitate phase, and the solutionizing, recrystallizing, and stress-relieving temperature ranges in 21-6-9 were established. Secondly, mechanical properties and microstructure as a function of percent deformation and stress-relieving temperature are reported

  3. Effects of microstructure on ultrasonic examination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel components or stainless steel welds is difficult, and the results obtained are hard to interpret. The present study describes the effects of stainless steel microstructure on ultrasonic test results. Welded coupons, 2.5 and 5.0 cm thick, were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel, with Type 308 stainless steel as the weld material. Metallography of the base material shows grain sizes of 15 and 80 μm, and dendrites aligned from the top to the bottom surface in cast material. X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements indicate a random crystal orientation in the base material, but the cast sample had aligned dendrites. The weld material exhibits a dendritic structure with a preferred (100) direction perpendicular to the weld pass. Spectral analysis of ultrasonic broad-band signals through the base materials shows drastic attenuation of higher frequencies with increasing grain size (Rayleigh scattering). Annealing and recrystallization increases the ultrasonic attenuation and produces carbide precipitation at grain boundaries. The microstructural differences of the base metal, heat-affected zone, and weld metal affect the amplitude of ultrasonic reflections from artificial flaws in these zones. Data obtained from two samples of different grain sizes indicate that grain size has little effect when a 1-MHz transducer is used. When going from a 15 to an 80-μm crystalline structure, a 5-MHz unit suffers a 30-dB attenuation in the detection of a 1.2 mm deep notch. The anisotropy of the dendritic structure in stainless steel renewed the interest in the effect of shear-wave polarization. In the (110) crystallographic orientation of stainless steel, two modes of shear waves can be generated, which have velocities differing by a factor of two. This effect may be helpful in ''tuning'' of shear waves by polarization to obtain better penetration in large grain materials such as welds

  4. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  5. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-01-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  6. Influence of sigma-phase formation on the localized corrosion behavior of a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhe, K.N.; Kain, V.; Madangopal, K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1996-01-01

    Because of their austenitic-ferritic microstructures, duplex stainless steels offer a good combination of mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. However, heat treatments can lower the mechanical strength of these stainless steels as well as render them susceptible to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and pitting corrosion. In this study, a low-carbon (0.02%) duplex stainless steel is subjected to various heat treatments at 450 to 950 C for 30 min to 10 h. The heat-treated samples than undergo ASTM IGC and pitting corrosion tests, and the results are correlated with the microstructures obtained after each heat treatment. In the absence of Cr 23 C 6 precipitation, σ-phase precipitates render this duplex stainless steel susceptible to IGC and pitting corrosion. Even submicroscopic σ-phase precipitates are deleterious for IGC resistance. Longer-duration heat treatments (at 750 to 850 C) induce chromium diffusion to replenish the chromium-depleted regions around the σ-phase precipitates and improve IGC resistance; pitting resistance, however, is not fully restored. Various mechanisms of σ-phase formation are discussed to show that regions adjacent to σ-phase are depleted of chromium and molybdenum. The effect of chemical composition (pitting resistance equivalent) on the pitting resistance of various stainless steels is also noted

  7. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  8. Enhancement of Stainless Steel's Mechanical Properties via Carburizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Alias, S. K.; Abdullah, B.; Hafiz Mohd Bakri, Mohd.; Hafizuddin Jumadin, Muhammad; Mat Shah, Muhammad Amir

    2016-11-01

    Carburizing process is a method to disperse carbon into the steel surface in order to enhance its mechanical properties such as hardness and wear resistance. This paper study investigates the effect of carburizing temperature to the carbon dispersion layer in stainless steel. The standard AISI 304 stainless steel was carburized in two different temperatures which were 900°C and 950°C. The effect of carbon dispersion layers were observed and the results indicated that the increasing value of the average dispersion layer from 1.30 mm to 2.74 mm thickness was found to be related to increment of carburizing holding temperature . The increment of carbon thickness layer also resulted in improvement of hardness and tensile strength of carburized stainless steel.

  9. Radiation-induced grain boundary segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Vetrano, J.S.; Simonen, E.P.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to grain boundaries in Fe-Ni-Cr-Si stainless alloys has been measured as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. Heavy-ion irradiation was used to produce damage levels from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures from 175 to 550 degrees C. Measured Fe, Ni, and Cr segregation increased sharply with irradiation dose (from G to 5 dpa) and temperature (from 175 to about 350 degrees C). However, grain boundary concentrations did not change significantly as dose or temperatures were further increased. Although interfacial compositions were similar, the width of radiation-induced enrichment or depletion profiles increased consistently with increasing dose or temperature. Impurity segregation (Si and P) was also measured, but only Si enrichment appeared to be radiation-induced. Grain boundary Si peaked at levels approaching 10 at% after irradiation doses to 10 dpa at an intermediate temperature of 325 degrees C. No evidence of grain boundary silicide precipitation was detected after irradiation at any temperature. Equilibrium segregation of P was measured in the high-P alloys, but interfacial concentration did not increase with irradiation exposure. Comparisons to reported RIS in neutron-irradiated stainless steels revealed similar grain boundary compositional changes for both major alloying and impurity elements

  10. Electrochemical Corrosion of Stainless Steel in Thiosulfate Solutions Relevant to Gold Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Wang, Wei; Alfantazi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the electrochemical corrosion behavior of stainless steel in the ammoniacal thiosulfate gold leaching solutions. Electrochemical corrosion response was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, while the semi-conductive properties and the chemical composition of the surface film were characterized using Mott-Schottky analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The morphology of the corroded specimens was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The stainless steel 316L showed no signs of pitting in the ammoniacal thiosulfate solutions.

  11. Substitution for chromium in 304 stainless steel. [effects on oxidation and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of substituting less strategic elements for Cr on oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of 33 percent. Two alloys containing 12% Cr plus 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified which exhibited oxidation and corrosion resistance comparable to AISI 304 stainless steel.

  12. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  13. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel with Ru and Ni mixtures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lekala, MB

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The surfaces of AISI 316L stainless steel were laser alloyed with ruthenium powder and a mixture of ruthenium and nickel powders using a cw Nd:YAG laser set at fixed operating parameters. The microstructure, elemental composition, and corrosion...

  14. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  15. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  16. Influence of sulphate ions on the composition and structure of the oxide films on stainless steel and nickel alloys in simulated BWR crack conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, E.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Toivonen, A.; Campbell, J.M.; Johansson, L.S.; Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A.; Ollonqvist, T.; Vaeyrynen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to clarify the influence of sulphate ions on the oxide films formed on stainless steel and Ni-based alloys in simulated crack chemistry conditions using different ex situ analytical techniques. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: The thickness of the films formed in simulated oxygen-free crack chemistry conditions during an exposure of circa 4 days varies roughly in the range 200..500 nm, which corresponds to observations reported in the literature [2]. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions in simulated crack tip conditions seems to lead to a considerably lower thickness of the oxide films when compared to sulphate-free conditions. The presence of 10000 ppb sulphate ions leads also to considerable changes in the morphology of the oxide crystals on the material samples. In the absence of sulphate the outer oxide layer contains elongated round-edged crystals, while in the presence of sulphate ions the crystals are longish and needle-like. No visible difference can be observed in the outlook of the crystals formed on stainless steel and Inconel alloy surfaces. A small amount of sulphur in the form of sulphate can be found on the oxide surface on all the studied materials after exposure to the 10000 ppb solution. Sulphur seems to become incorporated inside the oxide film on AISI 316 L(NG). It is not clear at this stage, whether the observed influence of the sulphate ions can be ascribed to the lower pH, to a possible effect on solubility or to a direct influence of the anionic species. (authors)

  17. Study of corrosion resistance of AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel for application as a biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rogerio Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are ferromagnetic materials. This property does not allow their use in orthopedic prosthesis. Nevertheless, in some specific applications, this characteristic is very useful, such as, for fixing dental and facial prostheses by using magnetic attachments. In this study, the corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of the AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel, with low nickel content, extra-low interstitial levels (C and N) and Ti and Nb stabilizers, were investigated for magnetic dental attachments application. The ISO 5832-1 (ASTM F-139) austenitic stainless steel and a commercial universal keeper for dental attachment (Neo-magnet System) were evaluated for comparison reasons. The first stainless steel is the most used metallic material for prostheses, and the second one, is a ferromagnetic keeper for dental prostheses (NeoM). In vitro cytotoxicity analysis was performed by the red neutral incorporation method. The results showed that the AISI 444 stainless steel is non cytotoxic. The corrosion resistance was studied by anodic polarization methods and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in a saline phosphate buffered solution (PBS) at 37 °C. The electronic properties of the passive film formed on AISI 444 SS were evaluated by the Mott-Schottky approach. All tested materials showed passivity in the PBS medium and the passive oxide film presented a duplex nature. The highest susceptibility to pitting corrosion was associated to the NeoM SS. This steel was also associated to the highest dopant concentration. The comparatively low levels of chromium (nearly 12.5%) and molybdenum (0.3%) of NeoM relatively to the other studied stainless steels are the probable cause of its lower corrosion resistance. The NeoM chemical composition does not match that of the SUS444 standards. The AISI 444 SS pitting resistance was equivalent to the ISO 5832-1 pointing out that it is a potential candidate for replacement of commercial ferromagnetic alloys used

  18. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  19. Growth of MWCNTs on Flexible Stainless Steels without Additional Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udomdej Pakdee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized on austenitic stainless steel foils (Type 304 using a home-built thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD under atmospheric pressure of hydrogen (H2 and acetylene (C2H2. During the growth, the stainless steel substrates were heated at different temperatures of 600, 700, 800, and 900°C. It was found that MWCNTs were grown on the stainless steel substrates heated at 600, 700, and 800°C while amorphous carbon film was grown at 900°C. The diameters of MWCNTs, as identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM images together with ImageJ software program, were found to be 67.7, 43.0, and 33.1 nm, respectively. The crystallinity of MWCNTs was investigated by an X-ray diffractometer. The number of graphitic walled layers and the inner diameter of MWCNTs were investigated using a transmission electron microscope (TEM. The occurrence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles associated with carbon element can be used to reveal the behavior of Fe in stainless steel as catalyst. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the growth and quality of MWCNTs. The results obtained in this work showed that the optimum heated stainless steel substrate temperature for the growth of effective MWCNTs is 700°C. Chemical states of MWCNTs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS using synchrotron light.

  20. Aluminum deoxidation equilibria and inclusion modification mechanism by calcium treatment of stainless steel melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, Sang Beom

    2005-01-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium between aluminum and oxygen along with the inclusion morphology in Fe-16%Cr stainless steel was investigated to understand the fundamentals of aluminum deoxidation technology for ferritic stainless steels. Further, the effects of calcium addition on the changes in chemistry and morphology of inclusions were discussed. The measured results for aluminum-oxygen equilibria exhibit relatively good agreement with the calculated values, indicating that the introduction of the first- and second-order interaction parameters, recently reported, is reasonable to numerically express aluminum deoxidation equilibrium in a ferritic stainless steel. In the composition of dissolved aluminum content greater than about 60 ppm, pure alumina particles were observed, while the alumino-manganese silicates containing Cr 2 O 3 were appeared at less than 20 mass ppm of dissolved aluminum. The formation of calcium aluminate inclusions after Ca treatment could be discussed based on the thermodynamic equilibrium with calcium, aluminum, and oxygen in the steel melts. In the composition of steel melt with relatively high content of calcium and low aluminum, the log(X CaO /X Al 2 O 3 ) of inclusions linearly increases with increasing the log [a Ca /a Al 2 ·a O 2 ] with the slope close to unity. However, the slope of the line is significantly lower than the expected value in the composition of steel melt with relatively low calcium and high aluminum contents

  1. Yield stress of duplex stainless steel specimens estimated using a compound Hall–Petch equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Hirota, Fuxing Yin, Tsukasa Azuma and Tadanobu Inoue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the 0.2% yield stress of duplex stainless steel was evaluated using a compound Hall–Petch equation. The compound Hall–Petch equation was derived from four types of duplex stainless steel, which contained 0.2–64.4 wt% δ-ferrite phase, had different chemical compositions and were annealed at different temperatures. Intragranular yield stress was measured with an ultra-microhardness tester and evaluated with the yield stress model proposed by Dao et al. Grain size, volume fraction and texture were monitored by electron backscattering diffraction measurement. The kγ constant in the compound equation for duplex stainless steel agrees well with that for γ-phase SUS316L steel in the temperature range of 1323–1473 K. The derived compound Hall–Petch equation predicts that the yield stress will be in good agreement with the experimental results for the Cr, Mn, Si, Ni and N solid-solution states. We find that the intragranular yield stress of the δ-phase of duplex stainless steel is rather sensitive to the chemical composition and annealing conditions, which is attributed to the size misfit parameter.

  2. Precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, M.; Yung-Shih Chen

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation reactions for commercial austenitic stainless steels (AISI type 347, 321, 316, 316L, 304 and 304L) and Ti-modified AISI type 316 SS were studied in the temperature range of 750 0 C-1350 0 C. Specimens were held at the temperature for 15 to 25 hours to ensure that equilibrium conditions were reached and followed by a water quench to prevent further precipitation reactions during cooling process. The precipitates were extracted from bulk specimens by anodic dissolution and identified by x-ray diffraction analysis. In Ti-stabilized 321 SS, large TiN and Ti 2 S (Ti 4 C 2 S2) precipitates were present in solution treated and subsequent annealed specimens. Small TiC precipitates were present in specimens annealed below 1150 0 C. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were found to be present after annealing at 850 0 C for 25 hours. The amount of M 23 C 6 was found to increase with decreased Ti content as shown in the Ti-motified 316 SS. In Nb-stabilized 347 SS, Nb(CN) precipitates were present in solution treated as well as annealed specimens. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were detected at an annealing temperature of 1050 0 C, which is higher than the precipitation temperature detected in 321 SS. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to obtain the temperature where precipitation starts, and the temperatures where 50, 90 and 99% of the precipitates should be formed. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the calculations. (orig.) [de

  3. Low stress creep of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, I.G.; Clay, B.D.; Baker, C.

    1976-06-01

    The creep of 20%Cr, 25%Ni, Nb stainless steel has been examined at temperatures from 675 to 775 0 C at sheer stressed below 13 MPa and grain sizes from 6 to 20μm. The results have indicated that the initial creep rates were linearly dependent upon stress but with a threshold stress below which no creep occurred, i.e. Bingham behaviour; in addition, the creep activation energy at small strains was substantially lower than the lattice self-diffusion value and the initial creep rates were approximately related to the grain size through an inverse cube relation. It has been concluded that at low strains (approaching the initial elastic deflection) the creep mechanism was probably that of grain boundary diffusion creep (Coble, 1963) and this is further supported by the close agreement between the observed and theoretically predicted creep rate values. Steady-state creep rates were not observed; initially the creep rates fell rapidly with strain after which a more gradual decrease occurred. Whilst the creep rate - stress relationship continued to be of a Bingham form, the progressive reduction in creep rate with strain was found to be mainly attributable to an increase in the effective viscosity, threshold stress effects being generally of secondary importance. A model has been proposed which explains the initial creep rates as being due to Cable creep with elastic accommodation at grain boundary particles. At higher strains grain boundary collapse caused by vacancy sinking is accommodated at precipitate particles by plastic deformation of the adjacent matrix material. (author)

  4. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  5. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  6. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, William H [ORNL; Lou, Xiaoyuan [General Electric (GE); List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Webber, David [General Electric (GE)

    2016-09-01

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainless steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.

