WorldWideScience

Sample records for staining chromosome region

  1. Hoffman's violet and dahlia as specific stains for animal chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, M K

    1979-03-01

    The paper deals with staining of the chromosomes of animal testicular materials with two basic dyes, Hoffman's violet and dahlia of the triphenylmethane group, following iodine-dye procedure. The important finding, as presented herein, is that iodinated alcohol after staining can be substituted with various acids, both organic as well as inorganic, all of which act as trapping agent preventing leaching of the dye that binds with the chromosomal DNA. It is clear from this study that RNA is not involved by this process of staining, since treatment of stained sections with cold phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20--25 min and then stained also reveals perfect colouration of the chromosomes without any cytoplasmic staining. The in vitro absorption properties of Hoffman's violet have also been presented herein. The probable mechanism of action of these dyes has been suggested.

  2. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W [San Francisco, CA; Pinkel, Daniel [Lafayette, CA; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka [Turku, FI; Kallioniemi, Anne [Tampere, FI; Sakamoto, Masaru [Tokyo, JP

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  4. Homogeneously staining regions (HSR) in a human malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieux de Salum, S; Slavutsky, I; Besuschio, S; Pavlovsky, A A

    1984-01-01

    A case of nodular malignant melanoma (level V of Clark's classification) with homogeneously staining regions (HSR) on the long arm of one chromosome #2 is described. Ultrastructural observation of melanosomic and promelanosomic granules near Golgi's vesicles confirmed the histologic diagnosis. Chromosome analysis was performed on nine metaphases from a bone marrow sample and 76 metaphases from culture of the malignant skin tumor. G-banding revealed the presence of a clone with trisomy #8 and another cell line with the HSR marker. This is the first report of HSR in human melanoma cells. As HSR has been found only in malignant cells, we believe that among the many factors that influence the patients' clinical evolution and poor response to treatment, the genic imbalance is of the utmost importance.

  5. Karyotype Evolution in Birds: from Conventional Staining to Chromosome Painting

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm

    2018-01-01

    In this work we performed comparative chromosome painting using probes from Gallus gallus (GGA) Linnaeus, 1758 and Leucopternis albicollis (LAL) Latham, 1790 in Synallaxis frontalis Pelzeln, 1859 (Passeriformes, Furnariidae), an exclusively Neotropical species, in order to analyze whether the complex pattern of intrachromosomal rearrangements (paracentric and pericentric inversions) proposed for Oscines and Suboscines is shared with more basal species. S. frontalis has 82 chromosomes, similar...

  6. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  7. [Investigation of chromosomes in varieties and translocation lines of pea Pisum sativum L. by FISH, Ag-NOR, and differential DAPI staining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatadze, T E; Muravenko, O M; Bol'sheva, N L; Amosova, A B; Gostimsckiĭ, S A; Zelenin, A V

    2005-12-01

    The DNA intercalator 9-aminoachridine was used for obtaining high-resolution DAPI patterns of chromosomes of Pisum sativum L. with more than 300 bands per haploid chromosome set. The karyotypes of three pea varieties, Viola, Capital, and Rosa Crown, and two translocation lines, L-108 (T(2-4s)) and M-10 (T(2-7s)), were examined. Based on the results of DAPI staining, we have identified chromosomes, constructed idiograms, and established breakpoints of chromosome translocations. Lines L-108 (T(2-4s)) and M-10 (T(2-7s)) were shown to appear as a result of respectively one translocation between chromosomes 2 and 4 and two translocations between chromosomes 2 and 7. All varieties and translocation lines of pea were examined using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with telomere repetition probes, 5S and 45S wheat DNA probes. Transcriptional activity of 45S rRNA was detected by Ag-NOR staining. Telomere repetitions were shown to be located only in telomeric chromosome regions. Using high-resolution DAPI staining allowed us to verify localization of 5S genes on pea chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. 45S rDNAs were localized in the secondary constriction regions on the satellite and the satellite thread of chromosome and on the satellite thread and in more proximal satellite heterochromatic region of chromosome 7. The size of 45S rDNA signal on chromosome 7 was larger and its transcriptional activity, higher than the corresponding parameters on chromosome 4 in most of the forms studied. A visual comparison of the results of FISH and Ag-NOR staining of normal and translocated pea chromosomes did not reveal any significant differences between them. The translocations of the satellite chromosomes apparently did not cause significant changes either in the amount of the ribosomal genes or in their transcriptional activity.

  8. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M'kacher, Radhia; El Maalouf, Elie; Terzoudi, Georgia; Ricoul, Michelle; Heidingsfelder, Leonhard; Karachristou, Ionna; Laplagne, Eric; Hempel, William M.; Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sabatier, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to 60 Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw

  9. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  10. [B chromosome polymorphism of blackflies (Diptera, Simuliidae) from the north-western region of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubareva, L A; Petrova, N A

    2006-01-01

    We have studied karyofonds of natural populations and B-chromosome morphology of 8 species of blackflies from the North-Western region of Russia: Odagmia ornata Mg., Hellichiella crassa Rubz., Simulium morsitans Edw., Simulium argyreatum Mg., Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duo-decimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. For this purpose we made slides of squashed blackflies larvae with salivary gland polytene chromosomes stained by aceto-orcein, in addition to similarly stained slides with mitotic chromosomes from gonads and ganglia. Morphology of polytene B-chromosomes of Shoenbaueria pusilla Fries., Cnetha fontinalis Radzv., Stegopterna duodecimata Rubz., and Archesimulium tuberosum Lundstr. has been first described. B-chromosome polymorphism was found in all species, but the number of B chromosomes was conserved within each differences in polytene individual. Stable and distinct interspecific differences in the morphology of polytene B-chromosomes were demonstrated, and these characters are advisable to use to distinguish the species. We have investigated for the first time karyofonds of Od. ornata populations from Arkhangelsk Region (Solovetskie Islands) and Leningrad Region (railway station Sablino), and those of S. argyreatum populations from Murmansk Region (Kandalaksha environs) and Karelia (railway station Chupa). A long term study of Od. ornata and S. argyrestum population from North-Western Russia revealed interspecific and interpopulation dynamics of the occurrence of specimens with B-chromosomes. Some populations showed an increased percentage of individuals with B-chromosomes. It is suggested that B-chromosomes may play a role in adaptation of polulations to severe environmental conditions.

  11. 45S rDNA regions are chromosome fragile sites expressed as gaps in vitro on metaphase chromosomes of root-tip meristematic cells in Lolium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, chromosome fragile sites are regions that are especially prone to forming non-staining gaps, constrictions or breaks in one or both of the chromatids on metaphase chromosomes either spontaneously or following partial inhibition of DNA synthesis and have been well identified. So far, no plant chromosome fragile sites similar to those in human chromosomes have been reported. METHODS AND RESULTS: During the course of cytological mapping of rDNA on ryegrass chromosomes, we found that the number of chromosomes plus chromosome fragments was often more than the expected 14 in most cells for Lolium perenne L. cv. Player by close cytological examination using a routine chromosome preparation procedure. Further fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH using 45S rDNA as a probe indicated that the root-tip cells having more than a 14-chromosome plus chromosome fragment count were a result of chromosome breakage or gap formation in vitro (referred to as chromosome lesions at 45S rDNA sites, and 86% of the cells exhibited chromosome breaks or gaps and all occurred at the sites of 45S rDNA in Lolium perenne L. cv. Player, as well as in L. multiflorum Lam. cv. Top One. Chromatin depletion or decondensation occurred at various locations within the 45S rDNA regions, suggesting heterogeneity of lesions of 45S rDNA sites with respect to their position within the rDNA region. CONCLUSIONS: The chromosome lesions observed in this study are very similar cytologically to that of fragile sites observed in human chromosomes, and thus we conclude that the high frequency of chromosome lesions in vitro in Lolium species is the result of the expression of 45S rDNA fragile sites. Possible causes for the spontaneous expression of fragile sites and their potential biological significance are discussed.

  12. Frequencies of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of xeroderma pigmentosum and Fanconi anemia patients estimated by Giemsa and fluorescence in situ hybridization staining techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Saraswathy,Radha; Natarajan,A.T.

    2000-01-01

    Blood lymphocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Fanconi anemia (FA) patients were assessed for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation by estimating the frequency of X-ray (1 and 2 Gy)-induced chromosome aberrations (CA). The frequencies of aberrations in the whole genome were estimated in Giemsa-stained preparations of lymphocytes irradiated at G0 or G2 stages. The frequencies of translocations and dicentrics involving chromosomes 1 and 3 as well as the X-chromosome were determined in ...

  13. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae: evidence of a chromosome inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Oliveira Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs. Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  14. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. (La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)); Riggs, A.D. (Beckman Inst., Duarte, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  15. Partition of distinct chromosomal regions: negotiable border and fixed border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akatsuki; Horikoshi, Masami

    2004-06-01

    Chromosomes are partitioned into distinct functional regions. For example, heterochromatin regions consist of condensed chromatin and contain few transcriptionally active genes, whereas euchromatin regions are less condensed and majority of active genes reside in the euchromatin regions. Because distinct regions reside in each chromosome, borders are accordingly established between these regions. A prevailing view of the borders is that they are 'walls' that actively inhibit communication between distinct regions on chromosomes. Although little is known about the molecular bases of these walls, specific DNA elements are considered to recruit these walls to define the positions of the borders. We call the borders established with this mechanism as 'fixed borders'. Past studies have identified various insulators (boundary DNA elements) that have been suggested to recruit fixed borders to them. Another mechanism, which we introduce and focus on in this review, does not require walls recruited by specific DNA elements at the chromosomal borders. Instead, the borders are defined by a balance of opposing enzymatic activities located at the opposite sides of the resultant borders. We name these borders 'negotiable borders'. Here we review some of the recent progress in the field that offer valuable insight into mechanisms of establishing structural and functional borders on chromosomes. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Limited

  16. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system, the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes.

  17. Chromosome study in Schistocerca (Orthoptera-Acrididae-Cyrtacanthacridinae: karyotypes and distribution patterns of constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolus organizer regions (NORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome analyses were performed in two grasshopper species of the genus Schistocerca, S. pallens and S. flavofasciata. Both species shared the same diploid number (2n = 23, X in males; 2n = 24, XX in females;and a conserved karyotype composed exclusively of acrocentric chromosomes, but differed in their distribution patterns of constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolus organizer regions (NORs. Constitutive heterochromatin was located in the pericentromeric region of all chromosomes in both species. S. flavofasciata presented an additional C-band on the distal region of the long arm of a small autosome pair (S9. Nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, revealed by silver nitrate staining (Ag-NORs, were observed on a medium autosome pair (M5 in both species. S. pallens presented an additional NOR-bearing autosome (M6. The same sites were labeled after FISH with an rDNA probe in S. pallens cells.

  18. Isolation of a cosmid sublibrary for a region of chromosome 12 frequently amplified in human cancers using a complex chromosome microdissection probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkahloun, A.G.; Meltzer, P.S.; Guan, Xin-Yuan [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Chromosome-specific cosmid libraries are in extremely useful resource for positional cloning projects. Once a particular region of interest has been identified, it would be of value to have an approach for isolating chromosome band-specific cosmids that could be assembled into a sublibrary for rapid screening. We constructed a region-specific sublibrary of 700 cosmids by screening a chromosome 12-specific cosmid library with a complex probe generated by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR of a microdissected homogeneously staining region containing sequences amplified from chromosome 12q13-q15. Based on fluorescence in situ hybridization, approximately 60% of the cosmids in the sublibrary were derived from the microdissected region. To demonstrate further the utility of the sublibrary, a 150-kb contig containing the SAS and CDK4 genes was constructed, as well as several additional contigs between CDK4 and MDM2. This study demonstrates the possibility of utilizing probes generated by microdissection for assembling band-specific libraries that are amendable to rapid screening with multiple markers.

  19. Investigation of the chromosome regions with significant affinity for the nuclear envelope in fruit fly--a model based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Allen Kinney

    Full Text Available Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the "boundary conditions"--points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE attachments of polytene (giant chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin--gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin--gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not

  20. Delineation and analysis of chromosomal regions specifying Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Huon, Christèle; Fayolle, Corinne; Demeure, Christian E; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Médigue, Claudine; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has recently diverged from the less virulent enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Its emergence has been characterized by massive genetic loss and inactivation and limited gene acquisition. The acquired genes include two plasmids, a filamentous phage, and a few chromosomal loci. The aim of this study was to characterize the chromosomal regions acquired by Y. pestis. Following in silico comparative analysis and PCR screening of 98 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, we found that eight chromosomal loci (six regions [R1pe to R6pe] and two coding sequences [CDS1pe and CDS2pe]) specified Y. pestis. Signatures of integration by site specific or homologous recombination were identified for most of them. These acquisitions and the loss of ancestral DNA sequences were concentrated in a chromosomal region opposite to the origin of replication. The specific regions were acquired very early during Y. pestis evolution and were retained during its microevolution, suggesting that they might bring some selective advantages. Only one region (R3pe), predicted to carry a lambdoid prophage, is most likely no longer functional because of mutations. With the exception of R1pe and R2pe, which have the potential to encode a restriction/modification and a sugar transport system, respectively, no functions could be predicted for the other Y. pestis-specific loci. To determine the role of the eight chromosomal loci in the physiology and pathogenicity of the plague bacillus, each of them was individually deleted from the bacterial chromosome. None of the deletants exhibited defects during growth in vitro. Using the Xenopsylla cheopis flea model, all deletants retained the capacity to produce a stable and persistent infection and to block fleas. Similarly, none of the deletants caused any acute flea toxicity. In the mouse model of infection, all deletants were fully virulent upon subcutaneous or aerosol infections. Therefore

  1. Frequencies of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of xeroderma pigmentosum and Fanconi anemia patients estimated by Giemsa and fluorescence in situ hybridization staining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathy Radha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood lymphocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP and Fanconi anemia (FA patients were assessed for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation by estimating the frequency of X-ray (1 and 2 Gy-induced chromosome aberrations (CA. The frequencies of aberrations in the whole genome were estimated in Giemsa-stained preparations of lymphocytes irradiated at G0 or G2 stages. The frequencies of translocations and dicentrics involving chromosomes 1 and 3 as well as the X-chromosome were determined in slides stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique. An increase in all types of CA was observed in XP and FA lymphocytes irradiated at G0 when compared to controls. The frequency of dicentrics and rings was 6 to 27% higher (at 1 and 2 Gy in XP lymphocytes and 37% higher (at 2 Gy in FA lymphocytes than in controls, while chromosome deletions were higher in irradiated (30% in 1 Gy and 72% in 2 Gy than in control XP lymphocytes and 28 to 102% higher in FA lymphocytes. In G2-irradiated lymphocytes the frequency of CA was 24 to 55% higher in XP lymphocytes than in controls. In most cases the translocation frequencies were higher than the frequencies of dicentrics (21/19.

  2. A comparative chromosome analysis of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornnarong Siripiyasing

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is the first comparative chromosome analysis report of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and its relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique. Blood samples of the Thai wild boar were taken from two males and two females kept in Nakhon Ratchasima Zoo. After standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37 oC for 72 hr. in the presence of colchicine, the metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and airdried. Conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique were applied to stain the chromosomes. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosomes of Thai wild boar was 2n (diploid = 38, and the fundamental numbers (NF were 62 in the male and female. The type of autosomes were 12 metacentric, 14 submetacentric, 4 acrocentric and 6 telocentric chromosomes, with X and Y chromosomes being metacentric chromosomes. We found that chromosomes 1, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, X and Y had the same Gbanding and high-resolution technique patterns as those of domestic pig chromosomes. Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 15 are similar to those of domestic pig chromosomes. These results show the evolutionary relationship between the Thai wild boar and the domestic pig.

  3. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  4. Centromere Destiny in Dicentric Chromosomes: New Insights from the Evolution of Human Chromosome 2 Ancestral Centromeric Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiatante, Giorgia; Giannuzzi, Giuliana; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genomic rearrangements that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Due to the presence of two primary constrictions, they are inherently unstable and overcome their instability by epigenetically inactivating and/or deleting one of the two centromeres, thus resulting in functionally monocentric chromosomes that segregate normally during cell division. Our understanding to date of dicentric chromosome formation, behavior and fate has been largely inferred from observational studies in plants and humans as well as artificially produced de novo dicentrics in yeast and in human cells. We investigate the most recent product of a chromosome fusion event fixed in the human lineage, human chromosome 2, whose stability was acquired by the suppression of one centromere, resulting in a unique difference in chromosome number between humans (46 chromosomes) and our most closely related ape relatives (48 chromosomes). Using molecular cytogenetics, sequencing, and comparative sequence data, we deeply characterize the relicts of the chromosome 2q ancestral centromere and its flanking regions, gaining insight into the ancestral organization that can be easily broadened to all acrocentric chromosome centromeres. Moreover, our analyses offered the opportunity to trace the evolutionary history of rDNA and satellite III sequences among great apes, thus suggesting a new hypothesis for the preferential inactivation of some human centromeres, including IIq. Our results suggest two possible centromere inactivation models to explain the evolutionarily stabilization of human chromosome 2 over the last 5-6 million years. Our results strongly favor centromere excision through a one-step process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Characterizing soil preferential flow using iodine--starch staining experiments and the active region model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Feng; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Renduo; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen iodine-starch staining experiments with different boundary conditions and measurement scales were conducted at two sites to study preferential flow processes in natural unsaturated soils. Digital imaging analyses were implemented to obtain the corresponding preferential flow patterns. The test results are used to evaluate a recently proposed active region model in terms of its usefulness and robustness for characterizing unsaturated flow processes at field scale. Test results provide useful insights into flow patterns in unsaturated soils. They show that flow pattern depends on the top boundary condition. As the total infiltrating-water depth increased form 20 mm to 80 mm for the 100 x 100 cm{sup 2} plots, the corresponding flow pattern changed from few preferential flow paths associated with a relatively small degree of stained coverage and a small infiltration depth, to a pattern characterized by a higher stained coverage and a larger infiltration depth, and to (finally) a relatively homogeneous flow pattern with few unstained area and a much larger infiltration depth. Test results also show that the preferential flow pattern became generally more heterogeneous and complex for a larger measurement scale (or size of infiltration plot). These observations support the general idea behind the active region model that preferential flow pattern in unsaturated soils are dynamic and depend on water flow conditions. Further analyses of the test results indicate that the active-region model is able to capture the major features of the observed flow pattern at the scale of interest, and the determined parameter values do not significantly depend on the test conditions (initial water content and total amount of infiltrating water) for a given test site. This supports the validity of the active region model that considers that parameter to be a property of the corresponding unsaturated soil. Results also show that some intrinsic relation seems to exist between active

  6. Cytogenetic characterization of Melipona rufiventris Lepeletier 1836 and Melipona mondury Smith 1863 (Hymenoptera, Apidae by C banding and fluorochromes staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilce Meneses Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stingless bees Melipona rufiventris and M. mondury were analyzed cytogenetically by conventional staining with Giemsa, C-banding and sequential staining with the fluorochromes CMA3/DA/DAPI. Both species presented 2n = 18 and n = 9, except for one colony of M. rufiventris, in which some individuals had 2n = 19 due to the presence of a B chromosome. After Giemsa staining and C-banding the chromosomes appeared very condensed and presented a high heterochromatic content, making it difficult to localize the centromere and therefore to visualize the chromosomes morphology. The constitutive heterochromatin was located in interstitial chromosome regions covering most of the chromosomes extension and consisted mainly of AT, as shown by DAPI staining. The euchromatin was restricted to the chromosome extremities and was GC-rich, as evidenced by CMA3 staining. The B chromosome was CMA3-negative and DAPI-positive, a heterochromatic constitution similar to that of the A genome chromosomes.

  7. Fine mapping of a region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p in human glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesten, A. M.; Bijleveld, E. H.; Westerveld, A.; Hulsebos, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 10 is a frequent event in high grade gliomas. Earlier studies have shown that in most cases a complete copy of chromosome 10 is lost in the tumor. To define more accurately and specifically the region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p, we have screened a large

  8. Analysis of the terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and identification of the dif site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    The terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and the dif chromosome dimer resolution site were characterized. The Caulobacter genome contains skewed sequences that abruptly switch strands at dif and may have roles in chromosome maintenance and segregation. Absence of dif or the Xer...

  9. Application of conventional and FPG staining for the analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by low levels of dose in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.; Schmid, E.; Bauchinger, M.

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 0.05-0.5 Gy of 220 keV X-rays. After application of either a conventional or the fluorescence plus Giemsa (FPG) staining technique, the dose response for dicentrics and acentrics was studied. The analysis of exclusively first-division cells (M 1 ), carried out by the FPG method, revealed significantly higher aberration yields as compared with the results of the conventional method. The data from M 1 cells support the assumption of a linear dose response for both dicentrics and acentrics. The results are discussed with regard to the application of chromosome analyses for a cytogenetic dosimetry after exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  10. Radiation hybrids from human chromosome 3: A basis for the construction of region and specific sublibraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, L.; Cosmis, R.L.; Atchison, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are interested in identifying genes on human chromosome involved in disease processes. To date at least 20 different loci on this chromosome are implicated with various disease states. DNA libraries containing clones derived from a small chromosomal subregion implicated in a particular disease would greatly assist these studies. They have utilized the radiation hybrid (RH) technique to generate a series of somatic cell hybrids that contain small segments of human chromosome 3 as the only human genetic material. A Chinese hamster-human cell hybrid (Q314-2) containing only human chromosome 3 was used to prepare radiation hybrids. Cells were lethally X-irradiated with 6,000 rads and fused to Urd(??) Chinese hamster cells by PEG 1000 treatment. The majority of hybrids (>72%) analyzed retained portions of chromosome 3. The amount of chromosome 3 in each hybrid ranged from nearly all of the chromosome to very little. Currently these hybrids are being further characterized with single copy probes of known map location in order to isolate regions of chromosome 3 that contain specific disease locus. These reduced hybrids can then be used for the construction of region specific libraries and for the generation of new DNA probes from the specific region of interest

  11. Chromosomal location and gene paucity of the male specific region on papaya Y chromosome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Hou, S.; Hobza, Roman; Feltus, F.A.; Wang, X.; Jin, W.; Skelton, R.L.; Blas, A.; Lemke, C.; Saw, J.H.; Moore, P.H.; Alam, M.; Jiang, J.; Paterson, A.H.; Vyskot, Boris; Ming, R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 2 (2007), s. 177-185 ISSN 1617-4615 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/06/0056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : Carica papaya * repetitive sequences * sex chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2007

  12. Nucleolus organizer regions and B-chromosomes of wood mice (mammalia, rodentia, Apodemus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeskorov, G.G. [Yakutia Institute of Biology, Yakutsk (Russian Federation); Kartavtseva, I.V. [Biological Soil Institute, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zagorodnyuk, I.V. [Shmal`gausen Institute of Zoology, Kiev (Ukraine); Belyanin, A.N. [Saratov State Univ. (Russian Federation); Lyapunova, E.A. [Kol`tsov Institute of Developmental Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-02-01

    Distribution of nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in karyotypes was studied in 10 species of wood mice, including Apodemus flavicollis, A. sylvaticus, A. uralensis (=A. microps), A. fulvipectus (=A. falzfeini), A. ponticus, A. hyrcanicus, A. mystacinus, A. agrarius, A. peninsulae, and A. speciosus. Peculiarities of NOR location in karyotypes can be used in interspecific diagnostics of wood mice. Intraspecific polymorphism of A. sylvaticus, A. agrarius, and A. peninsulae in terms of the number of NORs and their localization in chromosomes can serve as evidence for karyological differentiation in certain populations of these species. The minimum number of active NORs in mice of the genus Apodemus is two to four. Two A. flavicollis wood mice with karyotypes containing one small acrocentric B-chromosome (2n = 49) were identified among animals captured in Estonia. In A. peninsulae, B-chromosomes were found among animals captured in the following regions: the vicinity of Kyzyl (one mouse with 17 microchromosomes, 2n = 65); the vicinity of Birakan (two mice with one metacentric chromosome each, 2n = 49); and in the Ussuri Nature Reserve (one mouse with five B-chromosomes, including three metacentric and two dotlike chromosomes; 2n = 53). In the latter animal, the presence of NORs on two metacentric B-chromosomes was revealed; this is the first case of identification of active NORs on extra chromosomes of mammals. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The {beta} crystallin genes on human chromosome 22 define a new region of homology with mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulsebos, T.J.M. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jenkins, N.A.; Gilbert, D.J. [ABL-Basic Research Program, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    The human {beta} crystallin genes CRYBB2, CRYBB2P1, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 are located in 22q11.2. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we mapped the mouse homologies of CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 (i.e., Crybb2, Crybb3, and Cryba4) to the central region of mouse chromosome 5. The homologue of human CRYBB2P1 is absent in mouse. These assignments define a new region of homology in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  14. [Chromosomal polymorphism in the populations of malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae (Diptera, Culicidae) in the Volga region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, M I; Moskaev, A V

    2016-06-01

    We studied the species composition and chromosomal variability of malaria mosquitoes in the Volga Basin (Upper, Middle, and Lower Volga regions). We investigated larvae karyotypes of sibling species of the Anopheles maculipennis group. We calculated the frequencies of chromosomal inversions in the local populations of the dominant species An. messeae. We discovered that karyotypic structure of An. messeae populations depends on landscape-climatic zones. Populations of the Upper, Middle and Lower Volga differ in frequency of chromosome inversions XL, 2R, 3R, and 3L.

  15. Control of bacterial chromosome replication by non-coding regions outside the origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Eubacteria is initiated by initiator protein(s) binding to specific sites within the replication origin, oriC. Recently, initiator protein binding to chromosomal regions outside the origin has attracted renewed attention; as such binding sites contribute to control...... the frequency of initiations. These outside-oriC binding sites function in several different ways: by steric hindrances of replication fork assembly, by titration of initiator proteins away from the origin, by performing a chaperone-like activity for inactivation- or activation of initiator proteins...... or by mediating crosstalk between chromosomes. Here, we discuss initiator binding to outside-oriC sites in a broad range of different taxonomic groups, to highlight the significance of such regions for regulation of bacterial chromosome replication. For Escherichia coli, it was recently shown that the genomic...

  16. Nucleolar organizer regions and a new chromosome number for Rhea americana (Aves: Rheiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José Gunski

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequential banding analysis (Giemsa-C-banding-Ag NOR of chromosomes of the common rhea (Rhea americana was performed. Metaphases were obtained by peripheral blood lymphocyte culture and monolayer embryo cell culture. The diploid chromosome number was 80, different from the 2n = 82 in previous reports. Macrochromosome pairs 1, 2 and 5 were submetacentric and pair 3, subacrocentric. The 4th pair was acrocentric and all of the microchromosomes appeared to be acrocentric, with the exception of a clearly metacentric pair which was fully heterochromatic. The Z was slightly larger than the W, both being acrocentric and C-band negative. Nucleolar organizer regions were observed in the secondary constriction of a microchromosome pair. Correct identification of the NOR-bearing pair was possible only by sequential analyses, Giemsa staining followed by the Ag-NOR technique.Foram efetuadas análises seqüenciais de bandeamento cromossômico (Giemsa-banda-C-AgNOR em material da espécie Rhea americana (ema com o objetivo de identificar os cromossomos portadores de regiões organizadoras de nucléolos e confirmar o cariótipo desta espécie. As metáfases foram obtidas de culturas de leucócitos e de células de embrião. O número diplóide de cromossomos, determinado pela análise de metáfases oriundas de 19 espécimes, foi de 80 (2n = 80, NF = 95, o que difere da literatura. Os pares de macrocromossomos números 1, 2 e 5 eram submetacêntricos e o par 3 era sub-acrocêntrico, confirmado pelo bandeamento C. O par 4 era acrocêntrico, bem como todos os microcromossomos, com exceção de um metacêntrico inteiramente heterocromático. O cromossomo Z era ligeiramente maior que o W, sendo ambos acrocêntricos e banda-C negativos. A região organizadora de nucléolos foi observada na constrição secundária de um par de microcromossomos. A correta identificação do par portador da NOR só foi possível com a utilização da análise seqüencial de colora

  17. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  18. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K. [Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofuni, Toshio; Tanabe, Kazumi; Awa, A.A.

    1979-02-01

    Thirty-four cases with Dp+ and Gp+, known to be chromosome heteromorphisms in man, were examined using Q- and C-staining methods. Of 18 cases with Dp+, 14 involved No. 15 chromosome and 2 each were No. 13 and No. 14 respectively. Of 16 cases with Gp+, 13 were concerned with No. 22 and the remaining 3 were No. 21. Short arm regions of eight cases with 15p+ and one with 14p+ were stained very darkly by the C-method, but did not fluoresce brilliantly by the Q-method. On the other hand, brightly fluorescing short arm regions observed in three cases with 15p+ and two with 22p+, were not very darkly stained by the C-method. In the remaining 20 cases, short arm regions were not stained positively by either method, but showed negatively or intermediately variable staining intensities. (author)

  20. Copy number variations of chromosome 16p13.1 region associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingason, A; Rujescu, D; Cichon, S

    2011-01-01

    Deletions and reciprocal duplications of the chromosome 16p13.1 region have recently been reported in several cases of autism and mental retardation (MR). As genomic copy number variants found in these two disorders may also associate with schizophrenia, we examined 4345 schizophrenia patients an...... disorder and dyslexia. Candidate genes in the region include NTAN1 and NDE1. We conclude that duplications and perhaps also deletions of chromosome 16p13.1, previously reported to be associated with autism and MR, also confer risk of schizophrenia....

  1. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteracaea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, K.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Lindhout, W.H.; Dijk, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The

  3. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Kitty; van der Hulst, R.G.M.; Lindhout, P.; Van Dijk, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The

  4. Chromosome region 2p25 is linked and associated with type 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous disorder which in- volves both genetic and environmental factors. ... Chromosome region 2p25 is linked and associated with type 1 diabetes in. Colombia. J. Genet. 89, 457–461] ... each primer and 1× Qiagen HotStarTaq Master Mix kit. The allelic sizes were determined using ...

  5. Fine Mapping and Evolution of a QTL Region on Cattle Chromosome 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthu, Ravikiran

    2009-01-01

    The goal of my dissertation was to fine map the milk yield and composition quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped to cattle chromosome 3 (BTA3) by Heyen et al. (1999) and to identify candidate genes affecting these traits. To accomplish this, the region between "BL41" and "TGLA263" was mapped to the cattle genome sequence assembly Btau 3.1 and a…

  6. Ring Chromosome 17 Not Involving the Miller-Dieker Region: A Case with Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonietta; Morrogh, Deborah; Farrell, Fiona; Balestrini, Simona; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Krithika, S; Sander, Josemir W; Waters, Jonathan J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are often identified in people with neurodevelopmental disorders including intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy. Ring chromosomes, which usually involve gene copy number loss, are formed by fusion of subtelomeric or telomeric chromosomal regions. Some ring chromosomes, including ring 14, 17, and 20, are strongly associated with seizure disorders. We report an individual with a ring chromosome 17, r(17)(p13.3q25.3), with a terminal 17q25.3 deletion and no short arm copy number loss, and with a phenotype characterized by intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy, including a propensity for nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

  7. Evolution of the DAZ gene and the AZFc region on primate Y chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jane-Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azoospermia Factor c (AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a unique product of segmental duplication. It consists almost entirely of very long amplicons, represented by different colors, and is frequently deleted in subfertile men. Most of the AZFc amplicons have high sequence similarity with autosomal segments, indicating recent duplication and transposition to the Y chromosome. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ gene within the red-amplicon arose from an ancestral autosomal DAZ-like (DAZL gene. It varies significantly between different men regarding to its copy number and the numbers of RNA recognition motif and DAZ repeat it encodes. We used Southern analyses to study the evolution of DAZ and AZFc amplicons on the Y chromosomes of primates. Results The Old World monkey rhesus macaque has only one DAZ gene. In contrast, the great apes have multiple copies of DAZ, ranging from 2 copies in bonobos and gorillas to at least 6 copies in orangutans, and these DAZ genes have polymorphic structures similar to those of their human counterparts. Sequences homologous to the various AZFc amplicons are present on the Y chromosomes of some but not all primates, indicating that they arrived on the Y chromosome at different times during primate evolution. Conclusion The duplication and transposition of AZFc amplicons to the human Y chromosome occurred in three waves, i.e., after the branching of the New World monkey, the gorilla, and the chimpanzee/bonobo lineages, respectively. The red-amplicon, one of the first to arrive on the Y chromosome, amplified by inverted duplication followed by direct duplication after the separation of the Old World monkey and the great ape lineages. Subsequent duplication/deletion in the various lineages gave rise to a spectrum of DAZ gene structure and copy number found in today's great apes.

  8. Fine mapping analysis confirms and strengthens linkage of four chromosomal regions in familial hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderhäll, Cilla; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Thai, Hanh T T; Cao, Jia; Chen, Yougen; Zhang, Xufeng; Shulu, Zu; van der Zanden, Loes F M; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Frisén, Louise; Roeleveld, Nel; Markljung, Ellen; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common male genital malformation and is regarded as a complex disease affected by multiple genetic as well as environmental factors. In a previous genome-wide scan for familial hypospadias, we reported suggestive linkage in nine chromosomal regions. We have extended this analysis by including new families and additional markers using non-parametric linkage. The fine mapping analysis displayed an increased LOD score on chromosome 8q24.1 and 10p15 in altogether 82 families. On chromosome 10p15, with the highest LOD score, we further studied AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and AKR1C4 involved in steroid metabolism, as well as KLF6 expressed in preputial tissue from hypospadias patients. Mutation analysis of the AKR1C3 gene showed a new mutation, c.643G>A (p.(Ala215Thr)), in a boy with penile hypospadias. This mutation is predicted to have an impact on protein function and structure and was not found in controls. Altogether, we homed in on four chromosomal regions likely to harbor genes for hypospadias. Future studies will aim for studying regulatory sequence variants in these regions. PMID:24986825

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  10. The gene for death agonist BID maps to the region of human 22q11.2 duplicated in cat eye syndrome chromosomes and to mouse chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footz, T K; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Riazi, M A; McDermid, H E

    1998-08-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a duplication of a segment of human chromosome 22q11.2. Only one gene, ATP6E, has been previously mapped to this duplicated region. We now report the mapping of the human homologue of the apoptotic agonist Bid to human chromosome 22 near locus D22S57 in the CES region. Dosage analysis demonstrated that BID is located just distal to the CES region critical for the majority of malformations associated with the syndrome (CESCR), as previously defined by a single patient with an unusual supernumerary chromosome. However, BID remains a good candidate for involvement in CES-related mental impairment, and its overexpression may subtly add to the phenotype of CES patients. Our mapping of murine Bid confirms that the synteny of the CESCR and the 22q11 deletion syndrome critical region immediately telomeric on human chromosome 22 is not conserved in mice. Bid and adjacent gene Atp6e were found to map to mousechromosome 6, while the region homologous to the DGSCR is known to map to mouse chromosome 16. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Gram staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  12. Comparative mapping in the beige-satin region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.; Kaplan, J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    The proximal end of mouse chromosome (Chr) 13 contains regions conserved on human chromosomes 1q42-q44, 6p23-p21, and 7p22-p13. This region also contains mutations that may be models for human disease, including beige (human Chediak-Higashi syndrome). An interspecific backcross of SB/Le and Mus spretus mice was used to generate a molecular genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 with an emphasis on the proximal region including beige (bg) and satin (sa). This map provides the gene order of the two phenotypic markers bg and sa relative to restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in 131 backcross animals. In parallel, we have created a physical map of the region using Nidogen (Nid) as a molecular starting point for cloning a YAC contig that was used to identify the beige gene. The physical map provides the fine-structure order of genes and anonymous DNA fragments that was not resolved by the genetic linkage mapping. The results show that the bg region of mouse Chr 13 is highly conserved on human Chr 1q42-q44 and provide a starting point for a complete functional analysis of the entire bg-sa interval. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Characterization of the OmyY1 Region on the Rainbow Trout Y Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B. Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the male-specific region on the Y chromosome of rainbow trout, which contains both sdY (the sex-determining gene and the male-specific genetic marker, OmyY1. Several clones containing the OmyY1 marker were screened from a BAC library from a YY clonal line and found to be part of an 800 kb BAC contig. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, these clones were localized to the end of the short arm of the Y chromosome in rainbow trout, with an additional signal on the end of the X chromosome in many cells. We sequenced a minimum tiling path of these clones using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The region is rich in transposons and rDNA, but also appears to contain several single-copy protein-coding genes. Most of these genes are also found on the X chromosome; and in several cases sex-specific SNPs in these genes were identified between the male (YY and female (XX homozygous clonal lines. Additional genes were identified by hybridization of the BACs to the cGRASP salmonid 4x44K oligo microarray. By BLASTn evaluations using hypothetical transcripts of OmyY1-linked candidate genes as query against several EST databases, we conclude at least 12 of these candidate genes are likely functional, and expressed.

  14. Trans-chromosomal recombination within the Ig heavy chain switch region in B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingzette, Mae; Spieker-Polet, Helga; Yam, Pi-Chen; Zhai, Shi-Kang; Knight, Katherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Somatic DNA rearrangements in B lymphocytes, including V(D)J gene rearrangements and isotype switching, generally occur in cis, i. e., intrachromosomally. We showed previously, however, that 3 to 7% of IgA heavy chains have the VH and Cα regions encoded in trans. To determine whether the trans-association of VH and Cα occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination, by trans-splicing, or by trans-chromosomal gene conversion, we generated and analyzed eight IgA-secreting rabbit hybridomas with trans-associated VH and Cα heavy chains. By ELISA and by nucleotide sequence analysis we found that the VH and Cα regions were encoded by genes that were in trans in the germline. We cloned the rearranged VDJ-Cα gene from a fosmid library of one hybridoma and found that the expressed VH and Cα genes were juxtaposed. Moreover, the juxtaposed VH and Cα genes originated from different IgH alleles. From the same hybridoma, we also identified a fosmid clone with the other expected product of a trans-chromosomal recombination. The recombination breakpoint occurred within the Sμ/Sα region, indicating that the trans-association of VH and Cα genes occurred by trans-chromosomal recombination during isotype switching. We conclude that trans-chromosomal recombination occurs at an unexpectedly high frequency (7%) within the IgH locus of B lymphocytes in normal animals, which may explain the high incidence of B-cell tumors that arise from oncogene translocation into the IgH locus. PMID:9751752

  15. Physical mapping in the Cri du Chat region on human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, D.M.; Bengtsson, U. [Univ. of California, Irvine (United States); Niebuhr, E. [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome is a segmental aneusomy associated with deletions in the short arm of human chromosome 5. More specifically, the cytogenetic band 5p15.2 must be deleted in order to manifest the typical phenotypic signs. We have studied several cell lines from individuals who have chromosomal abnormalities within this cytogenetic band but who do not have typical Cri du Chat syndrome. In fact, several individual studied have no discernible features of this syndrome. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and PCR analysis on somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the breakpoints relative to each other within this band. There is a great degree of phenotypic heterogeneity between several of the patients, even those which share common breakpoints. This heterogeneity makes it very difficult to narrow the region of interest to a very small (<1 Mb) region. In order to more thoroughly analyze this region, we have assembled a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of part of this region. This contig has been analyzed for STS content and covers approximately a 1.5-2.0 Mb region within 5p15.2. In addition, we have constructed a radiation hybrid map of the region. The YACs contained within the minimal contig have been used as hybridization probes to isolate corresponding cosmid clones within the region of interest. These cosmids, in turn, are being utilized to obtain potential exons using exon amplification. Several cosmids within this region have been isolated by STS content and potential exons have been isolated from them. These exons have been used as probes to isolate cDNA clones from the region. It is our hope that isolation of genes throughout the region of interest will allow a better understanding of the etiology of Cri du Chat.

  16. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) gene region

    OpenAIRE

    Vortkamp, Andrea; Gessler, Manfred; Paslier, D. Le; Elaswarapu, R.; Smith, S.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the zinc finger gene GLI3 has been shown to be the cause of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), at least in some GCPS translocation patients. To characterize this genomic region on human chromosome 7p13, we have isolated a VAC contig of more than 1000 kb including the GLI3 gene. In this contig the gene itself spans at least 200-250 kb. A CpG island is located in the vicinity of the 5' region of the known GLI3 cDNA, implying a potential promoter region.

  17. The regional microvascular density of the gluteus medius tendon determined by immunohistochemistry with CD31 staining: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, William H; Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Woodcock, Santiago; Arias, Luis F; Sampson, Thomas G; Gallo, Jaime A

    2015-01-01

    There are no studies to date about the vascularisation into the gluteus medius tendon. The purpose of this study was to define the microvessel density of the gluteus medius in 3 zones through a special staining with CD31 and to identify regional differences in microvascular density that may have implications for the healing. We obtained 12 complete gluteus medius tendons from cadavers who had been an average age of 30.3 years old (range 18 to 55). All the donors were males with no known history of hip abnormalities.Following a rigorous protocol, each gluteus medius tendon was divided in 3 portions. Each gluteus medius tendon was divided in 3 portions (I: musculotendinous, II: Tendon, III: Tendon-Bone junction). There were regional differences between all anatomic zones in both the transverse section (p<0.001) and the longitudinal section (p = 0.007). Furthermore, a significant difference was found between zones II and I (mean difference -23.45 IC95% -38.77 to -8.13, p<0.001) and between zones II and III (mean difference -26.08 IC95% -41.39 to -10.76, p<0.001) in transverse section. In longitudinal sections, this difference was found as well between zones II and I (mean difference -29.48 IC95% -51.54 to -7.43, p = 0.01), but not between zones II and III (mean difference -10.87 IC95% -32.93 to 11.18, p = 0.67). The microvessel density was significantly lower in the length of the tendon (central portion) compared to the other 2 regions.

  18. Characterization of chromosomal regions conserved in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and lost by Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouillot, Flavie; Fayolle, Corinne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2008-10-01

    The transformation of the enteropathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis into the plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis, has been accompanied by extensive genetic loss. This study focused on chromosomal regions conserved in Y. pseudotuberculosis and lost during its transformation into Y. pestis. An extensive PCR screening of 78 strains of the two species identified five regions (R1 to R5) and four open reading frames (ORFs; orf1 to orf4) that were conserved in Y. pseudotuberculosis and absent from Y. pestis. Their conservation in Y. pseudotuberculosis suggests a positive selective pressure and a role during the life cycle of this species. Attempts to delete two ORFs (orf3 and orf4) from the chromosome of strain IP32953 were unsuccessful, indicating that they are essential for its viability. The seven remaining loci were individually deleted from the IP32953 chromosome, and the ability of each mutant to grow in vitro and to kill mice upon intragastric infection was evaluated. Four loci (orf1, R2, R4, and R5) were not required for optimal growth or virulence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, orf2, encoding a putative pseudouridylate synthase involved in RNA stability, was necessary for the optimal growth of IP32953 at 37 degrees C in a chemically defined medium (M63S). Deletion of R1, a region predicted to encode the methionine salvage pathway, altered the mutant pathogenicity, suggesting that the availability of free methionine is severely restricted in vivo. R3, a region composed mostly of genes of unknown functions, was necessary for both optimal growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis at 37 degrees C in M63S and for virulence. Therefore, despite their loss in Y. pestis, five of the nine Y. pseudotuberculosis-specific chromosomal loci studied play a role in the survival, growth, or virulence of this species.

  19. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: further delineation of the critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, A J; el-Shanti, H; Murray, J C; McDermid, H E; Patil, S R

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility.

  20. Minute supernumerary ring chromosome 22 associated with cat eye syndrome: Further delineation of the critical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); El-Shanti, H. [Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is typically associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome (inv dup 22pter-22q11.2) resulting in four copies of this region. We describe an individual showing the inheritance of a minute supernumerary double ring chromosome 22, which resulted in expression of all cardinal features of CES. The size of the ring was determined by DNA dosage analysis and FISH analysis for five loci mapping to 22q11.2. The probes to the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E were present in four copies, whereas D22S57 and D22S181 were present in two copies. This finding further delineates the distal boundary of the critical region of CES, with ATP6E being the most distal duplicated locus identified. The phenotypically normal father and grandfather of the patient each had a small supernumerary ring chromosome and demonstrated three copies for the loci D22S9, D22S43, and ATP6E. Although three copies of this region have been reported in other cases with CES features, it is possible that the presence of four copies leads to greater susceptibility. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  2. Novel transcripts discovered by mining genomic DNA from defined regions of bovine chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberlein Annett

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linkage analyses strongly suggest a number of QTL for production, health and conformation traits in the middle part of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. The identification of the molecular background underlying the genetic variation at the QTL and subsequent functional studies require a well-annotated gene sequence map of the critical QTL intervals. To complete the sequence map of the defined subchromosomal regions on BTA6 poorly covered with comparative gene information, we focused on targeted isolation of transcribed sequences from bovine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones mapped to the QTL intervals. Results Using the method of exon trapping, 92 unique exon trapping sequences (ETS were discovered in a chromosomal region of poor gene coverage. Sequence identity to the current NCBI sequence assembly for BTA6 was detected for 91% of unique ETS. Comparative sequence similarity search revealed that 11% of the isolated ETS displayed high similarity to genomic sequences located on the syntenic chromosomes of the human and mouse reference genome assemblies. Nearly a third of the ETS identified similar equivalent sequences in genomic sequence scaffolds from the alternative Celera-based sequence assembly of the human genome. Screening gene, EST, and protein databases detected 17% of ETS with identity to known transcribed sequences. Expression analysis of a subset of the ETS showed that most ETS (84% displayed a distinctive expression pattern in a multi-tissue panel of a lactating cow verifying their existence in the bovine transcriptome. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate that the exon trapping method based on region-specific BAC clones is very useful for targeted screening for novel transcripts located within a defined chromosomal region being deficiently endowed with annotated gene information. The majority of identified ETS represents unknown noncoding sequences in intergenic regions on BTA6 displaying a

  3. Methylation profiling in individuals with uniparental disomy identifies novel differentially methylated regions on chromosome 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Andrew J.; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Dupre, Yann; Stathaki, Elisavet; Sailani, Mohammad Reza; Baumer, Alessandra; Schinzel, Albert; Mackay, Deborah J.; Robinson, David O.; Cobellis, Gilda; Cobellis, Luigi; Brunner, Han G.; Steiner, Bernhard; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2010-01-01

    The maternal and paternal genomes possess distinct epigenetic marks that distinguish them at imprinted loci. In order to identify imprinted loci, we used a novel method, taking advantage of the fact that uniparental disomy (UPD) provides a system that allows the two parental chromosomes to be studied independently. We profiled the paternal and maternal methylation on chromosome 15 using immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA and hybridization to tiling oligonucleotide arrays. Comparison of six individuals with maternal versus paternal UPD15 revealed 12 differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Putative DMRs were validated by bisulfite sequencing, confirming the presence of parent-of-origin-specific methylation marks. We detected DMRs associated with known imprinted genes within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region, such as SNRPN and MAGEL2, validating this as a method of detecting imprinted loci. Of the 12 DMRs identified, eight were novel, some of which are associated with genes not previously thought to be imprinted. These include a site within intron 2 of IGF1R at 15q26.3, a gene that plays a fundamental role in growth, and an intergenic site upstream of GABRG3 that lies within a previously defined candidate region conferring an increased maternal risk of psychosis. These data provide a map of parent-of-origin-specific epigenetic modifications on chromosome 15, identifying DNA elements that may play a functional role in the imprinting process. Application of this methodology to other chromosomes for which UPD has been reported will allow the systematic identification of imprinted sites throughout the genome. PMID:20631049

  4. Genetic and physical map of the von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis (NF1) region on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagle, M.K.; Parruti, G.; Xu, W.; Solomon, E. (Somatic Cell Genetics Lab., London (England)); Ponder, B.A.J. (Univ. of Cambridge (England))

    1990-09-01

    The von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) locus has been previously assigned to the proximal long arm of chromosome 17, and two NF1 patients have been identified who have constitutional balanced translocations involving 17q11.2. The authors have constructed a cosmid library from a chromosome-mediated gene transfectant, KLT8, that contains approximately 10% of chromosome 17, including 17q11.2. Cosmids isolated from this library have been mapped across a panel of somatic cell hybrids, including the hybrids from the two patients, and have been localized to seven small regions of proximal 17q. They have 5 cosmids that map directly above the two NF1 translocations, and 11 cosmids that map directly below. Of these, 2 cosmids in each region are linked to the disease locus and 3 of these cosmids show no recombination. One distal cosmid, 2B/B35, detects the two NF1 translocations by pulsed-field gel analysis and has been used to produce a long-range restriction map that covers the translocations.

  5. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, NY (United States)); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Isolation of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce chromosomal region and recombinational mapping of dunce sequences with restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ronald L.; Davidson, Norman

    1984-01-01

    Using the method of chromosomal walking, we have isolated a contiguous region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome which corresponds to salivary gland chromosome bands 3C12 to 3D4. This five-band region contains approximately 100 kilobases of DNA, including those sequences comprising dunce, a gene which functions in memory and cyclic nucleotide metabolism. Genome blots of DNA from flies carrying several different chromosomal aberrations with breakpoints in the region have been probed w...

  7. Dynamics of rye chromosome 1R regions with high or low crossover frequency in homology search and synapsis development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohelia T Valenzuela

    Full Text Available In many organisms, homologous pairing and synapsis depend on the meiotic recombination machinery that repairs double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs produced at the onset of meiosis. The culmination of recombination via crossover gives rise to chiasmata, which locate distally in many plant species such as rye, Secale cereale. Although, synapsis initiates close to the chromosome ends, a direct effect of regions with high crossover frequency on partner identification and synapsis initiation has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the dynamics of distal and proximal regions of a rye chromosome introgressed into wheat to define their role on meiotic homology search and synapsis. We have used lines with a pair of two-armed chromosome 1R of rye, or a pair of telocentrics of its long arm (1RL, which were homozygous for the standard 1RL structure, homozygous for an inversion of 1RL that changes chiasma location from distal to proximal, or heterozygous for the inversion. Physical mapping of recombination produced in the ditelocentric heterozygote (1RL/1RL(inv showed that 70% of crossovers in the arm were confined to a terminal segment representing 10% of the 1RL length. The dynamics of the arms 1RL and 1RL(inv during zygotene demonstrates that crossover-rich regions are more active in recognizing the homologous partner and developing synapsis than crossover-poor regions. When the crossover-rich regions are positioned in the vicinity of chromosome ends, their association is facilitated by telomere clustering; when they are positioned centrally in one of the two-armed chromosomes and distally in the homolog, their association is probably derived from chromosome elongation. On the other hand, chromosome movements that disassemble the bouquet may facilitate chromosome pairing correction by dissolution of improper chromosome associations. Taken together, these data support that repair of DSBs via crossover is essential in both the search of the homologous partner

  8. Study of Y Chromosome Microdeletion in AZF Region in Infertile Males of Isfahan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Motovali-Bashi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: One of the main genetic factors of infertility is the deletions in the chromosome Y. Accordingly this study was conducted to determine the frequency of microdeletion of AZF region in infertile men of Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 100 infertile men referred to the Infertility Center of Isfahan and 100 fertile men as controls were randomly selected. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood and amplified by sequence tagged sites-polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR method. The presence of microdeletion in AZF locus was diagnosed. Results: No AZFa, AZFb or AZFc deletions were found in the control group. Microdeletions were observed in one patient in AZFb region, eight patients in AZFc region and two patients in AZFa region. Conclusion: The incidence of Yq microdeletions in Iranian population is similar to the international frequency. Our data agree with other studies regarding microdeletions of AZFc, but for microdeletions of AZFa (2% our results show smaller frequency and differ significantly with many studies. Key words: Infertility, Y chromosome, Microdeletion

  9. Identification of ovule transcripts from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozias-Akins Peggy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apomixis, asexual seed production in plants, holds great potential for agriculture as a means to fix hybrid vigor. Apospory is a form of apomixis where the embryo develops from an unreduced egg that is derived from a somatic nucellar cell, the aposporous initial, via mitosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism regulating aposporous initial specification will be a critical step toward elucidation of apomixis and also provide insight into developmental regulation and downstream signaling that results in apomixis. To discover candidate transcripts for regulating aposporous initial specification in P. squamulatum, we compared two transcriptomes derived from microdissected ovules at the stage of aposporous initial formation between the apomictic donor parent, P. squamulatum (accession PS26, and an apomictic derived backcross 8 (BC8 line containing only the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum. Toward this end, two transcriptomes derived from ovules of an apomictic donor parent and its apomictic backcross derivative at the stage of apospory initiation, were sequenced using 454-FLX technology. Results Using 454-FLX technology, we generated 332,567 reads with an average read length of 147 base pairs (bp for the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 363,637 reads with an average read length of 142 bp for the BC8 ovule transcriptome library. A total of 33,977 contigs from the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 26,576 contigs from the BC8 ovule transcriptome library were assembled using the Multifunctional Inertial Reference Assembly program. Using stringent in silico parameters, 61 transcripts were predicted to map to the ASGR-carrier chromosome, of which 49 transcripts were verified as ASGR-carrier chromosome specific. One of the alien expressed genes could be assigned as tightly linked to the ASGR by screening of apomictic and sexual F1s. Only one transcript, which did not map to the ASGR

  10. Transcript catalogs of human chromosome 21 and orthologous chimpanzee and mouse regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Xiaolu; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive representation of the gene content of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21q) remains of interest for the study of Down syndrome, its associated phenotypic features, and mouse models. Here we compare transcript catalogs for Hsa21q, chimpanzee chromosome 21 (Ptr21q), and orthologous regions of mouse chromosomes 16, 17, and 10 for open reading frame (ORF) characteristics and conservation. The Hsa21q and mouse catalogs contain 552 and 444 gene models, respectively, of which only 162 are highly conserved. Hsa21q transcripts were used to identify orthologous exons in Ptr21q and assemble 533 putative transcripts. Transcript catalogs for all three organisms are searchable for nucleotide and amino acid sequence features of ORF length, repeat content, experimental support, gene structure, and conservation. For human and mouse comparisons, three additional summaries are provided: (1) the chromosomal distribution of novel ORF transcripts versus potential functional RNAs, (2) the distribution of species-specific transcripts within Hsa21q and mouse models of Down syndrome, and (3) the organization of sense-antisense and putative sense-antisense structures defining potential regulatory mechanisms. Catalogs, summaries, and nucleotide and amino acid sequences of all composite transcripts are available and searchable at http://gfuncpathdb.ucdenver.edu/iddrc/chr21/home.php. These data sets provide comprehensive information useful for evaluation of candidate genes and mouse models of Down syndrome and for identification of potential functional RNA genes and novel regulatory mechanisms involving Hsa21q genes. These catalogs and search tools complement and extend information available from other gene annotation projects.

  11. Robust associations of four new chromosome regions from genome-wide analyses of type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A; Walker, Neil M; Cooper, Jason D; Smyth, Deborah J; Downes, Kate; Plagnol, Vincent; Bailey, Rebecca; Nejentsev, Sergey; Field, Sarah F; Payne, Felicity; Lowe, Christopher E; Szeszko, Jeffrey S; Hafler, Jason P; Zeitels, Lauren; Yang, Jennie H M; Vella, Adrian; Nutland, Sarah; Stevens, Helen E; Schuilenburg, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Maisuria, Meeta; Meadows, William; Smink, Luc J; Healy, Barry; Burren, Oliver S; Lam, Alex A C; Ovington, Nigel R; Allen, James; Adlem, Ellen; Leung, Hin-Tak; Wallace, Chris; Howson, Joanna M M; Guja, Cristian; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Simmonds, Matthew J; Heward, Joanne M; Gough, Stephen CL; Dunger, David B; Wicker, Linda S; Clayton, David G

    2007-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) primary genome-wide association (GWA) scan1 on seven diseases, including the multifactorial, autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), shows significant association (P < 5 × 10−7 between T1D and six chromosome regions: 12q24, 12q13, 16p13, 18p11, 12p13 and 4q27. Here, we attempted to validate these and six other top findings in 4,000 individuals with T1D, 5,000 controls and 2,997 family trios that were independent of the WTCCC study. We confirmed unequivocally the associations of 12q24, 12q13, 16p13 and 18p11 (Pfollow-up ≤ 1.35 × 10−9; Poverall ≤ 1.15 × 10−14), leaving eight regions with small effects or false-positive associations with T1D. We also obtained evidence for chromosome 18q22 (Poverall = 1.38 × 10−8) from a genome-wide association study of nonsynonymous SNPs. Several regions, including 18q22 and 18p11, showed association with autoimmune thyroid disease. This study increases the number of T1D loci with compelling evidence from six to at least ten. PMID:17554260

  12. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, S.G.; O' Connell, P. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States)); Dixon, M.J. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)); Nigro, M.A. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)); Kelts, K.A. (Black Hills Neurology, Rapid City, SD (United States)); Markand, O.N. (Indiana Univ., Indianopolis (United States)); Shiang, R.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Terry, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight linkage to the colony-stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF1-R) locus in a single large family. The authors performed linkage analysis in the original and three additional STHE pedigrees with eight chromosome 5q microsatellite markers and placed several of the most closely linked markers on an existing radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region. The results provide strong evidence for genetic locus homogeneity and assign STHE to a 5.9-cM interval defined by CSF1-R and D5S379, which are separated by an RH map distance of 74 centirays (roughly 2.2-3.7 Mb). Two polymorphic markers (D5S119 and D5S209) lie within this region, but they could not be ordered with respect to STHE. RH mapping eliminated the candidate genes GABRA1 and GABRG2, which encode GABA-A receptor components, by showing that they are telomeric to the target region. 45 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Extensive polymorphism and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis (Characiformes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Nirchio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis were investigated using differential staining techniques (C-banding, Ag-NOR staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with an 18S rDNA probe. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 52, karyotype composition and sex chromosome determination system of the ZZ/ZW type were the same as previously described in other species of the genus Triportheus. However, extensive variation regarding nucleolus organizer regions (NOR different from other species was observed. 18S rDNA sequences were distributed on nine chromosome pairs, but the number of chromosomes with Ag-NORs was usually lower, reaching a maximum of four chromosomes. When sequential staining experiments were performed, it was demonstrated that: 1. active NORs usually corresponded to segments with 18S rDNA genes identified in FISH experiments; 2. several 18S rDNA sequences were not silver-stained, suggesting that they do not correspond to active NORs; and 3. some chromosomes with silver-stained regions did not display any 18S rDNA signals. These findings characterize an extensive polymorphism associated with the NOR-bearing chromosomes of T. venezuelensis and emphasize the importance of combining traditional and molecular techniques in chromosome studies.

  14. DNA repair and crossing over favor similar chromosome regions as discovered in radiation hybrid of Triticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ajay

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uneven distribution of recombination across the length of chromosomes results in inaccurate estimates of genetic to physical distances. In wheat (Triticum aestivum L. chromosome 3B, it has been estimated that 90% of the cross over events occur in distal sub-telomeric regions representing 40% of the chromosome. Radiation hybrid (RH mapping which does not rely on recombination is a strategy to map genomes and has been widely employed in animal species and more recently in some plants. RH maps have been proposed to provide i higher and ii more uniform resolution than genetic maps, and iii to be independent of the distribution patterns observed for meiotic recombination. An in vivo RH panel was generated for mapping chromosome 3B of wheat in an attempt to provide a complete scaffold for this ~1 Gb segment of the genome and compare the resolution to previous genetic maps. Results A high density RH map with 541 marker loci anchored to chromosome 3B spanning a total distance of 1871.9 cR was generated. Detailed comparisons with a genetic map of similar quality confirmed that i the overall resolution of the RH map was 10.5 fold higher and ii six fold more uniform. A significant interaction (r = 0.879 at p = 0.01 was observed between the DNA repair mechanism and the distribution of crossing-over events. This observation could be explained by accepting the possibility that the DNA repair mechanism in somatic cells is affected by the chromatin state in a way similar to the effect that chromatin state has on recombination frequencies in gametic cells. Conclusions The RH data presented here support for the first time in vivo the hypothesis of non-casual interaction between recombination hot-spots and DNA repair. Further, two major hypotheses are presented on how chromatin compactness could affect the DNA repair mechanism. Since the initial RH application 37 years ago, we were able to show for the first time that the iii

  15. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  16. Further evidence for a relationship between the 5p15 chromosome region and the oculoauriculovertebral anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Siggberg, Linda; Knuutila, Sakari; von Koskull, Harriet; Taskinen, Mervi; Peippo, Maarit

    2008-10-01

    The oculoauriculovertebral anomaly (OAV) or Goldenhar syndrome is a malformation complex that has been described in several chromosomal rearrangements. Among them a deletion of the terminal 5p has recurred in seven previous patients. We wish to report on an additional such patient in order to reinforce the significance of this genomic region in the cause of at least a subgroup of OAV cases. Future studies, particularly in the OAV patients with a lateral facial cleft, might define one genetic background of the disorder. Our patient had a complex translocation chromosome 45,XX, inv(2) (q32q37)mat, dic(5;21) (p15.3;q22.3)dn, resulting in a terminal 5p deletion, a terminal deletion of 21q demonstrated by FISH studies, and a duplication of 21q22.11-q22.12 documented by molecular karyotyping. In addition to OAV she developed myelodysplasia treated with bone marrow transplantation. We discuss her clinical findings with reference to her karyotype findings and review the patients with OAV and a terminal deletion of 5p. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Geographic stratification of linkage disequilibrium: a worldwide population study in a region of chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Neira Anna

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies of haplotype diversity in a number of genomic regions have suggested that long stretches of DNA are preserved in the same chromosome, with little evidence of recombination events. The knowledge of the extent and strength of these haplotypes could become a powerful tool for future genetic analysis of complex traits. Different patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD have been found when comparing individuals of African and European descent, but there is scarce knowledge about the worldwide population stratification. Thus, the study of haplotype composition and the pattern of LD from a global perspective are relevant for elucidating their geographical stratification, as it may have implications in the future analysis of complex traits. We have typed 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a chromosome 22 region--previously described as having high LD levels in European populations -- in 39 different world populations. Haplotype structure has a clear continental structure with marked heterogeneity within some continents (Africa, America. The pattern of LD among neighbouring markers exhibits a strong clustering of all East Asian populations on the one hand and of Western Eurasian populations (including Europe on the other, revealing only two major LD patterns, but with some very specific outliers due to specific demographic histories. Moreover, it should be taken into account that African populations are highly heterogeneous. The present results support the existence of a wide (but not total communality in LD patterns in human populations from different continental regions, despite differences in their demographic histories, as population factors seem to be less relevant compared with genomic forces in shaping the patterns of LD.

  18. Chromosomal diversity and phylogenetic inferences concerning thrips (Insecta, Thysanoptera) in a semi-arid region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, R O; Affonso, P R A M; Silva, J C

    2010-11-16

    The order Thysanoptera is composed of cosmopolitan phytophagous and predaceous insects with diverse life histories, behaviors and habits. This order is currently thought to form a trichotomy with Hemiptera and Psocodea; Hemiptera and Thysanoptera are considered to be sister groups. The interrelationships within Thysanoptera remain unclear and cytotaxonomic studies are scarce in thrips. We report, for the first time, chromosomal data on seven species of thrips collected from a semi-arid region in the States of Bahia and Pernambuco (Northeast Brazil). A distinctive chromosomal pattern was observed in Thysanoptera when compared to other members within the infraclass Paraneoptera. Considerable karyotypic differences were also found within genera and species of Thysanoptera. Based on these data, we suggest that Paraneoptera forms a polyphyletic group and that Terebrantia and Tubulifera should be regarded as sister groups. The high chromosomal variability observed in Thysanoptera indicates that chromosomal rearrangements have played a key role in their speciation pathways.

  19. Adaptive Localization of Focus Point Regions via Random Patch Probabilistic Density from Whole-Slide, Ki-67-Stained Brain Tumor Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan M. Alomari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  20. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of the ACH gene. Two additional loci, D4S412 and IDUA, showed strong linkage to the disease (Zmax=3.34 at {theta}=0.03 and Zmax=3.35 at {theta}=0.0, respectively). Multipoint analysis and direct counting of recombinants places the ACH gene in a 2.5 cM region between the marker D4S43 and the chromosome 4p telomere. No evidence was found for genetic heterogeneity. The ACH region contains a number of genes, including that for the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR3, which are being evaluated as candidates for the ACH gene. This identification of tightly linked polymorphic markers, as well as being the first step in the characterization of the ACH gene, offers the possibility of DNA based prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  1. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nogueira Brum Fontes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23, Pernambuco (n = 41, Rio de Janeiro (n = 22 and Rondônia (RO (n = 78. All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1% yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  2. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Deletion and duplication within the p11.2 region of chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCorquodale, D.J.; McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O. [Univ. of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 7 1/2-year-old male patient presented with mild mental retardation, speech delay, hyperactivity, behavioral problems, mild facial hypoplasia, short broad hands, digital anomalies, and self-injurious behavior. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed a deletion of 17p11.2 in about 40% of the metaphases examined, suggesting that the patient had Smith-Magenis Syndrome. A similar pattern of mosaicism in peripheral blood cells, but not in fibroblasts in which all cells displayed the deletion, has been previously reported. Since some cases of Smith-Magenis Syndrome have a deletion that extends into the region associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Syndrome, we examined interphase cells with a CMT1A-specific probe by the method of fluorescence in situ hybridization. The CMT1A region was not deleted, but about 40% of the cells gave signals indicating a duplication of the CMT1A region. The patient has not presented neuropathies associated with CMT at this time. Future tracking of the patient should be informative.

  4. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  5. Incompatibility between X chromosome factor and pericentric heterochromatic region causes lethality in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, M Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C

    2012-06-01

    The Dobzhansky-Muller model posits that postzygotic reproductive isolation results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: alleles that function in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. Progress in identifying and characterizing factors involved in postzygotic isolation in Drosophila has remained slow, mainly because Drosophila melanogaster, with all of its genetic tools, forms dead or sterile hybrids when crossed to its sister species, D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. To circumvent this problem, we used chromosome deletions and duplications from D. melanogaster to map two hybrid incompatibility loci in F(1) hybrids with its sister species. We mapped a recessive factor to the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the X chromosome in D. simulans and D. mauritiana, which we call heterochromatin hybrid lethal (hhl), which causes lethality in F(1) hybrid females with D. melanogaster. As F(1) hybrid males hemizygous for a D. mauritiana (or D. simulans) X chromosome are viable, the lethality of deficiency hybrid females implies that a dominant incompatible partner locus exists on the D. melanogaster X. Using small segments of the D. melanogaster X chromosome duplicated onto the Y chromosome, we mapped a dominant factor that causes hybrid lethality to a small 24-gene region of the D. melanogaster X. We provide evidence suggesting that it interacts with hhl(mau). The location of hhl is consistent with the emerging theme that hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila involve heterochromatic regions and factors that interact with the heterochromatin.

  6. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... mixing it with a violet stain (called a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to ... reveals an abnormal collection of pleural fluid. The Gram stain can help identify the bacteria that might ...

  7. Strong selective sweeps associated with ampliconic regions in great ape X chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger

    2014-01-01

    The unique inheritance pattern of X chromosomes makes them preferential targets of adaptive evolution. We here investigate natural selection on the X chromosome in all species of great apes. We find that diversity is more strongly reduced around genes on the X compared with autosomes, and that a ......The unique inheritance pattern of X chromosomes makes them preferential targets of adaptive evolution. We here investigate natural selection on the X chromosome in all species of great apes. We find that diversity is more strongly reduced around genes on the X compared with autosomes...

  8. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. PMID:21296764

  9. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to both sequence and location between Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (DDAH; datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas Dna...

  10. Loss of heterozygosity in Wilms' tumors, studied for six putative tumor suppressor regions, is limited to chromosome 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Devilee, P.; Bliek, J.; Mandjes, I.; de Kraker, J.; Heyting, C.; Slater, R. M.; Westerveld, A.

    1990-01-01

    Studies on the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human malignancies have shown that a number of different chromosomal regions associated with putative tumor suppressor genes may be involved in any one given tumor. We have carried out a similar study on Wilms' tumor using a range of DNA markers for a

  11. On the Wegener granulomatosis associated region on chromosome 6p21.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csernok Elena

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wegener granulomatosis (WG belongs to the heterogeneous group of systemic vasculitides. The multifactorial pathophysiology of WG is supposedly caused by yet unknown environmental influence(s on the basis of genetic predisposition. The presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA in the plasma of patients and genetic involvement of the human leukocyte antigen system reflect an autoimmune background of the disease. Strong associations were revealed with WG by markers located in the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II region in the vicinity of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DPB1 and the retinoid X receptor B (RXRB loci. In order to define the involvement of the 6p21.3 region in WG in more detail this previous population-based association study was expanded here to the respective 3.6 megabase encompassing this region on chromosome 6. The RXRB gene was analysed as well as a splice-site variation of the butyrophilin-like (BTNL2 gene which is also located within the respective region. The latter polymorphism has been evaluated here as it appears as a HLA independent susceptibility factor in another granulomatous disorder, sarcoidosis. Methods 150–180 German WG patients and a corresponding cohort of healthy controls (n = 100–261 were used in a two-step study. A panel of 94 microsatellites was designed for the initial step using a DNA pooling approach. Markers with significantly differing allele frequencies between patient and control pools were individually genotyped. The RXRB gene was analysed for single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP. The splice-site polymorphism in the BTNL2 gene was also investigated by RFLP analysis. Results A previously investigated microsatellite (#1.0.3.7, Santa Cruz genome browser (UCSC May 2004 Freeze localisation: chr6:31257596-34999883, which was used as a positive control, remained associated throughout the whole two

  12. On the Wegener granulomatosis associated region on chromosome 6p21.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyld, Paweł; Jagiello, Peter; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Epplen, Joerg T

    2006-01-01

    Background Wegener granulomatosis (WG) belongs to the heterogeneous group of systemic vasculitides. The multifactorial pathophysiology of WG is supposedly caused by yet unknown environmental influence(s) on the basis of genetic predisposition. The presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in the plasma of patients and genetic involvement of the human leukocyte antigen system reflect an autoimmune background of the disease. Strong associations were revealed with WG by markers located in the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) region in the vicinity of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 and the retinoid X receptor B (RXRB) loci. In order to define the involvement of the 6p21.3 region in WG in more detail this previous population-based association study was expanded here to the respective 3.6 megabase encompassing this region on chromosome 6. The RXRB gene was analysed as well as a splice-site variation of the butyrophilin-like (BTNL2) gene which is also located within the respective region. The latter polymorphism has been evaluated here as it appears as a HLA independent susceptibility factor in another granulomatous disorder, sarcoidosis. Methods 150–180 German WG patients and a corresponding cohort of healthy controls (n = 100–261) were used in a two-step study. A panel of 94 microsatellites was designed for the initial step using a DNA pooling approach. Markers with significantly differing allele frequencies between patient and control pools were individually genotyped. The RXRB gene was analysed for single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). The splice-site polymorphism in the BTNL2 gene was also investigated by RFLP analysis. Results A previously investigated microsatellite (#1.0.3.7, Santa Cruz genome browser (UCSC) May 2004 Freeze localisation: chr6:31257596-34999883), which was used as a positive control, remained associated throughout the whole two-step approach

  13. A STUDY OF SILVER STAINING NUCLEOLAR ORGANISING REGIONS AGNOR SCORE AS PROGNOSTIC MARKER IN BREAST LESIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN HYDERABAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Nithyananda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nucleolar Organising Regions (NORS are segments of DNA closely associated with nucleolus, which code for ribosomal DNA consisting of non-histone proteins, which are argyrophilic. They are demonstrated as black, brown spots on staining with silver colloidal staining technique. Hence, they are called AgNORs. The assessment of AgNORs correlates with rate of proliferation, cell cycle time, since shorter the cell cycle, greater the ribosomal activity and protein synthesis higher AgNOR count. 1 AgNORs have been studied on NHL, GIT neoplasms, skin, gynaecological neoplasms, pulmonary neoplasms, prostate, bladder and breast cancer. In breast cancer, AgNOR can be used for early detection, grading and staging of disease. In this study, we have tried to correlate AgNOR character to morphological prognostic markers. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 159 cases presenting with lump in the breast were included in the study. Specimens were subjected to histopathological examination. Sections cut three micron thickness were stained for AgNOR with silver colloidal AgNOR staining technique. AgNOR count was done on both benign and malignant lesions. RESULTS Benign breast lesions were more common compared to malignant lesions. The age of the patients ranged from 15-79 yrs. The mean age for benign lesions was 31 yrs. and for malignant lesions 43 yrs. The most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma and most common malignant lesion was infiltrating ductal carcinoma. AgNOR spots were seen as black/brown spots. AgNOR score was higher in malignant lesions when compared to benign lesions. Among malignant lesions, AgNOR score was found to be higher in high grade, metastatic tumours. CONCLUSION AgNOR count is a useful technique, which can supplement other prognostic markers like Ki-67, mitotic index. A long follow up study is required to confirm the prognostic utility of AgNOR count done in this study

  14. A 3 Mb YAC contig in the region of Usher Ib on chromosome 11q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.; Weston, M. [Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Under syndrome type Ib, a recessive disorder characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and vestibular dysfunction has been mapped to chromosome 11q13. A 3 Mb YAC contig has been constructed covering the critical region of Usher Ib and spanning over eight loci: D11S1321, D11S527, D11S533, OMP, D11S906, D11S911, D11S937, and D11S918. This contig was constructed by PCR screening using the above described DNA markers of the CEPH mega YAC library. Additional YACs were identified by data presented in the Genethon physical map. A long-range restriction map has been constructed from both YAC and genomic DNA using STS markers as probes. Cosmid libraries from a subset of YACs have been screened for the location of CpG islands. In addition, potential transcribed regions have been identified by 3{prime} exon trapping of cosmid pools and placed on the YAC physical map.

  15. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position.