  7. Boron effect on stainless steel plasticity under hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Kardonov, B.A.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of boron on plasticity of stainless steels at temperatures of hot deformation has been studied at three levels of alloying, i.e. 0-0.01% (micro-alloying or modifying), 0.01-0.02% (low alloying) and 0.02-2.0% (high alloying). Introduction of 0.001-0.005% of boron increases hot plasticity of both low and high carbon stainless steels due to decrease in grain size and strengthening of grain boundaries. Microalloying by boron has a positive effect at temperatures below 1200-1220 deg C. At higher temperatures, particularly when its content exceeds 0.008%, boron deteriorates plasticity by increasing the size of grains and weakening their boundaries. 0.1-2% boron strengthen the stainless steel and dectease its plasticity

  8. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  9. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1963-03-01

    High strength diffusionless bonds can be produced between 1S aluminum and oxidized 304 stainless steel by hot pressing and extrusion bonding. Both the hot pressing and extrusion bonding techniques have been developed to a point where consistently good bonds can be obtained. Although the bonding is performed at elevated temperatures (about 510 o C) a protective atmosphere is not required to produce strong bonds. The aluminum-stainless steel bonded specimens can be used to join aluminum and stainless steel by conventional welding. Welding close to the bond zone does not appear to affect the integrity of the bond. The extrusion bonding technique is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965 and the hot press bonding technique by Canadian patent application 904,548 June 6, 1964. (author)

  10. Silver deposition on stainless steel container surfaces in contact with disinfectant silver aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petala, M., E-mail: petala@civil.auth.gr [Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Tsiridis, V. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Mintsouli, I. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Pliatsikas, N. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Spanos, Th. [Department of Petroleum and Mechanical Engineering Sciences, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology, Kavala, 65404 (Greece); Rebeyre, P. [ESA/ESTEC, P.O.Box 299, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Darakas, E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Patsalas, P.; Vourlias, G. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece); Kostoglou, M.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Karapantsios, Th. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 54124 (Greece)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Silver is one of the biocides of water consumed in the International Space Station. • Ionic silver is depleted from potable water when in contact with stainless steel (SS). • SEM and XPS analysis reveal a uniform silver deposition over the SS surface. • Silver deposits in its metallic form, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. • Evidence is provided that Cr and/ or Ni oxide builds-up on SS surfaces. - Abstract: Silver is the preservative used on the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prevent microbial proliferation within potable water supplies. Yet, in the frame of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) missions to ISS, silver depletion from water has been detected during ground transportation of this water to launch site, thereby indicating a degradation of water quality. This study investigates the silver loss from water when in contact with stainless steel surfaces. Experiments are conducted with several types of stainless steel surfaces being exposed to water containing 10 or 0.5 mg/L silver ions. Results show that silver deposits on stainless steel surfaces even when a passivation layer protects the metallic surface. The highest protection to silver deposition is offered by acid passivated and electropolished SS 316L. SEM and XPS experiments were carried out at several locations of the sample area that was in contact with the Ag solution and found similar morphological (SEM) and compositional (sputter-etch XPS) results. The results reveal that silver deposits uniformly across the wetted surface to a thickness larger than 3 nm. Moreover, evidence is provided that silver deposits in its metallic form on all stainless steel surfaces, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. Combination of ICP-MS and XPS results suggests a mechanism for Ag deposition/reduction with simultaneous substrate oxidation resulting in oxide growth at the exposed stainless steel surface.

  11. Silver deposition on stainless steel container surfaces in contact with disinfectant silver aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petala, M.; Tsiridis, V.; Mintsouli, I.; Pliatsikas, N.; Spanos, Th.; Rebeyre, P.; Darakas, E.; Patsalas, P.; Vourlias, G.; Kostoglou, M.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Karapantsios, Th.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver is one of the biocides of water consumed in the International Space Station. • Ionic silver is depleted from potable water when in contact with stainless steel (SS). • SEM and XPS analysis reveal a uniform silver deposition over the SS surface. • Silver deposits in its metallic form, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. • Evidence is provided that Cr and/ or Ni oxide builds-up on SS surfaces. - Abstract: Silver is the preservative used on the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prevent microbial proliferation within potable water supplies. Yet, in the frame of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) missions to ISS, silver depletion from water has been detected during ground transportation of this water to launch site, thereby indicating a degradation of water quality. This study investigates the silver loss from water when in contact with stainless steel surfaces. Experiments are conducted with several types of stainless steel surfaces being exposed to water containing 10 or 0.5 mg/L silver ions. Results show that silver deposits on stainless steel surfaces even when a passivation layer protects the metallic surface. The highest protection to silver deposition is offered by acid passivated and electropolished SS 316L. SEM and XPS experiments were carried out at several locations of the sample area that was in contact with the Ag solution and found similar morphological (SEM) and compositional (sputter-etch XPS) results. The results reveal that silver deposits uniformly across the wetted surface to a thickness larger than 3 nm. Moreover, evidence is provided that silver deposits in its metallic form on all stainless steel surfaces, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. Combination of ICP-MS and XPS results suggests a mechanism for Ag deposition/reduction with simultaneous substrate oxidation resulting in oxide growth at the exposed stainless steel surface.

  12. Fabrication of Porous Stainless Steel 316L for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor F. Mat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous metals are very attractive materials for biomedical application as the physical and mechanical properties of these materials can be tailored similarly to the natural bone. In this work, porous stainless steel 316L has been fabricated by foam replication method. This method offers a lot of advantages including of easy processing technique, very economic, does not involve the use of toxic chemical and capable of producing porous structure that almost similar to natural bone. The porous stainless steel 316L (SS316L samples were prepared by varying the SS316L composition from 40 wt% to 60 wt%. Sintering process was carried out at 1250°C in a vacuum furnace. The microstructure and pore size were observed and determined through Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Archimedes method was used to measure the samples density, while compression test was carried out to determine the compressive strength and elastic modulus. The average pore size for samples with 50 wt% and 60 wt% SS316L are 268μm and 299μm respectively. Samples with 40 wt% SS316L experienced the largest shrinkage which is 33% while the sample with 60 wt% SS316L experienced the smallest shrinkage which is 21%. The density and porosity of the porous SS316L with 50 wt% SS316L are 0.43g/cm3 and 93.6% respectively, and for porous SS316L with 60 wt% SS316L are 0.69 g/cm3 and 89.2% respectively. The modulus of elasticity and compressive strength for porous SS316L with 60 wt% SS316L are 0.46 GPa and 56 MPa respectively. All these properties are in the range of the natural bone properties. Besides, the cytotoxicity test showed that this porous SS316L does not have a cytotoxic potential for biomedical implant.

  13. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  14. The use of titanium and stainless steel in fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Richards, R G

    2010-11-01

    The use of metal in fracture fixation has demonstrated unrivalled success for many years owing to its high stiffness, strength, biological toleration and overall reliable function. The most prominent materials used are electropolished stainless steel and commercially pure titanium, along with the more recent emergence of titanium alloys. Despite the many differences between electropolished stainless steel and titanium, both materials provide a relatively predictable clinical outcome, and offer similar success for fulfilling the main biomechanical and biological requirements of fracture fixation despite distinctive differences in implant properties and biological responses. This article explores these differences by highlighting the limitations and advantages of both materials, and addresses how this translates to clinical success.

  15. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  16. Failure of austenitic stainless steel tubes during steam generator operation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Głowacka; J. Łabanowski; S. Topolska

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: of this study is to analyze the causes of premature failure of steam generator coil made of austenitic stainless steel. Special attention is paid to corrosion damage processes within the welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Examinations were conducted several segments of the coil made of seamless cold-formed pipes Ø 23x2.3 mm, of austenitic stainless steel grade X6CrNiTi18-10 according to EN 10088-1:2007. The working time of the device was 6 months. The reason for the withdrawa...

  17. Corrosion of 316L stainless steels MAVL wastes containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, M.

    2003-01-01

    The long lived and medium activity wastes are conditioned or could be re-conditioned in primary drums of 316L stainless steels. In the framework of wastes storage, these drums will be placed in concrete containers; each containers would contain one or more drums. This document recalls global information on the corrosion of stainless steels, analyzes specific conditions bond to the drums conditioning in concrete containers and the nature of the wastes, and details the consequences on the possible risks of external and internal corrosion of the drums. (A.L.B.)

  18. Metal-ceramic interfaces: joining silicon nitride-stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, R.; De Pablos, A.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2004-11-01

    Joining of hot pressed silicon nitride using three types of stainless steel (AISI 304, 316 and 321) as interlayer was done by diffusion bonding at 1100 °C for 120 min. An extensive reaction zone of about 7 μm was formed in the contact region, where Cr2N, FexSiy and α-Fe were observed, outside that region the austenitic phase with precipitates of chromium nitride was observed. In the Mo-containing stainless steel (AISI 316) formation of Mo3Si was also detected. Moderate strengths were measured by shear testing for these joints.

  19. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  20. Intergranular stress corrosion in soldered joints of stainless steel 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress cracking of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, is a serious problem in BWR type reactors. It is associated with the simultaneous presence of three factors; stress, a critical media and sensibilization (DOS). EPR technique was used in order to verify the sensibilization degree in the base metal, and the zone affected by heat and welding material. The characterization of material was done. The objective of this work is the study of microstructure and the evaluation of EPR technique used for the determination of DOS in a welded plate of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. (Author)

  1. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  2. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  3. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From... duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/exporter of the subject... its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. See...

  4. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-588-833] Stainless Steel Bar From... order on stainless steel bar from Japan (the Order) covering the period February 1, 2010, through... Suruga to the Secretary, ``Stainless Steel Bar--Withdrawal of Request for Administrative Review,'' dated...

  5. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would... Publication 4280 (December 2011), entitled Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe from Korea and Taiwan...

  6. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  7. Preparation of high-performance ultrafine-grained AISI 304L stainless steel under high temperature and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bulk ultra-fine grained (UFG AISI 304L stainless steel with excellent mechanical properties was prepared by a high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP method using nanocrystalline AISI 304L stainless steel powders obtained from ball milling. Samples were sintered in high-pressure conditions using the highest martensite content of AISI 304L stainless steel powders milled for 25 h. Analyses of phase composition and grain size were accomplished by X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. By comparing the reverse martensite transformation under vacuum and HTHP treat, we consider that pressure can effectively promote the change in the process of transformation. Compared with the solid-solution-treated 304L, the hardness and yield strength of the samples sintered under HTHP are considerably higher. This method of preparation of UFG bulk stainless steel may be widely popularised and used to obtain UFG metallic materials with good comprehensive performance.

  8. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality control of stainless steel pipings for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Kitamura, Ichiro; Ito, Hisao; Sasaki, Ryoichi

    1979-01-01

    The proportion of nuclear power in total power generation is increasing recently in order to avoid the concentrated dependence on petroleum resources, consequently the reliability of operation of nuclear power plants has become important. In order to improve the reliability of plants, the reliability of each machine or equipment must be improved, and for the purpose, the quality control at the time of manufacture is the important factor. The piping systems for BWRs are mostly made of carbon steel, and stainless steel pipings are used for the recirculation system cooling reactors and instrumentation system. Recently, grain boundary type stress corrosion cracking has occurred in the heat-affected zones of welded stainless steel pipings in some BWR plants. In this paper, the quality control of stainless steel pipings is described from the standpoint of preventing stress corrosion cracking in BWR plants. The pipings for nuclear power plants must have sufficient toughness so that the sudden rupture never occurs, and also sufficient corrosion resistance so that corrosion products do not raise the radioactivity level in reactors. The stress corrosion cracking occurred in SUS 304 pipings, the factors affecting the quality of stainless steel pipings, the working method which improves the corrosion resistance and welding control are explained. (Kako, I.)

  10. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  11. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless......Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... calculations, made by use of the computer programme Thermo-Calc, were also correlated with the observed microstructure. Corrosion measurements by electrochemical techniques show no signs of intergranular corrosion in contrast to the case of AISI 316L based steel. Furthermore most of the material showed...

  12. Overview of the swelling behavior of 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The austenitic stainless steel designated as AISI 316 is currently being used as the major structural material for fast breeder reactors in the United States, Britain and France. Efforts are now underway in each country to optimize the swelling resistance of this alloy for further application to both fission and fusion power generating devices. The optimization effort requires knowledge of the factors which control swelling in order that appropriate compositional and fabricational modifications can be made to the alloy specification. The swelling data for this alloy are reviewed and the conclusion is reached that optimization efforts must focus on the incubation or transient regime of swelling rather than the post-transient or ''steady-state'' regime. Attempts to reduce the swelling of this steel by solute modification have focused on elements such as phosphorus and titanium. It is shown that the action of these solutes is manifested only in their ability to extend the transient regime. It is also shown that irradiation at high helium/dpa ratios does not appear to change the conclusions of this study. Another important conclusion is that small differences in reactor environmental history can have a larger influence than either helium or solutes. 31 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab

  13. Instrumental Neuron Activation Analysis for certification of stainless steel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polkowska-Motrenko, H.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Instrumental Neuron Activation Analysis (INAA) may contribute to improve the certification of the materials, especially in the case of minor and trace elements. In presented paper the INAA method of analysis of stainless steel materials has been elaborated. The obtained results were compared with those of common analytical techniques. The presented results show the usefulness of the INAA method for the certification of CRMs for the iron and steel industry

  14. Pitting Corrosion Susceptibility of AISI 301 Stainless Steel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions - 0.1M, 0.2M, 0.3M, 0.5M and 0.7M and 1.0M. Tensile tests and microscopic examinations were performed on samples prepared from the steel after exposure in the various environments.

  15. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304 and AISI 430 stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,Carlos Eduardo Reis de; Costa,Geraldo Magela da; Cota,André Barros; Rossi,Edson Hugo

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of AISI 304 and AISI 430 stainless steels was investigated from 1100 °C up to 1200 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy and x ray diffraction were used to access the phase composition of the formed scales. The main crystalline phases found in the oxidized materials at temperatures above 1100 °C were hematite and magnetite for AISI 430 steel, and hematite and a spinel-like phase for AISI 304 steel. Hematite was found to be the dominant oxide at lower temperatures, wher...

  16. Characterization of Stainless Steel Welding Fume Particles : Influence of Stainless Steel Grade, Welding Parameters and Particle Size

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Nanxuan

    2016-01-01

    Welding is a widely used method to join two pieces of stainless steel. Since it produces a large amount of fume during the process, it can cause adverse health effects. The welding fume particles contain many elements. Among them Cr, Mn and Ni are of concern. These three elements can cause diseases if inhaled by humans, especially Cr(VI). In this project, welding fume particles are collected during welding of different stainless steel grades (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex LDX2101). Furtherm...

  17. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304 and AISI 430 stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Reis de Carvalho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation behavior of AISI 304 and AISI 430 stainless steels was investigated from 1100 °C up to 1200 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy and x ray diffraction were used to access the phase composition of the formed scales. The main crystalline phases found in the oxidized materials at temperatures above 1100 °C were hematite and magnetite for AISI 430 steel, and hematite and a spinel-like phase for AISI 304 steel. Hematite was found to be the dominant oxide at lower temperatures, whereas magnetite preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation is smaller for AISI 430 steel in relation to AISI 304 steel in the range of studied temperatures, and therefore the AISI 430 steel is less resistant towards oxidation at high temperatures.