  16. AN INTEGRATED MAP OF HUMAN-CHROMOSOME-13 ALLOWING REGIONAL LOCALIZATION OF GENETIC-MARKERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOY, RF; WIJNGAARD, A; VERLIND, E; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    37 CA repeats, 5 STSs, 9 ESTs, and 4 genes were mapped to 19 different intervals of chromosome 13 determined by the cytogenetic breakpoints of 19 different cell lines with interstitial deletions or translocations involving various parts of chromosome 13. A framework genetic linkage map was

  17. Hyperexpression of HOXC13, located in the 12q13 chromosomal region, in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated human liposarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANTILE, MONICA; GALLETTA, FRANCESCA; FRANCO, RENATO; AQUINO, GABRIELLA; SCOGNAMIGLIO, GIOSUÈ; MARRA, LAURA; CERRONE, MARGHERITA; MALZONE, GABRIELLA; MANNA, ANGELA; APICE, GAETANO; FAZIOLI, FLAVIO; BOTTI, GERARDO; DE CHIARA, ANNAROSARIA

    2013-01-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue neoplasm in adults and is characterized by neoplastic adipocyte proliferation. Some subtypes of LPSs show aberrations involving the chromosome 12. The most frequent are t(12;16) (q13;p11) present in more than 90% of myxoid LPSs and 12q13-15 amplification in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs. In this region, there are important oncogenes such as CHOP (DDIT3), GLI, MDM2, CDK4, SAS, HMGA2, but also the HOXC locus, involved in development and tumor progression. In this study, we evaluated the expression of HOXC13, included in this chromosomal region, in a series of adipocytic tumors. We included 18 well-differentiated, 4 dedifferentiated, 11 myxoid and 6 pleomorphic LPSs as well as 13 lipomas in a tissue microarray. We evaluated the HOXC13 protein and gene expression by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. Amplification/translocation of the 12q13-15 region was verified by FISH. Immunohistochemical HOXC13 overexpression was observed in all well-differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs, all characterized by the chromosome 12q13-15 amplification, and confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, our data show a deregulation of the HOXC13 marker in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs, possibly related to 12q13-15 chromosomal amplification. PMID:24085196

  18. Hyperexpression of HOXC13, located in the 12q13 chromosomal region, in well‑differentiated and dedifferentiated human liposarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantile, Monica; Galletta, Francesca; Franco, Renato; Aquino, Gabriella; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Marra, Laura; Cerrone, Margherita; Malzone, Gabriella; Manna, Angela; Apice, Gaetano; Fazioli, Flavio; Botti, Gerardo; De Chiara, Annarosaria

    2013-12-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue neoplasm in adults and is characterized by neoplastic adipocyte proliferation. Some subtypes of LPSs show aberrations involving the chromosome 12. The most frequent are t(12;16) (q13;p11) present in more than 90% of myxoid LPSs and 12q13-15 amplification in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs. In this region, there are important oncogenes such as CHOP (DDIT3), GLI, MDM2, CDK4, SAS, HMGA2, but also the HOXC locus, involved in development and tumor progression. In this study, we evaluated the expression of HOXC13, included in this chromosomal region, in a series of adipocytic tumors. We included 18 well-differentiated, 4 dedifferentiated, 11 myxoid and 6 pleomorphic LPSs as well as 13 lipomas in a tissue microarray. We evaluated the HOXC13 protein and gene expression by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. Amplification/translocation of the 12q13-15 region was verified by FISH. Immunohistochemical HOXC13 overexpression was observed in all well-differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs, all characterized by the chromosome 12q13-15 amplification, and confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, our data show a deregulation of the HOXC13 marker in well‑differentiated and dedifferentiated LPSs, possibly related to 12q13-15 chromosomal amplification.

  19. Localization of the MEN1 gene to a small region within chromosome 11q13 by deletion mapping in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, C.; Larsson, C.; Blomberg, C.; Nordenskjoeld, M.; Sandelin, K.; Falkmer, U.; Werner, S.; Skogseid, B.; Oeberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine neoplasm of the parathyroid glands, the pancreatic islet parenchyma, and the anterior pituitary gland, was recently mapped to chromosome 11q13 based on genetic linkage in families. The authors now show that the pathogenesis of MEN1-associated parathyroid lesions involves unmasking of a recessive mutation at the disease locus and that sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism shares the same mechanisms. By examination of allele losses in MEN1-associated lesions, they could define deletions of chromosome 11 and map the MEN1 locus to a small region within chromosome band 11q13, telomeric to the PYGM locus. In contrast, a low incidence of deletions involving the MEN1 gene was found in sporadic pituitary adenomas

  20. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products

  1. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A. (ICRF Human Immunogenetics, London (England))

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products.

  2. Over-representation of specific regions of chromosome 22 in cells from human glioma correlate with resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Adrienne C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant form of brain tumor. Despite treatment including surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation, these tumors typically recur. The recurrent tumor is often resistant to further therapy with the same agent, suggesting that the surviving cells that repopulate the tumor mass have an intrinsic genetic advantage. We previously demonstrated that cells selected for resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU are near-diploid, with over-representation of part or all of chromosomes 7 and 22. While cells from untreated gliomas often have over-representation of chromosome 7, chromosome 22 is typically under-represented. Methods We have analyzed cells from primary and recurrent tumors from the same patient before and after in vitro selection for resistance to clinically relevant doses of BCNU. Karyotypic analyses were done to demonstrate the genetic makeup of these cells, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses have defined the region(s of chromosome 22 retained in these BCNU-resistant cells. Results Karyotypic analyses demonstrated that cells selected for BCNU resistance were near-diploid with over-representation of chromosomes 7 and 22. In cells where whole copies of chromosome 22 were not identified, numerous fragments of this chromosome were retained and inserted into several marker and derivative chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses using whole chromosome paints confirmed this finding. Additional FISH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 22 have allowed us to map the over-represented region to 22q12.3–13.32. Conclusion Cells selected for BCNU resistance either in vivo or in vitro retain sequences mapped to chromosome 22. The specific over-representation of sequences mapped to 22q12.3–13.32 suggest the presence of a DNA sequence important to BCNU survival and/or resistance located in

  3. A map of nuclear matrix attachment regions within the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey A.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Chernov, Igor P.

    2007-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. To explore the DNA domain organization of the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1, we have...

  4. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijverberg, K; Van Der Hulst, R G M; Lindhout, P; Van Dijk, P J

    2004-02-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The genus includes sexual diploid as well as apomictic polyploid, mostly triploid, plants. Apomictic Taraxacum is diplosporous, parthenogenetic, and has autonomous endosperm formation. Previous studies have indicated that these three apomixis elements are controlled by more than one locus in Taraxacum and that diplospory inherits as a dominant, monogenic trait ( Ddd; DIP). A bulked segregant analysis provided 34 AFLP markers that were linked to DIP and were, together with two microsatellite markers, used for mapping the trait. The map length was 18.6 cM and markers were found on both sides of DIP, corresponding to 5.9 and 12.7 cM, respectively. None of the markers completely co-segregated with DIP. Eight markers were selected for PCR-based marker development, of which two were successfully converted. In contrast to all other mapping studies of apomeiosis to date, our results showed no evidence for suppression of recombination around the DIP locus in Taraxacum. No obvious evidence for sequence divergence between the DIP and non- DIP homologous loci was found, and no hemizygosity at the DIP locus was detected. These results may indicate that apomixis is relatively recent in Taraxacum.

  5. Genetic and molecular analysis in the 70CD region of the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, T; Mink, M; Pál, M; Lászlóffy, Z; Lepesant, J; Maróy, P

    2000-04-04

    A collection of lethal and semi-lethal P-element insertions in the 70CD region of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster was used to investigate genes and gene arrangements by a combination of genetic, cytological, functional and molecular methods. The 12 lethal insertions studied fall into seven complementation groups of six genes. Lethal phases, expression patterns and other phenotypic aspects of these genes were determined. The genes and additional available sequences were placed on cloned genomic DNA fragments and arranged in an EcoRI map of 150kb that covers approximately the bands 70C7-8 to 70D1. Determination of deficiency breakpoints links the genetic, physical and molecular data. The sequences adjacent to seven independent P-element insertions were established after plasmid rescue or polymerase chain reaction. Similarity searches allowed the assignment of the P-element insertions to known mutations, expressed sequence tags, sequence tagged sites, or homologous genes of other species. Among these were identified a putative transacylase, a putative cell cycle gene, and the gene responsible for the dominant Polycomb-suppressor phenotype of devenir. The genomic sequence of the l(3)70Ca/b gene reveals a novel heat shock protein (hsc70Cb). l(3)70Da was identified as a member of the CDC48/PEX1 ATPase family and its coding sequence was determined.

  6. Mutagenesis of the repeat regions of herpesviruses cloned as bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuguang; Nair, Venugopal

    2010-01-01

    Cloning of infectious and pathogenic herpesvirus genomes in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector greatly facilitates genetic manipulation of their genomes. BAC-based mutagenesis strategies of viruses can advance our understanding of the viral gene functions and determinants of pathogenicity, and can ultimately help to develop molecularly defined improved vaccines against virus diseases. Unlike the virus stocks, where continuous passage in tissue culture can lead to phenotypic alterations such as loss of virulence or immunogenicity, viral genomes can be stably maintained with high fidelity as BAC clones in bacteria. Thanks to the "RecA" or the inducible phage "lambda Red" homologous recombination systems and a variety of positive and negative selection strategies, viral genomes cloned as BAC can be efficiently manipulated in E. coli. All the manipulations, including DNA fragment deletion or insertion, point mutations, or even multiple modifications in repeat regions can be carried out accurately in E. coli, and the mutated DNA can be used directly to reconstitute mutant viruses in transfected host cells. Furthermore, using self-excision strategies, the non-viral bacterial replicon sequence can be excised automatically during virus reconstitution, thus generating recombinant viruses virtually identical to the wild-type parent viruses. Here, we describe the various technologies of manipulating the infectious BAC clones of a group E herpesvirus as an example through a combination of different approaches.

  7. Loss of chromosome 1p/19q in oligodendroglial tumors: refinement of chromosomal critical regions and evaluation of internexin immunostaining as a surrogate marker.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-03-01

    Loss of chromosome 1p\\/19q in oligodendrogliomas represents a powerful predictor of good prognosis. Expression of internexin (INA), a neuronal specific intermediate filament protein, has recently been proposed as a surrogate marker for 1p\\/19q deletion based on the high degree of correlation between both parameters in oligodendrogliomas. The aim of this study was to assess further the diagnostic utility of INA expression in a set of genetically well-characterized oligodendrogliomas. On the basis of a conservative approach for copy number determination, using both comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization, INA expression as a surrogate marker for 1p\\/19q loss had both reduced specificity (80%) and sensitivity (79%) compared with respective values of 86% and 96% reported in the previous report. The histologic interpretation and diagnostic value of INA expression in oligodendrogliomas should therefore be assessed with greater caution when compared with 1p\\/19q DNA copy number analysis. In addition, DNA copy number aberrations of chromosomes 10, 16, and 17 were detected exclusively in 1p\\/19q codeleted samples, suggesting that other regions of the genome may contribute to the 1p\\/19q-deleted tumor phenotype inthese samples.

  8. Isolation of candidate genes and physical mapping in the Familial Dysautonomia region of chromosome 9q31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A.; Liebert, C.B.; Monahan, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Familial Dysautonomia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the developmental loss of both sensory and autonomic neurons. We have mapped the DYS gene to human chromosome 9q31-33 by genetic linkage analysis of 26 Ashkenazi Jewish pedigrees. The gene is located in a 3 cM interval between D9S310 and D9S105. We have examined several new SSCP and repeat polymorphisms and have successfully narrowed the minimum candidate region to approximately 300 kb using linkage disequilibrium. A YAC contig that spans 1.5 Mb has been constructed using both Alu-PCR and STS screening methods. In addition, the YACs were used to isolate cosmids by direct hybridization to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory chromosome 9 flow-sorted cosmid library. Having cloned the minimal candidate region, we are now constructing a detailed transcription map of the DYS region of chromosome 9. Using exon amplification, we have rapidly identified exon sequences and have used these as probes to isolate three candidate genes. These genes are currently being sequenced and will be assessed for mutations using both SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A detailed physical map of the DYS region, as well as sequence and homology information for DYS candidate genes, will be presented.

  9. Identification of 2nd chromosome region translocated onto the W chromosome by RFLP with EST-cDNA clones in the Gensei-kouken strains of the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakurup Sreekumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In silkworms, sex-limited strains are either obtained spontaneously or induced by X-rays or gamma rays. When a fragment of an autosome carrying a dominant allele of those genes responsible for certain characters is translocated onto a W chromosome, the female of the successive generations will express these phenotypic characters and sex discrimination can be facilitated. Gensei-kouken strains are sex-limited strains of silkworms developed by irradiating the pupae with gamma rays, by which a portion of the second chromosome is translocated onto the W chromosome. In these improved strains, the females are yellow-blooded and spin yellow cocoons. By using the EST-cDNA clones mapped on the Z chromosome, we identified the sex according to the polymorphic banding pattern or intensity of the signals. Furthermore, by using the clones on the second chromosome, the region of the second chromosome translocated onto the W chromosome was also defined. In both the A95 and A 96 strains selected for the present study, only the mid-portion of the second chromosome was translocated. The differences in length of the fragments translocated in these strains are discussed.

  10. Association of the NuMA region on chromosome 11q13 with breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Stefan; Roth, Richard B; Hoyal, Carolyn R; Reneland, Richard; Marnellos, George; Kiechle, Marion; Schwarz-Boeger, Ulrike; Griffiths, Lyn R; Ebner, Florian; Rehbock, Joachim; Cantor, Charles R; Nelson, Matthew R; Braun, Andreas

    2005-02-08

    The development of breast cancer is a complex process that involves multiple genes at many stages, from initial cell cycle dysregulation to disease progression. To identify genetic variations that influence this process, we conducted a large-scale association study using a collection of German cases and controls and >25,000 SNPs located within 16,000 genes. One of the loci identified was located on chromosome 11q13 [odds ratio (OR)=1.85, P=0.017]. The initial association was subsequently tested in two independent breast cancer collections. In both sample sets, the frequency of the susceptibility allele was increased in the cases (OR=1.6, P=0.01). The susceptibility allele was also associated with an increase in cancer family history (P=0.1). Fine mapping showed that the region of association extends approximately 300 kb and spans several genes, including the gene encoding the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA). A nonsynonymous SNP (A794G) in NuMA was identified that showed a stronger association with breast cancer risk than the initial marker SNP (OR=2.8, P=0.005 initial sample; OR=2.1, P=0.002 combined). NuMA is a cell cycle-related protein essential for normal mitosis that is degraded in early apoptosis. NuMA-retinoic acid receptor alpha fusion proteins have been described in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Although the potential functional relevance of the A794G variation requires further biological validation, we conclude that variations in the NuMA gene are likely responsible for the observed increased breast cancer risk.

  11. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-01-01

    Background Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Methods Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. Results We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. Conclusions We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. PMID:26747863

  12. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen S; South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-04-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Malignancy-Associated Regions of Transcriptional Activation: Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Common Chromosomal Regions of a Recurrent Transcriptional Activation in Human Prostate, Breast, Ovarian, and Colon Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadi V. Glinsky

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite remarkable advances in our understanding of a genetic basis of cancer, the precise molecular definition of the phenotypically relevant genetic features associated with human epithelial malignancies remains a significant and highly relevant challenge. Here we performed a systematic analysis of the chromosomal positions of cancer-associated transcripts for prostate, breast, ovarian, and colon tumors, and identified short segments of human chromosomes that appear to represent a common target for transcriptional activation in major epithelial malignancies in human. These cancer-associated transcriptomeres correspond well to the regions of transient transcriptional activity on chromosomes 1q21-q23 (144-160 Mbp, 12q13 (52-63 Mbp, 17q21 (38-50 Mbp, 17q23-q25 (72-82 Mbp, 19p13 (1-16 Mbp, and Xq28 (132-142 Mbp during human cell cycle, suggesting a common epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional activation. Consistent with this idea, two of these transcriptomeres (12q13 and 17q21 seemed to be related to the p53regulated transcriptional clusters, and some of the cancer-associated transcriptomeres appeared to correspond well to the recently identified regions of increased gene expression on human chromosomes.

  14. GNE-886: A Potent and Selective Inhibitor of the Cat Eye Syndrome Chromosome Region Candidate 2 Bromodomain (CECR2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Terry D; Audia, James E; Bellon, Steve; Burdick, Daniel J; Bommi-Reddy, Archana; Côté, Alexandre; Cummings, Richard T; Duplessis, Martin; Flynn, E Megan; Hewitt, Michael; Huang, Hon-Ren; Jayaram, Hariharan; Jiang, Ying; Joshi, Shivangi; Kiefer, James R; Murray, Jeremy; Nasveschuk, Christopher G; Neiss, Arianne; Pardo, Eneida; Romero, F Anthony; Sandy, Peter; Sims, Robert J; Tang, Yong; Taylor, Alexander M; Tsui, Vickie; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shumei; Wang, Yongyun; Xu, Zhaowu; Zawadzke, Laura; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Albrecht, Brian K; Magnuson, Steven R; Cochran, Andrea G

    2017-07-13

    The biological function of bromodomains, epigenetic readers of acetylated lysine residues, remains largely unknown. Herein we report our efforts to discover a potent and selective inhibitor of the bromodomain of cat eye syndrome chromosome region candidate 2 (CECR2). Screening of our internal medicinal chemistry collection led to the identification of a pyrrolopyridone chemical lead, and subsequent structure-based drug design led to a potent and selective CECR2 bromodomain inhibitor (GNE-886) suitable for use as an in vitro tool compound.

  15. Assignment of the gene coding for human peroxisomal 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase (ACAA) to chromosome region 3p22----p23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout, A.; Hoovers, J. M.; Bakker, E.; Mannens, M. M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Westerveld, A.; Tager, J. M.; Benne, R.

    1989-01-01

    The chromosomal location of the human gene coding for peroxisomal 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase (ACAA) was determined with the aid of cDNA and genomic probes by screening of rodent x human somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The results localize the gene to chromosome region 3p22----p23

  16. Systematic characterisation of disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements by FISH: cytogenetically and genetically anchored YACs identify microdeletions and candidate regions for mental retardation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, J; Nothwang, H G; van der Maarel, S

    1999-01-01

    Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements (DBCRs) have been instrumental in the isolation of many disease genes. To facilitate the molecular cytogenetic characterisation of DBCRs, we have generated a set of >1200 non-chimeric, cytogenetically and genetically anchored CEPH YACs...... the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network (MCN), a collaborative effort of, at present, 270 cytogenetic laboratories throughout the world. In this pilot study, we have characterised 10 different MR associated chromosome regions delineating candidate regions for MR. Five of these regions are narrowed to breakpoint...

  17. A novel chromosome region maintenance 1-independent nuclear export signal of the large form of hepatitis delta antigen that is required for the viral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C H; Chang, S C; Wu, C H; Chang, M F

    2001-03-16

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a satellite virus of hepatitis B virus, as it requires hepatitis B virus for virion production and transmission. We have previously demonstrated that sequences within the C-terminal 19-amino acid domain flanking the isoprenylation motif of the large hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg-L) are important for virion assembly. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that in the absence of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), the wild-type HDAg-L was localized in the nuclei of transfected COS7 cells. Nevertheless, in the presence of HBsAg, the HDAg-L became both nuclei- and cytoplasm-distributed in about half of the cells. An HDAg-L mutant with a substitution of Pro-205 to alanine could neither form HDV-like particles nor shift the subcellular localization in the presence of HBsAg. In addition, nuclear trafficking of HDAg-L in heterokaryons indicated that HDAg-L is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. A proline-rich HDAg peptide spanning amino acid residues 198 to 210, designated NES(HDAg-L), can function as a nuclear export signal (NES) in Xenopus oocytes. Pro-205 is critical for the NES function. Furthermore, assembly of HDV is insensitive to leptomycin B, indicating that the NES(HDAg-L) directs nuclear export of HDAg-L to the cytoplasm via a chromosome region maintenance 1-independent pathway.

  18. Increased disomic homozygosity in the telomeric region of chromosome 21 among Down Syndrome individuals with duodenal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Feingold, E.; Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ., Altanta, GA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Although duodenal atresia (DA) is present in only 4-7% of all Down Syndrome (DS) individuals, 30-50% of all congenital duodenal atresias occur in the DS population, suggesting the presence of gene(s) on chromosome 21 that play an important role in intestinal development. We recently proposed a chromosome 21 gene dosage model to explain the phenotypic variance seen among DS individuals and presented a strategy to map genes involved in these phenotypic traits. We suggest that {open_quote}hyper-dosage{close_quote} resulting from normal allelic differences explains the phenotypic variation. A proportion of trisomic genotypes would exceed some activity threshold and express the trait. In affected individuals, this increase in expression is due to the presence of two identical copies of {open_quote}susceptibility{close_quote} allele, inherited from a heterozygous parent of origin. Individuals with trisomy 21 and a specific phenotypic defect should exhibit increased levels of disomic homozygosity in the region containing the gene involved in the defect`s etiology. These data can be used to map these genes. Using this approach, we have examined markers along the long arm of chromosome 21 among DS individuals with DA and determined the degree of disomic homozygosity at each marker. This frequency was compared to the level of disomic homozygosity among our entire DS study population consisting of approximately 380 DS families to test for linkage between DA and each marker. Preliminary analysis of 13 DS cases with DA indicates an increase in disomic homozygosity along the distal region of the chromosome, from HMG14 to D21S171, the most telomeric marker analyzed. An additional 15 cases are currently being analyzed to confirm and better define this candidate region.

  19. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Port-Wine Stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Port-Wine Stains KidsHealth / For Parents / Port-Wine Stains What's ... Manchas de vino de oporto What Are Port-Wine Stains? A port-wine stain is a type ...

  1. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  2. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent molecular studies of breakpoints of recurrent chromosome rearrangements revealed the role of genomic architecture in their formation. In particular, segmental duplications representing blocks of >1 kb with >90% sequence homology were shown to mediate non-allelic homologous reco...

  3. Definition of a critical region on chromosome 18 for congenital aural atresia by arrayCGH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Jonkers, Y.M.H.; Nuijten, I.; Janssen, I.M.; Vliet, W. van der; Huys, E.; Vermeesch, J.; Buggenhout, G.J.C.M. van; Fryns, J.P.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Terhal, P.; Lacombe, D.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van

    2003-01-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. Congenital aural atresia (CAA), or narrow external auditory canals, occurs in approximately 66% of all patients who have a terminal deletion 18q. The present report describes a series of 20 patients with CAA,

  4. Definition of a critical region on chromosome 18 for congenital aural atresia by arrayCGH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, JA; Jonkers, Y; Nuijten, [No Value; Janssen, [No Value; van der Vliet, W; Huys, E; Vermeesch, J; Van Buggenhout, G; Fryns, JP; Admiraal, R; Terhal, P; Lacombe, D; van Kessel, AG; Smeets, D; Schoenmakers, EFPM; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, CM

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 occur in similar to1 in 10,000 live births. Congenital aural atresia (CAA), or narrow external auditory canals, occurs in similar to66% of all patients who have a terminal deletion 18q. The present report describes a series of 20 patients with CAA, of whom

  5. Involvement of the chromosomal region 11q13 in renal oncocytoma : Case report and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuhaus, C; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; Storkel, S; Stockle, M; Mensch, B; Huber, C; Decker, HJ

    Renal oncocytomas comprise a cytogenetically heterogeneous group of tumors consisting potentially of cytogenetic distinguishable subgroups. Review of the literature revealed loss of chromosome 1 and Y as a possible anomaly for at least one subset of oncocytomas. The frequent finding of

  6. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2pter----p12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vijlder, J. J.; Dinsart, C.; Libert, F.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Bikker, H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Vassart, G.

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kb thyroid peroxidase cDNA of human origin was used as probe for Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from human somatic cells and human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The results showed that the gene coding for human thyroid peroxidase is located on chromosome. 2. Further analysis of

  7. Physical map of mouse Chromosome 17 in the region relevant for positional cloning of the hybrid sterility 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trachtulec, Z.; Vincek, V. [Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States); Hamvas, R.M.J. [Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hybrid sterility 1 (Hst1) is the major gene responsible for sterility of male hybrids between Mus musculus and certain laboratory strains. Thus, Hst1 is of importance in studying both postreproductive isolation of closely related species and male fertility. It has been mapped to mouse chromosome 17 in the region corresponding to the third inversion of the t haplotypes. The aim of the present study was to construct a physical map of the Hst1 region as the first step in an effort to clone the gene. Three yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries (Princeton, Whitehead, and ICRF) were screened with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) oligonucleotide primers and DNA probes specific for loci previously mapped into the region of the third inversion. The isolated YAC clones were restriction mapped and arranged into contigs. Sixteen YAC clones were arranged into a single contig encompassing a region approximately 2000 kb long based on restriction mapping of highly overlapping but independently derived YAC clones. Five new loci in the region of the third inversion were mappd and the order and approximate physical distances of 12 loci established in this contig. The Hst1 gene maps approximately 0.2 cM proximal to the D17Ph1 locus encompassed by the YAC contig. Since the contig extends at least 1200 kb proximal to D17Ph1, it should contain the Hst1 gene.

  8. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to sequence and location among Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas DnaA rejuvenation sequences 1 and 2 (DARS1 and DARS2) reactivate DnaAADP to DnaAATP. The structural organization of oriC, datA, DARS1, and DARS2 were found conserved among 59 fully sequenced E. coli genomes, with differences primarily in the non-functional spacer regions between key protein binding sites. The relative distances from oriC to datA, DARS1, and DARS2, respectively, was also conserved despite of large variations in genome size, suggesting that the gene dosage of either region is important for bacterial growth. Yet all three regions could be deleted alone or in combination without loss of viability. Competition experiments during balanced growth in rich medium and during mouse colonization indicated roles of datA, DARS1, and DARS2 for bacterial fitness although the relative contribution of each region differed between growth conditions. We suggest that this fitness advantage has contributed to conservation of both sequence and chromosomal location for datA, DARS1, and DARS2. PMID:26441936

  9. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  10. The first cytogenetic data on Strumigenys louisianae Roger, 1863 (Formicidae: Myrmicinae: Dacetini: the lowest chromosome number in the Hymenoptera of the neotropical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Alves-Silva

    Full Text Available In the present study, the first cytogenetic data was obtained for the ant species Strumigenys louisianae, from a genus possessing no previous cytogenetic data for the Neotropical region. The chromosome number observed was 2n = 4, all possessing metacentric morphology. Blocks rich in GC base pairs were observed in the interstitial region of the short arm of the largest chromosome pair, which may indicate that this region corresponds to the NORs. The referred species presented the lowest chromosome number observed for the subfamily Myrmicinae and for the Hymenoptera found in the Neotropical region. Observation of a low chromosome number karyotype has been described in Myrmecia croslandi, in which the occurrence of tandem fusions accounts for the most probable rearrangement for its formation. The accumulation of cytogenetic data may carry crucial information to ensure deeper understanding of the systematics of the tribe Dacetini.

  11. [FISH analysis of chromosomes of sweet potato(Ipomoea batatas cv.Xushu No.18)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia-Li; Qi, Da-Shi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Hui-Juan; Sun, Jian-Ying; Cao, Qing-He; Ma, Dai-Fu; Li, Zong-Yun

    2010-02-01

    In order to understand the chromosome structure of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Xushu 18), molecular cytogenetic analyses were carried out on I. batatas. by using 45S rDNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (45S rDNA-FISH), self genomic in situ hybridization (self-GISH), and silver staining techniques. Twelve, sixteen, and eighteen regions were silver stained in the interphase nucleus of I. batatas. The results of FISH analysis demonstrated 16 or 18 signals with different intensity on chromosomes of I. batatas. Self-GISH analysis showed that the intensive signals on I. batatas mitotic chromosomes were distributed along the chromosomes. However, the signals located in centromeric, subcentromeric, and telomeric regions were stronger and denser than those in other regions.

  12. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  13. Image-based stained glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present a method of restyling an image so that it approximates the visual appearance of a work of stained glass. To this end, we develop a novel approach which involves image warping, segmentation, querying, and colorization along with texture synthesis. In our method, a given input image is first segmented. Each segment is subsequently transformed to match real segments of stained glass queried from a database of image exemplars. By using real sources of stained glass, our method produces high quality results in this nascent area of nonphotorealistic rendering. The generation of the stained glass requires only modest amounts of user interaction. This interaction is facilitated with a unique region-merging tool.

  14. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L. [Institut Pasteur a Paris (France); Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Association between genetic variation in a region on chromosome 11 and schizophrenia in large samples from Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietschel, M; Mattheisen, M; Degenhardt, F

    2012-01-01

    the recruitment of very large samples of patients and controls (that is tens of thousands), or large, potentially more homogeneous samples that have been recruited from confined geographical areas using identical diagnostic criteria. Applying the latter strategy, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS...... an additional 2569 SCZ patients and 4088 controls (from Germany, The Netherlands and Denmark). Genetic variation in a region on chromosome 11 that contains the candidate genes AMBRA1, DGKZ, CHRM4 and MDK was significantly associated with SCZ in the combined sample (n=11 540; P=3.89 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR)=1...

  17. Analysis of two novel cDNAs from the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Jiralerspong, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. To date, only one gene encoding snRNA U3 has been mapped to this region. Here we report the identification of two novel genes, designated 463 and B9, which have been mapped to the SMS region. A full-length cDNA corresponding to each of these genes has been cloned and sequenced. Deletion analysis has been conducted on somatic cell hybrids retaining the del(17)(p11.2) chromosome from each of 15 SMS patients by PCR of sequence tagged sites for the cDNAs and confirmed by Southern analysis. The gene 463 is deleted in 15/15 patients analyzed to date, whereas the gene B9 is deleted in 10/15 of the patients analyzed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to analyze additional SMS patients for hemizygosity at these loci. A physical map of the region is being constructed to determine the relative location of these cDNAs within 17p11.2. Our studies to date, thus, suggest that although both genes 463 and B9 are located within 17p11.2, gene 463 is more likely to be associated with SMS. Complete and exhaustive definition of the critical interval is required to demonstrate the role and importance of gene 463 in SMS.

  18. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  19. Parental imprinting of human chromosome region 11p15.3-pter involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and various human neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Hoovers, J. M.; Redeker, E.; Verjaal, M.; Feinberg, A. P.; Little, P.; Boavida, M.; Coad, N.; Steenman, M.; Bliek, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cytogenetic and DNA analyses of patients with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) enabled us to refine the localization of the syndrome at 11p15.3-pter to two distinct regions. One chromosome region (BWSCR1) is near the insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) genes. The other region

  20. Validated context-dependent associations of coronary heart disease risk with genotype variation in the chromosome 9p21 region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusk, Christine M; Dyson, Greg; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    variations marking the 9p21 region for explaining variation in CHD risk? We analyzed a sample of 7,589 (3,869 females and 3,720 males) European American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We confirmed CHD-SNP genotype associations for two 9p21 region marker SNPs previously......Markers of the chromosome 9p21 region are regarded as the strongest and most reliably significant genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals for Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; this was recently confirmed by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis. However, while these associations...... are significant at the population level, they may not be clinically relevant predictors of risk for all individuals. We describe here the results of a study designed to address the question: What is the contribution of context defined by traditional risk factors in determining the utility of DNA sequence...

  1. A Meiotic Drive Element in the Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides Is Located Within a 102 kb Region of Chromosome V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Pyle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides is an agriculturally important fungus because of its association with maize and its propensity to contaminate grain with toxic compounds. Some isolates of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element known as Spore killer (SkK that causes nearly all surviving meiotic progeny from an SkK × Spore killer-susceptible (SkS cross to inherit the SkK allele. SkK has been mapped to chromosome V but the genetic element responsible for meiotic drive has yet to be identified. In this study, we used cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers to genotype individual progeny from an SkK × SkS mapping population. We also sequenced the genomes of three progeny from the mapping population to determine their single nucleotide polymorphisms. These techniques allowed us to refine the location of SkK to a contiguous 102 kb interval of chromosome V, herein referred to as the Sk region. Relative to SkS genotypes, SkK genotypes have one extra gene within this region for a total of 42 genes. The additional gene in SkK genotypes, herein named SKC1 for Spore Killer Candidate 1, is the most highly expressed gene from the Sk region during early stages of sexual development. The Sk region also has three hyper-variable regions, the longest of which includes SKC1. The possibility that SKC1, or another gene from the Sk region, is an essential component of meiotic drive and spore killing is discussed.

  2. CRA-1 uncovers a double-strand break-dependent pathway promoting the assembly of central region proteins on chromosome axes during C. elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Smolikov

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The synaptonemal complex (SC, a tripartite proteinaceous structure that forms between homologous chromosomes during meiosis, is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation. Here we identify CRA-1, a novel and conserved protein that is required for the assembly of the central region of the SC during C. elegans meiosis. In the absence of CRA-1, central region components fail to extensively localize onto chromosomes at early prophase and instead mostly surround the chromatin at this stage. Later in prophase, central region proteins polymerize along chromosome axes, but for the most part fail to connect the axes of paired homologous chromosomes. This defect results in an inability to stabilize homologous pairing interactions, altered double-strand break (DSB repair progression, and a lack of chiasmata. Surprisingly, DSB formation and repair are required to promote the polymerization of the central region components along meiotic chromosome axes in cra-1 mutants. In the absence of both CRA-1 and any one of the C. elegans homologs of SPO11, MRE11, RAD51, or MSH5, the polymerization observed along chromosome axes is perturbed, resulting in the formation of aggregates of the SC central region proteins. While radiation-induced DSBs rescue this polymerization in cra-1; spo-11 mutants, they fail to do so in cra-1; mre-11, cra-1; rad-51, and cra-1; msh-5 mutants. Taken together, our studies place CRA-1 as a key component in promoting the assembly of a tripartite SC structure. Moreover, they reveal a scenario in which DSB formation and repair can drive the polymerization of SC components along chromosome axes in C. elegans.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis chromosomal status of subjects from the regions in the vicinity of uranium-contaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovicic, D.; Milacie, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Petrovic, I.

    2004-07-01

    The past application of nuclear technology has brought about free emission of numerous Due to the military application of the depleted uranium (DU) in our country, the problem of its radioactivity and hemo toxicity if actualized. Likewise every heavy metal, its is highly toxic and, in addition to it, also radioactive: Interaction of the water-soluble uranium forms with soil is an important effect. In this way, it penetrates into food chain and endangers human health. The study was aimed at determining possible karyotype genotoxic effects in individuals from the regions close to the contaminated areas. Biological dosimetry was performed using modified Moorthead's micromethod. Our studies included the targeted group of 29 patients from the affected regions. The subjects were averagely aged 39.5{+-}2.8 years. Average age of the control group (k), unexposed to the effects of the known genotoxic agents comprising 22 individuals was 28.3{+-}1.2 years. The presented data evidenced that increased incidence of the chromosomal aberrations was found in 6 subjects,accounting for 20.6%. Dicentric type changes were evidence, as well ring chromosomes and eccentric fragments, which are, at the same time the most frequent aberrations. The changes are considered reparable aberrations accounting for 2-3% in metaphases of the unexposed individuals. Statistical data processing evidenced significant difference (p<0.005) between structural chromosomal aberrations in the studied and control groups, as well as in the number of chromatid aberrations (p<0.05).Based on the obtained data it may be concluded that human karyotype changes were present in the studied group, resulting from interaction of ionizing irradiation and other genotoxic agents, with possibility of potent synergistic effects. It is necessary to stress the importance of further monitoring and control of the general population health, particularly due to possible late genetic effects that may affect future generations

  4. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Metabolic and molecular changes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum lines carrying different Solanum pennellii wild chromosomal regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manuela Rigano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Solanum lycopersicum represents an important dietary source of bioactive compounds including the antioxidants flavonoids and phenolic acids. We previously identified two genotypes (IL7-3 and IL12-4 carrying loci from the wild species Solanum pennellii, which increased antioxidants in the fruit. Successively, these lines were crossed and two genotypes carrying both introgressions at the homozygous condition (DHO88 and DHO88-SL were selected. The amount of total antioxidant compounds was increased in DHOs compared to both ILs and the control genotype M82. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the positive interaction between the two wild regions pyramided in DHO genotypes, detailed analyses of the metabolites accumulated in the fruit were carried out by colorimetric methods and LC/MS/MS. These analyses evidenced a lower content of flavonoids in DHOs and in ILs, compared to M82. By contrast, in the DHOs the relative content of phenolic acids increased, particularly the fraction of hexoses, thus evidencing a redirection of the phenylpropanoid flux towards the biosynthesis of phenolic acid glycosides in these genotypes. In addition, the line DHO88 exhibited a lower content of free phenolic acids compared to M82. Interestingly, the two DHOs analyzed differ in the size of the wild region on chromosome 12. Genes mapping in the introgression regions were further investigated. Several genes of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, such as one 4-coumarate:CoA ligase and two UDP-glycosyltransferases in the region 12-4 and one chalcone isomerase and one UDP-glycosyltransferase in the region 7-3. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated a different expression of the detected genes in the ILs and in the DHOs compared to M82.These analyses, combined with biochemical analyses, suggested a central role of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in redirecting the phenylpropanoid pathways towards the biosynthesis of phenolic acids in the

  6. DNA fingerprinting tags novel altered chromosomal regions and identifies the involvement of SOX5 in the progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Stephanie; Chan, Yuen Piu; Woolcock, Bruce; Hu, Liang; Wong, Kai Yau; Ling, Ming Tat; Bainbridge, Terry; Webber, Douglas; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Lam, Wan; Vielkind, Juergen; Chan, Kwok Wah

    2009-05-15

    Identification of genomic alterations associated with the progression of prostate cancer may facilitate the better understanding of the development of this highly variable disease. Matched normal, premalignant high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive prostate carcinoma cells were procured by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from human radical prostatectomy specimens. From these cells, comparative DNA fingerprints were generated by a modified PCR-based technique called scanning of microdissected archival lesion (SMAL)-PCR. Recurrent polymorphic fingerprint fragments were used in tagging altered chromosomal regions. Altered regions were found at cytobands 1p31.3, 1q44, 2p23.1, 3p26.3, 3q22.3, 4q22.3, 4q35.2, 5q23.2, 8q22.3, 8q24.13, 9q21.3, 9q22.32, 10q11.21, 11p13, 12p12.1, 13q12.1, 16q12.2 and 18q21.31. Candidate genes in the surrounding area that may possibly harbor mutations that change normal prostatic cells to progress into their tumor stages were proposed. Of these fragments, a 420 bp alteration, absent in all 26 normal samples screened, was observed in 2 tumors. This fragment was cloned, sequenced and localized to chromosome 12p12.1. Within this region, candidate gene sex determining region Y-box 5 (SOX5) was proposed. Further studies of SOX5 in cell lines, xenografts and human prostate specimens, at both the RNA and protein levels, found overexpression of the gene in tumors. This overexpression was then subsequently found by fluorescent in situ hybridization to be caused by amplification of the region. In conclusion, our results suggest LCM coupled with SMAL-PCR DNA fingerprinting is a useful method for the screening and identification of chromosomal regions and genes associated with cancer development. Further, overexpression of SOX5 is associated with prostate tumor progression and early development of distant metastasis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A recurrent human papillomavirus integration site at chromosome region 12q14-q15 in SW756 and SK-v cell lines derived from genital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Garau, X.; Couturier, J.; Favre, M.; Orth, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SW756 cell line, derived from an invasive cancer of the uterine cervix, harbours integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 DNA sequences which have been located in chromosome band 12q13. By in situ hybridization experiments with tritiated and digoxigenin-labelled HPV18 probes on R-banded chromosomes, we now localize the integrated viral sequences in 12q14-q15. Interestingly, we have previously localized integrated HPV16 sequences in the same chromosomal region in SK-v cells, derived from a pre-invasive vulvar neoplasia. The chromosomal region 12q14-q15 could thus correspond to a preferential site for the integration of HPV DNA in genital tumors. (authors). 29 refs., 2 figs

  8. Tetralogy of Fallot associated with deletion in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (22q11)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Angelo, J.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Jett, P.L. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ. Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cardiac conotruncal defects, such as Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), are associated with DiGeorge syndrome which has been mapped to the q11 region of chromosome 22 and includes abnormalities of neural crest and branchial arch development. Patients with conotruncal defects and velo-cardio-facial syndrome may have defects in the 22q11 region but not show the complete DiGeorge phenotype consisting of cardiac, thymus, and parathyroid abnormalities. We report two neonates with TOF and small deletions in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (46,XX,del(22)(q11.21q11.23) and 46,XY,del(22)(q11.2q11.2)) using both high-resolution cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The first patient is a female with TOF and a family history of congenital heart disease. The mother has pulmonic stenosis and a right-sided aortic arch, one brother has TOF, and a second brother has a large VSD. The patient had intrauterine growth retardation and had thrombocytopenia due to maternal IgG platelet-directed autoantibody. Lymphocyte populations, both T and B cells, were reduced in number but responded normally to stimulation. The findings were not attributed to a DiGeorge phenotype. Although she had transient neonatal hypocalcemia, her parathyroid hormone level was normal. The patient was not dysmorphic in the newborn period but her mother had features consistent with velo-cardio-facial syndrome. The second patient was a male with TOF who was not dysmorphic and had no other significant clinical findings and no family history of heart disease. Lymphocyte testing did not reveal a specific immunodeficiency. No significant postnatal hypocalcemia was noted. These cases illustrate that there is a wide spectrum of clinical features associated with defects of the 22q11 region. We recommend karyotype analysis, including FISH probes specific to the DiGeorge region, in any patient with conotruncal cardiac defects.

  9. A review of thresholding strategies applied to human chromosome segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Enea; Zappelli, Francesca; Ruggeri, Alfredo; Grisan, Enrico

    2012-11-01

    Karyotype analysis is a widespread procedure in cytogenetics to assess the presence of genetic defects by the visualization of the structure of chromosomes. The procedure is lengthy and repetitive and an effective automatic analysis would greatly help the cytogeneticist routine work. Still, automatic segmentation and the full disentangling of chromosomes are open issues. The first step in every automatic procedure is the thresholding step, which detect blobs that represent either single chromosomes or clusters of chromosomes. The better the thresholding step, the easier is the subsequent disentanglement of chromosome clusters into single entities. We implemented eleven thresholding methods, i.e. the ones that appear in the literature as the best performers, and compared their performance in segmenting chromosomes and chromosome clusters in cytogenetic Q-band images. The images are affected by the presence of hyper- or hypo-fluorescent regions and by a contrast variability between the stained chromosomes and the background. A thorough analysis of the results highlights that, although every single algorithm shows peculiar strong/weak points, Adaptive Threshold and Region Based Level Set have the overall best performance. In order to provide the scientific community with a public dataset, the data and manual segmentation used in this paper are available for public download at http://bioimlab.dei.unipd.it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Refined genetic mapping of the darier locus to a <1-cM region of chromosome 12q24.1, and construction of a complete, high-resolution P1 artificial chromosome/bacterial artificial chromosome contig of the critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, S; Sakuntabhai, A; Carter, S A; Bryce, S D; Cox, R; Harrington, L; Levy, E; Ruiz-Perez, V L; Katsantoni, E; Kodvawala, A; Munro, C S; Burge, S; Larrègue, M; Nagy, G; Rees, J L; Lathrop, M; Monaco, A P; Strachan, T; Hovnanian, A

    1998-01-01

    Darier disease (DD) (MIM 124200) is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by loss of adhesion between epidermal cells and by abnormal keratinization. We present linkage analysis showing, in four families, key recombination events that refine the location of the DD locus on chromosome 12q23-24.1 to a region of <1 cM. We have constructed a YAC/P1 artificial chromosome (PAC)/bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map that encompasses this refined DD region. The map consists of 35 YAC, 69 PAC, 16 BAC, and 2 cosmid clones that were ordered by mapping 54 anonymous sequence-tagged sites. The critical region is estimated to be 2.4 Mb in size, with an average marker resolution of 37.5 kb. The refinement of the critical interval excludes the ALDH2, RPL6, PTPN11, and OAS genes, as well as seven expressed sequence tags (ESTs) previously mapped in the DD region. The three known genes (ATP2A2, PPP1CC, and SCA2) and the 10 ESTs mapped within the critical region are not obvious candidates for the DD gene. Therefore, this detailed integrated physical, genetic, and partial transcript map provides an important resource for the isolation of the DD gene and, possibly, other disease genes. PMID:9529352

  11. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  12. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M’kacher, Radhia; Maalouf, Elie E.L.; Ricoul, Michelle; Heidingsfelder, Leonhard; Laplagne, Eric; Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M.; Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to 137 Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10 −3 ) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10 −4 ) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for the best

  13. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M’kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maalouf, Elie E.L. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 6, 68804 Altlussheim (Germany); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, 61 Rue Erlanger, 75016 Paris (France); Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to {sup 137}Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10{sup −3}) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10{sup −4}) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for

  14. Chromosome 4q deletion syndrome: narrowing the cardiovascular critical region to 4q32.2-q34.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbo; Ahmad, Ayesha; Dagenais, Susan; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2012-03-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome is a rare chromosome deletion syndrome with a wide range of clinical phenotypes. There is limited clinical phenotype and molecular correlation for congenital heart defects (CHDs) reported so far for this region primarily because many cases are large deletions, often terminal, and because high-resolution array has not been reported in the evaluation of this group of patients. CHDs are reported in about 60% of patients with 4q deletion syndrome, occurring in the presence or absence of dHAND deletion, implying the existence of additional genes in 4q whose dosage influences cardiac development. We report an 8-month-old patient with a large mid-muscular to outlet ventricular septal defect (VSD), moderate-sized secundum-type atrial septal defect (ASD), thickened, dysplastic pulmonary valve with mild stenosis and moderate pulmonic regurgitation, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Illumina CytoSNP array analysis disclosed a de novo, heterozygous, interstitial deletion of 11.6 Mb of genomic material from the long arm of chromosome 4, at 4q32.3-q34.3 (Chr4:167236114-178816031; hg18). The deleted region affects 37 RefSeq genes (hg18), including two provisional microRNA stemloops. Three genes in this region, namely TLL1 (Tolloid-like-1), HPGD (15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase), and HAND2 (Heart and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 2), are known to be involved in cardiac morphogenesis. This report narrows the critical region responsible for CHDs seen in 4q deletion syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fine genetic structure of the 2D3-2F5 region of the X-chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvozdev, V.A.; Gostimsky, S.A.; Gerasimova, T.I.; Dubrovskaya, E.S.; Braslavskaya, O.Yu.

    1975-01-01

    97 lethal and semilethal mutations were induced by ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrosomethyl urea and γ-irradiation in the 2D3-F5 region of the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster. Approximately 1 per cent of the tested X-chromosomes carried a lethal in the 2D3-2F5 region. The mutation frequencies per band of DNA content in this region and the whole X-chromosome are equal. Complementation analysis revealed at least 10 functionally independent essential loci in this region including about 10 bands. The data presented in this study support the one band - one gene hypothesis. The Pgd locus coding for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is mapped in the 2D3 (or 2D4) band. Isolation of 11 lethal or semilethal point mutations with null or reduced 6PGD acticity shows that the Pgd locus is a vital one. (orig.) [de

  16. Mapping Second Chromosome Mutations to Defined Genomic Regions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahsai, Lily; Cook, Kevin R

    2018-01-04

    Hundreds of Drosophila melanogaster stocks are currently maintained at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center with mutations that have not been associated with sequence-defined genes. They have been preserved because they have interesting loss-of-function phenotypes. The experimental value of these mutations would be increased by tying them to specific genomic intervals so that geneticists can more easily associate them with annotated genes. Here, we report the mapping of 85 second chromosome complementation groups in the Bloomington collection to specific, small clusters of contiguous genes or individual genes in the sequenced genome. This information should prove valuable to Drosophila geneticists interested in processes associated with particular phenotypes and those searching for mutations affecting specific sequence-defined genes. Copyright © 2018 Kahsai,Cook.

  17. Mapping Second Chromosome Mutations to Defined Genomic Regions in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of Drosophila melanogaster stocks are currently maintained at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center with mutations that have not been associated with sequence-defined genes. They have been preserved because they have interesting loss-of-function phenotypes. The experimental value of these mutations would be increased by tying them to specific genomic intervals so that geneticists can more easily associate them with annotated genes. Here, we report the mapping of 85 second chromosome complementation groups in the Bloomington collection to specific, small clusters of contiguous genes or individual genes in the sequenced genome. This information should prove valuable to Drosophila geneticists interested in processes associated with particular phenotypes and those searching for mutations affecting specific sequence-defined genes.

  18. Replication of the association of chromosomal region 9p21.3 with generalized aggressive periodontitis (gAgP) using an independent case-control cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); K. Uhr (Katharina); A. Teumer (Alexander); J. Fanghänel (Jutta); S. Schulz (Susanne); B. Noack (Barbara); J. Gonzales (Jose); S. Reichert (Stefan); P. Eickholz (Peter); B. Holtfreter (Birte); P. Meisel (Peter); G.J. Linden (Gerard); G. Homuth (Georg); T. Kocher (Thomas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The human chromosomal region 9p21.3 has been shown to be strongly associated with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) in several Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS). Recently, this region has also been shown to be associated with Aggressive Periodontitis (AgP), strengthening the

  19. Cosmid contig and cDNA map of the human chromosome 13q14 region frequently lost in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapanadze, BI; Brodyanskii, VM; Semov, AB; Baranova, AV; Sulimova, GE; Aitova, SS; Udina, IG; Ptitsyna, SN; Salnikova, LE; Chudinov, OS; Borbiev, TE; Kashuba, VV; Gizatullin, R; Zabarovska, [No Value; Zabarovsky, ER; Fedorova, LI; Zelenin, AV; Rasool, O; Grander, D; Einhorn, S; vanEverdink, W; van den Berg, Anke; Buys, C; Corcoran, M; Chapman, RM; Yankovsky, NK

    1997-01-01

    We constructed a fine physical map of human chromosome 13q14 region between D13S1168 and D13S25 loci consisting of cosmid and cDNA clones. This interval had been shown to be in the center of the genome region frequently lost in a human blood malignancy known as B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

  20. Stabilized Romanowsky blood stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, J W; Dean, W W; Stastny, M; Lubrano, G J

    1979-05-01

    It has been shown that the degradation of thiazine dyes which normally occurs in methanolic solution, as in the case of Romanowsky blood stains, can be prevented by making the solution acidic. In a certain range of acidity, the stain precipitates in the form of monothiazine eosinate, but by making the solution sufficiently acidic, eosin is protonated and the precipitate cannot form. These observations have been used to develop a blood stain which is stable, even at elevated temperatures, for several months. For use the stain is neutralized by a specially formulated fixative solution.

  1. Deletions at chromosome regions 7q11.23 and 7q36 in a patient with Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, C. H.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. J.; Eussen, B. J.; van der Heide, A. A.; van Luijk, R. B.; van Drunen, E.; Beverloo, B. B.; Visscher, F.; van Hemel, J. O.

    2001-01-01

    We report on a patient with Williams syndrome and a complex de novo chromosome rearrangement, including microdeletions at 7q11.23 and 7q36 and additional chromosomal material at 7q36. The nature of this additional material was elucidated by spectral karyotyping and first assigned to chromosome 22.

  2. High-resolution physical mapping reveals that the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) in Cenchrus ciliaris is located on a heterochromatic and hemizygous region of a single chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yukio; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2005-10-01

    An apomictic mode of reproduction known as apospory is displayed by most buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) genotypes, but rare sexual individuals have been identified. Previously, intraspecific crosses between sexual and aposporous genotypes allowed linkage to be discovered between the aposporous mode of reproduction and nine molecular markers that had been isolated from an aposporous relative, Pennisetum squamulatum. This region was described as the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). We now show an ideogram of the chromosome complement for aposporous tetraploid buffelgrass accession B-12-9 including the ASGR-carrier chromosome. The ASGR-carrier chromosome has a region of hemizygosity, as determined by in situ hybridization of BAC clones and unique morphological characteristics when compared with other chromosomes in the genome. In spite of its unique morphology, the ASGR-carrier chromosome could be identified as one of the chromosomes of a meiosis I quadrivalent. A similar partially hemizygous segment was also detected in the ASGR-carrier chromosome of the aposporous buffelgrass genotype, Higgins, but not in the sexual accession B-2S. Two non-recombining BACs linked to apospory were physically mapped on a highly condensed chromatin region of the short arm of B-12-9, and the distance between the BACs was estimated to be approximately 11 Mbp, a distance similar to what previously has been shown in P. squamulatum. The short arm of the ASGR-carrier chromosome was highly condensed at pachytene and extended only 1.7-2.7 fold that of mitotic chromosomes. Low recombination in the ASGR may partially be due to its localization in heterochromatin.

  3. A 1.5-Mb contig within the cat eye syndrome critical region at human chromosome 22q11.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Shizuya, H; Roe, B A; McDermid, H E

    1999-04-15

    We have constructed a 1.5-Mb contig spanning the distal half of the critical region for cat eye syndrome on human chromosome 22 from D22S543 to D22S181. The contig consists of 20 P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) clones and 11 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones screened from 2 BAC and 2 PAC libraries. Continuous overlap between the clones was confirmed using vectorette PCR and riboprobes. Despite the instability of this region in a previous YAC contig, only 1 BAC showed a minor instability and then in only one isolation. This contig is now providing the basis for genomic sequencing and gene identification in the cat eye syndrome critical region. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Analysis of t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) chromosomal breakpoint regions and genetic association reveals novel candidate genes for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajkumar, A.P.; Christensen, Jane H.; Mattheisen, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities facilitate identification of novel candidate genes for psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide significant evidence supports the linkage between chromosome 17q25.3 and bipolar disorder (BD). Co-segregation of translocation t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.......3) with psychiatric disorders has been reported. We aimed to narrow down these chromosomal breakpoint regions and to investigate the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms within these regions and BD as well as schizophrenia (SZ) in large genome-wide association study samples. METHODS: We cross......,856) data. Genetic associations between these disorders and single nucleotide polymorphisms within these breakpoint regions were analysed by BioQ, FORGE, and RegulomeDB programmes. RESULTS: Four protein-coding genes [coding for (endonuclease V (ENDOV), neuronal pentraxin I (NPTX1), ring finger protein 213...

  5. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  6. Sequencing and association analysis of the type 1 diabetes – linked region on chromosome 10p12-q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barratt Bryan J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to locate susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes (T1D several genome-wide linkage scans have been undertaken. A chromosomal region designated IDDM10 retained genome-wide significance in a combined analysis of the main linkage scans. Here, we studied sequence polymorphisms in 23 Mb on chromosome 10p12-q11, including the putative IDDM10 region, to identify genes associated with T1D. Results Initially, we resequenced the functional candidate genes, CREM and SDF1, located in this region, genotyped 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and found no association with T1D. We then undertook analysis of the whole 23 Mb region. We constructed and sequenced a contig tile path from two bacterial artificial clone libraries. By comparison with a clone library from an unrelated person used in the Human Genome Project, we identified 12,058 SNPs. We genotyped 303 SNPs and 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 765 multiplex T1D families and followed up 22 associated polymorphisms in up to 2,857 families. We found nominal evidence of association in six loci (P = 0.05 – 0.0026, located near the PAPD1 gene. Therefore, we resequenced 38.8 kb in this region, found 147 SNPs and genotyped 84 of them in the T1D families. We also tested 13 polymorphisms in the PAPD1 gene and in five other loci in 1,612 T1D patients and 1,828 controls from the UK. Overall, only the D10S193 microsatellite marker located 28 kb downstream of PAPD1 showed nominal evidence of association in both T1D families and in the case-control sample (P = 0.037 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that polymorphisms in the CREM and SDF1 genes have no major effect on T1D. The weak T1D association that we detected in the association scan near the PAPD1 gene may be either false or due to a small genuine effect, and cannot explain linkage at the IDDM10 region.

  7. A small XY chromosomal region explains sex determination in wild dioecious V. vinifera and the reversal to hermaphroditism in domesticated grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picq, Sandrine; Santoni, Sylvain; Lacombe, Thierry; Latreille, Muriel; Weber, Audrey; Ardisson, Morgane; Ivorra, Sarah; Maghradze, David; Arroyo-Garcia, Rosa; Chatelet, Philippe; This, Patrice; Terral, Jean-Frédéric; Bacilieri, Roberto

    2014-09-03

    In Vitis vinifera L., domestication induced a dramatic change in flower morphology: the wild sylvestris subspecies is dioecious while hermaphroditism is largely predominant in the domesticated subsp. V. v. vinifera. The characterisation of polymorphisms in genes underlying the sex-determining chromosomal region may help clarify the history of domestication in grapevine and the evolution of sex chromosomes in plants. In the genus Vitis, sex determination is putatively controlled by one major locus with three alleles, male M, hermaphrodite H and female F, with an allelic dominance M > H > F. Previous genetic studies located the sex locus on chromosome 2. We used DNA polymorphisms of geographically diverse V. vinifera genotypes to confirm the position of this locus, to characterise the genetic diversity and traces of selection in candidate genes, and to explore the origin of hermaphroditism. In V. v. sylvestris, a sex-determining region of 154.8 kb, also present in other Vitis species, spans less than 1% of chromosome 2. It displays haplotype diversity, linkage disequilibrium and differentiation that typically correspond to a small XY sex-determining region with XY males and XX females. In male alleles, traces of purifying selection were found for a trehalose phosphatase, an exostosin and a WRKY transcription factor, with strikingly low polymorphism levels between distant geographic regions. Both diversity and network analysis revealed that H alleles are more closely related to M than to F alleles. Hermaphrodite alleles appear to derive from male alleles of wild grapevines, with successive recombination events allowing import of diversity from the X into the Y chromosomal region and slowing down the expansion of the region into a full heteromorphic chromosome. Our data are consistent with multiple domestication events and show traces of introgression from other Asian Vitis species into the cultivated grapevine gene pool.

  8. Identification and uniparental expression of a novel gene from the Prader-Willi region of chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wevrick, R.; Kerns, J.A.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder which occurs at a frequency of about 1/25,000. Most patients ({approximately}70%) have a cytogentic deletion of their paternal 15q11-q13 region, while {approximately}30% have uniparental maternal disomy. The parent of origin dependence of the phenotype is thought to be reflective of the uniparental pattern of expression of genes in the region, a phenomenon known as genomic imprinting. A small subset of PWS patient with a typical cytogenetic rearrangements has defined a critical region for genes involved in PWS. We have used STSs from the region to construct a YAC contig including the entire PWS critical region, which is about 350 kb considering presently characterized deletions. We are now using these YACs to isolate and characterize novel genes potentially involved in PWS. Overlapping YACs from the critical region were subjected to the technique of cDNA selection. Gel-purified YAC DNA was biotinylated during PCR amplification and annealed in solution to amplified cDNA. cDNAs remaining after hybridization washing, and denaturation of the hybrids were tested for localization within the YAC contig. One such cDNA mapped back to the YAC contig and was further analyzed. A full length cDNA clone was isolated from a fetal brain library and sequenced. The pattern of expression was determined in cell lines derived from Prader-Willi and Angelman patients and in normal individuals. The gene was found to have monoallelic, paternal expression in normal individuals and is marginally or not expressed in cell lines derived form Prader-Willi individuals. Expression in cell lines from Angelman patients, who are deleted for the same region on the maternal chromosome 15, was normal. Thus this apparently maternally imprinted gene is a candidate for involvement in the Prader-Willi phenotype.

  9. A putative polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase/Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region 17 (WBSCR17) regulates lamellipodium formation and macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Naosuke; Oki, Sayoko; Wakabayashi, Masaki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Kurosaka, Akira

    2012-09-14

    We previously identified a novel polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T) gene, which is designated Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region 17 (WBSCR17) because it is located in the chromosomal flanking region of the Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion. Recent genome-scale analysis of HEK293T cells treated with a high concentration of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrated that WBSCR17 was one of the up-regulated genes possibly involved in endocytosis (Lau, K. S., Khan, S., and Dennis, J. W. (2008) Genome-scale identification of UDP-GlcNAc-dependent pathways. Proteomics 8, 3294-3302). To assess its roles, we first expressed recombinant WBSCR17 in COS7 cells and demonstrated that it was N-glycosylated and localized mainly in the Golgi apparatus, as is the case for the other GalNAc-Ts. Assay of recombinant WBSCR17 expressed in insect cells showed very low activity toward typical mucin peptide substrates. We then suppressed the expression of endogenous WBSCR17 in HEK293T cells using siRNAs and observed phenotypic changes of the knockdown cells with reduced lamellipodium formation, altered O-glycan profiles, and unusual accumulation of glycoconjugates in the late endosomes/lysosomes. Analyses of endocytic pathways revealed that macropinocytosis, but neither clathrin- nor caveolin-dependent endocytosis, was elevated in the knockdown cells. This was further supported by the findings that the overexpression of recombinant WBSCR17 stimulated lamellipodium formation, altered O-glycosylation, and inhibited macropinocytosis. WBSCR17 therefore plays important roles in lamellipodium formation and the regulation of macropinocytosis as well as lysosomes. Our study suggests that a subset of O-glycosylation produced by WBSCR17 controls dynamic membrane trafficking, probably between the cell surface and the late endosomes through macropinocytosis, in response to the nutrient concentration as exemplified by environmental GlcNAc.

  10. Identification of two distinct chromosome 12-derived amplification units in neuroblastoma cell line NGP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roy, N.; Forus, A.; Myklebost, O.; Cheng, N. C.; Versteeg, R.; Speleman, F.

    1995-01-01

    The neuroblastoma cell line NGP contains two homogeneously staining regions (hsr). One of these hsrs contains MYCN sequences. Reverse painting experiments demonstrated that the second HSR consisted of two chromosome 12-derived amplification units, located at 12q14-15 and 12q24. Southern blot and

  11. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  12. Endocervical gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no symptoms. Alternative Names Gram stain of cervix; Gram stain of cervical secretions References Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  13. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  14. Mapping of four distinct BCR-related loci to chromosome region 22q11: order of BCR loci relative to chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Fainstain, E.; Lifshitz, B.; Shtivelman, E.; Canaani, E.

    1987-10-01

    A probe derived from the 3' region of the BCR gene (breakpoint cluster region gene) detects four distinct loci in the human genome. One of the loci corresponds to the complete BCR gene, whereas the other contain a 3' segment of the gene. After HindIII cleavage of human DNA, these four loci are detected as 23-, 19-, 13-, and 9-kikobase-pair fragments, designated BCR4, BCR3, BCR2, and BCR1, respectively, with BCR1 deriving from the original complete BCR gene. All four BCR loci segregate 100% concordantly with human chromosome 22 in a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel and are located at chromosome region 22q11.2 by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The BCR2 and BCR4 loci are amplified in leukemia cell line K562 cells, indicating that they fall within the amplification unit that includes immunoglobulin lambda light chain locus (IGL) and ABL locus on the K562 Philadelphia chromosome (Ph/sup 1/). Similarly, in mouse-human hybrids retaining a Ph/sup 1/ chromosome derived from an acute lymphoblastic leukemia-in the absence of the 9q/sup +/ and 22, only BCR2 and BCR4 loci are retained. Thus, the order of loci on chromosome 22 is centromere ..-->.. BCR2, BCR4, and IGL ..-->.. BCR1 ..-->.. BCR3 ..-->.. SIS, possibly eliminating BCR2 and BCR4 loci as candidate targets for juxtaposition to the ABL gene in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia Ph/sup 1/ chromosome.

  15. A High-Density Genetic Map of Wild Emmer Wheat from the Karaca Dağ Region Provides New Evidence on the Structure and Evolution of Wheat Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Jorgensen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild emmer (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is a progenitor of all cultivated wheat grown today. It has been hypothesized that emmer was domesticated in the Karaca Dağ region in southeastern Turkey. A total of 445 recombinant inbred lines of T. turgidum ssp. durum cv. ‘Langdon’ x wild emmer accession PI 428082 from this region was developed and genotyped with the Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphism Infinium assay. A genetic map comprising 2,650 segregating markers was constructed. The order of the segregating markers and an additional 8,264 co-segregating markers in the Aegilops tauschii reference genome sequence was used to compare synteny of the tetraploid wheat with the Brachypodium distachyon, rice, and sorghum. These comparisons revealed the presence of 15 structural chromosome rearrangements, in addition to the already known 4A-5A-7B rearrangements. The most common type was an intra-chromosomal translocation in which the translocated segment was short and was translocated only a short distance along the chromosome. A large reciprocal translocation, one small non-reciprocal translocation, and three large and one small paracentric inversions were also discovered. The use of inversions for a phylogeny reconstruction in the Triticum–Aegilops alliance was illustrated. The genetic map was inconsistent with the current model of evolution of the rearranged chromosomes 4A-5A-7B. Genetic diversity in the rearranged chromosome 4A showed that the rearrangements might have been contemporary with wild emmer speciation. A selective sweep was found in the centromeric region of chromosome 4A in Karaca Dağ wild emmer but not in 4A of T. aestivum. The absence of diversity from a large portion of chromosome 4A of wild emmer, believed to be ancestral to all domesticated wheat, is puzzling.

  16. Chromosomal characteristics of a Brazilian whip spider (Amblypygi) and evolutionary relationships with other arachnid orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Neto, E; Araujo, D; Carvalho, L S; Cella, D M; Schneider, M C

    2013-09-19

    We analyzed mitotic and meiotic cells of a Brazilian amblypygid, Heterophrynus longicornis, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa staining, C-banding, Ag-NOR, and FISH with rDNA probe). This is the first study that focuses solely on amblypygid chromosomes; it was undertaken to add data on cytogenetic knowledge of this group and contribute to the understanding of chromosome evolution in the Arachnida. We found 2n = 66 for male and female individuals, monocentric chromosomes, and absence of morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes. C-banding showed heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of most chromosomes. Mitotic and meiotic nuclei submitted to silver impregnation and FISH revealed, respectively, Ag-NORs and ribosomal genes in the terminal region of two chromosome pairs. Most chromosome features that we observed in H. longicornis are shared with species of other arachnid orders; however, the absence of morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes in amblypygid contrasts with the remarkable variety of sex chromosome systems recorded for the Araneae. Consequently, we conclude that analysis of species of the Tetrapulmonata clade is useful for understanding the trends of sex chromosome evolution in this arachnid group.

  17. Distamycin A/DAPI bands and the effects of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Haaf, T

    1984-01-01

    The chromosomes of the chimpanzee were stained with distamycin A/DAPI, which labels specific C-bands. Bright distamycin A/DAPI fluorescence was found in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 6, 11, 14 to 16, 18 to 20, and 23 and the Y. Lymphocyte cultures from chimpanzees were treated with low doses of 5-azacytidine during the last hours of culture. This cytosine analog induces highly distinct undercondensations in 28 heterochromatic regions of 19 chromosomes. These 5-azacytidine-sensitive regions are predominantly located in the terminal C-bands of the chromosomes. In vitro treatment with 5-azacytidine also preserves into the metaphase stage somatic pairings between the 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatic regions in interphase nuclei. The homologies and differences regarding the chromosomal localization of distamycin A/DAPI-bright C-bands, 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatin, 5-methylcytosine-rich DNA sequences, and satellite DNAs in the chimpanzee and man are discussed.

  18. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in rennet-induced skim milk gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M

    2015-01-01

    genomic regions affecting traits related to rennet-induced gelation, the aim of this study was to identify potential candidate genes affecting these traits. Hence, rennet-induced gelation, including rennet coagulation time, gel strength, and yield stress, was measured in skim milk samples collected from...... 379 animals of the Swedish Red breed using low-amplitude oscillation measurements. All animals had genotypes for almost 621,000 segregating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), identified using the Bovine HD SNPChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). The genome was scanned for associations, haplotypes...... based on SNP sets comprising highly associated SNP were inferred, and the effects of the 2 most common haplotypes within each region were analyzed using mixed models. Even though the number of animals was relatively small, a total of 21 regions were identified, with 4 regions showing association...

  19. Pasture names with Romance and Slavic roots facilitate dissection of Y chromosome variation in an exclusively German-speaking alpine region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederstätter, Harald; Rampl, Gerhard; Erhart, Daniel; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert; Neuhuber, Franz; Hausner, Isolde; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    The small alpine district of East Tyrol (Austria) has an exceptional demographic history. It was contemporaneously inhabited by members of the Romance, the Slavic and the Germanic language groups for centuries. Since the Late Middle Ages, however, the population of the principally agrarian-oriented area is solely Germanic speaking. Historic facts about East Tyrol's colonization are rare, but spatial density-distribution analysis based on the etymology of place-names has facilitated accurate spatial mapping of the various language groups' former settlement regions. To test for present-day Y chromosome population substructure, molecular genetic data were compared to the information attained by the linguistic analysis of pasture names. The linguistic data were used for subdividing East Tyrol into two regions of former Romance (A) and Slavic (B) settlement. Samples from 270 East Tyrolean men were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs) and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs). Analysis of the probands' surnames revealed no evidence for spatial genetic structuring. Also, spatial autocorrelation analysis did not indicate significant correlation between genetic (Y-STR haplotypes) and geographic distance. Haplogroup R-M17 chromosomes, however, were absent in region A, but constituted one of the most frequent haplogroups in region B. The R-M343 (R1b) clade showed a marked and complementary frequency distribution pattern in these two regions. To further test East Tyrol's modern Y-chromosomal landscape for geographic patterning attributable to the early history of settlement in this alpine area, principal coordinates analysis was performed. The Y-STR haplotypes from region A clearly clustered with those of Romance reference populations and the samples from region B matched best with Germanic speaking reference populations. The combined use of onomastic and molecular genetic data revealed and mapped the marked structuring of the distribution of Y

  20. High-Throughput Screening for Spermatogenesis Candidate Genes in the AZFc Region of the Y Chromosome by Multiplex Real Time PCR Followed by High Resolution Melting Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alechine, Evguenia; Corach, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microdeletions in the AZF region of the Y chromosome are among the most frequent genetic causes of male infertility, although the specific role of the genes located in this region is not fully understood. AZFa and AZFb deletions impair spermatogenesis since no spermatozoa are found in the testis. Deletions of the AZFc region, despite being the most frequent in azoospermic patients, do not correlate with spermatogenic failure. Therefore, the aim of this work was to develop a screening method t...

  1. High-throughput screening for spermatogenesis candidate genes in the AZFc region of the Y chromosome by multiplex real time PCR followed by high resolution melting analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alechine, Evguenia; Corach, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Microdeletions in the AZF region of the Y chromosome are among the most frequent genetic causes of male infertility, although the specific role of the genes located in this region is not fully understood. AZFa and AZFb deletions impair spermatogenesis since no spermatozoa are found in the testis. Deletions of the AZFc region, despite being the most frequent in azoospermic patients, do not correlate with spermatogenic failure. Therefore, the aim of this work was to develop a screening method t...

  2. A high-resolution linkage map of the achondroplasia critical region on human chromosome 4q16.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common nonlethal skeletal dysplasia, with an incidence of greater than 1/40,000 births. Recently, a random search of the genome using highly polymorphic autosomal markers has localized the gene for achondroplasia to the distal portion of human chromosome 4p. We report here the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the critical region including the achondroplasia locus. The CEPH panel of pedigrees was genotyped at several loci using highly polymorphic markers, including the Huntington locus (IT15), D4S43, D4S115, and the gene for the {beta}-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). These data were incorporated into the CEPH v.6.6 database and a multipoint map was generated using the LINKAGE programs v.5.1. Based on reported recombination events in achondroplasia pedigrees, the gene for achondroplasia lies distal to the anonymous marker D4S43, in the 8 cM region defined as follows: cen-IT15-D4S43-D4S98-[D4S115-D4S111]-D4S90-PDEB. The disparity between the genetic distance and the physical distance (2 mB) among these markers likely reflects the high rate of recombination within the region. Extension of this linkage map further toward the telomere and identification of distal recombinant markers should expedite efforts directed toward isolation of the gene for achondroplasia.

  3. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of a southern Brazilian population of Boophilus microplus (Acari, Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Nunes Garcia

    Full Text Available Using conventional staining with acetic orcein and C-banding techniques it was investigated constitutive heterochromatin chromosomal polymorphisms and the mitotic and the meiotic behavior of male and female chromosomes of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887. Some differences were detected in the population of southern Brazil as compared to the data of other authors for populations in other latitudes. The differences being mainly concerned with the distribution of constitutive centromeric heterochromatin and variation in the length of heterochromatic blocks in the pericentromeric regions of some chromosome pairs.

  4. A variant of the H6 homeobox gene maps to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region of human chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, H.S.; Solursh, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Goodfellow, P.J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Homeobox genes represent a class of transcription factors which play a major role in the regulation of embryogenesis. Utilizing primers based on the conserved regions of the H6 homeobox gene, we were able to amplify several H6-like homeobox sequences from human genomic DNA. Analysis of these sequences indicated that at least 3 distinct H6-like homeobox regions may be present in Homo sapiens. From these distinct homeobox regions, primers were selected to screen a CEPH mega-YAC library for genomic clones containing the variant H6-like sequences. These screenings identified a YAC clone (YH6var) which contained the variant H6-like homeobox sequence. Utilizing a human/rodent somatic cell panel (Coriell B), the end clones from YH6var were chromosomally mapped to human chromosomes 10 and 16, indicating that YH6var was chimeric. An additional sequence flanking the H6 variant homeobox region was derived by inverse-PCR using YH6var as a template. From this flanking sequence, Homo sapien-specific primers were selected to assign the H6 variant to human chromosome 10 using the same Coriell B panel. The H6 variant gene was sublocalized to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region using a panel of somatic cell hybrids that retain well-characterized deletions/derivatives of chromosome 10. We are currently screening for STS-based markers for genetic linkage studies to confirm our physical mapping to the 10q25.1-q26.2 region as well as for use in linkage studies with developmental defects mapping to the same chromosomal region.