  19. Properties of super stainless steels for orthodontic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Young-Sik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-05-15

    Orthodontic stainless-steel appliances are considered to be corrosion resistant, but localized corrosion can occur in the oral cavity. This study was undertaken to evaluate the properties of super stainless steels in orthodontic applications. Accordingly, the metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, amount of the released nickel, cytotoxicity, and characteristics of the passive film were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the specimens were high and in the following order: super austenitic stainless steel (SR-50A) > super ferritic stainless steel (SFSS) = super duplex stainless steel (SR-6DX) > 316L SS > super martensitic stainless steel (SR-3Mo) in artificial saliva, 37 degrees C. At 500 mV (SCE), current densities of SR-50A, SFSS, SR-6DX, 316L SS, and SR-3Mo were 5.96 microA/cm(2), 20.3 microA/cm(2), 31.9 microA/cm(2), 805 microA/cm(2), and 5.36 mA/cm(2), respectively. Open circuit potentials of SR-50A, 316L SS, SR-6DX, SR-3Mo, and SFSS were - 0.2, - 0.22, - 0.24, - 0.43, and - 0.46 V (SCE), respectively. SR-50A, SFSS, and SR-6DX released below 3 ng/ml nickel for 8 weeks, and increased a little with immersion time, and 316L SS released about 3.5 ng/ml nickel, but SR-3Mo released a large amount of nickel, which increased with immersion time. The study demonstrated that SR-50A, SR-6DX, and SFSS have high corrosion resistance and mild or no cytotoxicity, due to the passive film enhanced by synergistic effect of Mo + N or by high addition effect of Cr + W. All super stainless steels showed very low cytotoxicity regardless of their nickel contents, although SR-3Mo was found to be relatively cytotoxic. From these studies, these steels are considered suitable for orthodontic applications. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  1. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  2. Effects of cerium on the compositional variations in and around inclusions and the initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion in hyperduplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Choi, Min-Seok; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Kwang-Tae; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Ce added alloy increased the pitting corrosion resistance. •Ce added alloy forms stable Ce oxides and decreases the area of microcrevice. •Cr-enriched zones were formed around Ce oxides with low Cr content. •Pitting corrosion of base alloy propagated from microcrevice to Cr oxides. •Pitting corrosion of Ce added alloy propagated not to stable Ce oxides but to matrix. -- Abstract: Ce addition to a hyperduplex stainless steel increased its resistance to pitting corrosion because of the formation of stable Ce oxides and a decrease in the area of microcrevices between the matrix and inclusions that act as pit initiation sites. In addition, Cr-enriched zones were formed around Ce oxides with low Cr content in the Ce added alloy. Pitting corrosion in the base alloy initiated at the microcrevice and propagated to Cr oxides, which deteriorated the pitting corrosion resistance. However, pitting corrosion in the Ce added alloy propagated not to the stable Ce oxides but to the matrix

  3. Immobilization of mesoporous silica particles on stainless steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqua, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.pasqua@unical.it [University of Calabria, Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering (Italy); Morra, Marco, E-mail: mmorra@nobilbio.com [Via Valcastellana 26 (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    A preliminary study aimed to the nano-engineering of stainless steel surface is presented. Aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica is covalently and electrostatically anchored on the surface of stainless steel plates. The anchoring is carried out through the use of a nanometric spacer, and two different spacers are proposed (both below 2 nm in size). The first sample is obtained by anchoring to the stainless steel amino functionalized, a glutaryl dichloride spacer. This specie forms an amide linkage with the amino group while the unreacted acyl groups undergo hydrolysis giving a free carboxylic group. The so-obtained functionalized stainless steel plate is used as substrate for anchoring derivatized mesoporous silica particles. The second sample is prepared using 2-bromo-methyl propionic acid as spacer (BMPA). Successively, the carboxylic group of propionic acid is condensed to the aminopropyl derivatization on the external surface of the mesoporous silica particle through covalent bond. In both cases, a continuous deposition (coating thickness is around 10 μm) is obtained, in fact, XPS data do not reveal the metal elements constituting the plate. The nano-engineering of metal surfaces can represent an intriguing opportunity for producing long-term drug release or biomimetic surface.

  4. Lithium wetting of stainless steel for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring continuous wetting of a solid container by the liquid metal is a critical issue in the design of liquid metal plasma facing components foreseen for NSTX-U and FNSF. Ultrathin wetting layers may form on metallic surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions if material reservoirs are present from which spreading and wetting can start. The combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ion beam etching capabilities of a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) have been used to study the spreading of lithium films on stainless steel substrates. A small (mm-scale) amount of metallic lithium was applied to a stainless steel surface in an argon glove box and transferred to the SAM. Native impurities on the stainless steel and lithium surfaces were removed by Ar+ ion sputtering. Elemental mapping of Li and Li-O showed that surface diffusion of Li had taken place at room temperature, well below the 181°C Li melting temperature. The influence of temperature and surface oxidation on the rate of Li spreading on stainless steel will be reported. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Resistance microwelding of 316L stainless steel wire to block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Khan, M.I.; Bay, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel coupled with its non-magnetic properties makes it ideal for biomedical applications. The typical joint geometry for microcomponents, such as medical implants, includes joining of fine wire to a larger block. However...

  6. Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by electropolymerized conducting polymer coating in 0·5 M NaCl solution. T DHANABAL, G AMIRTHAGANESAN. ∗ and J RAVICHANDRAN. Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya College of Arts and Science,.

  7. Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    The galvanostatic polymerization of pyrrole is carried out on stainless steel electrodes using .... polymerization. Figure 3b indicates that the essential peaks anticipated for SS substrates are noticed. 3.2 Characterization of Ppy coated SS. In order to test the feasibility ..... Jesus Lopez-Palacios 2006 Polymer degradation and.

  8. Monitoring of occupational exposure in manufacturing of stainless steel constructions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Bencko, V.; Pápayová, A.; Šaligová, D.; Tejral, J.; Borská, L.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2001), s. 171-175 ISSN 1210-7778 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : occupational exposure * stainless steel construction industry * instrumental neutron activation analysis Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines

  9. Pitting corrosion of low-Cr austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Albany Research Center has investigated the pitting corrosion resistance of experimental low-Cr stainless steels and several commercial stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous and atmospheric environments. Previous research had shown the experimental alloys to be as corrosion resistant as commercial stainless steels in chloride-free acid environments. The alloys studied were Fe-8Cr-16Ni-5.5Si-1Cu-(0-1)Mo, 304 SS, and 316 SS. These alloys were examined by immersion and electrochemical tests in 3.5 wt. pct. NaCl and 6 wt.pct.FeCl 3 . Results of these tests showed that the addition of one weight percent Mo improved the pitting resistance of the low-Cr alloy and that the Mo-containing experimental alloy was as resistant to pitting as the commercial alloys. Electrochemical tests did, however, show the experimental alloys to be slightly less resistant to pitting than the commercial alloys. Because of these results, the low-Cr alloy with one weight percent Mo and 304 SS were exposed for one year to a marine atmospheric environment on the coast of Oregon. The marine atmospheric corrosion resistance of the low-Cr alloy was found to be comparable to that for type 304 stainless steel

  10. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE present...

  11. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...

  12. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized, with ...

  13. Methane formation in tritium gas exposed to stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were performed to determine the effect cleanliness of a surface exposed to tritium gas had on methane formation. These tests performed on 304 stainless steel vessels, cleaned in various ways, showed that the methane formation was reduced by the use of various cleaning procedures

  14. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  15. Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosive medium. The low value of Rct for uncoated speci- men is due to the easy penetration of the corrosive chloride ions through stainless steel surface. The double layer capacitance (Cdl) of PoPD decreases to a lower value than that of PANi and uncoated specimen, indi- cating the thickening of the PoPD polymer film.

  16. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  17. Bending Behavior of Porous Sintered Stainless Steel Fiber Honeycombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shuiping; Wan, Zhenping; Lu, Longsheng; Tang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A novel porous honeycomb-type substrate has been developed using solid-state sintering stainless steel fibers. The porous sintered stainless steel fiber honeycombs (PSSSFH) are composed of a skeleton of sintered stainless steel fibers, three-dimensionally interconnected porous structures and multiple parallel microchannels. The bending behavior of the PSSSFH is investigated using three-point bending tests. Four stages, including an elastic stage, a yielding stage with a plateau, a hardening stage and a failure stage, are observed during the bending process of the PSSSFH. In the initial yielding stage, the bending forces increase slowly with displacement increasing, and then a yielding plateau follows, which is unique compared with other porous materials. Moreover, the structure parameters of the PSSSFH are varied to investigate the influence on the bending strength. It is determined that the multiple parallel microchannels can enhance the bending strength of porous stainless steel fiber sintered substrates (PSSFSS) and do not influence the variation trend of bending strength of PSSFSS with porosity increasing. The open ratio is conducive to increasing the bending strength, and the microchannel diameters ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm have little influence on the bending strength. In addition, both the increasing of sintering temperature and sintering time can strengthen the PSSSFH.

  18. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  19. Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The galvanostatic polymerization of pyrrole is carried out on stainless steel electrodes using -toluene sulphonic acid. The morphology of the film is studied from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements while the nature of the substrate is analysed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX) technique.

  20. Static friction of stainless steel wire rope–rubber contacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeve, A.J.; Krijger, T.; Mugge, W.; Breedveld, P.; Dodou, D.; Dankelman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about static friction of stainless-steel wire ropes ('cables') in contact with soft rubbers, an interface of potential importance for rigidifiable medical instruments. Although friction theories imply that the size and profile of the cables affect static friction, there are no

  1. Towards commercialization of fast gaseous nitrocarburising stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for fast and versatile low temperature nitrocarburising of stainless steel has recently been invented by the present authors. Selected results obtained with this new surface hardening process are presented. It is shown that it is possible to obtain a case thickness of 20 μm...

  2. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate me...

  3. Welding Characteristics of Nitrogen Added Stainless Steels for Nuclear Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. D. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co., Ltd, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Characteristics of properties and manufacturing process was evaluated in development of high strength and corrosion resistant stainless steel. The continuous cast structure of STS 316L was similar to that of STS 304. The most of residual {delta}-ferrite of STS 316L was vermicular type. The residual {delta}-ferrite content increased from the surface towards the center of the slab and after reaching a maximum value at about 50mm distance from surface and steeply decreased towards the center itself. Hot ductility of STS 304L and STS 316L stainless steels containing below 1000 ppm N was appeared to be reasonably good in the range of hot rolling temperature. In case of the steels containing over 1000 ppm N, the hot ductility was decreased rapidly when sulfur content of the steel was above 20 ppm. Therefore, to achieve good hot ductility of the high nitrogen containing steel, reduction of sulfur contents is required as low as possible. The inter granular corrosion resistance and impact toughness of STS 316L were increased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Yield strength and tensile strength of 304 and 316 stainless steels are increased linearly with increasing the nitrogen contents but their elongations are decreased with increasing the nitrogen contents. Therefore, the mechanical properties of these stainless steels could be controlled with variation of nitrogen. The effects of nitrogen on the resistance of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can be explained by improvement of the load bearing capacity with increasing tensile strength rather than inhibition of trans granular SCC crack generation and propagation. 101 refs., 17 tabs., 105 figs. (author)

  4. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  5. Materials Integrity Analysis for Application of Hyper Duplex Stainless Steels to Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyun Young; Park, Heung Bae; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Kwang Tae; Jhang, Yoon Young

    2010-01-01

    Hyper duplex stainless steels have been developed in Korea for the purpose of application to the seawater system of Korean nuclear power plants. This system supplies seawater to cooling water heat exchanger tubes, related pipes and chlorine injection system. In normal operation, seawater is supplied to heat exchanger through the exit of circulating water pump headers, and the heat exchanged sea water is extracted to the discharge pipes in circulating water system connected to the circulating water discharge lines. The high flow velocity of some part of seawater system in nuclear power plants accelerates damages of components. Therefore, high strength and high corrosion resistant steels need to be applied for this environment. Hyper duplex stainless steel (27Cr-7.0Ni-2.5Mo-3.2W-0.35N) has been newly developed in Korea and is being improved for applying to nuclear power plants. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of newly developed materials are quantitatively evaluated in comparative to commercial stainless steels in other countries. The properties of weld and HAZ (heat affected zone) are analyzed and the best compositions are suggested. The optimum conditions in welding process are derived for ensuring the volume fraction of ferrite(α) and austenite(γ) in HAZ and controlling weld cracks. For applying these materials to the seawater heat exchanger, CCT and CPT in weldments are measured. As a result of all experiments, it was found that the newly developed hyper duplex stainless steel WREMBA has higher corrosion resistance and mechanical properties than those of super austenitic stainless steels including welded area. It is expected to be a promising material for seawater systems of Korean nuclear power plants

  6. Influence of Silicon on Swelling and Microstructure in Russian Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated to High Neutron Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For some applications in fusion devices austenitic stainless steels are still considered to be candidates for use as structural components, but high neutron exposures must be endured by the steels. Operational experience of fast reactors in Western Europe, USA and Japan provides evidence of the possible use of austenitic steels up to ∼ 150 dpa. Studies aimed at improvement of existing Russian austenitic steels are being carried out in Russia. For improvement of irradiation resistance of Russian steels it is necessary to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for deterioration of steel properties. This understanding can be achieved by continuing detailed investigations of the microstructure of cladding steels after irradiation to high doses. By investigating the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure in neutron irradiated steels of different chemical composition one can study the effect of chemical variations on steel properties. Silicon is one of the most important chemical elements that strongly influence the behavior of austenitic steel properties under irradiation. In this paper results are presented of investigations of the effect of silicon additions on void swelling and microstructure of base austenitic stainless steel EI-847 (0.06C-16Cr-15Ni- 3Mo-Nb) irradiated as fuel pin cladding of both regular and experimental assemblies in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors to neutron doses up to 49 dpa. The possible mechanisms of silicon's effect on void swelling in austenitic stainless steels are presented and analyzed. (authors)

  7. Compatibility of stainless steel with Pb-17 AT. % Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The corrosion of type 316 stainless steel and Sandvik HT9 by static Pb-17 at. % Li between 300 and 500 0 C was studied. The resulting weight losses were significantly greater than those of these steels in lithium. The corrosive attack was very uniform, and the room-temperature tensile properties of the steels were unaffected by the exposure. The application of molten Pb-17 at. % Li as a tritium-breeding fluid in conjunction with ferrous alloys in a fusion reactor may be limited to 400 0 C or below

  8. Study to define NDE research for inspection of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhart, E.R.

    1978-08-01

    After the boiling water reactor (BWR) stress corrosion cracking incidents on 4- and 10-inch stainless steel piping, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) organized a round-robin ultrasonic examination of piping removed from service (TPS-75-609). Five inspection teams participated in this program, using both a standard procedure and the individual team procedure. The original intent was to section the piping after the program to evaluate the effectiveness of state-of-the-art ultrasonics in finding stress corrosion cracking. The sectioning was delayed, however, to allow research and development (R and D) groups time to perform basic measurements aimed at determining optimum search unit and instrument characteristics for the ultrasonic examination of stainless steel piping and to study the applicability of various advanced inspection methods. This additional effort was funded as part of an EPRI technical planning study (TPS-75-620), A Study to Define NDE Research for Inspection of Stainless Steels. Inspection methods evaluated in this study included (1) processing of manual scan data using a miniature programmable calculator (Aerojet Nuclear); (2) investigation into the performance characteristics of three experimental ultrasonic transducers (Battelle-Columbus Laboratories); (3) analysis of fundamental ultrasonic response data from intergranular stress corrosion cracks in stainless steels (Southwest Research Institute); and (4) a feasibility study of advanced signal processing and pattern recognition for analyzing flaws in stainless steel piping (Ultrasonics International). The results of the studies compiled in the report have indicated the direction for future research and development and have formed the basis for the recently initiated EPRI Research Project 892, Ultrasonic System Optimization

  9. Influence of Citric Acid on the Metal Release of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazinanian, N.; Wallinder, I. Odnevall; Hedberg, Y. S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Knowledge of how metal releases from the stainless steels used in food processing applications and cooking utensils is essential within the framework of human health risk assessment. A new European standard test protocol for testing metal release in food contact materials made from metals and alloys has recently been published by the Council of Europe. The major difference from earlier test protocols is the use of citric acid as the worst-case food simulant. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of citric acid at acidic, neutral, and alkaline solution pH on the extent of metal release for stainless steel grades AISI 304 and 316, commonly used as food contact materials. Both grades released lower amounts of metals than the specific release limits when they were tested according to test guidelines. The released amounts of metals were assessed by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and changes in the outermost surface composition were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that both the pH and the complexation capacity of the solutions affected the extent of metal release from stainless steel and are discussed from a mechanistic perspective. The outermost surface oxide was significantly enriched in chromium upon exposure to citric acid, indicating rapid passivation by the acid. This study elucidates the effect of several possible mechanisms, including complex ion- and ligand-induced metal release, that govern the process of metal release from stainless steel under passive conditions in solutions that contain citric acid.