  5. Chromosome region 2p25 is linked and associated with type 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    majority of these studies have been carried out in genetically unique populations, where just a few founders and ... The main branch of the pedigree consists of parents and 13 children (eight alive and five dead). (Uribe et al. ... region in Colombia (Antioquia) as the original large family. Serum portions were separated from ...

  6. Small regions of overlapping deletions on 6q26 in human astrocytic tumours identified using chromosome 6 tile path array CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Koichi; Mungall, Andrew J; Fiegler, Heike; Pearson, Danita M.; Dunham, Ian; Carter, Nigel P; Collins, V. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 6 are a common abnormality in diverse human malignancies including astrocytic tumours, suggesting the presence of tumour suppressor genes (TSG). In order to help identify candidate TSGs, we have constructed a chromosome 6 tile path microarray. The array contains 1780 clones (778 PACs and 1002 BACs) that cover 98.3% of the published chromosome 6 sequences. A total of 104 adult astrocytic tumours (10 diffuse astrocytomas, 30 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 64 glioblastomas (GB)) were analysed using this array. Single copy number change was successfully detected and the result was in general concordant with a microsatellite analysis. The pattern of copy number change was complex with multiple interstitial deletions/gains. However, a predominance of telomeric 6q deletions was seen. Two small common and overlapping regions of deletion at 6q26 were identified. One was 1002 kb in size and contained PACRG and QKI, while the second was 199 kb and harbours a single gene, ARID1B. The data show that the chromosome 6 tile path array is useful in mapping copy number changes with high resolution and accuracy. We confirmed the high frequency of chromosome 6 deletions in AA and GB, and identified two novel commonly deleted regions that may harbour TSGs. PMID:16205629

  7. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines.

  8. A family of human Y chromosomes has dispersed throughout northern Eurasia despite a 1.8-Mb deletion in the azoospermia factor c region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repping, Sjoerd; van Daalen, Saskia K. M.; Korver, Cindy M.; Brown, Laura G.; Marszalek, Janet D.; Gianotten, Judith; Oates, Robert D.; Silber, Sherman; van der Veen, Fulco; Page, David C.; Rozen, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The human Y chromosome is replete with amplicons-very large, nearly identical repeats-which render it susceptible to interstitial deletions that often cause spermatogenic failure. Here we describe a recurrent, 1.8-Mb deletion that removes half of the azoospermia factor c (AZFc) region, including 12

  9. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei-Yu Lin, Lin; Camp, Nicola J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Th Rutgers, Emiel J.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Cheng, Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Frederik Marmé, Marmé; Surowy, Harald M.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon Dschun; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Horio, Akiyo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Neven, Patrick; Wauters, Els; Wildiers, Hans; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Mclean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Marchand, Loic Le; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Hassan, Norhashimah; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Van DenOuweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu Tang; Cai, Hui; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D P; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Blows, Fiona M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun Young; Noh, Dong Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Hamann, Ute; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen Yang; Hsiung, Chia Ni; Wu, Pei Ei; Ding, Shian Ling; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Bui, Quang M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Irwanto, Astrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare A.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Adank, Muriel A.; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas F.; Cox, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide

  10. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei-Yu Lin; N.J. Camp (Nicola); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); J. Beesley (Jonathan); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J. Stone (Jennifer); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); E.J. Th Rutgers (Emiel J.); K.R. Muir (K.); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); S. Stewart-Brown (Sarah); P. Siriwanarangsan (Pornthep); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias W.); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); T. Cheng (Timothy); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); Frederik Marmé; H. Surowy (Harald); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Meindl (Alfons); P. Lichtner (Peter); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).

  11. Stool Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stool; Feces Gram stain References Allos BM. Campylobacter infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ... Bacterial Infections Read more Foodborne Illness Read more Gastroenteritis Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  12. Quantitative variation in obesity-related traits and insulin precursors linked to the OB gene region on human chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggirala, R.; Stern, M.P.; Reinhart, L.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Despite the evidence that human obesity has strong genetic determinants, efforts at identifying specific genes that influence human obesity have largely been unsuccessful. Using the sibship data obtained from 32 low-income Mexican American pedigrees ascertained on a type II diabetic proband and a multipoint variance-components method, we tested for linkage between various obesity-related traits plus associated metabolic traits and 15 markers on human chromosome 7. We found evidence for linkage between markers in the OB gene region and various traits, as follows: D7S514 and extremity skinfolds (LOD = 3.1), human carboxypeptidase A1 (HCPA1) and 32,33-split proinsulin level (LOD = 4.2), and HCPA1 and proinsulin level (LOD = 3.2). A putative susceptibility locus linked to the marker D7S514 explained 56% of the total phenotypic variation in extremity skinfolds. Variation at the HCPA1 locus explained 64% of phenotypic variation in proinsulin level and {approximately}73% of phenotypic variation in split proinsulin concentration, respectively. Weaker evidence for linkage to several other obesity-related traits (e.g., waist circumference, body-mass index, fat mass by bioimpedance, etc.) was observed for a genetic location, which is {approximately}15 cM telomeric to OB. In conclusion, our study reveals that the OB region plays a significant role in determining the phenotypic variation of both insulin precursors and obesity-related traits, at least in Mexican Americans. 66 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  14. Towards the cloning of imprinted genes in the Prader-Willi/Angelman region of chromosome 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, M.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Beaudet, A.L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct clinical phenotypes resulting from paternal and maternal deficiencies respectively in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The data suggest the presence of oppositely imprinted genes in the region, and the gene for small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN) has been identified as a candidate gene for PWS. Previous strategies for positional cloning identified a number of transcripts from the PWS/AS region, and two of them, PAR-5 (D15S226E) and PAR-1 (D15S227E), are paternally expressed in cultured human cells from patients deleted for 15q11-q13 as is SNRPN. Cosmid contig maps have been developed from the following YACs (contained loci in parentheses): 307A12 (D15S13), 457B4 (SNRPN), 132D4 (D15S10), A229A2, and 378A12 (D15S113), to facilitate molecular studies of PWS and AS. Exon trapping has been employed to isolate putative exons from these overlapping cosmids. Two trapped fragments from the D15S113 region and one fragment from the SNRPN region has been isolated. Sequence information is available for all of the fragments. In addition to imprinting analysis in cultured human cells, we have developed a method to detect imprinting in mouse and human using a GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis strategy, in combination with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The imprinting analyses of putative exons are in progress to investigate their possible candidacy for involvement in PWS or AS phenotypes.

  15. Standard specimens for stain calibration: application to Romanowsky-Giemsa staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J N; Weir, B; Collins, D N

    1990-01-01

    Standardized specimens with reproducible staining properties were fabricated from extracts of biological objects (bovine liver, nucleoprotamine and defatted muscle). The standard specimens were stained with two formulations of the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain (RG), using the same azure B and eosin Y. One formulation used methanol and Sorensen's buffer and the other DMSO and Hepes buffer as solvents. The standard specimens were stained either in the composite stain or in the individual dyes dissolved in the same solvents and at the same concentration as the composite stain. Solution spectroscopy demonstrated different spectra for the two formulations with some wavelength regions varying by more than an order of magnitude. The RG spectra were also very different from those of the individual dyes dissolved at the RG concentration in the respective solvents. The stained standard specimens were analyzed by microspectrophotometry and were found to have spectra similar to those of cell smears. Furthermore, the standard specimens were shown to be a repeatable substrate for stain uptake. The transmitted light intensity from random fields of the same standardized specimen varied +/- 5%. When specimens were stained at the same time, the specimen-to-specimen variation depended on preparation conditions and the measurement wavelength, but was as good as +/- 5% for some conditions. The quantitative stain performance of both formulations was studied and compared. The standardized specimens provide a tool for the quantitative study of staining processes and specimen preparation procedures and for stain calibration.

  16. A complex rearrangement on chromosome 22 affecting both homologues; haplo-insufficiency of the Cat eye syndrome region may have no clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriek, Marjolein; Szuhai, Karoly; Kant, Sarina G; White, Stefan J; Dauwerse, Hans; Fiegler, Heike; Carter, Nigel P; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; den Dunnen, Johan T; Tanke, Hans J; Breuning, Martijn H; Rosenberg, Carla

    2006-08-01

    The presence of highly homologous sequences, known as low copy repeats, predisposes for unequal recombination within the 22q11 region. This can lead to genomic imbalances associated with several known genetic disorders. We report here a developmentally delayed patient carrying different rearrangements on both chromosome 22 homologues, including a previously unreported rearrangement within the 22q11 region. One homologue carries a deletion of the proximal part of chromosome band 22q11. To our knowledge, a 'pure' deletion of this region has not been described previously. Four copies of this 22q11 region, however, are associated with Cat eye syndrome (CES). While the phenotypic impact of this deletion is unclear, familial investigation revealed five normal relatives carrying this deletion, suggesting that haplo-insufficiency of the CES region has little clinical relevance. The other chromosome 22 homologue carries a duplication of the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) region. In addition, a previously undescribed deletion of 22q12.1, located in a relatively gene-poor region, was identified. As the clinical features of patients suffering from a duplication of the VCFS/DGS region have proven to be extremely variable, it is impossible to postulate as to the contribution of the 22q12.1 deletion to the phenotype of the patient. Additional patients with a deletion within this region are needed to establish the consequences of this copy number alteration. This study highlights the value of using different genomic approaches to unravel chromosomal alterations in order to study their phenotypic impact.

  17. The identification of exons from the MED/PSACH region of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Quan-Yi; Brook, J.D. [Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lennon, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We have used exon amplification to identify putative transcribed sequences from an 823-kb contig consisting of 28 cosmids that form a minimum tiling path from the interval 19p12-p13.1. This region contains the genes responsible for multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). We have trapped 66 exons (an average of 2.4 exons per cosmid) from pools of 2 or 3 cosmids. The majority of exons (51.5%) show only weak similarity or no similarity (36.3%) to sequences in current databases. Six of 8 exons examined from these groups, however, show cross-species sequence conservation, indicating that many of them probably represent authentic exons. Eight exons show identity or significant similarity to ESTs or known genes, including the human TNF receptor 3{prime}-flanking region gene, human epoxide hydrolase (EPHX), human growth/differentiation factor (GOF-1), human myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2, the rat neurocan gene, and the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene (COMP). Mutations in this latter gene have recently been shown to be responsible for MED and PSACH. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Chromosome 5p Region SNPs Are Associated with Risk of NSCLC among Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, A. L. V.

    2009-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we explored the associations between 42 polymorphisms in seven genes in this region and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) risk among Caucasian (364 cases; 380 controls) and African American (95 cases; 103 controls) women. Two TERT region SNPs, rs2075786 and rs2853677, conferred an increased risk of developing NSCLC, especially among African American women, and TERT-rs2735940 was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer among African Americans. Five of the 20 GHR polymorphisms and SEPP1-rs6413428 were associated with a marginally increased risk of NSCLC among Caucasians. Random forest analysis reinforced the importance of GHR among Caucasians and identified AMACR, TERT, and GHR among African Americans, which were also significant using gene-based risk scores. Smoking-SNP interactions were explored, and haplotype in TERT and GHR associated with NSCLC risk were identified. The roles of TERT, GHR, AMACR and SEPP1 genes in lung carcinogenesis warrant further exploration

  19. Overlapping chromosomal regions for fertility traits and production traits in the Danish Holstein population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Johanna Karolina; Buitenhuis, A J; Guldbrandtsen, B

    2009-01-01

    Before implementing selection based on quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fertility, it is important to determine the existence of correlated effects between the fertility QTL and QTL with effects on production traits. When a QTL is detected for a trait that is a composite of subtraits...... placed in the placenta, and abortions. In addition, retained placenta was selected for analysis because it is related to uterine infections. A genome scan was performed using 416 microsatellite markers for the fertility treatment subtraits and retained placenta, and an additional genome scan for milk......) did not harbor a QTL for milk production or milk composition traits; that is, the region was specific for the fertility trait. The genome scan for the fertility treatment subtraits did not correspond to the QTL found for fertility treatments. No QTL were detected for the subtrait abortion, however...

  20. Haplotype frequencies in a sub-region of chromosome 19q13.3, related to risk and prognosis of cancer, differ dramatically between ethnic groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M.H.; Mailund, T.; Li, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A small region of about 70 kb on human chromosome 19q13.3 encompasses 4 genes of which 3, ERCC1, ERCC2, and PPP1R13L (aka RAI) are related to DNA repair and cell survival, and one, CD3EAP, aka ASE1, may be related to cell proliferation. The whole region seems related to the cellular r...

  1. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  2. Placental hydroxymethylation vs methylation at the imprinting control region 2 on chromosome 11p15.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Magalhaes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to methylated cytosines (5-mCs, hydroxymethylcytosines (5-hmCs are present in CpG dinucleotide-enriched regions and some transcription regulator binding sites. Unlike methylation, hydroxymethylation does not result in silencing of gene expression, and the most commonly used methods to study methylation, such as techniques based on restriction enzymatic digestion and/or bisulfite modification, are unable to distinguish between them. Genomic imprinting is a process of gene regulation where only one member of an allelic pair is expressed depending on the parental origin. Chromosome 11p15.5 has an imprinting control region (ICR2 that includes a differentially methylated region (KvDMR1 that guarantees parent-specific gene expression. The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of 5-hmC at the KvDMR1 in human placentas. We analyzed 16 third-trimester normal human placentas (chorionic villi. We compared two different methods based on real-time PCR after enzymatic digestion. The first method distinguished methylation from hydroxymethylation, while the other method did not. Unlike other methylation studies, subtle variations of methylation in ICRs could represent a drastic deregulation of the expression of imprinted genes, leading to important phenotypic consequences, and the presence of hydroxymethylation could interfere with the results of many studies. We observed agreement between the results of both methods, indicating the absence of hydroxymethylation at the KvDMR1 in third-trimester placentas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the investigation of hydroxymethylation in human placenta using a genomic imprinting model.

  3. t(8;14) chromosome translocation of the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Daudi occurred during immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and involved the heavy chain diversity region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluska, F.G.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent molecular analyses of Burkitt lymphomas carrying the t(8;14) chromosome translocation have indicated that a dichotomy exists regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the translocations occur. Most sporadic Burkitt tumors carry translocations that apparently arise due to mistakes in the immunoglobulin isotype-switching process. In contrast, there is evidence that the translocations of most endemic Burkitt lymphomas occur as a consequence of aberrant V-D-J recombination of variable, diversity, and joining gene segments, catalyzed by the recombinase enzymes. This phenomenon was first noted in follicular lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemias of the B-cell lineage and has been described in T-cell malignancies as well. In each of these cases, analysis of the nucleotide sequence at chromosome breakpoints demonstrated the involvement of immunoglobulin heavy chain J/sub H/ or T-cell-receptor α-chain Jα gene segments in the translocation. The authors now have cloned and sequenced both the 8q- and 14q+ translocation breakpoints deriving from the t(8;14) translocation of the endemic Burkitt lymphoma line Daudi. The data show that the translocation resulted from a reciprocal exchange between the D/sub H/ region on chromosome 14 and sequences far 5' of the MYC protooncogene on chromosome 8. Features of the nucleotide sequences surrounding the breakpoint further implicate the V-D-J joining machinery in the genesis of chromosome translocation in endemic Burkitt lymphomas and, more generally, in other lymphoid malignancies as well

  4. Haplotypes for 13 Y-chromosomal STR loci in South Tunisian population (Sfax region).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imen; Ammar-Keskes, Leila; Rebai, Ahmed

    2006-12-20

    Nine Y-STR loci from the "minimal haplotype" (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393) included in Y-STR Haplotype Reference Databases (YHRD) with 4 additional Y-STRs (DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439) were analyzed by PCR using duplex and Y-PLEX 12 kit, followed by automatic genotyping in a sample of 105 Tunisian males originating from Sfax region (south Tunisia). Allelic frequencies and gene diversities for each Y-STR locus were determined. The high haplotype diversity (0.9932) and discrimination capacity (0.7714) show the usefulness of these loci for human identification in forensic studies and paternity tests in Tunisia. The most common haplotype was shared by 4.7% (5 individuals) of the sample was only found in samples from the Tunisian population reported in YHRD. One private allele for DYS392 (allele 17) was discovered and duplications were observed for five loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS393, DYS437 and DYS439).

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis in Latin Americans enriched for Amerindian ancestry is associated with loci in chromosomes 1, 12, and 13, and the HLA class II region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Herráez, David; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Riba, Laura; García de la Torre, Ignacio; Sacnún, Mónica; Goñi, Mario; Berbotto, Guillermo A; Paira, Sergio; Musuruana, Jorge Luis; Graf, César E; Alvarellos, Alejandro J; Messina, Osvaldo D; Babini, Alejandra M; Strusberg, Ingrid; Marcos, Juan Carlos; Scherbarth, Hugo; Spindler, Alberto J; Quinteros, Ana; Toloza, Sergio M A; Moreno, José Luis C; Catoggio, Luis J; Tate, Guillermo; Eimon, Alicia; Citera, Gustavo; Catalán Pellet, Antonio; Nasswetter, Gustavo G; Cardiel, Mario H; Miranda, Pedro; Ballesteros, Francisco; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco A; Acevedo-Vásquez, Eduardo M; García García, Conrado; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2013-06-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Latin American individuals with admixed European and Amerindian genetic ancestry. Genotyping was performed in 1,475 patients with RA and 1,213 control subjects, using a customized BeadArray containing 196,524 markers covering loci previously associated with various autoimmune diseases. Principal components analysis (EigenSoft package) and Structure software were used to identify outliers and define the population substructure. REAP software was used to define cryptic relatedness and duplicates, and genetic association analyses were conducted using Plink statistical software. A strong genetic association between RA and the major histocompatibility complex region was observed, localized within BTNL2/DRA-DQB1- DQA2 (P = 7.6 × 10(-10) ), with 3 independent effects. We identified an association in the PLCH2-HES5-TNFRSF14-MMEL1 region of chromosome 1 (P = 9.77 × 10(-6) ), which was previously reported in Europeans, Asians, and Native Canadians. We identified one novel putative association in ENOX1 on chromosome 13 (P = 3.24 × 10(-7) ). Previously reported associations were observed in the current study, including PTPN22, SPRED2, STAT4, IRF5, CCL21, and IL2RA, although the significance was relatively moderate. Adjustment for Amerindian ancestry improved the association of a novel locus in chromosome 12 at C12orf30 (NAA25) (P = 3.9 × 10(-6) ). Associations with the HLA region, SPRED2, and PTPN22 improved in individuals positive for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. Our data define, for the first time, the contribution of Amerindian ancestry to the genetic architecture of RA in an admixed Latin American population by confirming the role of the HLA region and supporting the association with a locus in chromosome 1. In addition, we provide data for novel putative loci in chromosomes 12 and 13. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. A polymorphic and hypervariable locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the CBA/H mouse sex chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennelly, J.; Laval, S.; Wright, E.; Plumb, M. [MRC Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    We have identified a genomic locus (DXYH1) that is polymorphic and hypervariable within the CBA/H colony. Using a panel of C57BL/6 x Mus spretus backcross offspring, it was mapped to the distal end of the X chromosome. Pseudoautosomal inheritance was demonstrated through three generations of CBA/H x CBA/H and CBA/H x C57BL/6 crosses and confirmed through linkage to the Sxr locus in X/Y Sxr x 3H1 crosses. Meiotic recombination frequencies place DXYH1 {approximately}28% into the pseudoautosomal region from the boundary. The de novo generation of CBA/H variant DXYH1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms during spermatogenesis is suggestive of the germline instability associated with hypermutable human minisatellites. The absence of DXY1-related sequences in Mus spretus provides DNA sequence evidence to support the observed failure of X-Y pairing during meiosis and consequent hybrid infertility in C57BL/6 x Mus spretus male F1 offspring. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  8. Identification and characterization of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Camp, Nicola J; Ghoussaini, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single-nucleotide po......Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in CASP8 on chromosome 2 are associated with breast cancer risk. To clarify the role of CASP8 in breast cancer susceptibility, we carried out dense genotyping of this region in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Single......-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 1 Mb region around CASP8 were genotyped in 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 600 controls of European origin from 41 studies participating in the BCAC as part of a custom genotyping array experiment (iCOGS). Missing genotypes and SNPs were imputed and, after quality exclusions...

  9. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten H D Larmuseau

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample

  10. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vessi, Andrea; Jobling, Mark A; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Primativo, Giuseppina; Biondi, Gianfranco; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Ottoni, Claudio; Decorte, Ronny; Rickards, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY) has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample. Therefore, the uniquely

  11. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY chromosome sex determination system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail G Divashuk

    Full Text Available Hemp (Cannabis sativa L. was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71, 5S rDNA (pCT4.2, a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1 and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants. The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution.

  12. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  13. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  14. Port-wine stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Port-wine stain URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ...

  15. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avner, P.; Amar, L.; Arnaud, D.; Hanauer, A.; Cambrou, J.

    1987-01-01

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained

  16. Exclusion of Linkage to the CDL1 Gene Region on Chromosome 3q26.3 in Some Familial Cases of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Ian D.; Tonkin, Emma; Smith, Melanie; Devoto, Marcella; Bottani, Armand; Simpson, Claire; Hofreiter, Mary; Abraham, Vinod; Jukofsky, Lori; Conti, Brian P.; Strachan, Tom; Jackson, Laird

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a complex developmental disorder consisting of characteristic facial features, limb abnormalities, hirsutism, ophthalmologic involvement, gastroesophageal dysfunction, hearing loss, as well as growth and neuro-developmental retardation. Most cases of CdLS appear to be sporadic. Familial cases are rare and indicate autosomal dominant inheritance. Several individuals with CdLS have been reported with chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting candidate genomic regions within which the causative gene(s) may lie. A CdLS gene location (CDL1) has been assigned to 3q26.3 based on phenotypic overlap with the duplication 3q syndrome (critical region 3q26.2-q27) and the report of a CdLS individual with a balanced de novo t(3;17)(q26.3;q23.1). It has been postulated that a gene within the dup3q critical region results in the CdLS when deleted or mutated. We have performed a linkage analysis to the minimal critical region for the dup3q syndrome (that encompasses the translocation breakpoint) on chromosome 3q in 10 rare familial cases of CdLS. Nineteen markers spanning a region of approximately 40 Mb (37 cM) were used. Results of a multipoint linkage analysis demonstrated total lod-scores that were negative across the chromosome 3q26-q27 region. In 4/10 families, lod-scores were less than −2 in the 2 cM region encompassing the translocation, while in the remaining 6/10 families, lod-scores could not exclude linkage to this region. These studies indicate that in some multicase families, the disease gene does not map to the CDL1 region at 3q26.3. PMID:11391654

  17. Stain Removal Assessment of Two Manual Toothbrushes with an Interproximal Tooth Stain Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Svetlana; Grender, Julie M; Terézhalmy, Geza; Archila, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    To assess a newly developed index to measure interproximal stain and evaluate the stain removal efficacy of two commercially available manual toothbrushes. This was a randomized, examiner-blind, parallel-group, two-treatment clinical trial of two weeks' duration. Subjects qualified for the study if they had an average Modified Lobene Stain Index of ≥ 1.5 from two anterior teeth. At baseline, subjects brushed in front of a mirror for one minute under supervision. All subjects were provided with a standard 0.243% sodium fluoride dentifrice and were randomly assigned either an Oral-B Pulsar manual brush (OBP) or a Colgate Whitening manual brush (CW) to use for two weeks. Stain was reassessed after two weeks of product use. Stain measurements were conducted using the Modified Lobene Stain Index and the new Interproximal Modified Lobene Stain Index, which allows for assessment of stain in hard-to-reach areas using the same area and intensity scales as the Modified Lobene Stain Index. Use of the two manual brushes resulted in statistically significant reductions in surface stain relative to baseline after two weeks of use. Median stain reductions were 78% and 60% for the OBP and CW, respectively, as measured by the Modified Lobene Stain Index. The mean changes in the composite scores from baseline to week two were 1.85 and 1.57 for the two treatment groups, respectively. Statistically significant reductions from baseline were also found for the intensity and extent of stain measures (p brush and 83% reduction with the CW brush. For the gingival sites, the median stain removal percentages were 83% and 50%, respectively For the body region, a median stain removal of 100% was found for both treatment groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups for the mean composite scores for either index. Both manual brushes showed effective stain removal, including interproximal hard-to-reach sites. The Interproximal Modified Lobene Stain Index

  18. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  19. Role of the pseudoautosomal region in sex-chromosome pairing during male meiosis: Meiotic studies in a man with a deletion of distal Xp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K.; Passage, M.B.; Yen, P.H.; Speed, R.M.; Chandley, A.C.; Shapiro, L.J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Meiotic studies were undertaken in a 24-year-old male patient with short stature, chondrodysplasia punctata, ichthyosis, steroid sulfatase deficiency, and mild mental retardation with an inherited cytologically visible deletion of distal Xp. Molecular investigations showed that the pseudoautosomal region as well as the steroid sulfatase gene were deleted, but telomeric sequences were present at the pter on the deleted X chromosome. A complete failure of sex-chromosome pairing was observed in the primary spermatocytes of the patient. Telomeric approaches between the sex chromosomes were made at zygotene in some cells, but XY synaptonemal complex was formed. The sex chromosomes were present as univalents at metaphase I, and germ-cell development was arrested between metaphase I and metaphase II in the vast majority of cells, consistent with the azoospermia observed in the patient. The failure of XY pairing in this individual indicates that the pseudoautosomal sequences play an important role in initiating XY pairing and formation of synaptonemal complex at meiosis. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Loss at chromosome arm 16q in retinoblastoma: confirmation of the association with diffuse vitreous seeding and refinement of the recurrently deleted region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustmann, Sebastian; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Stephan, Harald; Weber, Susanne; Bornfeld, Norbert; Kaulisch, Marc; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Dünker, Nicole

    2011-05-01

    In addition to mutations in both alleles of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) alleles, retinoblastomas frequently show additional alterations including loss of chromosome arm 16q. In a previous study, the presence of 16q alterations was found to be associated with diffuse vitreous seeding of this tumor. This growth pattern is clinically important as it determines therapeutic decisions. The present study was designed to test this association and to narrow down the list of candidate genes in the minimal region of genomic loss on chromosome arm 16q. Our data confirm the association of 16q loss and diffuse vitreous seeding and define a minimal region of genomic loss of 6.6 Mb on 16q containing 86 known genes. As retinoblastoma is an embryonic tumor, we assumed that any gene relevant for its progression is likely to show regulated expression during retinogenesis. Microarray expression analysis of RNA from a continuous developmental series of murine retinas identified murine orthologs with regulated expression and these data helped to narrow the number of candidate genes in minimal region to 35. Analysis of gene expression in retinoblastomas with and without the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 16q further reduced this number to 26 candidate genes. One of these genes is cadherin 13 (CDH13) and notably, downregulation of CHD13 has previously been associated with poorer prognosis in various other cancers. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Chromosome banding in Amphibia. XXI. Inversion polymorphism and multiple nucleolus organizer regions in Agalychnis callidryas (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Feichtinger, W; Weimer, R; Mais, C; Bolaños, F; León, P

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed on several populations of the Central American tree frog Agalychnis callidryas, using conventional methods and banding techniques. The karyotype of this species is distinguished by an inversion polymorphism in chromosome 9, which is either submetacentric or telocentric. The populations examined are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to the two alternative morphs of chromosome 9. This is the first report of the occurrence of an intrapopulational chromosomal inversion polymorphism in the order Anura. In male meiosis, the two chromosomes 9 form a bivalent exhibiting a ring-like pairing configuration with terminal chiasmata in both arms, regardless of whether the paired homologs are heteromorphic or homomorphic. Furthermore, individual specimens of A. callidryas exhibit one or two unexpected 18S + 28S ribosomal RNA gene clusters, in addition to the standard nucleolus organizers. The chromosomal localization of these extra nucleolus organizers is identical in all metaphases from the same specimen and shows a specific intraindividual pattern. The karyotype evolution in the phyllomedusine hylids, the structure of the various classes of heterochromatin, and the occurrence and possible origin of the rare inversion polymorphisms and multiple nucleolus organizers in A. callidryas and a few other amphibian species are discussed.

  2. Strain of Synechocystis PCC 6803 with Aberrant Assembly of Photosystem II Contains Tandem Duplication of a Large Chromosomal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Martin; Bečková, Martina; Kopečná, Jana; Noda, Judith; Sobotka, Roman; Komenda, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 represents a favored model organism for photosynthetic studies. Its easy transformability allowed construction of a vast number of Synechocystis mutants including many photosynthetically incompetent ones. However, it became clear that there is already a spectrum of Synechocystis "wild-type" substrains with apparently different phenotypes. Here, we analyzed organization of photosynthetic membrane complexes in a standard motile Pasteur collection strain termed PCC and two non-motile glucose-tolerant substrains (named here GT-P and GT-W) previously used as genetic backgrounds for construction of many photosynthetic site directed mutants. Although, both the GT-P and GT-W strains were derived from the same strain constructed and described by Williams in 1988, only GT-P was similar in pigmentation and in the compositions of Photosystem II (PSII) and Photosystem I (PSI) complexes to PCC. In contrast, GT-W contained much more carotenoids but significantly less chlorophyll (Chl), which was reflected by lower level of dimeric PSII and especially trimeric PSI. We found that GT-W was deficient in Chl biosynthesis and contained unusually high level of unassembled D1-D2 reaction center, CP47 and especially CP43. Another specific feature of GT-W was a several fold increase in the level of the Ycf39-Hlip complex previously postulated to participate in the recycling of Chl molecules. Genome re-sequencing revealed that the phenotype of GT-W is related to the tandem duplication of a large region of the chromosome that contains 100 genes including ones encoding D1, Psb28, and other PSII-related proteins as well as Mg-protoporphyrin methylester cyclase (Cycl). Interestingly, the duplication was completely eliminated after keeping GT-W cells on agar plates under photoautotrophic conditions for several months. The GT-W strain without a duplication showed no obvious defects in PSII assembly and resembled the GT-P substrain. Although, we do not exactly

  3. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  4. Regulation of chromosomal replication by DnaA protein availability in Escherichia coli: effects of the datA region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morigen, H.; Boye, E.; Skarstad, K.

    2001-01-01

    A copy number, we introduced a minichromosome which only replicates from oriC., using a host cell which replicates its chromosome independently of oriC. Our data show that a moderate increase in datA copy number is accompanied by increased DnaA protein synthesis that allows oriC initiation to occur...... suggest that the datA locus plays a significant role in regulating oriC initiation, by its capacity to bind DnaA. They also suggest that auto regulation of the dnaA gene is of minor importance in regulation of chromosome initiation....

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome for fetuses with suspicious deletion of chromosomal region 15q11-q13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Hui-Kuo; Kao, Chiu-Ching; Huang, Jyun-Yuan; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2014-04-01

    To identify Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) among fetuses with suspicious deletion of the chromosomal region 15q11-q13. In a retrospective study, data were assessed from fetuses missing chromosomal band 15q12 that underwent molecular diagnosis at the National Chen-Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan, between January 2001 and December 2012. Amniocytes were subjected to molecular testing, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, methylation-specific PCR (M-PCR), and methylation-specific multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA). During the 12-year study period, 26 041 amniocyte samples were analyzed at the study center and 27 (0.1%) were found to have a missing 15q12 band. A further 16 samples with a missing 15q12 band were received from other cytogenetic laboratories; as a result, 43 amniocyte samples lacking chromosomal band 15q12 underwent further molecular testing. Among these samples, 3 fetuses (7.0%) were found to have PWS (n=1) or AS (n=2). A minority of cases with missing 15q12 had deletion of the PWS/AS critical region. This finding draws attention to the subtle structural rearrangements that occur on 15q11-q13 and provides useful information for prenatal diagnosis of PWS and AS. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical mapping of the Bloom syndrome region by the identification of YAC and P1 clones from human chromosome 15 band q26.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straughen, J.; Groden, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States); Ciocci, S. [New York Blood Center, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The gene for Bloom syndrome (BLM) has been mapped to human chromosome 15 band q26.1 by homozygosity mapping. Further refinement of the location of BLM has relied upon linkage-disequilibrium mapping and somatic intragenic recombination. In combination with these mapping approaches and to identify novel DNA markers and probes for the BLM candidate region, a contiguous representation of the 2-Mb region that contains the BLM gene was generated and is presented here. YAC and P1 clones from the region have been identified and ordered by using previously available genetic markers in the region along with newly developed sequence-tagged sites from radiation-restriction map of the 2-Mb region that allowed estimation of the distance between polymorphic microsatellite loci is also reported. This map and the DNA markers derived from it were instrumental in the recent identification of the BLM gene. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Characterization of a DNA sequence family in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, B.; Knoblauch, H.; Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    IR4-3R (D15S11) is an anonymous DNA sequence from human chromosome 15. Using YAC cloning and restriction enzyme analysis, the authors have found that IR4-3R detects five related DNA sequences, which are spread over 700 kb within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q 13. The RsaI and StyI polymorphisms, which were described previously, are associated with the most proximal copy of IR4-3R and are in strong linkage disequilibrium. IR4-3R represents the third DNA sequence family that has been identified in 15q11-q13. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Sons conceived by assisted reproduction techniques inherit deletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome and the DAZ gene copy number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau Kai, C; Juul, A; McElreavey, K

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome are frequent in infertile men. The clinical consequences and the mode of inheritance of these deletions are not yet clear. METHODS: Y chromosome deletion mapping and quantitative PCR analysis of the DAZ-gene copy...... number, supplemented with haplogroup typing in deleted patients, were performed, in combination with clinical assessments in 264 fathers and their sons conceived by assisted reproduction techniques (ART), and in 168 fertile men with normal sperm concentration. RESULTS: In the ART fathers group......, which needs confirmation in further studies in larger cohorts. However, deletions of two DAZ gene copies are compatible with normal spermatogenesis and fertility Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  9. Outcome of treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with rearrangements of the 11q23 chromosomal region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pui, CH; Gaynon, PS; Boyett, JM; Chessells, JM; Baruchel, A; Kamps, W; Silverman, LB; Biondi, A; Harms, DO; Vilmer, E; Schrappe, M; Camitta, B

    2002-01-01

    Background The prognosis and optimum treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with abnormalities of chromosomal band 11q23 are controversial. We aimed to identify prognostic factors that might help in planning future therapy, and to assess the effectiveness of haemopoietic

  10. Linkage and RH mapping of 10 genes to a QTL region for fatness and muscling traits on pig chromosome X

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepica, Stanislav; Masopust, Martin; Knoll, Aleš; Bartenschlager, H.; Yerle, M.; Rohrer, G. A.; Geldermann, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, 6 (2006), s. 603-604 ISSN 0268-9146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/04/0106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : pig chromosome X Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2006

  11. Division-induced DNA double strand breaks in the chromosome terminus region of Escherichia coli lacking RecBCD DNA repair enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kumar Sinha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marker frequency analysis of the Escherichia coli recB mutant chromosome has revealed a deficit of DNA in a specific zone of the terminus, centred on the dif/TerC region. Using fluorescence microscopy of a marked chromosomal site, we show that the dif region is lost after replication completion, at the time of cell division, in one daughter cell only, and that the phenomenon is transmitted to progeny. Analysis by marker frequency and microscopy shows that the position of DNA loss is not defined by the replication fork merging point since it still occurs in the dif/TerC region when the replication fork trap is displaced in strains harbouring ectopic Ter sites. Terminus DNA loss in the recB mutant is also independent of dimer resolution by XerCD at dif and of Topo IV action close to dif. It occurs in the terminus region, at the point of inversion of the GC skew, which is also the point of convergence of specific sequence motifs like KOPS and Chi sites, regardless of whether the convergence of GC skew is at dif (wild-type or a newly created sequence. In the absence of FtsK-driven DNA translocation, terminus DNA loss is less precisely targeted to the KOPS convergence sequence, but occurs at a similar frequency and follows the same pattern as in FtsK+ cells. Importantly, using ftsIts, ftsAts division mutants and cephalexin treated cells, we show that DNA loss of the dif region in the recB mutant is decreased by the inactivation of cell division. We propose that it results from septum-induced chromosome breakage, and largely contributes to the low viability of the recB mutant.

  12. New BAGE (B melanoma antigen) genes mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of human chromosomes 13 and 21 have a cancer/testis expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruault, Myriam; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Boyle, Shelagh; Roizès, Gérard; De Sario, Albertina

    2002-12-01

    A first BAGE (B melanoma antigen) gene, BAGE1, was identified because it encodes a human tumour antigen recognised by a cytolytic T lymphocyte. Here, we characterised five new BAGE genes mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of human chromosomes 13 and 21 and nine BAGE gene fragments mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of chromosomes 9, 13, 18, and 21. Genes and gene fragments share extensive regions of 90-99% nucleotide identity. We analysed the expression of BAGE genes on 215 tumours of various histological types and on nine normal tissues. Similar to BAGE1, the new BAGE genes are expressed in melanomas, bladder and lung carcinomas and in a few tumours of other histological types. All the normal tissues were negative, with the exception of testis. Our results show that human juxtacentromeric regions harbour genes, which are transcribed and translated, in addition to gene fragments that are generally not expressed. We suggest that the pattern of expression restricted to cancer/testis is a feature of the few genes mapping to juxtacentromeric regions.

  13. Research on pre-staining gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Ruibo; Liu Yushuang; Zhang Ping; Liu Jingran; Zhao Guofen; Zhang Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gel electrophoresis is a powerful biochemical separation technique. Most biological molecules are completely transparent in the visible region of light, so it is necessary to use staining to show the results after gel electrophoresis, and the general steps of conventional staining methods are time-consuming. Purpose: We try to develop a novel approach to simplify the gel electrophoresis: Pre-Staining Gel Electrophoresis (PSGE), which can make the gel electrophoresis results monitored in real time. Methods: Pre-stain the protein samples with Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) for 30 min before loading the sample into the gel well. Results and Conclusion: PSGE can be successfully used to analyze the binding efficiency of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and amphiphilic polymer via chemical coupling and physical absorption, and the double PSGE also shows a great potential in bio-analytical chemistry. (authors)

  14. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  15. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  16. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described. Images PMID:1688872

  17. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    OpenAIRE

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described.

  18. Gram stain of urethral discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral discharge Gram stain; Urethritis - Gram stain ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . ...

  19. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  20. Sequencing and assembly of low copy and genic regions of isolated Triticum aestivum chromosome arm 7DS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berkman, O. J.; Skarshewski, A.; Lorenc, M. T.; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Batley, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7 (2011), s. 768-775 ISSN 1467-7644 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk ED0007/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : wheat genome sequence * chromosome 7 * genome assembly Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.442, year: 2011

  1. Karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in two Nalassus species (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirim Şendoğan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic features of Nalassus bozdagus Nabozhenko & Keskin, 2010 and Nalassus plebejus Küster, 1850 were analysed using conventional and differential staining. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomal analysis revealed the diploid number as 2n = 20 (9+Xyp in both species. Besides the general resemblance of two Nalassus Mulsant, 1854 karyotypes, important differences related to variations in the number of metacentric/submetacentric chromosomes, localization of highly impregnated regions which are considered as NOR and heterochromatin distribution are clearly observed. The most prominent difference between two species is found related to the X chromosome which is clearly larger in N. bozdagus and has a conspicuous secondary constriction on the long arm. As a result of silver staining, the existence of highly impregnated areas associated with Xyp of N. bozdagus in both prophase I and metaphase I, suggests that NORs are seemingly located on sex chromosomes. On the other hand, the potential NORs of N. plebejus were observed only in prophase I nuclei. With the application of fluorescence dye DAPI, the AT rich chromosome regions and Xyp which forms the parachute configuration were shown in both species.

  2. Karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in twoNalassusspecies (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şendoğan, Dirim; Alpagut-Keskin, Nurşen

    2016-01-01

    Cytogenetic features of Nalassus bozdagus Nabozhenko & Keskin, 2010 and Nalassus plebejus Küster, 1850 were analysed using conventional and differential staining. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomal analysis revealed the diploid number as 2n = 20 (9+Xy p ) in both species. Besides the general resemblance of two Nalassus Mulsant, 1854 karyotypes, important differences related to variations in the number of metacentric/submetacentric chromosomes, localization of highly impregnated regions which are considered as NOR and heterochromatin distribution are clearly observed. The most prominent difference between two species is found related to the X chromosome which is clearly larger in Nalassus bozdagus and has a conspicuous secondary constriction on the long arm. As a result of silver staining, the existence of highly impregnated areas associated with Xy p of Nalassus bozdagus in both prophase I and metaphase I, suggests that NORs are seemingly located on sex chromosomes. On the other hand, the potential NORs of Nalassus plebejus were observed only in prophase I nuclei. With the application of fluorescence dye DAPI, the AT rich chromosome regions and Xy p which forms the parachute configuration were shown in both species.

  3. Physical and transcript map of the region between D6S264 and D6S149 on chromosome 6q27, the minimal region of allele loss in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Emilion, Gracy; Mungall, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown a high frequency of allele loss at D6S193 (62%) on chromosomal arm 6q27 in ovarian tumours and mapped the minimal region of allele loss between D6S297 and D6S264 (3 cM). We isolated and mapped a single non-chimaeric YAC (17IA12, 260-280 kb) containing D6S193 and D6S297...

  4. BAC array CGH in patients with Velocardiofacial syndrome-like features reveals genomic aberrations on chromosome region 1q21.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estivill Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region is the most common genetic aberration among patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS but a subset of subjects do not show alterations of this chromosome region. Methods We analyzed 18 patients with VCFS-like features by comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH array and performed a face-to-face slide hybridization with two different arrays: a whole genome and a chromosome 22-specific BAC array. Putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH and MLPA assays. Results One patient carried a combination of rearrangements on 1q21.1, consisting in a microduplication of 212 kb and a close microdeletion of 1.15 Mb, previously reported in patients with variable phenotypes, including mental retardation, congenital heart defects (CHD and schizophrenia. While 326 control samples were negative for both 1q21.1 rearrangements, one of 73 patients carried the same 212-kb microduplication, reciprocal to TAR microdeletion syndrome. Also, we detected four copy number variants (CNVs inherited from one parent (a 744-kb duplication on 10q11.22; a 160 kb duplication and deletion on 22q11.21 in two cases; and a gain of 140 kb on 22q13.2, not present in control subjects, raising the potential role of these CNVs in the VCFS-like phenotype. Conclusions Our results confirmed aCGH as a successful strategy in order to characterize additional submicroscopic aberrations in patients with VCF-like features that fail to show alterations in 22q11.2 region. We report a 212-kb microduplication on 1q21.1, detected in two patients, which may contribute to CHD.

  5. Engineered chromosome-based genetic mapping establishes a 3.7 Mb critical genomic region for Down syndrome-associated heart defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhong; Morishima, Masae; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yu, Tao; Meng, Kai; Ray, Debjit; Pao, Annie; Ye, Ping; Parmacek, Michael S; Yu, Y Eugene

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) is the most common human genetic anomaly associated with heart defects. Based on evolutionary conservation, DS-associated heart defects have been modeled in mice. By generating and analyzing mouse mutants carrying different genomic rearrangements in human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) syntenic regions, we found the triplication of the Tiam1-Kcnj6 region on mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu16) resulted in DS-related cardiovascular abnormalities. In this study, we developed two tandem duplications spanning the Tiam1-Kcnj6 genomic region on Mmu16 using recombinase-mediated genome engineering, Dp(16)3Yey and Dp(16)4Yey, spanning the 2.1 Mb Tiam1-Il10rb and 3.7 Mb Ifnar1-Kcnj6 regions, respectively. We found that Dp(16)4Yey/+, but not Dp(16)3Yey/+, led to heart defects, suggesting the triplication of the Ifnar1-Kcnj6 region is sufficient to cause DS-associated heart defects. Our transcriptional analysis of Dp(16)4Yey/+ embryos showed that the Hsa21 gene orthologs located within the duplicated interval were expressed at the elevated levels, reflecting the consequences of the gene dosage alterations. Therefore, we have identified a 3.7 Mb genomic region, the smallest critical genomic region, for DS-associated heart defects, and our results should set the stage for the final step to establish the identities of the causal gene(s), whose elevated expression(s) directly underlie this major DS phenotype.

  6. A complete YAC contig of the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region (15q11-q13) and refined localization of the SNRPN gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutirangura, A.; Jayakumar, A.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Nakao, M.; McKinney, M.J.; Beaudet, A.L.; Chinault, A.C.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Institut fur Humangenetik (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    Since a previous report of a partial YAC contig of the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region (15q11-q13), a complete contig spanning approximately 3.5 Mb has been developed. YACs were isolated from two human genomic libraries by PCR and hybridization screening methods. Twenty-three sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were mapped within the contig, a density of [approximately]1 per 200 kb. Overlaps between YAC clones were identified by Alu-PCR dot-blot analysis and confirmed by STS mapping or hybridization with ends of YAC inserts. The gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated peptide N (SNRPN), recently identified as a candidate gene for Prader-Willi syndrome, was localized within this contig between markers PW71 and TD3-21. Loci mapped within and immediately flanking the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosome region contig are ordered as follows: cen-IR39-ML34-IR4-3R-TD189-1-PW71-SNRPN-TD3-21-LS6-1-GABRB3,D15S97-GABRA5-IR10-1-CMW1-tel. This YAC contig will be a useful resource for more detailed physical mapping of the region, for generation of new DNA markers, and for mapping or cloning candidate genes for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A rapid alternative technique for obtaining silver-positive patterns in chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kavalco,Karine Frehner; Pazza,Rubens

    2004-01-01

    Silver nitrate chromosome staining to evidence nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) is a widely adopted methodology. The aim of the present work was to improve this technique, reducing the preparation time without decreasing the quality of the results. Microwave irradiation proved to be quite efficient and reliable for this purpose, as it allowed to identify Ag-NORs equivalent to those obtained by the conventional procedure and also to reduce the concentration of the employed reagents, as well ...

  8. Genes in a Refined Smith-Magenis Syndrome Critical Deletion Interval on Chromosome 17p11.2 and the Syntenic Region of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Yan, Jiong; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Park, Sung-Sup; Walz, Katherina; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Potocki, Lorraine; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Devriendt, Koen; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J.M.; Inoue, Ken; Lupski, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with behavioral abnormalities and sleep disturbance. Most patients have the same ∼4 Mb interstitial genomic deletion within chromosome 17p11.2. To investigate the molecular bases of the SMS phenotype, we constructed BAC/PAC contigs covering the SMS common deletion interval and its syntenic region on mouse chromosome 11. Comparative genome analysis reveals the absence of all three ∼200-kb SMS-REP low-copy repeats in the mouse and indicates that the evolution of SMS-REPs was accompanied by transposition of adjacent genes. Physical and genetic map comparisons in humans reveal reduced recombination in both sexes. Moreover, by examining the deleted regions in SMS patients with unusual-sized deletions, we refined the minimal Smith-Magenis critical region (SMCR) to an ∼1.1-Mb genomic interval that is syntenic to an ∼1.0-Mb region in the mouse. Genes within the SMCR and its mouse syntenic region were identified by homology searches and by gene prediction programs, and their gene structures and expression profiles were characterized. In addition to 12 genes previously mapped, we identified 8 new genes and 10 predicted genes in the SMCR. In the mouse syntenic region of the human SMCR, 16 genes and 6 predicted genes were identified. The SMCR is highly conserved between humans and mice, including 19 genes with the same gene order and orientation. Our findings will facilitate both the identification of gene(s) responsible for the SMS phenotype and the engineering of an SMS mouse model. PMID:11997338

  9. Staining properties and stability of a standardised Romanowsky stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1978-03-01

    An evaluation of the standardised Romanowsky stain of Marshall et al. has been made in a routine haematology laboratory. It was noted that this stain had several advantages over the May-Grünwald Giemsa stain used in most British laboratories. These advantages include ease and speed of preparation, a shorter staining time, and reproducibility of results. These results are described in detail. The stability of the stock stain solution and of the 'working' stain (stock + buffer) has been studied by, respectively, thin-layer chromatography and visible spectroscopy. No change was detected in the composition of the stock solution at ambient temperature over a period of six months. Stability was unaffected by the composition of the container (polyethylene, PyrexTM, or soda-glass) or by daylight. The 'working' solution was stable for 3 hours. Thereafter a precipitate is formed, consisting of thiazine dyes and eosin in a molar ratio of approximately 2:1.

  10. Analysis of the cat eye syndrome critical region in humans and the region of conserved synteny in mice: a search for candidate genes at or near the human chromosome 22 pericentromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footz, T K; Brinkman-Mills, P; Banting, G S; Maier, S A; Riazi, M A; Bridgland, L; Hu, S; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Pan, H; Nguyen, T; Fang, F; Fu, Y; Ray, L; Wu, H; Shaull, S; Phan, S; Yao, Z; Chen, F; Huan, A; Hu, P; Wang, Q; Loh, P; Qi, S; Roe, B A; McDermid, H E

    2001-06-01

    We have sequenced a 1.1-Mb region of human chromosome 22q containing the dosage-sensitive gene(s) responsible for cat eye syndrome (CES) as well as the 450-kb homologous region on mouse chromosome 6. Fourteen putative genes were identified within or adjacent to the human CES critical region (CESCR), including three known genes (IL-17R, ATP6E, and BID) and nine novel genes, based on EST identity. Two putative genes (CECR3 and CECR9) were identified, in the absence of EST hits, by comparing segments of human and mouse genomic sequence around two solitary amplified exons, thus showing the utility of comparative genomic sequence analysis in identifying transcripts. Of the 14 genes, 10 were confirmed to be present in the mouse genomic sequence in the same order and orientation as in human. Absent from the mouse region of conserved synteny are CECR1, a promising CES candidate gene from the center of the contig, neighboring CECR4, and CECR7 and CECR8, which are located in the gene-poor proximal 400 kb of the contig. This latter proximal region, located approximately 1 Mb from the centromere, shows abundant duplicated gene fragments typical of pericentromeric DNA. The margin of this region also delineates the boundary of conserved synteny between the CESCR and mouse chromosome 6. Because the proximal CESCR appears abundant in duplicated segments and, therefore, is likely to be gene poor, we consider the putative genes identified in the distal CESCR to represent the majority of candidate genes for involvement in CES.

  11. Radiation susceptibility of the mouse smalleye mutants, Del(2)Sey3Hpax6 and Del(2)Sey4Hpax6, which delete the chromosome 2 middle regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Y.; Hoshi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yamate, J.; Peters, J.; Cattanach, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: LOH at the chromosome 2 middle regions is common in the radiation-induced mouse acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To identify the suppressor or the modifier gene of AML at this region, the mouse deletion mutants, Del(2)Sey3H pax6 and Del(2)Sey3H pax6 could be the good models, as they deleted the chromosome 2 middle regions hemizygously. The allele of the partially deleted chromosome 2 was paternally generated and maintained hemizygously. The exact deleted regions of the two mutants were mapped by the PCR-based detection of polymorphism of the STS markers. The length of the deletions was 3.01Mb and 10.11MB for Del(2)Sey3H pax6 and Del(2)Sey3H pax6 , respectively. For the induction of tumors, a radiation, 3.0Gy of Co-60 and a chemical carcinogen, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea were applied to the mutants. Their tumorigenicity was compared with those of control as well as normal sibs by the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Both mutants were found to predispose to small intestinal tumors. Intestinal tumors developed spontaneously with the incidence of 30%. The radiation and the chemical accelerated the malignancy and increased the incidence of the intestinal tumors. Radiation shortened the latency of AML development in the Del(2)Sey3H pax6 mutant but not in the Del(2)Sey3H pax6 . Spontaneous AML has not been observed, nor any increase in the incidence of induced AMLs. The commonly deleted region of the two mutants, the 3.01Mb region, must be critical for the development of tumors and the high susceptibility to radiation. The role of Pax6 gene should be considered in the intestinal tumorigenesis, as the Pax6 gene plays an important role in the pancreas development during the embryogenesis. The Wt1, a tumor suppressor gene, which is deleted hemizygously in these mutants as well. The screening of homozygous deletion has been started using the induced as well as spontaneously developed tumors

  12. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Genomic analysis of a 1 Mb region near the telomere of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and avirulence gene vH13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To have an insight into the Mayetiola destructor (Hessian fly genome, we performed an in silico comparative genomic analysis utilizing genetic mapping, genomic sequence and EST sequence data along with data available from public databases. Results Chromosome walking and FISH were utilized to identify a contig of 50 BAC clones near the telomere of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and near the avirulence gene vH13. These clones enabled us to correlate physical and genetic distance in this region of the Hessian fly genome. Sequence data from these BAC ends encompassing a 760 kb region, and a fully sequenced and assembled 42.6 kb BAC clone, was utilized to perform a comparative genomic study. In silico gene prediction combined with BLAST analyses was used to determine putative orthology to the sequenced dipteran genomes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and to infer evolutionary relationships. Conclusion This initial effort enables us to advance our understanding of the structure, composition and evolution of the genome of this important agricultural pest and is an invaluable tool for a whole genome sequencing effort.

  14. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2012-06-12

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  15. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  16. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  17. Patterns of chromosome banding in four nabid species (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha, Nabidae) with high chromosome number karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozeva, S; Kuznetsova, V G; Nokkala, S

    2004-01-01

    Male Nabis (Aspilaspis) indicus (Stål), N. (A.) viridulus Spinola, Himacerus (Himacerus) mirmicoides (O. Costa) (2n=32+XY) and Prostemma guttula (Fabricius) (2n=26+XY) were studied using C-banding, silver nitrate staining and base-specific fluorochrome (DAPI and CMA(3)) staining. N. indicus differed from N. viridulus in distribution pattern of C-bands, which were telomeric in the former while interstitial in the latter. H. mirmicoides showed interstitial C-bands in the majority of autosomes. P. guttula had no conspicuous C-bands in other chromosomes, but only in the Y, which was totally heterochromatic. C-heterochromatin was labelled with DAPI, indicating that it was AT-rich. In every species, both X and Y chromosomes were NOR-bearing, and the NOR regions were GC-rich. In H.mirmicoides and P. guttula, NORs showed sub-median location in the X and distal in the Y, such a pattern being probably common in Nabidae. The present paper provides new information on the genome organization and new cytological markers useful for a better insight into karyotype evolution of nabid species.

  18. A radiation hybrid map of 15 loci on the distal long arm of chromosome 4, the region containing the gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.H. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)); Schutte, B. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); Weiffenbach, B. (Collaborative Research, Waltham, MA (United States)); Washington, S.S.; Chakravarti, A. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); McElligot, D. (Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A physical map of 4q35 was constructed through radiation hybrid analysis of 134 clones generated from the cell line HHW416, a chromosome 4-only human-hamster somatic cell hybrid. This subtelomeric region contains the as-yet-unidentified gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. The most likely order of 15 loci within 4q35 was determined. The loci ordered on this radiation hybrid map include both genes and polymorphic loci, as well as monomorphic loci which cannot be placed on a genetic linkage map. The physical distance spanning these loci was estimated to be approximately 4.5 Mb, by using a kilobase/centiray conversion factor derived from 4p16.3 marker analysis through the same set of radiation hybrids. The comparison of this physical map to established genetic maps suggests that this region is smaller than initially estimated and that recombination rates are increased near the telomere. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A 725 kb deletion at 22q13.1 chromosomal region including SOX10 gene in a boy with a neurologic variant of Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomou, Elisavet; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Petersen, Michael; Thomaidis, Loretta; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Orru, Sandro; Papoulidis, Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare (1/40,000) autosomal dominant disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four clinical subtypes (WS1-S4). Six genes have been identified to be associated with the different subtypes of WS, among which SOX10, which is localized within the region 22q13.1. Lately it has been suggested that whole SOX10 gene deletions can be encountered when testing for WS. In this study we report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a unique de novo 725 kb deletion within the 22q13.1 chromosomal region, including the SOX10 gene and presenting clinical features of a neurologic variant of WS2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Chromosome Map and Heterochromatin Features of the Gray Whale Karyotype (Cetacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Lemskaya, Natalia A; Perelman, Polina L; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Cetacean karyotypes possess exceptionally stable diploid numbers and highly conserved chromosomes. To date, only toothed whales (Odontoceti) have been analyzed by comparative chromosome painting. Here, we studied the karyotype of a representative of baleen whales, the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus, Mysticeti), by Zoo-FISH with dromedary camel and human chromosome-specific probes. We confirmed a high degree of karyotype conservation and found an identical order of syntenic segments in both branches of cetaceans. Yet, whale chromosomes harbor variable heterochromatic regions constituting up to a third of the genome due to the presence of several types of repeats. To investigate the cause of this variability, several classes of repeated DNA sequences were mapped onto chromosomes of whale species from both Mysticeti and Odontoceti. We uncovered extensive intrapopulation variability in the size of heterochromatic blocks present in homologous chromosomes among 3 individuals of the gray whale by 2-step differential chromosome staining. We show that some of the heteromorphisms observed in the gray whale karyotype are due to distinct amplification of a complex of common cetacean repeat and heavy satellite repeat on homologous autosomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate localization of the telomeric repeat in the heterochromatin of both gray and pilot whale (Globicephala melas, Odontoceti). Heterochromatic blocks in the pilot whale represent a composite of telomeric and common repeats, while heavy satellite repeat is lacking in the toothed whale consistent with previous studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in amenorrhea: a retrospective study and review of 637 patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Usha R; Ponnala, Rajitha; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Dalal, Ashwin B

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and to identify the most prevalent or frequent type of chromosomal abnormalities in cases of amenorrhea from the southern region of India. A total of 637 cases with amenorrhea were analyzed using G- banding, C-banding, Silver staining, and fluorescence in situ hybridization was done wherever necessary. Out of the 637 cases involved in our study, 132 abnormalities were detected. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in cases with primary and secondary amenorrhea was around 20.7 %. In addition to the numerical anomalies, various structural aberrations of the X chromosome like deletions, isochromosomes, duplications, ring chromosome, and also male karyotype were detected. Review of the literature and overall incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with amenorrhea suggests the need for cytogenetic analysis to be performed in all the cases referred for amenorrhea with or without short stature. Precise identification of chromosomal abnormalities helps in confirming the provisional diagnosis; it helps the secondary amenorrhea patients in assisted reproduction and to understand the clinical heterogeneity involved and in efficient genetic counseling.

  2. Genetic analysis of the proximal region of chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. I. Detachment products of compound autosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliker, A.J.; Holm, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    To examine the genetic composition of proximal heterochromatin in chromosome 2, the detachment of compound second autosomes, for generating proximal deficiencies, appeared a promising method. Compound seconds were detached by gamma radiation. A fraction of the detachment products were recessive lethals owing to proximal deficiencies. Analysis by inter se complementation, pseudo-dominance tests with proximal mutations and allelism tests with known deficiencies provided evidence for at least two loci between the centromere and the light locus in 2L and one locus in 2R between the rolled locus and the centromere. The data further demonstrate that rolled, and probably light, are located within the proximal heterochromatin. Thus, functional genetic loci are found in heterochromatin, albeit at low density

  3. Quantitative trait loci at the 11q23.3 chromosomal region related to dyslipidemia in the population of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranavchand, Rayabarapu; Reddy, Battini Mohan

    2017-06-13

    Given the characteristic atherogenic dyslipidemia of south Indian population and crucial role of APOA1, APOC3, APOA4 and APOA5 genes clustered in 11q23.3 chromosomal region in regulating lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis, a large number of recently identified variants are to be explored for their role in regulating the serum lipid parameters among south Indians. Using fluidigm SNP genotyping platform, a prioritized set of 96 SNPs of the 11q23.3 chromosomal region were genotyped on 516 individuals from Hyderabad, India, and its vicinity and aged >45 years. The linear regression analysis of the individual lipid traits viz., TC, LDLC, HDLC, VLDL and TG with each of the 78 SNPs that confirm to HWE and with minor allele frequency > 1%, suggests 23 of those to be significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with at least one of these quantitative traits. Most importantly, the variant rs632153 is involved in elevating TC, LDLC, TG and VLDLs and probably playing a crucial role in the manifestation of dyslipidemia. Additionally, another three SNPs rs633389, rs2187126 and rs1263163 are found risk conferring to dyslipidemia by elevating LDLC and TC levels in the present population. Further, the ROC (receiver operating curve) analysis for the risk scores and dyslipidemia status yielded a significant area under curve (AUC) = 0.675, suggesting high discriminative power of the risk variants towards the condition. The interaction analysis suggests rs10488699-rs2187126 pair of the BUD13 gene to confer significant risk (Interaction odds ratio = 14.38, P = 7.17 × 10 5 ) towards dyslipidemia by elevating the TC levels (β = 37.13, p = 6.614 × 10 5 ). On the other hand, the interaction between variants of APOA1 gene and BUD13 and/or ZPR1 regulatory genes at this region are associated with elevated TG and VLDL. The variants at 11q23.3 chromosomal region seem to determine the quantitative lipid traits and in turn dyslipidemia in the population of Hyderabad

  4. A new bacterial staining method involving Gram stain with theoretical considerations of the staining mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Y; Tôei, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Gram staining of bacteria, tests with anionic dyes followed by treatment with cationic octyltrimethylammonium (OTMA) were carried out. The study revealed that tetrabromophenolphthalein ethylester (TBPE) gave the most reliable staining of Gram-negative bacteria with negative staining of Gram-positive bacteria. Tests on many species of bacteria showed that TBPE positive bacteria were Gram-negative and vice versa, without exception.

  5. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may pl...

  6. Birth of a child with Down syndrome in a family transmitting an unusual chromosome 22 arising from a translocation between chromosomes 21 and an inverted chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviv, H.A.; Desposito, F. [UMDNJ-NJ Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Lieber, C. [Hackensack Medical Center, NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal analysis of a child with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual translocation and in the definition of the translocation breakpoints. Studies were performed on the child, his siblings, mother, mother`s sister, and grandmother. All of the family members were carriers of the translocation. We performed G-banding, silver stain, C-banding, and hybridization with the following FISH probes (Oncor): {alpha}-satellite 13/21; {beta}-satellite, coatasome 21 and 22, and the probes for chromosome 22 at 22q11 (DiGeorge region) and 22q13.3 (control region). Using the banding techniques and probes, we characterized the karyotype as: 45,XX,-21,-22,+der(22),t(21;22)(22qter{r_arrow}22q11.2::22p13{r_arrow}22q11.2::21q11.2{r_arrow}21qter). The effect of deletion of 21q11.2 and the break of chromosome 22 in the DiGeorge region in this family is not clear. However, the presence of the translocation increases the risk of family members of conceiving children with Down syndrome.

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21. 3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.; Andreasen, P.A.; Sartorio, R.; Nielsen, L.S.; Stuart, N.; Stanislovitis, P.; Watkins, P.; Douglas, R.

    1987-12-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer.

  8. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Franciso, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21.3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.

    1987-01-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer

  10. The neurological mouse mutations jittery and hesitant are allelic and map to the region of mouse chromosome 10 homologous to 19p13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfhamer, D.; Sufalko, D.; Warren, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Jittery (ji) is a recessive mouse mutation on Chromosome 10 characterized by progressive ataxic gait, dystonic movements, spontaneus seizures, and death by dehydration/starvation before fertility. Recently, a viable neurological recessive mutation, hesitant, was discovered. It is characterized by hesitant, uncoordinated movements, exaggerated stepping of the hind limbs, and reduced fertility in males. In a complementation test and by genetic mapping we have shown here that hesitant and jittery are allelic. Using several large intersubspecific backcrosses and intercrosses we have genetically mapped ji near the marker Amh and microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. The linked region of mouse Chromosome 10 is homologous to human 19p13.3, to which several human ataxia loci have recently been mapped. By excluding genes that map to human 21q22.3 (Pfkl) and 12q23 (Nfyb), we conclude that jittery is not likely to be a genetic mouse model for human Unverricht-Lundborg progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) on 21q22.3 nor for spinocerebellar ataxia II (SCA2) on 12q22-q24. The closely linked markers presented here will facilitate positional cloning of the ji gene. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Identification of two critically deleted regions within chromosome segment 7q35-q36 in EVI1 deregulated myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An De Weer

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements involving the EVI1 proto-oncogene are a recurrent finding in myeloid leukemias and are indicative of a poor prognosis. Rearrangements of the EVI1 locus are often associated with monosomy 7 or cytogenetic detectable deletions of part of 7q. As EVI1 overexpression alone is not sufficient to induce leukemia, loss of a 7q tumour suppressor gene might be a required cooperating event. To test this hypothesis, we performed high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of twelve EVI1 overexpressing patients and three EVI1 deregulated cell lines to search for 7q submicroscopic deletions. This analysis lead to the delineation of two critical regions, one of 0.39 Mb on 7q35 containing the CNTNAP2 gene and one of 1.33 Mb on chromosome bands 7q35-q36 comprising nine genes in EVI1 deregulated cell lines. These findings open the way to further studies aimed at identifying the culprit EVI1 implicated tumour suppressor genes on 7q.

  12. A genome-wide association study for body weight in Japanese Thoroughbred racehorses clarifies candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 9, 15, and 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOZAKI, Teruaki; KIKUCHI, Mio; KAKOI, Hironaga; HIROTA, Kei-ichi; NAGATA, Shun-ichi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Body weight is an important trait to confirm growth and development in humans and animals. In Thoroughbred racehorses, it is measured in the postnatal, training, and racing periods to evaluate growth and training degrees. The body weight of mature Thoroughbred racehorses generally ranges from 400 to 600 kg, and this broad range is likely influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Therefore, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the Equine SNP70 BeadChip was performed to identify the genomic regions associated with body weight in Japanese Thoroughbred racehorses using 851 individuals. The average body weight of these horses was 473.9 kg (standard deviation: 28.0) at the age of 3, and GWAS identified statistically significant SNPs on chromosomes 3 (BIEC2_808466, P=2.32E-14), 9 (BIEC2_1105503, P=1.03E-7), 15 (BIEC2_322669, P=9.50E-6), and 18 (BIEC2_417274, P=1.44E-14), which were associated with body weight as a quantitative trait. The genomic regions on chromosomes 3, 9, 15, and 18 included ligand-dependent nuclear receptor compressor-like protein (LCORL), zinc finger and AT hook domain containing (ZFAT), tribbles pseudokinase 2 (TRIB2), and myostatin (MSTN), respectively, as candidate genes. LCORL and ZFAT are associated with withers height in horses, whereas MSTN affects muscle mass. Thus, the genomic regions identified in this study seem to affect the body weight of Thoroughbred racehorses. Although this information is useful for breeding and growth management of the horses, the production of genetically modified animals and gene doping (abuse/misuse of gene therapy) should be prohibited to maintain horse racing integrity. PMID:29270069

  13. Chromosomal analysis of Astyanax fasciatus (PISCES, CHARACIDAE from the Araguari river, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Torres-Mariano

    Full Text Available The genus Astyanax is one of the most numerous of the family Characidae, comprising a large number of similar-shaped species, but displaying innumerable karyotypic variations in its chromosome number and/or structure. The literature describes A. fasciatus populations with diploid chromosome numbers varying from 2n = 45 to 2n = 48. In this study, A. fasciatus specimens captured in the Araguari River (Alto Paraná basin were cytogenetically characterized, revealing a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 46. The nucleolar organizing regions (NORs, detected with silver nitrate staining, showed a multiple system with two pairs of marked chromosomes. These findings are congruent with those of other studies involving populations of the same species.

  14. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  15. An evaluation of some commerical Romanowsky stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1975-08-01

    The staining properties of 43 commerical Romanowsky-type stains have been studied. Considerable differences in the appearance of stained blood films were observed with different batches of these stains, the staining of red cells being particularly variable. Attempts have been made to correlate staining patterns with stain composition as revealed by thin-layer chromatography and sulphated ash analyses. In this way it has been possible to define some essential requirements for satisfactory staining.

  16. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Lovett, M. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)); Brown, K. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)) (and others)

    1993-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Uniparental (mtDNA, Y-chromosome) polymorphisms in French Guiana and two related populations--implications for the region's colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazières, S; Guitard, E; Crubézy, E; Dugoujon, J-M; Bortolini, M C; Bonatto, S L; Hutz, M H; Bois, E; Tiouka, F; Larrouy, G; Salzano, F M

    2008-01-01

    Blood samples collected in four Amerindian French Guiana populations (Palikur, Emerillon, Wayampi and Kali'na) in the early 1980s were screened for selected mtDNA and Y-chromosome length polymorphisms, and sequenced for the mtDNA hypervariable segment I (HVS-I). In addition, two other Amerindian populations (Apalaí and Matsiguenga) were examined for the same markers to establish the genetic relationships in the area. Strong dissimilarities were observed in the distribution of the founding Amerindian haplogroups, and significant p-values were obtained from F(ST) genetic distances. Interpopulation similarities occurred mainly due to geography. The Palikur did not show obvious genetic similarity to the Matsiguenga, who speak the same language and live in a region from where they could have migrated to French Guiana. The African-origin admixture observed in the Kali'na probably derives from historical contacts they had with the Bushinengue (Noir Marron), a group of escaped slaves who now lead independent lives in a nearby region. This analysis has identified significant clues about the Amerindian peopling of the North-East Amazonian region.

  18. Analysis of DNA restriction fragments greater than 5.7 Mb in size from the centromeric region of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn, P H; Li, X; Smith, C; Hsu, M; Schwartz, D C; Jabs, E W

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed electrophoresis was used to study the organization of the human centromeric region. Genomic DNA was digested with rare-cutting enzymes. DNA fragments from 0.2 to greater than 5.7 Mb were separated by electrophoresis and hybridized with alphoid and simple DNA repeats. Rare-cutting enzymes (Mlu I, Nar I, Not I, Nru I, Sal I, Sfi I, Sst II) demonstrated fewer restriction sites at centromeric regions than elsewhere in the genome. The enzyme Not I had the fewest restriction sites at centromeric regions. As much as 70% of these sequences from the centromeric region are present in Not I DNA fragments greater than 5.7 and estimated to be as large as 10 Mb in size. Other repetitive sequences such as short interspersed repeated segments (SINEs), long interspersed repeated segments (LINEs), ribosomal DNA, and mini-satellite DNA that are not enriched at the centromeric region, are not enriched in Not I fragments of greater than 5.7 Mb in size.

  19. Genomic analysis of the chromosome 15q11-q13 Prader-Willi syndrome region and characterization of transcripts for GOLGA8E and WHCD1L1 from the proximal breakpoint region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashork Catherine D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, childhood obesity, dysmorphic features, hypogonadism, mental retardation, and behavioral problems. Although PWS is most often caused by a paternal interstitial deletion of a 6-Mb region of chromosome 15q11-q13, the identity of the exact protein coding or noncoding RNAs whose deficiency produces the PWS phenotype is uncertain. There are also reports describing a PWS-like phenotype in a subset of patients with full mutations in the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1 gene. Taking advantage of the human genome sequence, we have performed extensive sequence analysis and molecular studies for the PWS candidate region. Results We have characterized transcripts for the first time for two UCSC Genome Browser predicted protein-coding genes, GOLGA8E (golgin subfamily a, 8E and WHDC1L1 (WAS protein homology region containing 1-like 1 and have further characterized two previously reported genes, CYF1P1 and NIPA2; all four genes are in the region close to the proximal/centromeric deletion breakpoint (BP1. GOLGA8E belongs to the golgin subfamily of coiled-coil proteins associated with the Golgi apparatus. Six out of 16 golgin subfamily proteins in the human genome have been mapped in the chromosome 15q11-q13 and 15q24-q26 regions. We have also identified more than 38 copies of GOLGA8E-like sequence in the 15q11-q14 and 15q23-q26 regions which supports the presence of a GOLGA8E-associated low copy repeat (LCR. Analysis of the 15q11-q13 region by PFGE also revealed a polymorphic region between BP1 and BP2. WHDC1L1 is a novel gene with similarity to mouse Whdc1 (WAS protein homology region 2 domain containing 1 and human JMY protein (junction-mediating and regulatory protein. Expression analysis of cultured human cells and brain tissues from PWS patients indicates that CYFIP1 and NIPA2 are biallelically expressed. However, we were not able to

  20. Comparability of multiple data types from the Bering Strait region: cranial and dental metrics and nonmetrics, mtDNA, and Y-chromosome DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Brianne; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Godde, Kanya

    2014-07-01

    Different data types have previously been shown to have the same microevolutionary patterns in worldwide data sets. However, peopling of the New World studies have shown a difference in migration paths and timings using multiple types of data, spurring research to understand why this is the case. This study was designed to test the degree of similarity in evolutionary patterns by using cranial and dental metric and nonmetric data, along with Y-chromosome DNA and mtDNA. The populations used included Inuits from Alaska, Canada, Siberia, Greenland, and the Aleutian Islands. For comparability, the populations used for the cranial and molecular data were from similar geographic regions or had a shared population history. Distance, R and kinship matrices were generated for use in running Mantel tests, PROTEST analyses, and Procrustes analyses. A clear patterning was seen, with the craniometric data being most highly correlated to the mtDNA data and the cranial nonmetric data being most highly correlated with the Y-chromosome data, while the phenotypic data were also linked. This patterning is suggestive of a possible male or female inheritance, or the correlated data types are affected by the same or similar evolutionary forces. The results of this study indicate cranial traits have some degree of heritability. Moreover, combining data types leads to a richer knowledge of biological affinity. This understanding is important for bioarchaeological contexts, in particular, peopling of the New World studies where focusing on reconciling the results from comparing multiple data types is necessary to move forward. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Microclones derived from the mouse chromosome 7 D-E bands map within the proximal region of the c14CoS deletion in albino mutant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toenjes, R.R.W.; Weith, A.; Rinchik, E.M.; Winking, H.; Carnwath, J.W.; Kaliner, B.; Paul, D.