  10. Initial assessment of the mechanisms and significance of low-temperature embrittlement of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Sather, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Metallurgical characterization and mechanical property data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests are presented for several experimental and commercial heats, as well as for reactor-aged CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M cast stainless steels. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast stainless steels are evaluated. Chemical composition and ferrite morphology strongly affect the extent and kinetics of embrittlement. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 stainless steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M stainless steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. The microstructural and mechanical-property data are analyzed to establish the mechanisms of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for low-temperature-aged cast stainless steel are defined. 39 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  11. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of various stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate new plant materials for their future applications to boiling water reactors (BWRs), the creviced bent beam SCC tests (CBB tests) were conducted on various sensitized stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water. The results obtained are as follows. 1. Field SCC can be easily reproduced by the CBB test using the specimens taken from the 304 stainless steel pipe weld joints. 2. The SCC susceptibility of 18Cr-11Ni stainless steel in oxygenated high temperature water decreases markedly with the reduction of the carbon content. 3. The SCC susceptibility of low carbon stainless steels (304L, 316L) and stabilized stainless steels (321, 347) is significantly lower than that of the 304 and 316 stainless steels. 4. The addition of molybdenum causes the sensitization of stainless steels to delay at lower temperatures, improving the SCC resistance of the weld joints of BWR pipe materials. (auth.)

  12. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  13. Study on Thermal Physical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dong; Jun-mao, Qie; Hao-hua, Deng

    The DIL402C thermal dilatometer and STA449C thermal analyzer were employed to test the linear expansion and contraction coefficient, CP and DSC curve of 304 stainless steel. The result showed that the linear expansion coefficient range was 20.9700×10-6˜21.5712×10-6 and the linear contraction coefficient range was 21.2528×10-6˜21.9471×10-6. The linear expansion and contraction coefficient were higher than other steel grade, so the 304 stainless steel belonged to the crack sensitive steel. Because of the crystal phase transformation occurred during the 1000˜1400 °C,the curve of CP fluctuated obviously and the defects of casting blank occurred easily. Chosen 1414°C as the liquidus temperature of 304 stainless steel based on the analysis results of DSC. The curve of DSC was unsmooth during 1450˜1100°C, the crystal phase transformation occurs and thermal stability of slab was inferior.When the initial solidified shell formed in this temperature range,the thickness of the shell would be nonuniform and the surface defects occurred more easily.

  14. Internal microporosity formation in stainless steel powders: kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.; Suwardijo, W.; Garcia, L.; Formoso, A.; Cores, A.

    2002-01-01

    The internal microporosity of stainless steel powders is obtained by a technology developed in the Metallurgical Research Center (CIME) in collaboration with ISPETP, which consists of carbon enrichment of alloy during the fusion process, and after powder atomization a subsequent decarburization annealing. The internal microporosity , which can reach up to 10 volume percent of the steel particle, reduces powder density and improves powder compressibility, while costs for technology installation are also reduced. In this paper the technology for obtaining the microporosity, the mathematical models of the process, and the structural transformations undergone by stainless steel powder are shown. It is concluded that for carbon contents lower than 0.05% internal microporosity tends to disappear. (Author) 17 refs

  15. Inorganic coatings on stainless steel for protection against crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, Sture

    1989-12-01

    In order to create protection against crevice corrosion stainless steel test specimens of type 316 steel with various inorganic coatings applied on crevice surfaces were tested for 3-50 months at 25 and 30 degree C in natural seawater containing 0.2-1.5 ppm free chlorine. Various metallic coatings, Ni base alloys with Cr and Mo, Ni with W, pure Ag and pure Mo, as well as ceramic coatings - Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - were studied. All the coatings tested, except pure Molybdenum applied by plasma spraying in a max 0.1 mm thick layer were found to promote crevice corrosion of the stainless steel. A significant reduction of the crevice corrosion susceptibility was obtained with Molybdenum. The result is considered promising enough to justify full scale tests in seawater on flange joints of pipes, valves or pumps. (author)

  16. Stainless steel valves with enhanced performance through microstructure optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, A. A.; Boukhattam, M.; Haggeney, M.; Güler, S.

    2017-08-01

    Compressor valves are made of hardened and tempered martensitic steels. The main design criterion for the material selection is the fatigue performance of the material under bending loads. In some cases impact loads and corrosive atmospheres additionally act on the part. For the first time, the microstructure of the most commonly used stainless steel and its influence on the properties relevant for flapper valves is presented and described in this paper. It is demonstrated how the tensile properties of a martensitic stainless steel can be enhanced by tailoring the microstructure. Electron back scatter diffraction method is carried out to explain the changes in monotonic mechanical properties. Through a modified heat treatment the martensite microstructure is refined resulting in an increase of yield and ultimate tensile strength and at the same time a significant increase of elongation.

  17. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Solidified Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktaş Çelik G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the family of stainless steels, cast austenitic stainless steels (CASSs are preferably used due to their high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. These steels owe their properties to their microstructural features consisting of an austenitic matrix and skeletal or lathy type δ-ferrite depending on the cooling rate. In this study, the solidification behavior of CASSs (304L and 316L grades was studied using ThermoCalc software in order to determine the solidification sequence and final microstructure during cooling. Theoretical findings were supported by the microstructural examinations. For the mechanical characterization, not only hardness measurements but also tribological studies were carried out under dry sliding conditions and worn surfaces were examined by microscopy and 3D profilometric analysis. Results were discussed according to the type and amount of microstructural features.

  18. Electrochemical evaluation of crevice corrosion in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyg, J.; Jargelius-Pettersson, R.F.A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical method for the evaluation of crevice corrosion in stainless steels is described. Specimens are carefully abraded in order to give a large number of microcrevices when the specimen is placed in contact with a rubber o-ring. Twelve specimens are tested simultaneously in a purpose-built electrochemical cell. A constant potential is applied to the specimens and the temperature automatically raised at intervals until a current increase indicates the onset of crevice corrosion and thereby defines the critical crevice corrosion temperature (CCT). Testing has been performed on a wide range of stainless steels in 3.5% NaCl at +700 mV SCE. The temperature was raised by 5 C every 70 minutes. Results show good reproducibility with a typical standard deviation of below 5 C. There is also excellent agreement with the ranking of crevice corrosion resistance for different steel grades which is obtained by immersion testing in 6% FeCl 3 solution. (orig.)

  19. Behaviour of steels in natural environments: focus on stainless steels in natural sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of steels and alloys in natural environments is not only dependent to material parameters and environmental chemistry, but also to micro-organisms which may be there. The global approach used to investigate the behaviour of alloys in natural environments is illustrated by the work done on stainless steels in seawater. In aerated seawater, studies led to the proposal of an 'enzymatic model' based on the enzymatic catalyze of the cathodic reaction and which allows reproducing the electrochemical behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater and the crevice corrosion phenomena observed in natural sea waters. Coupling areas under aerobic and anaerobic conditions leads to the worst situation for stainless steel behaviour: the catalysis of the cathodic reaction on aerobic exposed surfaces and the decrease of the corrosion resistance of anaerobic surfaces due to sulphides. These results lead to the concept of electro-active bio-films. (author)

  20. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  1. Listeria monocytogenes-carrying consortia in food industry. Composition, subtyping and numerical characterisation of mono-species biofilm dynamics on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Saá-Ibusquiza, Paula; Mosquera-Fernández, Maruxa; López-Cabo, Marta

    2015-08-03

    In order to find out how real Listeria monocytogenes-carrying biofilms are in industrial settings, a total of 270 environmental samples belonging to work surfaces from fish (n = 123), meat (n = 75) and dairy industries (n = 72) were analysed in order to detect L. monocytogenes. 12 samples were positive for L. monocytogenes and a total of 18 different species were identified as accompanying microbiota in fish and meat industry. No L. monocytogenes was found in samples from dairy industry. Molecular characterisation combining results of AscI and ApaI macrorestriction PFGE assays yielded 7 different subtypes of L. monocytogenes sharing in 71.43% of cases the same serogroup (1/2a-3a). Results from dynamic numerical characterisation between L. monocytogenes monospecies biofilms on stainless steel (SS) using MATLAB-based tool BIOFILMDIVER demonstrated that except in isolate A1, in which a significant increase in the percentage of covered area (CA), average diffusion distance (ADD) and maximum diffusion distance (MDD) was observed after 120 h of culture, no significant differences were observed in the dynamics of the rest of the L. monocytogenes isolates. Quantitative dual-species biofilm association experiments performed on SS indicated that L. monocytogenes cell counts presented lower values in mixed-species cultures with certain species at 24 and 48 h compared with mono-species culture. However, they remained unaltered after 72 h except when co-cultured with Serratia fonticola which presented differences in all sampling times and was also the dominant species within the dual-species biofilm. When considering frequency of appearance of accompanying species, an ecological distribution was demonstrated as Escherichia coli appeared to be the most abundant in fish industry and Carnobacterium spp. in meat industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stainless Steel Cladding Of Structural Steels By CO2 Laser Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, A.; Daurelio, G.; Arcamone, O.

    1989-01-01

    Steel cladding processes are usually performed in different ways: hot roll cladding, strip cladding, weld cladding, explosion forming. For the first time, a medium power (2 KW c.w.) CO2 laser was used to clad structural steels (Fe 37C), 3 and 5 mm thick, with austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and AISI 316), 0.5 and 1.5 mm thick. The cladding technique we have developed uses the laser penetration welding process.

  3. Physical and Tribological Properties of Nitrided AISI 316 Stainless Steel Balls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shicai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel balls (diameters 5.0 and 12.0 mm, typical hardness 250 HV0.3 and flat samples (20×20×2.0 mm were nitrided by a pulsed glow discharge Ar/N2 plasma. Hardness of the ball surfaces was analysed using Vickers indentation. Thermal stability of the nitrided balls (diameter 12.0 mm was studied using a furnace to heat them in air for 8 hours at temperatures up to 700.0°C and then, after cooling to room temperature, the surface hardness of the heated balls was re-measured. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to study the microstructures, composition and phase formation of the nitrided sublayers. Unlubricated pin-on-disc wear testing was used to evaluate the wear resistance of nitrided stainless steel balls (5.0 mm diameter and the results were compared with similar testing on hardened Cr-Steel balls (5 mm diameter with hardness of about 650 HV0.3. All the test results indicated that the nitrided AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel balls have advantages over the hardened Cr-Steel balls in terms of retaining high hardness after heat treatment and high resistance to sliding wear at room temperature under higher counterpart stress. These properties are expected to be beneficial for wide range of bearing applications.

  4. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Busby, Jeremy T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  5. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  6. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  7. Grain boundary chromium concentration effects on the IGSCC and IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Arey, B.W.; Charlot, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Comparisons are made between grain boundary composition and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of 304 and 309 austenitic stainless steels in high-temperature water environments. Chromium depletion had the dominant effect on cracking resistance with the extent of IG cracking controlled by the interfacial chromium concentration. The minimum chromium concentration required to promote cracking was a function of the applied strain rate during slow-strain-rate tensile tests in 288 C air-saturated water. Depletion from bulk levels of 18 wt% to ∼13.5 wt% Cr at grain boundaries prompted 100% IG cracking at a strain rate of 1 x 10 -6 s -1 , while embrittlement was observed with only a slight depletion to ∼17 wt% at 2 x 10 -7 s -1 . Insights into critical interfacial compositions promoting IGSCC are discussed in reference to cracking of irradiated stainless steel nuclear reactor core components

  8. High specialty stainless steels and nickel alloys for FGD dampers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herda, W.R.; Rockel, M.B.; Grossmann, G.K. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany); Starke, K. [Mannesmann-Seiffert GmbH, Beckum (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Because of process design and construction, FGD installations normally have bypass ducts, which necessitates use of dampers. Due to corrosion from acid dew resulting from interaction of hot acidic flue gases and colder outside environments, carbon steel cannot be used as construction material under these specific conditions. In the past, commercial stainless steels have suffered by pitting and crevice corrosion and occasionally failed by stress corrosion cracking. Only high alloy specialty super-austenitic stainless steels with 6.5% Mo should be used and considered for this application. Experience in Germany and Europe has shown that with regard to safety and life cycle cost analysis as well as providing a long time warranty, a new specialty stainless steel, alloy 31--UNS N08031--(31 Ni, 27 Cr, 6.5 Mo, 0.2 N) has proven to be the best and most economical choice. Hundreds of tons in forms of sheet, rod and bar, as well as strip (for damper seals) have been used and installed in many FGD installations throughout Europe. Under extremely corrosive conditions, the new advanced Ni-Cr-Mo alloy 59--UNS N06059--(59 Ni, 23 Cr, 16 Mo) should be used. This paper describes qualification and workability of these alloys as pertains to damper applications. Some case histories are also provided.

  9. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  10. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-05-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  11. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  12. Effects of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coatings on 304 stainless steel by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Zhai, Yong-Jie; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Yao

    2015-11-01

    Laser clad Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating on 304 stainless steel were heat treated at 600 °C (stress relief annealing) for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Effects of the phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness, nano-indentation and tribological properties of the composite coatings with and without heat treatment had been investigated systemically. Results indicated that three coatings mainly consist of the matrix γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution, the CrB ceramic phases and the h-BN lubricating phases. The maximum microhardness of the coatings was first increased from 667.7 HV0.5 to 765.0 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 1 h, and then decreased to 698.3 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 2 h. The hardness of γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution without heat treatment and after heat treatment 1 h and 2 h were 5.09 GPa, 7.20 GPa and 3.77 GPa, respectively. Compared with the coating without heat treatment, the friction coefficients of the coating after heat treatment were decreased obviously. Effects of the heat treatment time on friction coefficient were negligible, but were significant on wear volume loss. Comparatively speaking, the laser clad self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating after heat treatment for 1 h presented the best anti-wear and friction reduction properties.

  13. On the kinetics of martensite formation in a duplex stainless steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have been made of the kinetics of martensite transformation in a duplex stainless steel of composition 21Cr-6.6Ni, 2.5M0, 1.6Cu, <.0.03C (wt.%) Solution treatment at 1050οC for 1 hr was followed by deformation at the subzero temperatures of –70 and –196οC. The kinetics of the γ → α1 transformation in the duplex ...

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Additive Manufactured Layered Materials, Part 2: Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    stainless steel alloys produced with Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) was measured and is compared to that of similar conventional materials...and aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). in Light Metal Alloys Applications, Monteiro (ed.), InTech ISBN 978-953-51-1588-5. [4] Krishnan M...titanium alloys fabricated by additive layer manufacturing techniques for dental implants. Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A 2013; (44A

  15. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  16. Microstructural morphology and stability of rapidly solidified duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvijovic, Z.M.; Mihajlovic, D.V.; Knezevic, V.R. [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy

    1998-10-01

    The microstructure susceptibility of duplex stainless steel alloy with high ratio of Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} to unequilibrium solidification conditions were studied after rapid solidification. Three methods of locally surface melting were used: stationary gas tungsten arc, plasma arc and electron beam arc melting. Applying relatively high cooling rates in the range from 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 3} Cs{sup -1} and undercooling of 1.5-13 C, the primary ferrite with second-phase austenite (FA) solidification mode was unchanged, but significant changes in microstructure morphology, such as intercellular austenite, very fine microstructural constituents and increase of volume fraction of retained ferrite were observed. At the critical cooling rate of the order of 10{sup 4} Cs{sup -1} and undercooling {Delta}T>75 C a transformation of solidification mode from FA to single-phase ferrite (F) and developing of ferrite grain structure with Widmanstaetten austenite was demonstrated. Based on these results the partitionless solidification of ferrite and undercooling below the ferrite T{sub 0} curve was suggested. The fact that ferritic solidification was favored, was explained by the chemical composition of the alloy. During the subsequent annealing the obtained microstructures were highly unequilibrium and hence unstable. (orig.) 19 refs.

  17. Austenitic and duplex stainless steels in simulated physiological solution characterized by electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijan, Aleksandra; Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    A study of oxide layers grown on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel in simulated physiological solution is presented here in order to establish the possibility of replacement of AISI 316 L with 2205 DSS in biomedical applications. The results of the potentiodynamic measurements show that the extent of the passive range significantly increased for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L stainless steel. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate electrochemical processes taking place on the steel surfaces. Oxide layers formed by electrochemical oxidation at different oxidation potentials were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their compositions were analyzed as a function of depth. The main constituents on both the investigated materials were Cr- and Fe-oxides. Atomic force microscopy topography studies revealed the higher corrosion resistance of the DSS 2205 compared to the AISI 316L under the chosen experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  19. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  20. Hydrogen induced plastic deformation of stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadgil, V.J.; Keim, Enrico G.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen can influence the behaviour of materials significantly. The effects of hydrogen are specially pronounced in high fugacities of hydrogen which can occur at the surface of steels in contact with certain aqueous environments. In this investigation the effect of high fugacity hydrogen on the

  1. Effect of Austenite Stability on Pack Aluminizing of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christopher; Kvryan, Armen; Kasnakjian, Shahan; Coronado, Armando; Sujittosakul, Sutine; Villalpando, Obed; Ravi, Vilupanur A.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were applied to the surfaces of several austenitic stainless steels—UNS S30300, S30400, S30900, S31000, and S31600 (Type 303, 304, 309, 310, and 316)—by the halide activated pack cementation process. The coating compositions, microstructures, and hardness were determined for the different steels coated at 850°C for 25 h. The stability of the austenite phase for each type of steel was calculated by determining the ratio of the nickel to the chromium equivalents based on their nominal compositions. The thickness of the inner diffusion zone in the coating was shown to be inversely related to the austenite stability of the steels. Microhardness measurements were obtained across the coating thickness and into the substrate. The hardness values followed the same trends as the aluminum composition profile into the substrate.

  2. Infrared electro-thermal NDE of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.R.; Hassberger, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Electro-thermal examination, a branch of thermal testing, is a promising method being developed for nondestructive examination of stainless steel welds. This paper describes the first phase of development; i.e., preliminary demonstration and laboratory evaluation of the method's sensitivity to notches in Type 304 stainless steel plate specimens. It also includes a description of the basic principles, together with a description of the hardware and experimental results showing that electrical discharge machined notches down to 0.16 cm long x 0.08 cm deep were detected. A qualitative technique for interpreting the test results to determine whether defects are at the surface or deeper within the material is demonstrated

  3. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400 0 C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not α'. An FCC phase, similar to the M 23 C 6 precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  4. PITTING CORROSION OF STAINLESS STEEL AT THE VARIOUS SURFACE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Zatkalíková

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The stainless steel surface treatment is very important with regard to its pitting corrosion susceptibility. An effect of various types surfacing on pitting corrosion resistance of AISI 304stainless steel is investigated in this work. The samples of the tested material are turned, blasted, peened, grinded and a half of them are pickled to achieve higher purity of surfaces and better quality of passive film. Eight types of different finished surfaces are tested by electrochemical and immersion tests to determine corrosion behaviour in conditions where pitting is evoked by controlled potential and second by solution with high redox potential. By this way the effect of mechanical and chemical surface treatment on the resistance to pitting corrosion, character, size and shape of pits are compared in the conditions of different mechanisms of corrosion process.

  5. Multilayer modelling of stainless steel with a nanocrystallised superficial layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J. [Laboratoire Energetique Mecanique Electromagnetisme (LEME), EA4416, Universite Paris Ouest, 92410 Ville d' Avray (France); Waltz, L., E-mail: laurent.waltz@univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil de Montpellier (LMGC), University of Montpellier II, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34000 Montpellier (France); Montay, G.; Retraint, D.; Roos, A.; Francois, M. [Institut Charles Delaunay - LASMIS, UMR CNRS 6279, University of Technology of Troyes, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2012-02-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SMAT has been used for nanocrystallisation of an austenitic stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical response of the nano-phase has been obtained by an indirect method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minimisation of a stress formulated objective function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model predicts the strain at which diffuse necking occurs. - Abstract: In order to obtain the macroscopic mechanical response of a 316L stainless steel, nanocrystallised by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT), a multilayer model is proposed. The constitutive behaviour of each layer is determined from tensile tests or by an inverse method and its thickness is evaluated from Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM) analyses and local hardness measurements. The consistency of the model is verified by its ability to predict the strain at which diffuse necking occurs.

  6. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  7. Magnetic properties of the austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2002-01-01

    The magnetization was measured for the austenitic stainless steel of SUS304, SUS304L, SUS316, and SUS316L with the temperature from 5K to 300K and the magnetic field from 0T to 10T. The field dependences of the magnetizations changed at about 0.7T and 4T. The dependence was analyzed with ranges of 0-0.5T, 1-3T, and 5-10T. There was not so much difference between those stainless steels for the usage at small fields and 300 K. The SUS316 and SUS316L samples showed large non-linearity at high fields and 5K. Therefore, SUS304 was recommended for usage at high fields and low temperatures to design superconducting magnets with the linear approximation of the field dependence of magnetization

  8. Finite Element Modelling of Cold Formed Stainless Steel Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Macdonald

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results obtained from a finite element investigation into the load capacity of column members of lipped channel cross-section, cold formed from Type 304 stainless steel, subjected to concentric and eccentric compression loading. The main aims of this investigation were to determine the effects which the non-linearity of the stress-strain behaviour of the material would have on the column behaviour under concentric or eccentric loading. Stress-strain curves derived from tests and design codes are incorporated into non-linear finite element analyses of eccentrically loaded columns and the results obtained are compared with those obtained on the basis of experiments on stainless steel channel columns with the same properties and dimensions. Comparisons of the finite element results and the test results are also made with existing design specifications and conclusions are drawn on the basis of the comparisons. 

  9. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  10. High temperature damage of a re-sulfurized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinet, Hougo

    2002-01-01

    After having evoked the industrial problem raised by high-temperature damage in the 303 stainless steel, and outlined that the experimental study of high-temperature damage implies the study of the sane (or non damaged) material, the study of micro-voids germination, growth and coalescence, and the study of the material failure process, the author of this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on the behaviour of sane re-sulfurized stainless steel and different damage models. He presents experimental techniques (thermal-mechanical compression and tensile tests, image analysis in optical microscopy) which have been used in this work, and describes and comments results obtained on axisymmetric samples for micro-void germination, growth and coalescence in case of a damage under low and medium stress triaxiality. The last part addresses the study of the damage of strongly notched samples (stress triaxialities close to those existing at the crack bottom) [fr

  11. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan; Amin, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving ≥ 90% efficiencies

  12. Evaluation of Cutting Fluids in Multiple Reaming of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter; Zeng, Z.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2001-01-01

    An investigation on the effect of different cutting fluids in reaming is presented. The performance of three water based cutting fluids and one cutting oil was compared to that of a reference water based commercial product by measurement of cutting forces, surface roughness and part accuracy. Three...... subsequent reaming operations were carried out on austenitic stainless steel using high-speed-steel and solid carbide tools. The tested fluids were all significantly different from the reference fluid in at least some of the tested conditions. Significant differences down to 2 percent in cutting forces and 6...

  13. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  14. Cryogenic properties of austenitic stainless steels for superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, K.; Kato, T.; Ono, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the magnetic and mechanical properties of a variety of austenitic stainless steels and high maganese steel which are candidate materials for the superconducting magnet attached to high energy particle accelerators. The effect of a specified heat treatment for the precipitation of intermetallic compound Nb3Sn to be used as superconductor on ductility and toughness are especially examined. It is found that nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels have high strength and good ductility and toughness, but that these are destroyed by precipitation treatment. The poor ductility and toughness after precipitation are caused by a weakening of the grain boundaries due to the agglomerated chromium carbide percipitates. The addition of vanadium suppresses this effect by refining the grain. Austenitic steels are found to have low magnetic permeabilities and Neel temperatures, and show serrated flow in traction test due to strained martensitic transformation. High manganese steel has extremely low permeability, a Neel temperature about room temperature, and has a serrated flow in traction test due to adiabatic deformation at liquid helium temperature

  15. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Bin; Li, D Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Davis, Elisabeth M; Irvin, Randall T [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H7 (Canada); Hodges, Robert S [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at Fitzsimons, RC1 South Tower, Room 9121, PO Box 6511 MS 8101, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)], E-mail: dongyang@ualberta.ca

    2008-08-20

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force.

  16. Electrochemical testing of passivity state and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On low interstitial - supermartensitic stainless steels (X1CrNiMo 12-5-1, X2CrNiMo 13-6-2, X1CrNiMo 12-6-2 the electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the passive state stability and localized corrosion resistance were compared and evaluated. The effect of quenching and tempering as well as the changes in microstructure on polarisation curves and corrosion properties at room temperature were established. Small differences in chemical composition of steels were also registered on their corrosion parameters changes and resistance.

  17. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties of selected austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Oršulová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are materials, that are widely used in various fields of industry, architecture and biomedicine. Their specific composition of alloying elements has got influence on their deformation behavior. The main goal of this study was evaluation of magnetic properties of selected steels, caused by plastic deformation. The samples were heat treated in different intervals of temperature before measuring. Then the magnetic properties were measured on device designed for measuring of magnetism. From tested specimens, only AISI 304 confirmed effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties. Magnetic properties changed with increasing temperature.

  18. Effect of cold working on nitriding process of AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Silvio Andre de Lima

    2012-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steel was studied by different cold work degree before nitriding processes. The microstructure, thickness, microhardness and chemical micro-composition were evaluated through optical microscopy, microhardness, scanner electronic microscopy and x ray diffraction techniques. Through them, it was observed that previous plastic deformations do not have influence on layer thickness. However, a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. In addition, two different layers can be identified as resulted of the nitriding, composed for austenitic matrix expanded by nitrogen atoms and another thinner immediately below expanded by Carbon atoms. (author)

  19. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  20. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  1. Martensite transformations influence in austenite stainless steel fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, H.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1976-07-01

    The influence of martensitic transformation on the fracture of tensile specimens of type AISI 310, and type 302, stainless steels was studied in the temperature interval from 25 0 C to -196 0 C. The influence of the metastability through the amount and rate of martensite transformation leading to high stresses and work hardening, apparently explains the brittle characteristics observed in the fracture of type 302 alloy as well as its ductile nature at -196 0 C [pt

  2. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...... of mixed substitutional– interstitial atom clusters or coherent nitride platelets in nitrogen-expanded austenite is discussed....

  3. Versatility of superaustenitic stainless steels in marine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latha, G.; Rajeswari, S.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of construction materials in marine applications is a major problem. The frequent variations in chloride ion concentration and temperature experienced by a system pose a serious threat. This investigation evaluated the performance of superaustenitic stainless steels in marine applications by potentiodynamic anodic polarization studies. The concentrations of metal ions such as iron, chromium, and nickel at different impressed potentials were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, which revealed little tendency for leaching of metal ions

  4. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  5. Internal frictions of austenitic stainless steels at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubono, K.; Owa, S.; Mio, N.; Akasaka, N.; Hirakawa, H.

    Internal frictions were measured for three types of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, 310S and 316, in the temperature range 4-300 K. The intrinsic friction is presented in terms of the quality factor of a 20 kHz eigenmode vibration of discs made from each material. Temperature dependence is also given for the resonant frequency of each disc. These mechanical properties show some peculiarities at low temperature.

  6. Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    commercial 304 grade stainless steel (SS) foil. (thickness: 0⋅2 mm) was used as the substrate for. H2O2 reduction. A solution of 0⋅5 M NaClO4. (pH = 5⋅8) was .... oxide layers, unlike mediation of the reduction by. CuO present on Cu. A mechanism involving decomposition (or dis- proportionation) of H2O2 leading to the ...

  7. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... without drain boards, whether finished or unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or grade of... the stainless steel, and then welding and finishing the vertical corners to form the bowls. Stainless...

  8. 75 FR 81966 - Top of the Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Sunset...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Sunset Reviews and Revocation of... reviews of the antidumping and countervailing duty orders on top of the stove stainless steel cooking ware... the stove stainless steel cooking ware from Korea includes all non-electric cooking ware of stainless...

  9. 78 FR 7395 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-533-810] Stainless Steel Bar From... steel bar (SSB) from India. The period of review (POR) is February 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012... Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Stainless Steel Bar from India'' dated...

  10. 78 FR 4383 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From... steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. The period of review (POR) is February 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012... Review: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil'' dated concurrently with this notice (``Preliminary Decision...

  11. Corrosion produced failures in valves made of micro-melted stainless steel. Valve disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuin, G.; Alanis, I.; Berardo, L.

    1991-01-01

    Cast stainless steels show different metallographic structure than equivalent laminated steels where the former presents good resistance in media containing chlorides. In the present work, an analysis is made of the causes for the fracture of an AISI 316 micro-melted stainless steel disk for a valve in a cleaning agents feeding circuit in a food processing plant. (Author) [es

  12. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... steel welds, the original version of this guide, Safety Guide 31, ``Control of Stainless Steel Welding... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld.... Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing a revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of...

  13. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  14. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M

    1992-01-01

    A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G. Environm......A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G....... Environmental monitoring of welding fumes and selected metal oxides, biomonitoring of chromium and nickel in serum and urine and mutagenic activity in urine, and evaluation of semen quality were also done. Manual metal arc (MMA) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were the dominant welding processes...... lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding...

  15. Stainless steel and polyethylene surfaces functionalized with silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, José Fq; Naves, Emiliane Aa; Bernardes, Patrícia C; Ferreira, Deusmaque C; Dos Anjos, Letícia D; Gelamo, Rogério V; de Sá, João Pn; de Andrade, Nélio J

    2018-01-01

    The antimicrobial effects of a stainless steel surface and a polyethylene surface functionalized with silver nanoparticles on the adhesion of different bacteria and the changes in physical and chemical characteristics of these surfaces that influence biofilm formation were evaluated. The functionalized surfaces of polyethylene and stainless steel were more hydrophobic than the control ones. The bacterial surfaces were hydrophilic. The adhesion of all bacteria was thermodynamically favorable (ΔG adhesion functionalized and control. The numbers of adhered cells of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas fluorescens were not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the control and functionalized surfaces, reaching values compatible with biofilm formation. Analysis of atomic absorption spectrometry using water and reconstituted skim milk as simulants showed no release of Ag from the functionalized surfaces. In conclusion, the surfaces that were functionalized with silver nanoparticles were modified in hydrophobicity, roughness, and did not avoid bacterial adhesion. Additional studies of surfaces functionalized with silver nanoparticles should be conducted addressing the adsorption technique of silver nanoparticles on the stainless steel surface as well as in the preparation of the polyethylene surface to allow the contact of microorganism with the antimicrobial agent.

  16. Effect of dual torch technique on duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Z.; Kuo, M.; Annergren, I.; Pan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are characterized by balanced ferrite/austenite microstructures and are well known for their superior corrosion resistance and higher strength compared with the common austenitic stainless steels. One major concern, however, is that welding might degrade the corrosion resistance by producing unbalanced phase content, detrimental precipitates, and possible embrittlement of the weldment. In this paper, a dual-torch arc welding technique (plasma torch followed by a gas tungsten arc (GTA) torch) was proposed. Effects of the dual-torch technique on the microstructural changes and corrosion properties were investigated. The preliminary study indicated that a correlation between the welding parameters and the microstructural changes and corrosion resistance existed. It was found that the corrosion rate increases with increasing torch pitch and/or decreasing GTA welding current. By adjusting the distance between the torches, modification of weld microstructure may be realized. Although further studies are required to fine-tune the technique, the present study demonstrated the potential of using dual torch technique to improve weldability of duplex stainless steels

  17. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  18. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  20. The repair of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Gurbuz, Taskin; Eyuboglu, Ozge; Belduz, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    This study's purposes were to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) for and to perform dye penetration (microleakage) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations of preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns (SSCs) that were repaired using 2 different materials. Twenty-two crowns were used. They were stored in artificial saliva for 30 days and then thermocycled. A force was applied on the crowns' occlusal surfaces until the original veneer material appeared to be fractured. The fracture types and S8S values were recorded. The crowns were then repaired using Panavia opaque cement and Tetric Flow or Monoopaque and Tetric Flow. Twenty of the repaired crowns were subjected to dye penetration and SBS tests, and the remaining 2 were evaluated using SEM. Statistical analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in the results of either the S8S or the dye penetration test (P = .58 and P = 38, respectively). A statistically significant difference was found between original and repaired crowns regarding fracture extent (P = .02), but not failure type (P = .08). SEM evaluation showed that there was no observable gap at the interface of the original or repaired materials and the stainless steel base. Preveneered posterior stainless steel crowns may be repaired using either repair material types tested here.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  2. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction

  3. A morphological evaluation of a duplex stainless steel processed by high energy Ball Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekubo, Ariane Emi; Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Aguiar, Denilson Jose Marcolino de; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2009-01-01

    The duplex stainless steels are formed by a ferrite and austenite mixture, giving them a combination of properties. Commercially, these steels are hot rolled, developing an anisotropic, alternated ferrite and austenite elongated lamellae microstructure. In this work, a duplex stainless steel was produced by the mixture of elementary powders with the composition Fe-19.5Cr-5Ni processed in an ATTRITOR ball mill during periods up to 15 hours. The powders obtained were compressed in specimens and were heat treated in the temperatures of 900, 1050 and 1200 °C during 1 hour and analysed by x ray diffraction, optic microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy. An optimized microstructure with ultrafine, equiaxial and regular duplex microstructure was obtained in the 15 hour milling and 1200 °C heat treatment. Afterwards, a commercially super duplex stainless steel UNS S32520 was aged at 800 °C aiming the precipitation of σ phase in order to reduce its toughness and then, milled in SPEX mill. The resulting microstructure was a very fine duplex type with irregular grain boundary morphology duo to the grain growth barrier promoted by the renascent σ phase particles during sintering process. (author)

  4. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl - ). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure

  5. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  6. Modification of the surfaces of stainless steel during titanium nitride deposition by a dynamic mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Tamura, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Horiguchi, Motohiro; Nakaiwa, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Takashi; Akamatsu, Katsuya; Nakao, Kazuyoshi

    2000-05-01

    Surfaces of stainless steel SUS304 were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 770°C using a dynamic mixing technique. The N+ ions were accelerated at energies of 0.5-2.0 keV, and were implanted into the stainless steel. The composition of the prepared TiN films was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with He ions at an energy of 2.0 MeV. Intermediate layers containing compounds such as FesNq, Cr2N, and CrFe were formed between the TiN films and substrates at substrate temperatures higher than 700°C. The thickness of the TiN films decreased significantly when the intermediate layers were formed.