    1991-01-01

    A group of radiation-induced perinatal-lethal deletions that include the albino (c) locus on mouse chromosome 7 causes failure of expression of various hepatocyte-specific genes when homozygous. The transcription of such genes could be controlled in trans by a regulatory gene(s) located within the proximal region of the C14CoS deletion. To identify this potential regulatory gene, a microclone library was established from microdissected D and E bands of chromosome 7. Three nonoverlapping microclones (E305, E336B, and E453B) hybridizing with wildtype but not with C14CoS/C14CoS DNA were isolated. E336B represents a single-copy DNA fragment, whereas E305 and E453B hybridized with 3 and 10 EcoRI DNA restriction fragments, respectively. All fragments map exclusively within the deletion. The microclones hybridized to DNA of viable C6H/C14CoS deletion heterozygotes but not to DNA of homozygotes for the lethal mutation c10R75M, which belongs to the same complementation group as c14CoS. DNA of viable homozygous mutant C62DSD, which carries a deletion breakpoint proximal to that of c6H, hybridized only with E453B. This microclone identified 6 EcoRI restriction fragments in C62DSD/C62DSD DNA. The results demonstrate that of the isolated microclones, E453B identifies a locus (D7RT453B) that maps closest to the hsdr-1 (hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation) locus, which maps between the proximal breakpoints of deletions c10R75M and c62DSD

  2. Characterization of the chromosome 1q41q42.12 region, and the candidate gene DISP1, in patients with CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Sibel; Ackerman, Kate G; Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Sougnez, Carrie; Noonan, Kristin M; Hatchwell, Eli; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Pieretti Vanmarcke, Rafael; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Dickman, Paul; Wilson, Jay; Donahoe, Patricia K; Pober, Barbara R

    2010-10-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic studies demonstrate association between congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and chromosome 1q41q42 deletions. In this study, we screened a large CDH cohort (N=179) for microdeletions in this interval by the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique, and also sequenced two candidate genes located therein, dispatched 1 (DISP1) and homo sapiens H2.0-like homeobox (HLX). MLPA analysis verified deletions of this region in two cases, an unreported patient with a 46,XY,del(1)(q41q42.13) karyotype and a previously reported patient with a Fryns syndrome phenotype [Kantarci et al., 2006]. HLX sequencing showed a novel but maternally inherited single nucleotide variant (c.27C>G) in a patient with isolated CDH, while DISP1 sequencing revealed a mosaic de novo heterozygous substitution (c.4412C>G; p.Ala1471Gly) in a male with a left-sided Bochdalek hernia plus multiple other anomalies. Pyrosequencing demonstrated the mutant allele was present in 43%, 12%, and 4.5% of the patient's lymphoblastoid, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and saliva cells, respectively. We examined Disp1 expression at day E11.5 of mouse diaphragm formation and confirmed its presence in the pleuroperitoneal fold, as well as the nearby lung which also expresses Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Our report describes the first de novo DISP1 point mutation in a patient with complex CDH. Combining this finding with Disp1 embryonic mouse diaphragm and lung tissue expression, as well as previously reported human chromosome 1q41q42 aberrations in patients with CDH, suggests that DISP1 may warrant further consideration as a CDH candidate gene. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Ori-somes, NP complexes descending from origin regions of animal chromosomal DNA replication. A micromorphological study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korb, Jan; Štokrová, Jitka; Říman, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2001), s. 343-350 ISSN 0739-1102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : origin regions of DNA replication * replicative structure s * electron microscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.243, year: 2001

  4. Technique and Feasibility of a Dual Staining Method for Estrogen Receptors and AgNORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Günther

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A new staining method for dual demonstration of Estrogen receptors (ER and argyrophilc Nucleolus‐Organizer Regions (AgNORs was developed. To rule out possible reciprocal effects, serial slides of 10 invasive ductale breast cancers were stained with either the single staining method or the simultaneous ER/AgNOR‐staining method and investigated comparatively. By measuring the slides with the image analysis system AMBA, reciprocal effects could be excluded. It was proven that dual staining of both markers results in a reproducible and specific staining result. We concluded that it is justified to measure AgNORs in immunohistochemically stained cells.

  5. Prenatal Identification and Molecular Characterization of Two Simultaneous De Novo Interstitial Duplications of Chromosomal Regions 7p22.1p21.1 and 15q24.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina C. Burn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of simultaneous de novo chromosomal aberrations is extremely rare. Here, we describe two, previously unreported, simultaneous de novo interstitial duplications of chromosomes 7p and 15q. Amniocentesis was completed for a healthy gravida 4 para 3 woman due to her advanced maternal age and concurrent ultrasound findings of partial vermian agenesis, choroid-plexus cysts, and hypoplastic nasal bone. Cytogenetic analysis of cultured amniocytes by conventional chromosome analysis, comparative genomic hybridization, and fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed two interstitial duplications of the chromosomal regions 7p22.1p21.1 and 15q24.1, leading to partial trisomy of 7p and 15q and karyotype 46,XY,dup(7(p22.1-p21.1,dup (15(q24.1. Parental chromosomal analysis did not identify any heritable changes, suggesting both mutations were de novo in nature. Postnatal examination of the neonate was significant for low set ears, thick helices, flat nasal bridge, ankyloglossia, and aberrant head shape and size concerning for craniosynostosis. Postnatal MRI was consistent with Dandy-Walker variant showing hypogenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis. To our knowledge, there are no prenatal or postnatal reports of comparable duplications involving these two regions simultaneously. Continued observation of the neonate may reveal further phenotypic consequences of these two simultaneous de novo interstitial duplications.

  6. A Segment of the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region Is Highly Microsyntenic Not Only between the Apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and Buffelgrass, But Also with a Rice Chromosome 11 Centromeric-Proximal Genomic Region1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Moore, L. David; Mullet, John E.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory. PMID:16415213

  7. A segment of the apospory-specific genomic region is highly microsyntenic not only between the apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass, but also with a rice chromosome 11 centromeric-proximal genomic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A; Morishige, Daryl T; Moore, L David; Mullet, John E; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory.

  8. Verification of the Chromosome Region 9q21 Association with Pelvic Organ Prolapse Using RegulomeDB Annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam B. Khadzhieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic organ prolapse (POP is a common highly disabling disorder with a large hereditary component. It is characterized by a loss of pelvic floor support that leads to the herniation of the uterus in or outside the vagina. Genome-wide linkage studies have shown an evidence of POP association with the region 9q21 and six other loci in European pedigrees. The aim of our study was to test the above associations in a case-control study in Russian population. Twelve SNPs including SNPs cited in the above studies and those selected using the RegulomeDB annotations for the region 9q21 were genotyped in 210 patients with POP (stages III-IV and 292 controls with no even minimal POP. Genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR–CTPP. Association analyses were conducted for individual SNPs, 9q21 haplotypes, and SNP-SNP interactions. SNP rs12237222 with the highest RegulomeDB score 1a appeared to be the key SNP in haplotypes associated with POP. Other RegulomeDB Category 1 SNPs, rs12551710 and rs2236479 (scores 1d and 1f, resp., exhibited epistatic effects. In this study, we verified the region 9q21 association with POP in Russians, using RegulomeDB annotations.

  9. Investigating the prehistory of Tungusic peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri region with complete mtDNA genome sequences and Y-chromosomal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Ana T; Whitten, Mark; Wiebe, Victor; Crawford, Michael; Butthof, Anne; Spitsyn, Victor; Makarov, Sergey; Novgorodov, Innokentiy; Osakovsky, Vladimir; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north.

  10. Investigating the Prehistory of Tungusic Peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri Region with Complete mtDNA Genome Sequences and Y-chromosomal Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Ana T.; Whitten, Mark; Wiebe, Victor; Crawford, Michael; Butthof, Anne; Spitsyn, Victor; Makarov, Sergey; Novgorodov, Innokentiy; Osakovsky, Vladimir; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north. PMID:24349531

  11. Investigating the prehistory of Tungusic peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri region with complete mtDNA genome sequences and Y-chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T Duggan

    Full Text Available Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north.

  12. Genetic map of the region around grizzled (gr) and mocha (mh) on mouse chromosome 10, homologous to human 19p13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfhamer, D.; Burmeister, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Grizzled (gr) is a recessive mouse mutation resulting in a gray coat color and reduced perinatal viability. Mocha (mh) is one of several recessive mouse mutants characterized by platelet storage pool disorder, pigment abnormalities, reduced fertility, kidney function deficiencies, and, in some mutants, inner ear and natural killer cell deficiencies. Murine platelet storage pool deficient mutants may be models for Chediak-Higashi and Hermansky-Pudlak syndromes in humans. The genes for gr and mh are very closely linked to each other (0 {+-} 1.2 cM). However, their relative position with respect to molecular markers was previously unknown. Thus, genetic mapping of the gr locus will also yield information about the mh location. To map these two genes genetically, we have performed an intersubspecific backcross of grizzled mice with Mus musculus castaneus. In 539 progeny tested, we found no recombination between the gr gene, the gene for anti-Muellerian hormone (Amh), and the microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. One recombination event for each of the flanking markers Basigin (Bsg) and D10Mit22 was identified. These closely linked markers should provide entry points for positional cloning of the gr and mh genes. The region linked to grizzled is homologous to a gene-rich region on human Chromosome 19p13.3.

  13. QTL influencing blood pressure maps to the region of PPH1 on chromosome 2q31-34 in Old Order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W C; Mitchell, B D; Schneider, J L; Wagner, M J; Bell, C J; Nanthakumar, E; Shuldiner, A R

    2000-06-20

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and peripheral vascular disease. Although the genetic contribution to variation in blood pressure is well recognized, the specific genes involved are mostly unknown. We carried out a genome-wide scan to identify loci influencing blood pressure in the Old Order Amish population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Blood pressures were measured in 694 adult participants from families recruited without regard to blood pressure. We performed a quantitative linkage analysis by using 357 microsatellite markers. In multipoint analysis, strong evidence for linkage was observed with both diastolic (lod=3.36; P=0.00004) and to a lesser extent systolic (lod=1.64; P=0.003) blood pressure in the region of chromosome 2q31-34. Peak evidence for linkage occurred at map positions 217 and 221 cM from pter for diastolic and systolic blood pressure, respectively. A gene linked to familial primary pulmonary hypertension has recently been mapped to this same region, suggesting the intriguing hypothesis that other (attenuated) mutations in this same gene may influence variation in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in this population.

  14. Towards a transcription map spanning a 250 kb area within the DiGeorge syndrome chromosome region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, W.; Emanuel, B.S.; Siegert, J. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) are congenital anomalies affecting predominantly the thymus, parathyroid glands, heart and craniofacial development. Detection of 22q11.2 deletions in the majority of DGS and VCFS patients implicate 22q11 haploinsufficiency in the etiology of these disorders. The VCFS/DGS critical region lies within the proximal portion of a commonly deleted 1.2 Mb region in 22q11. A 250 kb cosmid contig covering this critical region and containing D22S74 (N25) has been established. From this contig, eleven cosmids with minimal overlap were biotinylated by nick translation, and hybridized to PCR-amplified cDNAs prepared from different tissues. The use of cDNAs from a variety of tissues increases the likelihood of identifying low abundance transcripts and tissue-specific expressed sequences. A DGCR-specific cDNA sublibrary consisting of 670 cDNA clones has been constructed. To date, 49 cDNA clones from this sub-library have been identified with single copy probes and cosmids containing putative CpG islands. Based on sequence analysis, 25 of the clones contain regions of homology to several cDNAs which map within the proximal contig. LAN is a novel partial cDNA isolated from a fetal brain library probed with one of the cosmids in the proximal contig. Using LAN as a probe, we have found 19 positive clones in the DGCR-specific cDNA sub-library (4 clones from fetal brain, 14 from adult skeletal muscle and one from fetal liver). Some of the LAN-positive clones extend the partial cDNA in the 5{prime} direction and will be useful in assembling a full length transcript. This resource will be used to develop a complete transcriptional map of the critical region in order to identify candidate gene(s) involved in the etiology of DGS/VCFS and to determine the relationship between the transcriptional and physical maps of 22q11.

  15. An algorithm for automatic detection of chromosome aberrations induced by radiation using features of gray level profile across the main axis of chromosome image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hironao; Imai, Katsuhiro; Fukuoka, Hideya; Yamamoto, Mikio; Hayata, Isamu.

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm for detecting chromosome aberrations induced by radiation is developed. Microscopic images of conventional Giemsa stained chromosomes of rearranged chromosomes (abnormal chromosomes) including dicentric chromosomes, ordinary acentric fragments, small acentric fragments, and acentric rings are used as samples. Variation of width along the main axis and gray level profile across the main axis of the chromosome image are used as features for classification. In 7 microscopic images which include 257 single chromosomes, 90.0% (231 chromosomes) are correctly classified into 6 categories and 23 of 26 abnormal chromosomes are correctly identified. As a result of discrimination between a normal and an abnormal chromosome, 95.3% of abnormal chromosomes are detected. (author)

  16. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means of standard and various other chromosome banding and staining methods (Ag-NOR-, Q-, CMA3-, late replicating [LR] banding pattern, C- and sequential C-banding + CMA3 + DAPI). This study ...

  17. Heterochromatin base pair composition and diversification in holocentric chromosomes of kissing bugs (Hemiptera, Reduviidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Vanessa Bellini; Pita, Sebastián; Vanzela, André Luis Laforga; Galvão, Cleber; Panzera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) includes 150 species of blood-sucking insects, vectors of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis. Karyotypic information reveals a striking stability in the number of autosomes. However, this group shows substantial variability in genome size, the amount and distribution of C-heterochromatin, and the chromosome positions of 45S rDNA clusters. Here, we analysed the karyotypes of 41 species from six different genera with C-fluorescence banding in order to evaluate the base-pair richness of heterochromatic regions. Our results show a high heterogeneity in the fluorescent staining of the heterochromatin in both autosomes and sex chromosomes, never reported before within an insect subfamily with holocentric chromosomes. This technique allows a clear discrimination of the heterochromatic regions classified as similar by C-banding, constituting a new chromosome marker with taxonomic and evolutionary significance. The diverse fluorescent patterns are likely due to the amplification of different repeated sequences, reflecting an unusual dynamic rearrangement in the genomes of this subfamily. Further, we discuss the evolution of these repeated sequences in both autosomes and sex chromosomes in species of Triatominae. PMID:27759763

  18. Heterochromatin base pair composition and diversification in holocentric chromosomes of kissing bugs (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bellini Bardella

    Full Text Available The subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae includes 150 species of blood-sucking insects, vectors of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis. Karyotypic information reveals a striking stability in the number of autosomes. However, this group shows substantial variability in genome size, the amount and distribution of C-heterochromatin, and the chromosome positions of 45S rDNA clusters. Here, we analysed the karyotypes of 41 species from six different genera with C-fluorescence banding in order to evaluate the base-pair richness of heterochromatic regions. Our results show a high heterogeneity in the fluorescent staining of the heterochromatin in both autosomes and sex chromosomes, never reported before within an insect subfamily with holocentric chromosomes. This technique allows a clear discrimination of the heterochromatic regions classified as similar by C-banding, constituting a new chromosome marker with taxonomic and evolutionary significance. The diverse fluorescent patterns are likely due to the amplification of different repeated sequences, reflecting an unusual dynamic rearrangement in the genomes of this subfamily. Further, we discuss the evolution of these repeated sequences in both autosomes and sex chromosomes in species of Triatominae.

  19. Chromosomal variability in the wild ornamental species of Symphysodon (Perciformes: Cichlidae from Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora R. Mesquita

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies were conducted on three discus species which inhabit the Amazon in Brazil: Symphysodon haraldi from Manacapuru, S. aequifasciatus from Tefé and S. discus from Barcelos. All individuals showed 2n=60 chromosomes, most of them biarmed. No sexual chromosomal heteromorphism was verified. However, different karyotypic formulae, owing to the presence of subtelocentric chromosomes, were verified for S. aequifasciatus and S. discus. One of the karyotypic formulae from S. aequifasciatus (cytotype 2 differs from the others, due to one of the homologues in the first chromosome pair being significantly larger than the other. A large variability was observed toward the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR of S. haraldi and S. aequifasciatus. Although the number of silver-stained blocks varied from 2 to 5, confirming different NOR patterns, at least seven homologue pairs were involved with NORs. In S. discus only two marks were observed, however two chromosome pairs were involved, characterizing a multiple NOR system for the three species. The heterochromatic blocks were mainly located in the pericentromeric region of all chromosomes but, in some of them, they are also located in the proximal regions, both in the short and long arms. Moreover, in the cytotype 2 from S. aequifasciatus, an interstitial heterochromatic block was observed on the long arm of the largest homologue of the first pair. A direct comparison of karyotypes from more related genera (Heros, Uaru, Mesonauta and Pterophyllum, makes it clear that a succession of chromosomal rearrangements, mainly pericentric inversions, translocations and fissions/fusions occurred resulting in the present diploid number and intraspecific karyological variability found in Symphysodon.

  20. Localization of the human RNA polymerase I transcription factor gene (UBTF) to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 and construction of a long-range restriction map of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A.; Black, D.M.; Griffiths, B.L.; Solomon, E. [Somatic Cell Genetics Lab., London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-10

    Human upstream binding factor (hUBF) is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is essential for the activation of human 18s and 28s rRNA gene transcription. We have isolated and localized the gene (UBTF) encoding hUBF to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 by analyzing a cosmid from the region and carrying out Southern analysis on a previously constructed chromosome 17 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using a probe from the hUBF cDNA. Confirmation of its location at this region was obtained from the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA using the hUBF cDNA and other probes from the region. These data also enabled the construction of a long-range restriction map of the region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A comparative study of chromosome morphology among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study karyotype and chromosome characteristics of the nine accessions of Aegilops crassa species obtained from gene bank of Seed and Plant Improvement Research Institute (SPII) of Iran and one accession collected by authors were inspected. Aceto-iron-hematoxilin staining method was used to stain ...

  2. Assignment of the human gene for the water channel of renal collecting duct Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to chromosome 12 region q12-->q13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, P M; Weghuis, D O; Sinke, R J; Geurts van Kessel, A; Wieringa, B; van Os, C H

    1994-01-01

    The chromosomal localization of the gene encoding Aquaporin 2 (previously called WCH-CD), which acts as a water channel in the collecting tubules of the kidney, was determined. Southern blot hybridizations of chromosomal DNA from a panel of 25 different human-rodent hybrid cell lines assigned AQP2

  3. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-12-01

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  4. Regional assignment of seven loci to 12p 13. 2-pter by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing the der(12) or the der(X) chromosome from a mesothelioma showing t(X; 12)(q22; p13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerssens, J.; Chaffanet, M.; Baens, M.; Matthijs, G.; Van Den Berche, H.; Cassiman, J.J.; Marynen, P. (Arthritis and Metabolic Bone Disease Research Unit, Leuven (Belgium))

    1994-03-01

    Two somatic cell hybrids containing the der(12) or the der(X) from a mesothelioma with a translocation t(X;12) (q22;p13) as the only chromosomal change were generated to characterize the region of 12p12 containing the translocation breakpoint. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed the breakpoint on chromosome 12 to occur between VWF and D12S158. On the linkage map developed by J. Weissenbach et al., the breakpoints were located between DXS1106 and DCS1001 on chromosome X. PCR analysis based on genomic sequences, with DNA from both somatic cell hybrids, enabled mapping of CACNL1A1, FGF6, D12S370, D12S38OE, D12S381E, and D12S382E distally to the 12p13 breakpoint and to VWF. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL) located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm-Perry, Amanda K; Kuehn, Larry A; Oliver, William T; Sexten, Andrea K; Miles, Jeremy R; Rempel, Lea A; Cushman, Robert A; Freetly, Harvey C

    2013-01-01

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only), cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P = 0.05). In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r = 0.26; P = 0.009). A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P = 0.04). LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P = 0.01). These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues.

  6. Adipose and Muscle Tissue Gene Expression of Two Genes (NCAPG and LCORL) Located in a Chromosomal Region Associated with Cattle Feed Intake and Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm-Perry, Amanda K.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Oliver, William T.; Sexten, Andrea K.; Miles, Jeremy R.; Rempel, Lea A.; Cushman, Robert A.; Freetly, Harvey C.

    2013-01-01

    A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG) and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL) are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only), cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P = 0.05). In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r = 0.26; P = 0.009). A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P = 0.04). LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P = 0.01). These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues. PMID:24278337

  7. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Lindholm-Perry

    Full Text Available A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL are positional candidate genes within this region. Previously identified genetic markers in both genes were associated with average daily gain (ADG and average daily feed intake (ADFI in a crossbred population of beef steers. These markers were also associated with hot carcass weight, ribeye area and adjusted fat thickness suggesting that they may have a role in lean muscle growth and/or fat deposition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the transcript abundance of either of these genes in cattle adipose and muscle tissue was associated with variation in feed intake and average daily gain phenotypes. Transcript abundance for NCAPG and LCORL in adipose and muscle tissue was measured in heifers (adipose only, cows and steers using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the adipose tissue from cows and heifers, a negative correlation between LCORL transcript abundance and ADFI were detected (P = 0.05. In the muscle tissue from cows, transcript abundance of NCAPG was associated with ADG (r = 0.26; P = 0.009. A positive correlation between LCORL transcript abundance from muscle tissue of steers and ADFI was detected (P = 0.04. LCORL protein levels in the muscle of steers were investigated and were associated with ADFI (P = 0.01. These data support our earlier genetic associations with ADFI and ADG within this region and represent the potential for biological activity of these genes in the muscle and adipose tissues of beef cattle; however, they also suggest that sex, age and/or nutrition-specific interactions may affect the expression of NCAPG and LCORL in these tissues.

  8. A yeast artificial chromosome contig that spans the RB1-D13S31 interval on human chromosome 13 and encompasses the frequently deleted region in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawthorn, L; Roberts, T; Verlind, E; Kooy, RF; Cowell, JK

    1995-01-01

    Abnormalities involving chromosome 13 have been reported as the only cytogenetic change in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). Deletions are the most common cytogenetic abnormality and always involve 13q14, but when translocations are seen, the consistent breakpoint is always in 13q14. It is

  9. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  10. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R. [Roche Biomedical Labs., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  11. Polytene chromosome map and inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ananina

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata belongs to the tripunctata group, and is one of the commonest Drosophila species collected in some places in Brazil, especially in the winter. A standard map of the polytene chromosomes is presented. The breakpoints of the naturally occurring chromosomal rearrangements are marked on the map. The distribution of breaking points through the chromosomes of D. mediopunctata is apparently non-random. Chromosomes X, II and IV show inversion polymorphisms. Chromosome II is the most polymorphic, with 17 inversions, 8 inversions in the distal region and 9 in the proximal region. Chromosome X has four different gene arrangements, while chromosome IV has only two.

  12. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of

  13. Karyotype, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer regions (NORs in Belosacris coccineipes (Acrididae-Leptysminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Vilma

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques including C-banding, fluorochromes and silver staining were used to obtain information about heterochromatin patterns in the grasshopper B. coccineipes. Conventional staining showed a karyotype with 2n = 23 chromosomes in males and 2n = 24 in females, as well as XO:XX sex determination and acrotelocentric chromosomes. The medium-sized X chromosome was heteropycnotic positive at the beginning of prophase I and negative in metaphase I. C-banding revealed heterochromatic blocks in the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes. Silver nitrate staining in this species showed three small bivalents (S9-S11 as nucleolar organizers with NORs located in the pericentromeric regions. CMA3-positive blocks were seen in pericentromeric regions of pairs M6, S9, S10 and S11. Sequential staining with CMA3/AgNO3 revealed homology between the CMA3-positive bands and NORs of the bivalents S9, S10 and S11. The CMA3-positive block of the bivalent M6 could represent a latent secondary NOR. The results obtained permit us to distinguish two categories of the constitutive heterochromatin in B. coccineipes.

  14. Centromeric banding pattern of mitotic chromosomes in Vigna vexillata

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vigna vexillata chromosome characterization was carried out using the Leishman C- banding technique. The results showed that the chromosomes mostly exhibited bands at both the centromeric and telomeric regions. These bands will serve, as a valuable marker for the identification of the chromosomes. Chromosomes 2 ...

  15. Kabuki syndrome is not caused by a microdeletion in the DiGeorge/velocardiofacial chromosomal region within 22q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Zackai, E.H.; Kaplan, P.; Driscoll, D.A. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-10-16

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) or Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome is a sporadic disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, developmental delay, mild to moderate retardation, and a characteristic facial appearance. Cardiovascular defects, clefts of the lip, palate, or both, and musculoskeletal abnormalities occur in about 50% of patients with KS. The cause of this multiple congenital anomaly syndrome is unknown, and investigators have speculated that KS is a contiguous gene-deletion syndrome. Based on the presence of congenital heart defects in patients with KS, it was suggested that this disorder might share a common cause with the 22q11 deletion syndromes. A preliminary study of 2 patients with KS failed to detect a deletion within 22q11. We report the results of fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes for loci D22S75 (N25) and D22S259 (1132) within the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR) on metaphase spreads from an additional 5 patients, 2 non-Japanese and 3 Japanese, with KS. None of the 5 had deletions at either locus. It is unlikely that KS is caused by a deletion within 22q11. 16 refs.

  16. Cross-species chromosome painting in the Perissodactyla: delimitation of homologous regions in Burchell's zebra (Equus Burchellii) and the white (Ceratotherium Simum) and black rhinoceros (Diceros Bicornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, V; Yang, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Robinson, T J

    2003-01-01

    Conserved chromosomal segments in the black rhinoceros, Diceros Bicornis (DBI, 2n = 84), and its African sister-species the white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium Simum (CSI, 2n = 82), were detected using Burchell's zebra (Equus Burchellii, EBU, 2n = 44) chromosome-specific painting probes supplemented by a subset of those developed for the horse (Equus Caballus, ECA, 2n = 64). In total 41 and 42 conserved autosomal segments were identified in C. Simum and D. Bicornis respectively. Only 21 rearrangements (20 fissions and 1 fusion) are necessary to convert the Burchell's zebra karyotype into that of the white rhinoceros. One fission distinguishes the D. Bicornis and C. Simum karyotypes which, excluding heterochromatic differences, are identical in all respects at this level of resolution. Most Burchell's zebra chromosomes correspond to two rhinoceros chromosomes although in four instances (EBU18, 19, 20 and 21) whole chromosome synteny has been retained among these species. In contrast, one rhinoceros chromosome (DBI1, CSI1) comprises two separate Burchell's zebra chromosomes (EBU11 and EBU17). In spite of the high diploid numbers of the two rhinoceros species their karyotypes are surprisingly conserved offering a glimpse of the putative ancestral perissodactyl condition and a broader understanding of genome organization in mammals. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Chromosomal minimal critical regions in therapy-related leukemia appear different from those of de novo leukemia by high-resolution aCGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Itzhar

    Full Text Available Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML, is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML. Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case. In primary leukemia with a previously "normal" karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40 kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1 Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML.

  18. Resistance to noise-induced hearing loss in 129S6 and MOLF mice: identification of independent, overlapping, and interacting chromosomal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Valerie A; Kujawa, Sharon G; Manichaikul, Ani; Broman, Karl W; Kallman, Jeremy C; Shilling, Dustin J; Iwata, Ayaka J; Robinson, Linda C; Robbins, Carol A; Li, Jin; Liberman, M Charles; Tempel, Bruce L

    2014-10-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a prevalent health risk. Inbred mouse strains 129S6/SvEvTac (129S6) and MOLF/EiJ (MOLF) show strong NIHL resistance (NR) relative to CBA/CaJ (CBACa). In this study, we developed quantitative trait locus (QTL) maps for NR. We generated F1 animals by intercrossing (129S6 × CBACa) and (MOLF × CBACa). In each intercross, NR was recessive. N2 animals were produced by backcrossing F1s to their respective parental strain. The 232 N2-129S6 and 225 N2-MOLF progenies were evaluated for NR using auditory brainstem response. In 129S6, five QTL were identified on chromosomes (Chr) 17, 18, 14, 11, and 4, referred to as loci nr1, nr2, nr3, nr4, and nr5, respectively. In MOLF, four QTL were found on Chr 4, 17, 6, and 12, referred to as nr7, nr8, nr9, and nr10, respectively. Given that NR QTL were discovered on Chr 4 and 17 in both the N2-129S6 and N2-MOLF cross, we generated two consomic strains by separately transferring 129S6-derived Chr 4 and 17 into an otherwise CBACa background and a double-consomic strain by crossing the two strains. Phenotypic analysis of the consomic strains indicated that whole 129S6 Chr 4 contributes strongly to mid-frequency NR, while whole 129S6 Chr 17 contributes markedly to high-frequency NR. Therefore, we anticipated that the double-consomic strain containing Chr 4 and 17 would demonstrate NR across the mid- and high-frequency range. However, whole 129S6 Chr 17 masks the expression of mid-frequency NR from whole 129S6 Chr 4. To further dissect NR on 129S6 Chr 4 and 17, CBACa.129S6 congenic strains were generated for each chromosome. Phenotypic analysis of the Chr 17 CBACa.129S6 congenic strains further defined the NR region on proximal Chr 17, uncovered another NR locus (nr6) on distal Chr 17, and revealed an epistatic interaction between proximal and distal 129S6 Chr 17.

  19. Meta-genome-wide association studies identify a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region for serum C-peptide in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Gubitosi-Klug, Rose; Bull, Shelley B; Canty, Angelo J; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; King, George L; Keenan, Hillary A; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Maahs, David M; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Orchard, Trevor J; Costacou, Tina; Weedon, Michael N; Oram, Richard A; Paterson, Andrew D

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with beta cell function in type 1 diabetes, as measured by serum C-peptide levels, through meta-genome-wide association studies (meta-GWAS). We performed a meta-GWAS to combine the results from five studies in type 1 diabetes with cross-sectionally measured stimulated, fasting or random C-peptide levels, including 3479 European participants. The p values across studies were combined, taking into account sample size and direction of effect. We also performed separate meta-GWAS for stimulated (n = 1303), fasting (n = 2019) and random (n = 1497) C-peptide levels. In the meta-GWAS for stimulated/fasting/random C-peptide levels, a SNP on chromosome 1, rs559047 (Chr1:238753916, T>A, minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.24-0.26), was associated with C-peptide (p = 4.13 × 10 -8 ), meeting the genome-wide significance threshold (p C>T, MAF 0.07-0.10, p = 8.43 × 10 -8 ). In the stimulated C-peptide meta-GWAS, rs61211515 (Chr6:30100975, T/-, MAF 0.17-0.19) in the MHC region was associated with stimulated C-peptide (β [SE] = - 0.39 [0.07], p = 9.72 × 10 -8 ). rs61211515 was also associated with the rate of stimulated C-peptide decline over time in a subset of individuals (n = 258) with annual repeated measures for up to 6 years (p = 0.02). In the meta-GWAS of random C-peptide, another MHC region, SNP rs3135002 (Chr6:32668439, C>A, MAF 0.02-0.06), was associated with C-peptide (p = 3.49 × 10 -8 ). Conditional analyses suggested that the three identified variants in the MHC region were independent of each other. rs9260151 and rs3135002 have been associated with type 1 diabetes, whereas rs559047 and rs61211515 have not been associated with a risk of developing type 1 diabetes. We identified a locus on chromosome 1 and multiple variants in the MHC region, at least some of which were distinct from type 1 diabetes risk loci, that were associated with C

  20. ISCN rules for listing chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for normal chromosomes at 400-, 550-, and 850-band levels of resolution. ISCN 1995 also contains guidelines for cancer cytogenetics and for in situ hybridization. The complete ISCN 1995 also contains nomenclature for human meiotic chromosomes (not included here). The guidelines presented herein are recommended for use when reporting karyotypes, designating chromosome rearrangements and aberrations, and indicating regions of the genome where DNA sequences are located. It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for.

  1. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  2. Distinct Patterns of Association of Variants at 11q23.3 Chromosomal Region with Coronary Artery Disease and Dyslipidemia in the Population of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayabarapu Pranav Chand

    Full Text Available In our attempt to comprehensively understand the nature of association of variants at 11q23.3 apolipoprotein gene cluster region, we genotyped a prioritized set of 96 informative SNPs using Fluidigm customized SNP genotyping platform in a sample of 508 coronary artery disease (CAD cases and 516 controls. We found 12 SNPs as significantly associated with CAD at P <0.05, albeit only four (rs2849165, rs17440396, rs6589566 and rs633389 of these remained significant after Benjamin Hochberg correction. Of the four, while rs6589566 confers risk to CAD, the other three SNPs reduce risk for the disease. Interaction of variants that belong to regulatory genes BUD13 and ZPR1 with APOA5-APOA4 intergenic variants is also observed to significantly increase the risk towards CAD. Further, ROC analysis of the risk scores of the 12 significant SNPs suggests that our study has substantial power to confer these genetic variants as predictors of risk for CAD, as illustrated by AUC (0.763; 95% CI: 0.729-0.798, p = <0.0001. On the other hand, the protective SNPs of CAD are associated with elevated Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Total Cholesterol levels, hence with dyslipidemia, in our sample of controls, which may suggest distinct effects of the variants at 11q23.3 chromosomal region towards CAD and dyslipidemia. It may be necessary to replicate these findings in the independent and ethnically heterogeneous Indian samples in order to establish this as an Indian pattern. However, only functional analysis of the significant variants identified in our study can provide more precise understanding of the mechanisms involved in the contrasting nature of their effects in manifesting dyslipidemia and CAD.

  3. Association analysis of two candidate phospholipase genes that map to the chromosome 15q15.1-15.3 region associated with reading disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D W; Ivanov, D; Robinson, L; Williams, N; Stevenson, J; Owen, M J; Williams, J; O'Donovan, M C

    2004-08-15

    Molecular genetic studies have suggested a reading disability (RD, dyslexia) susceptibility locus on chromosome 15q. We have previously mapped this locus by association to the region surrounding D15S994. Very little is known about the neurobiological processes involved in RD, and therefore selecting positional candidate genes for analysis based upon function is difficult. Nevertheless we were able to identify two functional candidates based upon existing hypotheses. Both were phospholipase genes, phospholipase C beta 2 (PLCB2) and phospholipase A2, group IVB (cytosolic; PLA2G4B). D15S944 is located within PLCB2 and is 1.6 Mb from PLA2G4B. We examined each gene for association using a mixed direct and indirect association approach, a case (n = 164)/control (n = 174) sample, and a partially overlapping sample of 178 RD parent-proband trios from South Wales and England. Mutation analysis revealed 14 sequence variants in PLCB2 and 33 variants in PLA2G4B. All non-synonymous SNPs were genotyped as were SNPs across each gene with maximum distance between SNPs of 6 kb. Case-control analyses revealed modest evidence (0.01 < P < 0.05) for association between a single variant in PLCB2 and two variants in PLA2G4B. However, association was not confirmed in the family based sample. As the latter sample has previously generated replicated significant evidence for association between RD and markers/haplotypes surrounding D15S944, it should have sufficient power to detect association to variants in susceptibility gene itself. We conclude that neither gene accounts for the association signal we previously observed. As these are the only clear cut functional candidate genes in the region, identification of the putative susceptibility locus for RD on 15q will require more methodical non-hypothesis driven positional cloning approaches. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. A chromosome 5q31.1 locus associates with tuberculin skin test reactivity in HIV-positive individuals from tuberculosis hyper-endemic regions in east Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Rafal S; Stein, Catherine M; Kodaman, Nuri; Maro, Isaac; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Igo, Robert P; Magohe, Albert; Malone, LaShaunda L; Chervenak, Keith; Hall, Noemi B; Matee, Mecky; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses; Moore, Jason H; Scott, William K; Lahey, Timothy; Boom, W Henry; von Reyn, C Fordham; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    One in three people has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), and the risk for MTB infection in HIV-infected individuals is even higher. We hypothesized that HIV-positive individuals living in tuberculosis-endemic regions who do not get infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis are genetically resistant. Using an "experiment of nature" design that proved successful in our previous work, we performed a genome-wide association study of tuberculin skin test positivity using 469 HIV-positive patients from prospective study cohorts of tuberculosis from Tanzania and Uganda to identify genetic loci associated with MTB infection in the context of HIV-infection. Among these individuals, 244 tested were tuberculin skin test (TST) positive either at enrollment or during the >8 year follow up, while 225 were not. We identified a genome-wide significant association between a dominant model of rs877356 and binary TST status in the combined cohort (Odds ratio = 0.2671, p = 1.22x10-8). Association was replicated with similar significance when examining TST induration as a continuous trait. The variant lies in the 5q31.1 region, 57kb downstream from IL9. Two-locus analyses of association of variants near rs877356 showed a haplotype comprised of rs877356 and an IL9 missense variant, rs2069885, had the most significant association (p = 1.59x10-12). We also replicated previously linked loci on chromosomes 2, 5, and 11. IL9 is a cytokine produced by mast cells and TH2 cells during inflammatory responses, providing a possible link between airway inflammation and protection from MTB infection. Our results indicate that studying uninfected, HIV-positive participants with extensive exposure increases the power to detect associations in complex infectious disease.