  7. Measurement and tailoring of residual stress in expanded austenite on austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2017-01-01

    Expanded austenite on stainless steel with a high interstitial nitrogen content is characterized by elasto-plastic accommodation of the large composition-induced lattice expansion leading to huge compressive residual stress. The elasto-plastic accommodation as well as the (steep) concentration...... profile has implications for the measurement strategy to determine lattice strains and associated residual stresses with X-ray diffraction. Lattice strain measurements were performed on nitrided as well as subsequently de-nitrided expanded austenite on AISI 316L stainless steel, for various grazing...... incidence angles. It is demonstrated that keeping the information depth constant by choosing appropriate combinations of grazing incidence and tilt angle leads to reliable results for the 111 reflection, while the 200 reflection should be avoided. Further, it is shown for the first time that the residual...

  8. Wear resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to low temperature plasma carburizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Barcelos

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the AISI 304 stainless steel has high corrosion/oxidation resistance, its tribological properties are poor, being one of the barriers for use in severe wear applications. Thus, there is a wide field for studying technologies that aim to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of this material. In this work, hardness and wear resistance for AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to the thermochemical treatment by low temperature plasma carburizing (LTPC in a fixed gas mixture composition of 93% H2 and 7% CH4 are presented. Through the evaluation of the carburizing layers, it was possible to observe a substantial improvement in tribological properties after all temperature and time of treatment. This improvement is directly related to the increase of the process variables; among them temperature has a stronger influence on the wear resistance obtained using LTPC process.

  9. Effect of Surface Treatment on the Surface Characteristics of AISI 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steve; Selvaduray, Guna

    2005-01-01

    The ability of 316L stainless steel to maintain biocompatibility, which is dependent upon the surface characteristics, is critical to its effectiveness as an implant material. The surfaces of mechanically polished (MP), electropolished (EP) and plasma treated 316L stainless steel coupons were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) for chemical composition, Atomic Force Microscopy for surface roughness, and contact angle measurements for critical surface tension. All surfaces had a Ni concentration that was significantly lower than the bulk concentration of -43%. The Cr content of the surface was increased significantly by electropolishing. The surface roughness was also improved significantly by electropolishing. Plasma treatment had the reverse effect - the surface Cr content was decreased. It was also found that the Cr and Fe in the surface exist in both the oxide and hydroxide states, with the ratios varying according to surface treatment.

  10. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  11. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The pH value play an important role on passive mechanism of stainless steel. • The relationship between Cr/Fe ratio within the passive film and pH is non-linear. • Better corrosion resistance due to high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions. - Abstract: In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  12. Corrosion behavior of a superduplex stainless steel in chloride aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabalà, Manuele; Calliari, Irene; Variola, Alessandra

    2004-04-01

    Super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) have been widely used as structural materials for chemical plants (especially in those engaged in phosphoric acid production), in the hydrometallurgy industries, and as materials for offshore applications due to their excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments, compared with other commercial types of ferritic stainless steels. These alloys also possess superior weldability and better mechanical properties than austenitic stainless steels. However, due to their two-phase structure, the nature of which is very dependent on their composition and thermal history, the behavior of SDSS regarding localized corrosion appears difficult to predict, especially in chloride environments. To improve their final properties, the effect of the partition of the alloying elements between the two phases, and the composition and microstructure of each phase are the key to understanding the localized corrosion phenomena of SDSS. This paper concerns the effects of the SDSS microstructure and heat treatment on the SDSS corrosion resistance in aqueous solutions, containing different amounts of NaCl at room temperature.

  13. Blast and Fragment Protective Sandwich Panel Concepts for Stainless Steel Monohull Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-21

    and Johnson-Cook parameters for AISI 304 stainless steel used in the numerical analyses. 3. Experimental results 3.1. Honeycomb panels. 3.1.1...20Cr-2Mn-lSi (wt%). The material proper- ties for AISI 304 stainless steel are reported in Table 2. A slotted metal sheet assembly approach was used...Figure 3. AISI 304 stainless steel panel with square honeycomb core, (a) Solid-ring spacers were employed to prevent core crushing while fastening the

  14. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    testing (ASTM G5) of low pressure cold spray austenitic stainless steel coatings. Several different powders and heat treatments will be applied to...diffusion eliminating the local low chromium region. The low carbon type stainless steel alloys as used here are generally considered to be...maximum 200words) This thesis presents research on the corrosion properties and effects of heat treatment on austenitic stainless steel coatings

  15. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  16. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems.

  17. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems

  18. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  19. Clean cast steel technology. Determination of transformation diagrams for duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbley, S. L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma ( can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ( formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local

  20. Controlling radiation induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmedabadi, Parag M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2011-01-01

    In-core components of austenitic stainless steels in light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high temperature and high pressure oxygenated water at temperature around 300 deg C . Though, the exact mechanism for IASCC is not fully understood, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) is considered to be a part of a complex process that leads to IASCC. Therefore, controlling RIS in austenitic stainless steels may lead to improvement in resistance to IASCC. RIS is non-equilibrium segregation/depletion of alloying elements in austenitic stainless steels at LWR operating temperatures. RIS occurs due to adsorption of point defects at grain boundaries and leads to segregation of Si and P and depletion of Cr at grain boundaries. Thus by controlling point defect flux towards grain boundaries, the extent of RIS at grain boundaries can be controlled. An extensive study was carried out to simulate and control RIS in austenitic stainless steels using proton irradiation at 300 deg C . The primary aim of this study was to reduce point defect flux towards grain boundaries. Various approaches viz. grain boundary engineering, addition of oversized alloying element, residual strain within matrix and presence of fine precipitates within the grains and at grain boundaries were employed to control RIS in austenitic stainless steels. A novel approach involving combination of electrochemical technique followed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination has been used to examine the nature and the extent of RIS. Type 304, 316 and 347 stainless steels were irradiated at 300 deg C (in FOTIA and PELLETRON) in the range of 0.2 to 1.0 dpa using proton beam. The results obtained so far have indicated that a small amount of pre-strain within the grains is very effective in reducing the flux of point defects towards grain boundaries and reducing the extent of RIS at grain boundaries. The presence of NbC precipitates within the grains is

  1. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  2. Effects of Thermal Aging on Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Bong Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Type 316H stainless steel is a prime candidate for reactor vessel material of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) which has been developed as one of the Gen IV nuclear reactors in Korea. The reactor vessel steel will be exposed to higher temperature for an extended design life time. It is known that austenitic stainless steel such as Type 316H stainless steel shows excellent toughness and adequate strength at a moderate temperature. However, the previous researches reported the mechanical properties of Type 316H stainless weld would be deteriorated by the aging at the elevated temperature range.

  3. Corrosion study of stainless steels in a dissolver off-gas environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Tsukaue, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Hirose, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Iodine induced corrosion characteristics of stainless steels have been studied under various case of simulated dissolver off-gas environment. No corrosion of any kind of stainless steel so far tested was observed under typical dissolver off-gas environment, containing HNO 3 and NOx as well as I 2 . Pitting corrosion was observed, however, in humid air containing I 2 but no HNO 3 nor NOx, depending upon I 2 concentration on certain types of stainless steel. The higher content of Mo in stainless steels, the less depth of pitting was measured. A mechanism based on iodine concentration in water film on metal surface, was proposed to explain above phenomena. (author)

  4. NDE of explosion welded copper stainless steel first wall mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Kauppinen, P.; Jeskanen, H.; Lahdenperae, K.; Ehrnsten, U.

    1997-04-01

    The study showed that reflection type C-mode scanning acoustic microscope (C-SAM) and internal ultrasonic inspection (IRIS) equipment can be applied for ultrasonic examination of copper stainless steel compound structures of ITER first wall mock-ups. Explosive welding can be applied to manufacture fully bonded copper stainless steel compound plates. However, explosives can be applied only for mechanical tightening of stainless steel cooling tubes within copper plate. If metallurgical bonding between stainless steel tubes and copper plate is required Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) method can be applied. (orig.)

  5. HIP bonding for the different material between Niobium and Stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Saito, K.; Abe, K.; Fujino, T.; Hitomi, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the future advanced cryomodule for superconducting RF cavities, a helium vessel made from titanium or stainless steel has to be welded directly to the niobium cavity wall in order to be simple structure. For that, we need a transformer from niobium to titanium or stainless steel. Stainless steel will have many benefits if the reliable bonding to the niobium is developed. We have tested the niobium/stainless steel bonding by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) with the heat shock between 1023K and 2K. The bonding interface was also observed by SEM. These test results will be presented. (author)

  6. Austenitic stainless steel-to-ferritic steel transition joint welding for elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Transition weld joints between ferritic steels and austenitic stainless steels are required for fossil-fired power plants and proposed nuclear plants. The experience with these dissimilar-metal transition joints has been generally satisfactory, but an increasing number of failures of these joints is occurring prematurely in service. These concerns with transition joint service history prompted a program to develop more reliable joints for application in proposed nuclear power plants

  7. Quick corrosion cracking test methods for high strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnich, L.Ya.; Shubadeeva, L.I.; Erofeeva, V.L.; Lashchevskij, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    Quicks method for testing high strength stainless steels during 10h under atmospheric and sea conditions has been developed. It is shown that (NH 4 ) 2 Se 2 O 8 - 13.5+-1 g/l, NaCl - 40+-2g/l, H 2 SO 4 -5g/l solution at 50+-2 C temperature is recommended for quick tests for tendency to corrosion cracking during. Development of steels and technologies of their treatment. Tests of steels of 08Kh15N5D2T, 07Kh16N6, 20Kh13, 40Kh13, 13Kh15N4AMD and other types can be performed in boiling solutions: H 2 SO 4 (55 ml/l)+CuSO 4 (110 g/l) or MgCl 2 (200 g/l hexahydrate)

  8. Additively manufactured hierarchical stainless steels with high strength and ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Morris; Voisin, Thomas; McKeown, Joseph T.; Ye, Jianchao; Calta, Nicholas P.; Li, Zan; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Wen; Roehling, Tien Tran; Ott, Ryan T.; Santala, Melissa K.; Depond, Philip J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Zhu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Many traditional approaches for strengthening steels typically come at the expense of useful ductility, a dilemma known as strength-ductility trade-off. New metallurgical processing might offer the possibility of overcoming this. Here we report that austenitic 316L stainless steels additively manufactured via a laser powder-bed-fusion technique exhibit a combination of yield strength and tensile ductility that surpasses that of conventional 316L steels. High strength is attributed to solidification-enabled cellular structures, low-angle grain boundaries, and dislocations formed during manufacturing, while high uniform elongation correlates to a steady and progressive work-hardening mechanism regulated by a hierarchically heterogeneous microstructure, with length scales spanning nearly six orders of magnitude. In addition, solute segregation along cellular walls and low-angle grain boundaries can enhance dislocation pinning and promote twinning. This work demonstrates the potential of additive manufacturing to create alloys with unique microstructures and high performance for structural applications.

  9. Corrosion and inhibition of stainless steel pitting corrosion in alkaline medium and the effect of Cl- and Br- anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaey, S.A.M.; Taha, F.; El-Malak, A.M. Abd

    2005-01-01

    The effect of carbonate anion on the pitting corrosion and inhibition behavior of stainless steel samples (304L SS and 316L SS) has been studied using potentiodynamic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The effect of concentration of CO 3 2- ions, pH, potential scanning rate and the composition of stainless steel are discussed. Additions of Cl - and Br - ions into the carbonate solution increase the anodic dissolution of stainless steel and decrease its pitting corrosion resistance. The effect of CO 3 2- anion on the inhibition of chloride and bromide pitting corrosion of the two stainless steel types has been studied also. Pitting corrosion decrease with the increasing of sodium carbonate concentration, i.e. increases the resistance of stainless steels towards the chloride and bromide pitting corrosion. This inhibition effect argued to formation of [Fe,Cr]CO 3 film caused by preferential adsorption of the CO 3 2- ion, leading to instantaneous repair of weak sites for pit nucleation

  10. Arc brazing of austenitic stainless steel to similar and dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Jamie Ian

    There is a desire within both the stainless steel and automotive industries to introduce stainless steel into safety critical areas such as the crumple zone of modem cars as a replacement for low carbon mild steel. The two main reasons for this are stainless steel's corrosion resistance and its higher strength compared with mild steel. It has been anticipated that the easiest way to introduce stainless steel into the automotive industry would be to incorporate it into the existing design. The main obstacle to be overcome before this can take place is therefore how to join the stainless steel to the rest of the car body. In recent times arc brazil g has been suggested as a joining technique which will eliminate many of the problems associated with fusion welding of zinc coated mild steel to stainless steel.Similar and dissimilar parent material arc brazed joints were manufactured using three copper based filler materials and three shielding gases. The joints were tested in terms of tensile strength, impact toughness and fatigue properties. It was found that similar parent material stainless steel joints could be produced with a 0.2% proof stress in excess of the parent material and associated problems such as Liquid Metal Embrittlement were not experienced. Dissimilar parent material joints were manufactured with an ultimate tensile strength in excess of that of mild steel although during fatigue testing evidence of Liquid Metal Embrittlement was seen lowering the mean fatigue load.At the interface of the braze and stainless steel in the similar material butt joints manufactured using short circuit transfer, copper appeared to penetrate the grain boundaries of the stainless steel without embrittling the parent material. Further microscopic investigation of the interface showed that the penetration could be described by the model proposed by Mullins. However, when dissimilar metal butt joints were manufactured using spray arc transfer, penetration of copper into the

  11. Feasibility of surface-coated friction stir welding tools to join AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lakshminarayanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to develop the tools that are capable enough to withstand the shear, impact and thermal forces that occur during friction stir welding of stainless steels. The atmospheric plasma spray and plasma transferred arc hardfacing processes are employed to deposit refractory ceramic based composite coatings on the Inconel 738 alloy. Five different combinations of self-fluxing alloy powder and 60% ceramic reinforcement particulate mixtures are used for coating. The best friction stir welding tool selected based on tool wear analysis is used to fabricate the austenitic stainless steel joints.

  12. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Sun; Huai-Yue Han

    1994-01-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCrl3Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. Based on the weldability tests, a welding procedure - tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for root passes with HNiCrMo-2B wire followed by manual metal arc (MMA) welding using coated electrode ENiCrFe-3B - was developed and a PWHT at 600 deg C/2h was recommended. Furthermore, the welding of tube/tube joints between these dissimilar steels is described. (21 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.)

  13. Fabrication of Nanostructured Medical-Grade Stainless Steel by Mechanical Alloying and Subsequent Liquid-Phase Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad J.; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Mashhadi, Shirazeh Bagheri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2012-08-01

    This article focuses on the microstructure of medical-grade P558 (ASTM F2581) stainless steel produced by mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering. Rietveld X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reflect that the mechanically alloyed stainless steel powder is a nanocrystal dispersed amorphous matrix composite. Mn-11.5 wt pct Si eutectic alloy as additive improves densification of the synthesized P558 alloy via liquid-phase sintering mechanism. X-ray mapping shows that after sintering at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 1 hour, a uniform distribution of dissolved Mn and Si is achieved. Moreover, the development of a nanostructured, fully austenitic stainless steel after sintering at the same temperature is realized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. A study on the effect of solution heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jee Yong; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Soon Tae

    2001-01-01

    High temperature solution heat treatment(typically higher than 1100 .deg. C) is known generally to reduces the resistance to localized corrosion on super duplex stainless. This is attributed to the formation of zone depleted of alloying elements. In this study, the corrosion properties were investigated on super duplex stainless steels with various solution heat treatments. The corrosion resistance of these steels was evaluated in terms of critical pitting temperature and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization test. Chemical composition of the austenite and ferrite phases were analyzed by SEM-EDS. The following results were obtained. (1) By conducting furnace cooling, critical pitting temperature and repassivation potential increased. (2) By omitting furnace cooling, solution heat treatment produced Cr and Mo depleted zone in the phase boundary. (3) During furnace cooling, Cr and Mo rediffused through the phase boundary. This increased the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

  15. Physical characterization of steel and stainless steel metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavilla, A.O.; Lucchesi, C.G.; Sandin, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the physical characterization of steel powders (obtained by atomization) for later sintering and for the construction of porous sheets and filtrating tubes, capable of operating at temperatures between 600 deg C and 800 deg C in corrosive atmospheres. This methodology was based on the equipment and methods used for the physical characterization of uranium oxide powders. (Author) [es

  16. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  17. 78 FR 21596 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... single or multiple drawn bowls, with or without drain boards, whether finished or unfinished, regardless... steel, and then welding and finishing the vertical corners to form the bowls. Stainless steel sinks with...

  18. 75 FR 973 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... and transport lines, general food processing lines, automotive paint lines, and paper process machines... purchased hot-rolled stainless steel coil from a Korean affiliate, Pohang Iron and Steel Company (POSCO...

  19. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. XPS and SEM studies of chromium oxide films chemically formed on stainless steel 316 L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Marinova, T.

    2000-01-01

    The structure and composition of chromium oxide films formed on stainless steel by immersion in a chromium electrolyte have been studied by SEM and XPS. Cr 2 O 3 crystallites in the range 30-150 nm are fully developed and cover the whole surface. The chemical composition in the depth and the thickness of the oxide layer have been determined by XPS sputter profiles. The oxide film can be described within the framework of a double layer consisting of a thin outer hydrated layer and an inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 . (orig.)

  1. Product consistency testing of three reference glasses in stainless steel and perfluoroalkoxy resin vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.M.; Smith, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.

    1995-03-01

    Because of their chemical durability, silicate glasses have been proposed and researched since the mid-1950s as a medium for incorporating high-level radioactive waste (HLW) generated from processing of nuclear materials. A number of different waste forms were evaluated and ranked in the early 1980s; durability (leach resistance) was the highest weighted factor. Borosilicate glass was rated the best waste form available for incorporation of HLW. Four different types of vessels and three different glasses were used to study the possible effect of vessel composition on durability test results from the Production Consistency Test (PCT). The vessels were 45-m 304 stainless steel vessels, 150-m 304 L stainless steel vessels, and 60-m perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) fluoropolymer resin vessels. The three glasses were the Environmental Assessment glass manufactured by Corning Incorporated and supplied by Westinghouse Savannah River company, and West Valley Nuclear Services reference glasses 5 and 6, manufactured and supplied by Catholic University of America. Within experimental error, no differences were found in durability test results using the 3 different glasses in the 304L stainless steel or PFA fluoropolymer resin vessels over the seven-day test period

  2. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma-enhanced fabrication of nonfouling nanocoatings for 316 stainless steel biomaterial interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun; Lin, Jin-He; Li, Chi-Heng; Yu, I.-Chun; Chen, Ting-Lun

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma, which was generated with electrical RF power, was fed to a tetramethyldisiloxane/argon gas mixture to prepare bioinert organosilicon coatings for 316 stainless steel. The surface characteristics of atmospheric-pressure-plasma-deposited nanocoatings were evaluated as a function of RF plasma power, precursor gas flow, and plasma working distance. After surface deposition, the chemical features, elemental compositions, and surface morphologies of the organosilicon nanocoatings were examined. It was found that RF plasma power and plasma working distance are the essential factors that affect the formation of plasma-deposited nanocoatings. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra indicate that the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-deposited nanocoatings formed showed inorganic features. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed the surface roughness variation of the plasma-deposited nanocoating at different RF plasma powers and plasma working distances during surface treatment. From these surface analyses, it was found that the plasma-deposited organosilicon nanocoatings under specific operational conditions have relatively hydrophobic and inorganic characteristics, which are essential for producing an anti-biofouling interface on 316 stainless steel. The experimental results also show that atmospheric-pressure-plasma-deposited nanocoatings have potential use as a cell-resistant layer on 316 stainless steel.

  3. Promising in vitro performances of a new nickel-free stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Lucio; Cervellati, Marina; Campoccia, Davide; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2006-03-01

    Stainless steel is a metallic alloy largely employed in orthopaedics. However, the presence in its composition of a high quantity of nickel, an agent known to trigger toxic and allergic responses, is cause for concern. In this study, we have investigated the in vitro biocompatibility of a new nickel-reduced stainless steel, namely Böhler P558, in comparison to the conventional stainless steel AISI 316L. The neutral red (NR) uptake and the amido black (AB) tests were performed on L929 fibroblasts and MG63 osteoblasts to assess the cytotoxicity, while cytogenetic effects were evaluated on CHOK1 cells by studying the frequency of Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations. Ames test was used to detect the mutagenic activity. The expression of selected markers typical of differentiated osteoblasts, such as alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), type I collagen (CICP) and osteocalcin (OC) production, were also monitored in MG63 cells cultured on the tested materials. Our results indicate the absence of significant cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for both test alloys. ALP, CICP and OC analyses confirmed that both materials support the expression of these phenotypic markers. Overall, these data show that this Ni-free alloy possesses good in vitro biocompatibility and could have a potential for orthopaedic applications.

  4. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

    2012-02-29

    There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

  5. Linear Friction Welding of Dissimilar Materials 316L Stainless Steel to Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjara, P.; Naik, B. S.; Yang, Q.; Cao, X.; Gholipour, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, there are a number of applications where the transition of stainless steel to Zircaloy is of technological importance. However, due to the differences in their properties there are considerable challenges associated with developing a joining process that will sufficiently limit the heat input and welding time—so as to minimize the extent of interaction at the joint interface and the resulting formation of intermetallic compounds—but still render a functional metallurgical bond between these two alloys. As such, linear friction welding, a solid-state joining technology, was selected in the present study to assess the feasibility of welding 316L stainless steel to Zircaloy-4. The dissimilar alloy welds were examined to evaluate their microstructural characteristics, microhardness evolution across the joint interface, static tensile properties, and fatigue behavior. Microstructural observations revealed a central intermixed region and, on the Zircaloy-4 side, dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zones were present. By contrast, deformation on the 316L stainless steel side was limited. In the intermixed region a drastic change in the composition was observed along with a local increase in hardness, which was attributed to the presence of intermetallic compounds, such as FeZr3 and Cr2Zr. The average yield (316 MPa) and ultimate tensile (421 MPa) strengths met the minimum strength properties of Zircaloy-4, but the elongation was relatively low ( 2 pct). The tensile and fatigue fracture of the welds always occurred at the interface in the mode of partial cohesive failure.

  6. Prevention of Crevice Corrosion of STS 304 Stainless Steel by a Mg-alloy Galvanic Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, U. J.; Yun, B. D.; Kim, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of crevice corrosion was studied for STS 304 stainless steel using a Mg-alloy galvanic anode in solutions with various specific resistivity. The crevice corrosion and corrosion protection characteristics of the steel was investigated by the electrochemical polarization and galvanic corrosion tests. Experimental results show that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel does not occur in solutions of high specific resistivity, but it occurs in solutions of low specific resistivity like in solutions with resistivities of 30, 60 and 115 Ω · m. With decreasing specific resistivity of the solution, the electrode potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice is lowered. The potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice after coupling is cathodically polarized more by decreasing specific resistivity indicating that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel is prevented by the Mg-alloy galvanic anode

  7. Monitoring of Fatigue Degradation in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, it was observed that microstructural changes occurred; these affect both the mechanical and physical properties of the material. For certain steels, a strain-induced martensite phase transformation was seen. The investigations showed that, for the given material and loading conditions, the volume fraction of martensite depends on the cycle number, temperature and initial material state. It was also found that the martensite content continuously increased with the cycle number. Therefore, the volume fraction of martensite was used as an indication of fatigue usage. It was noted that the temperature dependence of the martensite formation could be described by a Boltzmann function, and that the martensite content decreased with increasing temperature. Two different heats of the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (AISI 321, DIN 1.4541) were investigated. It was found that the martensite formation rate was much higher for the cold-worked than for the solution-annealed material. All applied techniques - neutron diffraction and advanced magnetic methods - were successful in detecting the presence of martensite in the differently fatigued specimens. (author)

  8. Effects of high energy nitrogen implantation on stainless steel microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Cornet, A.; Grob, J. J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Muller, D.

    1999-01-01

    Low energy ion implantation is known to improve chemical and mechanical surface properties of metals. This treatment is often used to enhance wear and corrosion resistance or mechanical life-time of fatigue test of stainless steel or titanium alloys. The aim of this work is to investigate these effects at higher energy, for which deeper (and still not well understood) modifications occur. High fluence (10 18 cm -2) 15N and 14N implantations at 1 MeV have been performed in the 316LL stainless steel and some specimen have been annealed in the 200-500°C temperature range. Nitrogen concentration distribution, structure, morphology and microhardness have been examined with Nuclear Resonance Analysis, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Nanoindentation, respectively. Precipitates of steel and chromium nitride phases and a superficial martensitic transformation can be observed, leading to a significant increase of hardness. The best result is obtained after one hour annealing at 425°C, due to a larger and more homogeneous repartition of nitride species. In this case, a near surface accumulation is observed and explained in terms of diffusion and precipitation mechanisms.

  9. Separation by transportation in vapor phase of stainless steels components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allibert, M.; Gibon, G.; Kurka, G.; Tanis, G.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for separating cobalt from other constituents of radioactive stainless steel is proposed in order to condition material originating from dismantling of reactor pressure vessels. The procedure is based on the transport in the vapour phase, under the presence of an appropriate carrier gas and a thermal gradient in a sealed device. By calculation, iodine was found to be the most appropriate carrier gas. Tests carried out at 50 mg to 2 g scale in quartz ampoules permitted to determine parameters, i.e. temperature range and gradient, pressure, and the effectiveness. It was shown that steel turnings may be treated efficiently. The procedure achieves well a partition of stainless steel into two metal masses: one containing the bulk of cobalt and radioactivity, the other depleted of cobalt and suitable for recycling. There is few or no secondary waste created, but the costs of the procedure are estimated to be high, i.e. between 100 and 1,000 ECU/kg [fr

  10. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Hales, R.

    1977-01-01

    During selective chromium oxidation of stainless steels the changes in chromium concentration at the metal surface and in the metal have an important bearing on the overall oxidation performance. It has been proposed that an analogue of chromium behaviour during selective oxidation is obtained from volatilisation of chromium during high temperature vacuum annealing. In the present report the evaporation of chromium from 316 type of steel, vacuum annealed at 1,000 0 C, has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels is rate controlled by interdiffusion in the alloy. As predicted the chromium concentration at the metal surface decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in good agreement with the previously derived model apart from an anomalous region near the surface. Here the higher resolution of the neutron activation technique indicated a zone within approximately 2μm of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (orig.) [de

  11. Barnacle cement: an etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  12. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance upset butt welded 304 austenitic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifitabar, M.; Halvaee, A.; Khorshahian, S.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three different microstructural zones formed at different distances from the joint interface in resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel. Highlights: → Evaluation of microstructure in resistance upset welding of 304 stainless steel. → Evaluation of welding parameters effects on mechanical properties of the joint. → Introducing the optimum welding condition for joining stainless steel bars. -- Abstract: Resistance upset welding (UW) is a widely used process for joining metal parts. In this process, current, time and upset pressure are three parameters that affect the quality of welded products. In the present research, resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel and effect of welding power and upset pressure on microstructure, tensile strength and fatigue life of the joint were investigated. Microstructure of welds were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to distinguish the phase(s) that formed at the joint interface and in heat affected zone (HAZ). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) linked to the SEM was used to determine chemical composition of phases formed at the joint interface. Fatigue tests were performed using a pull-push fatigue test machine and the fatigue properties were analyzed drawing stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves. Also tensile strength tests were performed. Finally tensile and fatigue fracture surfaces were studied by SEM. Results showed that there were three different microstructural zones at different distances from the joint interface and delta ferrite phase has formed in these regions. There was no precipitation of chromium carbide at the joint interface and in the HAZ. Tensile and fatigue strengths of the joint decreased with welding power. Increasing of upset pressure has also considerable influence on tensile strength of the joint. Fractography of fractured samples showed that formation of hot spots at

  14. Anodic behavior of stainless-steel substrate in organic electrolyte solutions containing different lithium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Egashira, Minato; Morita, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated anodic behavior of stainless-steel in organic electrolytes for advanced capacitor. • Anion of the electrolyte affected the anodic stability of the alloy. • Anodic passivation occurs in LiPF 6 solution but pitting or active dissolution proceeds in other electrolyte solutions. • Fluoride source in the solution contributes to forming a stable surface layer on the stainless steel. - Abstract: The anodic behavior of austenitic stainless-steel, SUS304, as a current collector of positive electrode in lithium-ion battery/capacitor has been investigated in organic electrolyte solutions based on a mixed alkyl carbonate solvent with different lithium salts. Stable passivation characteristics were observed for the stainless-steel in the LiPF 6 solution, but pitting corrosion or active dissolution proceeded in the solutions containing other anions, BF 4 - , (CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N - (TFSA - ) and ClO 4 - . The mass ratios of the dissolved metal species in the solutions of LiTFSA and LiClO 4 were equivalent to that of the alloy composition, which suggests that no preferential dissolution occurs during the anodic polarization in these electrolyte solutions. An HF component formed by decomposition of PF 6 - with the contaminate water will act as an F - source for the formation of a surface fluoride layer, that will contribute to the anodic stability of SUS304 in the LiPF 6 solution. The anodic corrosion in the LiTFSA solution was suppressed in part by mixing the PF 6 salt or adding HF in the electrolyte

  15. Atom probe, AFM and STM study on vacuum fired stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupnik, A.; Frank, P.; Leisch, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Stainless steel is one of the most commonly used structural materials for vacuum equipment. An efficient method to reduce the outgassing rate from stainless steel is a high temperature bakeout in vacuum (vacuum firing). This procedure reduces significantly the amount of dissolved hydrogen in the bulk. For the outgassing process the recombination rate of hydrogen atoms to the molecules plays the determining role and recombination is strongly related to the surface structure and composition. To get more detailed information about the surface morphology and composition AFM, STM and atom probe studies were carried out. Experiments on AISI 304L stainless steel samples show that the surface reconstructs completely during vacuum firing and large atomically flat terraces bounded by bunched steps and facets are formed. The large flat terraces can be assigned to (111) planes. The bunched steps and facets are corresponding in orientation almost to (110) planes and (100) planes. Surface inspection after vacuum firing by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) gives reason for a composition change indicated by a reduction of the chromium signal in relation to the iron and nickel signal. Since the information depth of AES covers several atomic layers not only the top atomic layer of the sample surface is probed. For this reason 3D atom probe was used as well suited tool to investigate the segregation behavior of this alloy with the goal to examine the change in local chemical composition due to the high temperature treatment. As a result of vacuum firing the atom probe experiments show a significant enrichment of nickel at the top surface layer. In the second atomic layer chromium enrichment is detected. After vacuum firing the average composition below the second atomic layer shows certain chromium depletion up to 2 nm in depth. The observed changes in surface chemistry influence recombination and desorption probability from the surface and may contribute to the present

  16. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whether the elevated risk of lung cancer observed among welders is caused by welding emissions or by confounding from smoking or asbestos exposure is still not resolved. This question was addressed in a cohort with a long follow-up and quantified estimates of individual exposure...... to welding fume particulates. METHODS: Male metal workers employed at least 1 year at one or more Danish stainless or mild steel industrial companies from 1964 through 1984 were enrolled in a cohort. Data on occupational and smoking history were obtained by questionnaire in 1986. Welders in the cohort who.......06-1.70)]. Among the stainless steel welders, the risk increased significantly with increasing accumulative welding particulate exposure, while no exposure-response relation was found for mild steel welders, even after adjustment for tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The study corroborates...

  17. Overview of Intergranular Fracture of Neutron Irradiated Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hojná

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are normally ductile and exhibit deep dimples on fracture surfaces. These steels can, however, exhibit brittle intergranular fracture under some circumstances. The occurrence of intergranular fracture in the irradiated steels is briefly reviewed based on limited literature data. The data are sorted according to the irradiation temperature. Intergranular fracture may occur in association with a high irradiation temperature and void swelling. At low irradiation temperature, the steels can exhibit intergranular fracture at low or even at room temperatures during loading in air and in high temperature water (~300 °C. This paper deals with the similarities and differences for IG fractures and discusses the mechanisms involved. The intergranular fracture occurrence at low temperatures might be correlated with decohesion or twinning and strain martensite transformation in local narrow areas around grain boundaries. The possibility of a ductile-to-brittle transition is also discussed. In case of void swelling higher than 3%, quasi-cleavage at low temperature might be expected as a consequence of ductile-to-brittle fracture changes with temperature. Any existence of the change in fracture behavior in the steels of present thermal reactor internals with increasing irradiation dose should be clearly proven or disproven. Further studies to clarify the mechanism are recommended.

  18. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    -state mixing. Thirdly, the corrosion resistance of multiple austenitic stainless steels (types 304, 316, and 309) processed in varying ways was compared for acid chloride environments using advanced electrochemical techniques. Physical simulation of fusion claddings and friction weld claddings (wrought stainless steels) was used for sample preparation to determine compositional and microstructural effects. Pitting resistance correlated firstly with Cr content, with N and Mo additions providing additional benefits. The high ferrite fraction of as-welded samples reduced their corrosion resistance. Wrought type 309L outperformed as-welded type 309L in dissolved mass loss and reverse corrosion rate from the potentiodynamic scan in 1.0 N HCl/3.5% NaCl solution. Electrochemical impedance results indicated that wrought 309L and 316L developed a corrosion resistant passive film more rapidly than other alloys in 0.1 N HCl/3.5% NaCl, and also performed well in long term (160-day) corrosion testing in the same environment. Fourthly, to prove the concept of internal CR lining by friction welding, a conical work piece of 304L stainless steel was friction welded internally to 1018 steel.

  19. The role of duplex stainless steels for downhole tubulars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.

    1993-01-01

    In sour conditions there is an increasing trend to turn to corrosion resistant alloys for downhole tubulars. The most commonly used CRA tubular is 13Cr, and there are thousands of feet in service. However, there are limits to the use of 13Cr, ie., the risk of sulphide stress corrosion cracking at high H 2 S levels, and the possibility of pitting or high corrosion rates in waters with high chloride contents. Where the service conditions are felt to be too severe for 13Cr alloys it has been traditional to switch to nickel base alloys such as alloys 825 and C-276 (UNS N08825 and N10276). The alloys are much more expensive than 13Cr, and in recent years the duplex stainless steels have been selected as alloys with superior corrosion and SSCC resistance compared with 13Cr, and having lower cost than nickel alloys. Originally the 22Cr duplex alloy (UNS 31803) was used, but more recently the 25Cr super duplex alloys (UNS S32760 and S32750) have become more available. The present paper reviews the data available for 13Cr and the limits of applicability. Data is also presented for laboratory tests for both the 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex alloys. There is extensive service experience with both 22Cr and 25Cr super duplex in the North Sea, covering both downhole tubulars, manifold and post wellhead equipment. Data is presented showing some of the sour condition being experienced in the North Sea by super duplex alloys. These results show that there is a substantial gap between the limits of use for 13Cr and the 25Cr super duplex stainless steel alloys. This means that in many sour environments super duplex stainless steel provides a cost effective alternative to nickel-base alloys

  20. Creep rupture properties of oxidised 20%Cr austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, R.C.; Ecob, R.C.

    1989-02-01

    Sheet specimens of stabilised 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb and nitrided 20%Cr/25%Ni/Ti stainless steels, both used as fuel cladding materials in CAGRs, have been oxidised in simulated reactor gas (Co 2 /1-2%CO) for up to l.9kh at 850 0 C, including intermediate thermal cycles to room temperature. The oxidised specimens have been creep tested subsequently at 750 0 C, under conditions of constant stress. The creep rupture properties are affected differently for the two materials. For 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb stainless steel, there was no effect of oxidation on the intrinsic microstructure, when compared with thermally aged, non-oxidised material. Any differences in creep ductility were ascribed to geometric effects in specimens of this alloy. Lower ductilities were associated with an increased incidence of pitting attack (higher oxide spallation) and it was concluded that the extent of local, rather than general, loss of section controlled the ductility. For nitrided 20%Cr/25%Ni/Ti stainless steel, the intrinsic microstructure was affected by oxidation, such that increased grain boundary precipitation of M 23 C 6 occurred. The resultant effect was for a greater tendency for intergranular failure at lower ductility than for the thermally aged material. The magnitude of this reduction could not be quantified because the specimen geometry was also changed by oxidation. In this instance, the oxidation mode that produced the most severe loss of section was grain boundary, rather than pitting, attack. This mode of attack was not linked directly to oxide fracture/spallation, but to the period of oxidation. (author)

  1. Cytotoxicity study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, C P O; Rogero, S O; Tschiptschin, A P

    2006-11-01

    Stainless steel has been frequently used for temporary implants but its use as permanent implants is restricted due to its low pitting corrosion resistance. Nitrogen additions to these steels improve both mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, particularly the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. Many reports concerning allergic reactions caused by nickel led to the development of nickel free stainless steel; it has excellent mechanical properties and very high corrosion resistance. On the other hand, stainless steels are biologically tolerated and no chemical bonds are formed between the steel and the bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited on stainless steels improve osseointegration, due their capacity to form chemical bonds (bioactive fixation) with the bone tissue. In this work hydroxyapatite coatings were plasma-sprayed on three austenitic stainless steels: ASTM-F138, ASTM-F1586 and the nickel-free Böhler-P558. The coatings were analyzed by SEM and XDR. The cytotoxicity of the coatings/steels was studied using the neutral red uptake method by quantitative evaluation of cell viability. The three uncoated stainless steels and the hydroxyapatite coated Böhler-P558 did not have any toxic effect on the cell culture. The hydroxyapatite coated ASTM-F138 and ASTM-F1586 stainless steels presented cytotoxicity indexes (IC50%) lower than 50% and high nickel contents in the extracts.

  2. Experimental Study Of Fog Water Harvesting By Stainless Steel Mesh

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil R. Pawar; Suman S. Jain; Smitha R. God

    2017-01-01

    The collection of fog water is a simple and sustainable technology to get hold of fresh water for various purposes. In areas where a substantial amount of fog can be obtained it is feasible to set up a stainless steel as well as black double layer plastic mesh structure for fog water harvesting. The mesh structure is directly exposed to the weather and the fog containing air is pushed through the active mesh surface by the wind. Afterward fog droplets are deposited on the active mesh area whi...

  3. Electrochemical noise measurements of stainless steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis-Juarez, C.R.; Malo, J.M.; Uruchurtu, J.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion in a high purity aqueous environment simulating a boiling water reactor (BWR) is addressed in this work. This condition necessitates autoclave experiments under high pressure and temperature. Long-term electrochemical noise measurements were explored as a mean to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. An experimental set up, designed to insulate the working electrode from external interference, made possible to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking in slow strain rate tests for sensitized and solution annealed 304 stainless steel at 288 o C. Time-series analysis showed variations in the signature of the current density series due to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC)

  4. High cycle fatigue of Type 422 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Chow, J.G.Y.; Sabatini, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    High cycle fatigue testing has been carried out on Type 422 stainless steel to determine the performance of cyclically stressed disks and blades in the main and auxiliary HTGR helium circulators. Tests were performed at 316, 482, and 538 0 C (600, 900, and 1000 0 F) in air for the fully reversible and mean load conditions. Goodman's analysis is shown to be valid in predicting failure at 316 0 C (600 0 F), marginally valid at 482 0 C (900 0 F), and probably invalid at 538 0 C (1000 0 F). Metallographic analyses were conducted to characterize the nature of failure for the temperatures and loading conditions investigated

  5. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  6. Cutting of Stainless Steel With Fiber and Disk Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandera, Catherine; Salminen, Antti; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2006-01-01

    role also in cutting applications. This has not happened mainly due to the fact that beam quality has not been sufficient. The introduction of new generation of solid state lasers has raised the interest of use of them in cutting application. This study was concentrated on use of fiber and disk lasers......, the new laser types with a high beam quality, in cutting of austenitic stainless steel. The performance of these new lasers at power level of 4 kW was compared with CO2-laser in respect of cutting speed, kerf width, kerf edge roughness and perpendicularity (squarness) in order to validate the potential...

  7. Physical properties of the AISI 348 L* austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Lucki, Georgi; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Terremoto, Luis Antanio Albiac; Castanheira, Myrthes; Damy, Margaret de Almeida

    2005-01-01

    The study of radiation damage in metals and alloys, used as structural materials of nuclear reactors has a strategic meaning in nuclear technology, because it allows the performance evaluation of these materials in working conditions of PWR. For this sake it is necessary to know the detrimental structural changes that occur during fast neutron irradiation. The aim of the present work is to show some strain-stress results of the AISI 348 L * stainless steel utilized as a structural material of the fuel elements of PWR, in comparison with the AISI 304. (author)

  8. Recycled hydroxyapatite coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes Filho, Antonio Alves; Pereira, Renato Alves; Araujo, Fernando Gabriel da Silva; Sousa, Camila Mateus de

    2010-01-01

    In this work were evaluated recycled hydroxyapatite coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates by plasma thermal aspersion. The hydroxyapatite used was obtained from bovine bone by the hydrothermal method. The samples of hydroxyapatite powders were divided according to their particle size distribution. The adhesion of the powders coating to the substrate was evaluated by assay scratch. The X-ray diffraction techniques and scanning electron microscopy were also used. The results of scratch resistance were between 46N and 63N. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction showed no cracks coatings, single-phase and with few fused particles. (author)

  9. Corrosion Resistance of Some Stainless Steels in Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzyk D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work compares corrosion behaviour of four types of S30403, S31603, S32615 austenitic and S32404 austenitic-ferritic stainless steels in chloride solutions (1%, 3% NaCl and in Ringer solution, at 37°C temperature. Corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and a thirty day immersion test conducted in Ringer solution. The immersion test was performed in term of biomedical application. These alloy were spontaneously passivated in all electrolytes, wherein S30403, S31603 and S32404 undergo pitting corrosion. Only S32615 containing 5.5% Si shows resistance to pitting corrosion.

  10. Stress relaxation characteristics of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjoine, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The stress relaxation of type 304 stainless steel below 900 0 F (482 0 C) is practically time independent after 100 h and has a maximum of about 18 per cent. The per cent relaxation decreases with increasing degree of cold work and with decreasing stress. Above 900 0 F the per cent relaxation increases with time, temperature, and cold work. The initial stress can also be increased for cold work materials so that the remaining stress can be maintained at a higher value even up to 1200 0 F (649 0 C). Time-temperature parameters are practical to correlate and extrapolate the data in the higher temperature range. (author)

  11. On femtosecond laser shock peening of stainless steel AISI 316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppius, Jan S.; Kukreja, Lalit M.; Knyazeva, Marina; Pöhl, Fabian; Walther, Frank; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we report on the competition in metal surface hardening between the femtosecond shock peening on the one hand, and formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and surface oxidation on the other hand. Peening of the stainless steel AISI 316 due to shock loading induced by femtosecond laser ablation was successfully demonstrated. However, for some range of processing parameters, surface erosion due to LIPSS and oxidation seems to dominate over the peening effect. Strategies to increase the peening efficiency are discussed.

  12. Void swelling behaviour of austenitic stainless steel during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Ti Zhongxin

    1994-04-01

    The irradiation swelling behaviour of 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) was investigated by means of high voltage electron microscope. Results showed that in solution annealed condition almost no swelling incubation period existed, and the swelling shifted from the transition period to the steady-state one when the displacement damage was around 40 dpa. In cold rolled condition there was evidently incubation period, and when the displacement damage was up to 84 dpa the swelling still remained in the transition period. The average size and density of voids in both conditions were measured, and the factors, which influenced the void swelling, were discussed. (3 figs.)

  13. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M

    1992-01-01

    . Environmental monitoring of welding fumes and selected metal oxides, biomonitoring of chromium and nickel in serum and urine and mutagenic activity in urine, and evaluation of semen quality were also done. Manual metal arc (MMA) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were the dominant welding processes....... A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA...

  14. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  15. Elastic interaction between defects during dynamic aging of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journaux, J.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the mechanical properties through traction tests, at temperatures above room temperature in 316 type stainless steel emphasizes the existence of the dynamic aging phenomenon (Portevin-Lechantelier effect). The present paper explains in a general way the fundamental causes of this effect by examining the elastic interactions that occur between the solute atoms in solid solution and the crystal dislocations. These interactions, which are present only at a certain temperature range, are responsible for the improvement of the mechanical properties always noticed in the alloys showing this phenomenon. (F.R.) [pt

  16. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process probably results in these cracks.

  17. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    OpenAIRE

    Jingqiang Yang; Qiongqi Wang; Zhongkun Wei; Kaishu Guan

    2014-01-01

    Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process pr...

  18. Deformation modes of proton and neutron irradiated stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailat, C.; Gröschel, F.; Victoria, M.

    2000-01-01

    AISI 304 and 316 stainless steels of two purity levels that have been irradiated with high energy protons up to 0.3 dpa and neutrons in a high flux reactor up to 7.5 dpa were investigated in terms of irradiation induced mechanical properties and microstructural changes. The stress-strain relationships were obtained at room temperature. The deformation, grain, twinning and irradiation defect microstructures were investigated using both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results are discussed in terms of deformation mechanisms linked with the radiation induced defect microstructure.

  19. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...... for temperatures (783 K. The case developed by thermochemical treatment was examined using reflected light microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and microhardness testing. Both nitriding and carburising led to the development of expanded austenite in the surface adjacent zone, irrespective of the phase...... constitution of the substrate. A two step process, consisting of carburising followed by nitriding, provides great flexibility with regard to adjusting the hardness–depth profile....

  20. Simulasi Proses Deep Drawing Stainless Steel dengan Software Abaqus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Widodo Besar Riyadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui hasil simulasi proses deep drawing terhadap bahan stainless steel pada proses pembentukan komponen end cup hub body. Penelitian dilakukan dengan paket software Abaqus 6.5-1 yang diawali dengan pengujian uji tarik, kemudian mengkonversi data tegangan-regangan nominal ke dalam tegangan-regangan sebenarnya, dan menghitung sifat plastisitas bahan dengan persamaan Holomon. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bentuk produk dan distribusi tegangan pada pelat setelah mengalami proses deep drawing. Hubungan antara tegangan dan fenomena kerutan juga diketahui. Perbandingan hasil menunjukkan bahwa bentuk produk pelat hasil simulasi mendekati hasil yang diperoleh dengan eksperimen.