  5. Chromosome mapping of repetitive DNAs in sergeant major fishes (Abudefdufinae, Pomacentridae): a general view on the chromosomal conservatism of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getlekha, Nuntaporn; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Maneechot, Nuntiya; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-10-01

    Species of the Abudefduf genus (sergeant-majors) are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans, with large schools inhabiting rocky coastal regions and coral reefs. This genus consists of twenty recognized species are of generalist habit, showing typical characteristics of colonizers. Some populations maintain gene flow between large oceanic areas, a condition that may influence their cytogenetic features. A number of species have been shown to be invaders and able to hybridize with local species. However, cytogenetic data in this genus are restricted to few species. In this way, the present study includes the chromosomal investigation, using conventional (Giemsa staining, Ag-NOR and C-banding) and molecular (in situ mapping of six different repetitive DNA classes) approaches in four Abudefduf species from different oceanic regions (A. bengalensis and A. sexfasciatus from the Indo-Pacific, A. vaigiensis from the Indian and A. saxatilis from the Atlantic oceans, respectively), to investigate the evolutionary events associated with the chromosomal diversification in this group. All species share a similar karyotype (2n = 48; NF = 52), except A. sexfasciatus (2n = 48; NF = 50), which possesses a characteristic pericentric inversion in the NOR-bearing chromosomal pair. Mapping of repetitive sequences suggests a chromosomal conservatism in this genus. The high karyotypic similarity between allopatric species of Abudefduf may be related to the success of natural viable hybrids among species with recent secondary contact.

  6. Etika Berbusana Mahasiswa Stain Samarinda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Suryani Wijaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethics is about behavior of human being, such as which one is right or wrong. The ethics is always affecting the human life. The ethics gives people orientation how he/she do manything every time every day. Islamic ethics consists of the way how someone interact each other; how someone should do or not to do, how to sit, how to walk, how to eat or drink, how to sleep, or how to get dressed. Al-Qur’an uses three terms to define about dressing, they are: libas, tsiyah, and sarahi. Dressing has a function as covering the body, as assessoris, as the way to do Islamic taqwa, and as an identiy. Dressing ethics of the female students of STAIN Samarinda has been regulated by the rector regulation No 19 of the year 2002 about relation and dressing ethics for the students of STAIN Samarinda.

  7. Chromosomal mapping and mutational analysis of the coding region of the glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha and beta isoforms in patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Arden, K C; Rasmussen, S B

    1997-01-01

    isoforms of GSK-3alpha and GSK-3beta in 72 NIDDM patients and 12 control subjects. No structural changes were detected apart from a few silent mutations. Mapping of the GSK-3alpha to chromosome 19q13.1-13.2 and the GSK-3beta to chromosome 3q13.3-q21 outside known genetic loci linked to NIDDM further makes...

  8. The ancestral chromosomes of Dromiciops gliroides (Microbiotheridae), and its bearings on the karyotypic evolution of American marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y; Haro, Ronie E; Vargas, Rodrigo A; Gallardo, Milton H

    2016-01-01

    The low-numbered 14-chromosome karyotype of marsupials has falsified the fusion hypothesis claiming ancestrality from a 22-chromosome karyotype. Since the 14-chromosome condition of the relict Dromiciops gliroides is reminecent of ancestrality, its interstitial traces of past putative fusions and heterochromatin banding patterns were studied and added to available marsupials' cytogenetic data. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and self-genomic in situ hybridization (self-GISH) were used to detect telomeric and repetitive sequences, respectively. These were complemented with C-, fluorescent banding, and centromere immunodetection over mitotic spreads. The presence of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) and diploid numbers were reconstructed and mapped onto the marsupial phylogenetic tree. No interstitial, fluorescent signals, but clearly stained telomeric regions were detected by FISH and self-GISH. Heterochromatin distribution was sparse in the telomeric/subtelomeric regions of large submetacentric chromosomes. Large AT-rich blocks were detected in the long arm of four submetacentrics and CG-rich block in the telomeric regions of all chromosomes. The ancestral reconstructions both ITS presence and diploid numbers suggested that ITS are unrelated to fusion events. Although the lack of interstitial signals in D. gliroides' karyotype does not prove absence of past fusions, our data suggests its non-rearranged plesiomorphic condition.

  9. Decondensation of chromosomal 45S rDNA sites in Lolium and Festuca genotypes does not result in karyotype instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Laiane Corsini; Jankowska, Maja; Fuchs, Joerg; Mittelmann, Andréa; Techio, Vânia Helena; Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Fragile sites (FSs) in plants have been described for species like Lolium and other grasses. Whereas in humans FSs were shown to be involved in genome instabilities; the consequences of FSs expression in plants are not known yet. To evaluate whether FSs cause karyotype instabilities, we assessed the frequency of micronuclei and lagging chromosomes in meristematic cells, the stability of the DNA content, and the occurrence of neocentromeres in the presumed chromosomal fragments of Lolium perenne, Lolium multiflorum, Festuca arrundinacea, and two Festulolium hybrids. The cell cycle analysis along with flow cytometric genome size measurements showed high stability in all genomes evaluated. Neocentromeric activity was neither observed in the presumed fragments nor in any other chromosomal region, then this is not the mechanism responsible by the stability. However, Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probe in combination with YOYO staining of metaphasic chromosomes showed that many extended nucleolus organizing region (NOR) form very thin YOYO-positive chromatin fibers connecting the acentric 'fragment' with the centromere-containing chromosome region. The obtained data indicate that the expression of FSs does not result in genome instabilities or neocentromere formation. The FS-containing 45S rDNA carrying chromatin fibers undergo a cell cycle and gene activity-dependent dynamic decondensation process.

  10. Microwave-stimulated staining of plastic embedded bone marrow sections with the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain: improved staining patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M E; Kok, L P; Moorlag, H E; Gerrits, P O; Suurmeijer, A J

    1987-07-01

    Staining plastic sections with the Romanowsky-Giemsa method is both time-consuming and difficult. This paper reports how the staining time can be reduced to 25 min using microwave irradiation of the staining solution. It is shown that staining results depend on the fixative used, staining temperature, dye concentration and pH of the staining solution as well as on several parameters of the microwave irradiation technique. The staining patterns are improved when compared with those obtained by conventional staining of plastic sections. The colors are more brilliant and greater contrasts are observed. Basophilia, polychromasia, and orthochromasia accompanying red cell maturation are more pronounced. For white cell maturation the initial appearance of specific granules (neutrophil, basophil, and eosinophil) is more evident. Thus, cell classification is easily accomplished using the described technique. It is suggested that microwave-stimulated staining be considered for routine use.

  11. Standardization of the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain: the influence of staining time on the RG-staining pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the influence of staining time on the staining pattern of Romanowsky-Giemsa (RG) type stains is investigated. Smears of rabbit bone marrow and of human venous blood were stained with azure B-eosin Y, azure A-eosin Y and with the cationic dyes alone under varying conditions of staining time and dye concentration. The stained smears were investigated by integrating microdensitometry. DNA-polyacrylamide (PAA) model films were stained with azure A-eosin Y, the extinction of the stained model films was determined by spectrophotometry. With increasing staining time the color of the cell nuclei changed from blue to an intense purple, the texture of the nuclear chromatin became more prominent. Prolonged staining resulted in over-staining of the cell nuclei with loss of a distinct chromatin texture. Besides such factors as dye concentration and pH of the staining solution standardization of staining time may be considered necessary for the reproducibility of the RG staining pattern.

  12. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  13. Antitumor effects of a novel chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1 inhibitor on non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in mouse tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome Region Maintenance 1 (CRM1 is a nuclear exporter and its inhibitor has anti-tumor activity in various cancers. This study assessed the therapeutic efficiency of the novel CRM1 inhibitor KPT-185 on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. METHODS: NSCLC cell lines were treated with KPT-185 to assess changes in cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, and protein expression. NOD-SCID mice carrying NSCLC cell xenografts were orally treated with KPT-276, a clinical analog of KPT-185, to examine the efficacy and side effects of KPT-276 in vivo. RESULTS: KPT-185 significantly reduced the viability of six NSCLC cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner, including epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI-resistant H1975 and H1650GR cell lines. In addition, KPT-185 induced these NSCLC cells to arrest at G1 phase of the cell cycle and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. KPT-185 treatment also reduced CRM1 protein levels in six NSCLC cell lines, and the reduction could be completely abolished by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. KPT-185 activated caspase 3, 8, and 9, but inhibited survivin expression in NSCLC cells. In a mouse H1975 cell xenograft model, tumor growth was significantly inhibited by oral KPT-276 administration, and there was no significant mouse body weight loss or other side effects. CONCLUSIONS: The current study demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of KPT-185 in NSCLC cells, including EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines. Further studies will assess anti-tumor activity of KPT-185 in a clinical trial for NSCLC patients.

  14. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  15. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  16. Effect of Melamine Sponge on Tooth Stain Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takero; Kawata, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stain removal ability of melamine sponge before aesthetic tooth whitening in extracted teeth. Melamine sponge of thickness 40 mm was compressed and the destruction of the partition wall structure during the compression process was examined under a stereoscopic microscope. An extracted human tooth was cleaned by normal polishing or with melamine sponge for 90 s. To evaluate the stain level, the tooth surfaces were photographed under a stereoscopic microscope at 0, 30, 60 and 90 s. The residual stained region was traced in a high-magnification photograph, and the stain intensity was presented as a change, relative to the intensity before the experiment (0 s). Mechanical cleaning by toothbrushing produced polishing scratches on the tooth surface, whereas use of the melamine sponge resulted in only minimal scratches. As the compression level increased, the stain-removing effect tended to become stronger. Melamine sponge can remove stains from the tooth surface more effectively and less invasively compared to a conventional toothbrush. As no new scratches are made on the tooth surface when using a melamine sponge brush, the risk of re-staining is reduced. Cleaning using a melamine sponge brush can be easily and effectively performed at home and in a dental office.

  17. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    -on-a-chip microfluidic device and fluorescence microscopy, coupled with a simple image analysis pipeline, to digest chromosomal proteins and examine the structure of the remaining DNA, which maintains the canonical ‘X’ shape. By directly staining DNA, we observe that DNA catenation between sister chromatids (separated...... by fluid flow) is composed of distinct fibres of DNA concentrated at the centromeres. Disrupting the catenation of the chromosomes with Topoisomerase IIa significantly alters overall chromosome shape, suggesting that DNA catenation must be simultaneously maintained for correct chromosome condensation...

  18. Chromosome aberrations: plants to human and Feulgen to FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations and their impact on human health have been recognized for a long time. In the 1950s, in India, studies on induced chromosome aberrations in plants were initiated by Swaminathan and his students. I trace here the impact of these initial studies on further developments in this field. The studies which were started in plants have been extended to mammals (including human) and the simple squash and solid staining have been improved by molecular cytogenetic techniques, thus enabling accurate identification and quantification of different types of chromosome aberrations. These studies have also thrown light on the mechanisms of chromosome aberration formation, especially following exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. Accelerated staining technique using kitchen microwave oven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Mukunda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Histopathological diagnosis of specimens is greatly dependent on good sample preparation and staining. Both of these processes is governed by diffusion of fluids and dyes in and out of the tissue, which is the key to staining. Diffusion of fluids can be accelerated by the application of heat that reduces the time of staining from hours to the minute. We modified an inexpensive model of kitchen microwave oven for staining. This study is an attempt to compare the reliability of this modified technique against the tested technique of routine staining so as to establish the kitchen microwave oven as a valuable diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: Sixty different tissue blocks were used to prepare 20 pairs of slides for 4 different stains namely hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson′s, 0.1% toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. From each tissue block, two bits of tissues were mounted on two different slides. One slide was stained routinely, and the other stained inside a microwave. A pathologist evaluated the stained slides and the results so obtained were analyzed statistically. Results: Microwave staining considerably cut down the staining time from hours to seconds. Microwave staining showed no loss of cellular and nuclear details, uniform-staining characteristics and was of excellent quality. Interpretation and Conclusion: The cellular details, nuclear details and staining characteristics of microwave stained tissues were better than or equal to the routine stained tissue. The overall quality of microwave-stained sections was found to be better than the routine stained tissue in majority of cases.

  20. A rapid alternative technique for obtaining silver-positive patterns in chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Frehner Kavalco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nitrate chromosome staining to evidence nucleolar organizer regions (NORs is a widely adopted methodology. The aim of the present work was to improve this technique, reducing the preparation time without decreasing the quality of the results. Microwave irradiation proved to be quite efficient and reliable for this purpose, as it allowed to identify Ag-NORs equivalent to those obtained by the conventional procedure and also to reduce the concentration of the employed reagents, as well as the precipitation of debris on the preparation.

  1. Chow fed UC Davis strain female Lepr fatty Zucker rats exhibit mild glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased urine volume, all reduced by a Brown Norway strain chromosome 1 congenic donor region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig H Warden

    Full Text Available Our objective is to identify genes that influence the development of any phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (T2D or kidney disease in obese animals. We use the reproductively isolated UC Davis fatty Zucker strain rat model in which the defective chromosome 4 leptin receptor (LeprfaSte/faSte results in fatty obesity. We previously produced a congenic strain with the distal half of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway strain (BN on a Zucker (ZUC background (BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90. Previously published studies in males showed that the BN congenic donor region protects from some phenotypes of renal dysfunction and T2D. We now expand our studies to include females and expand phenotyping to gene expression. We performed diabetes and kidney disease phenotyping in chow-fed females of the BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90 congenic strain to determine the specific characteristics of the UC Davis model. Fatty LeprfaSte/faSte animals of both BN and ZUC genotype in the congenic donor region had prediabetic levels of fasting blood glucose and blood glucose 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test. We observed significant congenic strain chromosome 1 genotype effects of the BN donor region in fatty females that resulted in decreased food intake, urine volume, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance test, plasma triglyceride levels, and urine glucose excretion per day. In fatty females, there were significant congenic strain BN genotype effects on non-fasted plasma urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and creatinine. Congenic region genotype effects were observed by quantitative PCR of mRNA from the kidney for six genes, all located in the chromosome 1 BN donor region, with potential effects on T2D or kidney function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the BN genotype chromosome 1 congenic region influences traits of both type 2 diabetes and kidney function in fatty UC Davis ZUC females and that there are many positional candidate genes.

  2. The architecture of chicken chromosome territories changes during differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Sonja

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between cell divisions the chromatin fiber of each chromosome is restricted to a subvolume of the interphase cell nucleus called chromosome territory. The internal organization of these chromosome territories is still largely unknown. Results We compared the large-scale chromatin structure of chromosome territories between several hematopoietic chicken cell types at various differentiation stages. Chromosome territories were labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization in structurally preserved nuclei, recorded by confocal microscopy and evaluated visually and by quantitative image analysis. Chromosome territories in multipotent myeloid precursor cells appeared homogeneously stained and compact. The inactive lysozyme gene as well as the centromere of the lysozyme gene harboring chromosome located to the interior of the chromosome territory. In further differentiated cell types such as myeloblasts, macrophages and erythroblasts chromosome territories appeared increasingly diffuse, disaggregating to separable substructures. The lysozyme gene, which is gradually activated during the differentiation to activated macrophages, as well as the centromere were relocated increasingly to more external positions. Conclusions Our results reveal a cell type specific constitution of chromosome territories. The data suggest that a repositioning of chromosomal loci during differentiation may be a consequence of general changes in chromosome territory morphology, not necessarily related to transcriptional changes.

  3. Sex-chromosome anaphase movements in crane-fly spermatocytes are coordinated: ultraviolet microbeam irradiation of one kinetochore of one sex chromosome blocks the movements of both sex chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedak, J.A.M.; Forer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Sex chromosomes in crane-fly spermatocytes move polewards at anaphase after the autosomes have reached the poles. We irradiated one kinetochore of one sex chromosome using an ultraviolet microbeam. When both sex chromosomes were normally oriented, irradiation of a single kinetochore permanently blocked movement of both sex chromosomes. Irradiation of non-kinetochore chromosomal regions or of spindle fibres did not block movement, or blocked movement only temporarily. We argue that ultraviolet irradiation of one kinetochore blocks movement of both sex chromosomes because of effects on a 'signal' system. Irradiation of one kinetochore of a maloriented sex chromosome did not block motion of either sex chromosome. However, irradiation of one kinetochore of a normally oriented sex chromosome permanently blocked motion of both that sex chromosome and the maloriented sex chromosome. Thus for the signal system to allow the sex chromosomes to move to the pole each sex chromosome must have one spindle fibre to each pole. (author)

  4. Fetal Outcome in Meconium Stained Deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Agarwal, Manika

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the foetal outcome in Meconium Stained Amniotic Fluid (MSAF). Material and Methods: This prospective observational study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health And Medical Sciences, Shillong, India, over a period of eighteen months, from January 2010 to June 2011. A total of 355 pregnant women who had completed more than 37 weeks of gestation, with singleton pregnancies and cephalic presentations were included in this study. One hundred and sixty five cases with MSAF, were thus selected and they were compared with 190 randomly selected controls. Results: Among 165 cases, 27.88 % of the cases had regular visits to the Institute at least 3 times previously, 72.12% cases had no previous visit at all. Primigravidas accounted for a majority of cases and approximately 50% cases had gestational ages of more than 40 weeks Pregnancies complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension had statistically significant higher rates of meconium staining among cases (16.97%), as compared to those among controls (7.89%). 21.81% cases had foetal heart rate abnormalities, as were detected by electronic foetal monitoring and presence of foetal bradycardia was statistically higher in cases compared to that in controls. Casearean section rates were nearly double in cases (49.09%). Neonatal outcome was poor in terms of low Apgar score at birth, birth asphyxia, Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS) and increased neonatal admission among cases as compared to that among controls. Conclusion: Meconium stained amniotic fluid is really worrisome from both, obstetrician’s and paediatrician’s points of view, as it increases the caesarean rates, causes birth asphyxia, MAS and increases neonatal intensive care unit admissions. PMID:24551662

  5. A gene-based high-resolution comparative radiation hybrid map as a framework for genome sequence assembly of a bovine chromosome 6 region associated with QTL for growth, body composition, and milk performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of different quantitative trait loci (QTL for various phenotypic traits, including milk production, functional, and conformation traits in dairy cattle as well as growth and body composition traits in meat cattle, have been mapped consistently in the middle region of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. Dense genetic and physical maps and, ultimately, a fully annotated genome sequence as well as their mutual connections are required to efficiently identify genes and gene variants responsible for genetic variation of phenotypic traits. A comprehensive high-resolution gene-rich map linking densely spaced bovine markers and genes to the annotated human genome sequence is required as a framework to facilitate this approach for the region on BTA6 carrying the QTL. Results Therefore, we constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH map for the QTL containing chromosomal region of BTA6. This new RH map with a total of 234 loci including 115 genes and ESTs displays a substantial increase in loci density compared to existing physical BTA6 maps. Screening the available bovine genome sequence resources, a total of 73 loci could be assigned to sequence contigs, which were already identified as specific for BTA6. For 43 loci, corresponding sequence contigs, which were not yet placed on the bovine genome assembly, were identified. In addition, the improved potential of this high-resolution RH map for BTA6 with respect to comparative mapping was demonstrated. Mapping a large number of genes on BTA6 and cross-referencing them with map locations in corresponding syntenic multi-species chromosome segments (human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken achieved a refined accurate alignment of conserved segments and evolutionary breakpoints across the species included. Conclusion The gene-anchored high-resolution RH map (1 locus/300 kb for the targeted region of BTA6 presented here will provide a valuable platform to guide high-quality assembling and

  6. Short Communication A small B chromosome in the grasshopper Ommexecha virens (Ommexechidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T E; Silva-Neto, L C; Santos, J F; Loreto, V; Rieger, T T

    2015-12-21

    B chromosomes, also called supernumerary or accessory chromosomes, have been characterized as extra elements found in the karyotypes of different eukaryotic species. B chromosomes are nonvital and only occur in some individuals within a species. Moreover, the chromosomes contain silenced genes, and they exhibit heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. In the present study, we describe an extra chromosome in the grasshopper Ommexecha virens for the first time, using conventional staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques, and we discuss the possible origin of the B chromosome.

  7. The gene for human erythrocyte protein 4. 2 maps to chromosome 15q15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najfeld, V. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States)); Ballard, S.G.; Menninger, J.; Ward, D.C. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)); Bouhassira, E.E.; Schwartz, R.S.; Nagel, R.L.; Rybicki, A.C. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Protein 4.2 (P4.2), one of the major components of the red-blood-cell membrane, is located on the interior surface, where it binds with high affinity to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3. Individuals whose red blood cells are deficient in P4.2 have osmotically fragile, abnormally shaped cells and moderate hemolytic anemia. cDNA clones from both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} coding regions of the P4.2 gene were used to map its chromosomal location by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The probes, individually or in combination, gave specific hybridization signals on chromosome 15. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescence images of the probe signals with fluorescence banding patterns generated by Alu-PCR (R-like) probe and by DAPI staining (G-like). The authors results demonstrate that the locus of the P4.2 gene is located within 15q15.

  8. Using chromosomal data in the phylogenetic and molecular dating framework: karyotype evolution and diversification in Nierembergia (Solanaceae) influenced by historical changes in sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, M C; Moscone, E A; Cocucci, A A

    2016-05-01

    Karyotype data within a phylogenetic framework and molecular dating were used to examine chromosome evolution in Nierembergia and to infer how geological or climatic processes have influenced in the diversification of this solanaceous genus native to South America and Mexico. Despite the numerous studies comparing karyotype features across species, including the use of molecular phylogenies, to date relatively few studies have used formal comparative methods to elucidate chromosomal evolution, especially to reconstruct the whole ancestral karyotypes. Here, we mapped on the Nierembergia phylogeny one complete set of chromosomal data obtained by conventional staining, AgNOR-, C- and fluorescent chromosome banding, and fluorescent in situ hybridisation. In addition, we used a Bayesian molecular relaxed clock to estimate divergence times between species. Nierembergia showed two major divergent clades: a mountainous species group with symmetrical karyotypes, large chromosomes, only one nucleolar organising region (NOR) and without centromeric heterochromatin, and a lowland species group with asymmetrical karyotypes, small chromosomes, two chromosomes pairs with NORs and centromeric heterochromatin bands. Molecular dating on the DNA phylogeny revealed that both groups diverged during Late Miocene, when Atlantic marine ingressions, called the 'Paranense Sea', probably forced the ancestors of these species to find refuge in unflooded areas for about 2 Myr. This split agrees with an increased asymmetry and heterochromatin amount, and decrease in karyotype length and chromosome size. Thus, when the two Nierembergia ancestral lineages were isolated, major divergences occurred in chromosomal evolution, and then each lineage underwent speciation separately, with relatively minor changes in chromosomal characteristics. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Generation of a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing unselected fragments of human chromosome 10 by X-ray irradiation and cell fusion: Application to isolating the MEN2A region in hybrid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodfellow, P.J.; Povey, S.; Nevanlinna, H.A.; Goodfellow, P.N.

    1990-01-01

    We have used X-ray irradiation and cell fusion to generate somatic cell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 10. Our experiments were directed towards isolating the region of the MEN2A gene in hybrids and to use those as the source of DNA for cloning and mapping new markers from near the MEN2A locus. A number of hybrid clones containing human sequences that are tightly linked to the MEN2A gene were identified. Some 25% of our hybrids, however, proved to contain more than one human chromosome 10-derived fragment or showed evidence of deletions and/or rearrangements. A detailed analysis of the human content of X-ray irradiation hybrids is required to assess the integrity and number of human fragments retained. Despite retention of multiple human-derived fragments, these hybrids will prove useful as cloning and mapping resources

  10. Preparation and bivariate analysis of suspensions of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van den Engh, G.J.; Trask, B.J.; Gray, J.W.; Langlois, R.G.; Yu, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Chromosomes were isolated from a variety of human cell types using a HEPES-buffered hypotonic solution (pH 8.0) containing KCl, MgSO/sub 4/ dithioerythritol, and RNase. The chromosomes isolated by this procedure could be stained with a variety of fluorescent stains including propidium iodide, chromomycin A3, and Hoeschst 33258. Addition of sodium citrate to the stained chromosomes was found to improve the total fluorescence resolution. High-quality bivariate Hoeschst vs. chromomycin fluorescence distributions were obtained for chromosomes isolated from a human fibroblast cell strain, a human colon carcinoma cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. Good flow karyotypes were also obtained from primary amniotic cell cultures. The Hoeschst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes of a given cell line, made at different times and at dye concentrations varying over fourfold ranges, show little variation in the relative peak positions of the chromosomes. The size of the DNA in chromosomes isolated using this procedure ranges from 20 to 50 kilobases. The described isolation procedure is simple, it yields high-quality flow karyotypes, and it can be used to prepare chromosomes from clinical samples. 22 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  11. Chromosomal and regional localization of the loci for IGKC, IGGC, ALDB, HOXB, GPT, and PRNP in the American mink (Mustela vison): comparisons with human and mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khlebodarova, TM; Malchenko, Sergey; Matveeva, NM

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal localization of the genes for gamma- and kappa-immunoglobulins (IGGC and IGKC, respectively), aldolase B (ALDB), prion protein (PRNP), homeo box B (HOXB), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) were determined with the use of mink-rodent hybrid cells. Analysis of segregation...

  12. Detailed phenotype-genotype study in five patients with chromosome 6q16 deletion : narrowing the critical region for Prader-Willi-like phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Ciccone, Roberto; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gimelli, Stefania; Marelli, Susan; Verheij, Joke; Giorda, Roberto; Grasso, Rita; Borgatti, Renato; Pagone, Filomena; Rodriguez, Laura; Martinez-Frias, Maria-Luisa; van Ravenswaaij, Conny; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2008-01-01

    Most patients with an interstitial deletion of 6q16 have Prader-Willi-like phenotype, featuring obesity, hypotonia, short hands and feet, and developmental delay. In all reported studies, the chromosome rearrangement was detected by karyotype analysis, which provides an overview of the entire genome

  13. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-08-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns sections are dewaxed, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, dried, covered with Sellotape, and the tissue cut out using a scalpel blade under direct visual control. The method is quick, eliminates problems of operator tremor, preserves the architecture of the micro-dissected tissue (for photographic documentation) and requires no special equipment. The presence of Sellotape and adhesive in the reaction mixture has no detrimental effect on the ability to extract DNA or to perform PCR.

  14. Comparison of immunohistochemical and modified Giemsa stains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2 cases immunostain could not demonstrate the bacteria but they were identified with modified Giemsa stain while in 5 cases the bacteria were identified by immunostain but not with modified Giemsa stain. The sensitivity of modified Giemsa stain was 85% (CI 66.5-98.8) while the specificity was 89% (CI 60.4 – 97.8).

  15. [Diagnostic stain of helminth eggs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L

    1976-12-01

    A description is given of a diagnostic method for the staining of eggs and larvae of intestinal helminth in smears of both fresh and fixed stool samples. The contents of the eggs and larvae stain red, the background various shades of blue. The most contrasting staining was obtained with thin-walled eggs.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  17. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Wang

    Full Text Available We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82% and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14% and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%. The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  18. X chromosome and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.

  19. Identifying Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla; Cervidae) chromosomes involved in rearrangements induced by doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazella, Iara Maluf; Abril, Vanessa Veltrini; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti

    2017-01-01

    The process of karyotype evolution in Cervidae from a common ancestor (2n = 70, FN = 70) has been marked by complex chromosomal rearrangements. This ancestral karyotype has been retained by the current species Mazama gouazoubira (Fischer 1814), for which a chromosomal polymorphism (Robertsonian translocations and the presence of B chromosomes) has been described, presumably caused by a chromosome fragility. Thus, this study has identified doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and mapped the regions involved in breaks, which may be related to the chromosome evolution process. G-banding pattern showed that 21 pairs of chromosomes presented chromosomal aberrations, 60% of the total chromosome number of the species M. gouazoubira. Among chromosomes that carry aberrations, the region where they were most frequently concentrated was distal relative to the centromere. These data suggest that certain chromosomal regions may be more susceptible to chromosome fragility and consequently could be involved in karyotype differentiation in species of the family Cervidae.

  20. Identifying Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla; Cervidae chromosomes involved in rearrangements induced by doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Maluf Tomazella

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The process of karyotype evolution in Cervidae from a common ancestor (2n = 70, FN = 70 has been marked by complex chromosomal rearrangements. This ancestral karyotype has been retained by the current species Mazama gouazoubira (Fischer 1814, for which a chromosomal polymorphism (Robertsonian translocations and the presence of B chromosomes has been described, presumably caused by a chromosome fragility. Thus, this study has identified doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and mapped the regions involved in breaks, which may be related to the chromosome evolution process. G-banding pattern showed that 21 pairs of chromosomes presented chromosomal aberrations, 60% of the total chromosome number of the species M. gouazoubira. Among chromosomes that carry aberrations, the region where they were most frequently concentrated was distal relative to the centromere. These data suggest that certain chromosomal regions may be more susceptible to chromosome fragility and consequently could be involved in karyotype differentiation in species of the family Cervidae.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in human glioblastomas: gain in chromosome 7p correlating with loss in chromosome 10q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María del Mar; Fan, Xing; Muñoz, Jorge; Perot, Christine; Fauvet, Didier; Danglot, Giselle; Palacio, Ana; Madero, Pilar; Zazpe, Idoya; Portillo, Eduardo; Tuñón, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Alfaro, Jorge; Eiras, José; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2003-01-01

    Various genomic alterations have been detected in glioblastoma. Chromosome 7p, with the epidermal growth factor receptor locus, together with chromosome 10q, with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 and deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 loci, and chromosome 9p, with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A locus, are among the most frequently damaged chromosomal regions in glioblastoma. In this study, we evaluated the genetic status of 32 glioblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization; the sensitivity of comparative genomic hybridization versus differential polymerase chain reaction to detect deletions at the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10, deleted in malignant brain tumors-1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A loci and amplifications at the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 locus; the frequency of genetic lesions (gain or loss) at 16 different selected loci (including oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and proliferation markers) mapping on 13 different chromosomes; and the possible existence of a statistical association between any pair of molecular markers studied, to subdivide the glioblastoma entity molecularly. Comparative genomic hybridization showed that the most frequent region of gain was chromosome 7p, whereas the most frequent losses occurred on chromosomes 10q and 13q. The only statistically significant association was found for 7p gain and 10q loss. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Molecular genetic testing of uveal melanoma from routinely processed and stained cytology specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Benjamin N.; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Wakely, Paul E.; Davidorf, Frederick H.; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.

    2013-01-01

    In the following study we investigated the utility of molecular genetic testing of the DNA extracted from routinely stained and processed smears from uveal melanoma (UM). Smears from five uveal melanoma cell lines and 12 primary tumors were prepared and stained with Papanicolaou and Romanowsky stains. Genotyping was carried out utilizing 14 microsatellite markers on chromosomes 3, 6 and 8. Mutational screening for alterations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes was carried out by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results were compared to those obtained through direct sequencing of frozen tumor tissues. High quality DNA was extracted from the stained slides with no difference in the efficiency of DNA extraction between the two staining techniques. The extracted DNA was of adequate quality for genotyping and mutational screening. DNA extracted from approximately 200 tumor cells is sufficient for reproducible testing of allelic imbalances and for studying the common somatic mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes. In conclusion, we presented the feasibility of utilizing routinely stained cytology smears from UM for molecular genetic testing. The DNA obtained is of sufficient quality to carry out genotyping for markers on chromosome 3, 6 and 8, as well as screening for somatic mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 genes. PMID:21945171

  3. Sex-specific effects on spatial learning and memory, and sex-independent effects on blood pressure of a <3.3 Mbp rat chromosome 2 QTL region in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have consistently found that hypertension is associated with poor cognitive performance. We hypothesize that a putative causal mechanism underlying this association is due to genetic loci affecting both blood pressure and cognition. Consistent with this notion, we reported several blood pressure (BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs that co-localized with navigational performance (Nav-QTLs influencing spatial learning and memory in Dahl rats. The present study investigates a chromosome 2 region harboring BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. We developed two congenic strains, S.R2A and S.R2B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 2 segments into Dahl S chromosome 2 region spanning BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. Radiotelemetric blood pressure analysis identified only S.R2A congenic rats with lower systolic blood pressure (females: -26.0 mmHg, P = 0.003; males: -30.9 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, diastolic blood pressure (females: -21.2 mmHg, P = 0.01; males: -25.7 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, and mean arterial pressure (females: -23.9 mmHg, P = 0.004; males: -28.0 mmHg, P<1×10(-5 compared with corresponding Dahl S controls, confirming the presence of BP-f4 QTL on rat chromosome 2. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect blood pressure. Testing of S.R2A, S.R2B, and Dahl S male rats in the Morris water maze (MWM task revealed significantly decreased spatial navigation performance in S.R2A male congenic rats when compared with Dahl S male controls (P<0.05. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect performance of the MWM task in males. The S.R2A female rats did not differ in spatial navigation when compared with Dahl S female controls, indicating that the Nav-8 effect on spatial navigation is male-specific. Our results suggest the existence of a single QTL on chromosome 2 176.6-179.9 Mbp region which affects blood pressure in both males and females and cognition solely in males.

  4. Histological stain evaluation for machine learning applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy C Azar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A methodology for quantitative comparison of histological stains based on their classification and clustering performance, which may facilitate the choice of histological stains for automatic pattern and image analysis. Background: Machine learning and image analysis are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications for automatic analysis of histological tissue samples. Pathologists rely on multiple, contrasting stains to analyze tissue samples, but histological stains are developed for visual analysis and are not always ideal for automatic analysis. Materials and Methods: Thirteen different histological stains were used to stain adjacent prostate tissue sections from radical prostatectomies. We evaluate the stains for both supervised and unsupervised classification of stain/tissue combinations. For supervised classification we measure the error rate of nonlinear support vector machines, and for unsupervised classification we use the Rand index and the F-measure to assess the clustering results of a Gaussian mixture model based on expectation-maximization. Finally, we investigate class separability measures based on scatter criteria. Results: A methodology for quantitative evaluation of histological stains in terms of their classification and clustering efficacy that aims at improving segmentation and color decomposition. We demonstrate that for a specific tissue type, certain stains perform consistently better than others according to objective error criteria. Conclusions: The choice of histological stain for automatic analysis must be based on its classification and clustering performance, which are indicators of the performance of automatic segmentation of tissue into morphological components, which in turn may be the basis for diagnosis.

  5. Efficiency of application of different DNA probes in identifying marker chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavokina L. V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of marker chromosomes in the human karyotype always requires a special diagnostic approach. Determination of the marker chromosome type and structure is of great diagnostic and prognostic importance. There are several methods of marker chromosomes identification, which differ in their informative value. The paper presents the results of cytogenetic and FISH diagnostics of supernumerical marker chromosomes (SMC cases in patients’ karyotype. Aim. To analyze the results of the cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic diagnostics for patients with marker chromosomes, and to evaluate and compare the efficiency of the methods used. Methods. Karyotyping was done according to the standard methods. GTG, CBG, QFQ and NOR-Ag methods of differential staining were used. FISH was performed according to the manufacturer’s instructions for CEP, LSI and WCP DNA-probes. Results. Marker chromosome was found in 15 of 7989 patients. Application of standard staining methods was effective in 66.6 % of cases. Combination of differential staining and FISH allowed identifying a marker chromosome in 83.3 %. 90 % of all marker chromosomes were identified as isochromosomes and 60 % of them were derivative from chromosome 15. Conclusions. The use of WCP probes is a main step in the marker chromosome identification with further application of CEP/LSI probes. If a marker chromosome has nonspecific DNA sequences more sensitive methods should be use..

  6. Clipboard Human Y-chromosome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Their findings, as described below, are revealing. They sequenced the euchromatic part of the Y-chromosome (23 Mb) (obtained from a single anony- mous human male), comprising 8 Mb of the short arm (Yp) and 14⋅5 Mb of the long arm (Yq), at an accuracy of 99⋅999% and classified these regions into three sequence ...

  7. The human genes for desmogleins (DSG1 and DSG3) are located in a small region on chromosome 18q12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimin; Amagai, Masayuki; Minoshima, Shinsei; Sakai, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Takeji; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Green, K.J. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Desmoglein is a transmembrane glycoprotein component of desmosomes in vertebrate epithelial cells. Two of the three currently known desmogleins are the autoantigens of autoimmune skin blistering diseases, pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, in which autoantibodies cause the loss of cell adhesion of keratinocytes with resultant blister formation. In this study, the genes for two autoantigens (DSG1 for pemphigus foliaceus and DSG3 for pemphigus vulgaris) were mapped on band q12 of human chromosome 18 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Furthermore, both genes were localized on a 320-kb genomic fragment separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These results suggest the possibility of a cluster for the desmoglein gene family on chromosome 18. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Physical mapping studies at D15S10: Implications for candidate gene identification in the Angelman syndrome/Prader-Willi syndrome chromosome region of 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodage, T.; Lindeman, R.; Deng, Z.M.; Fimmel, A.; Trent, R.J. (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)); Smith, A. (Children' s Hospital, New South Wales (Australia))

    1994-01-01

    The Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) loci have been mapped to chromosome 15q11-q13. Chromosomal deletions of differing parental origin in the two syndromes have been interpreted as being due to genetic imprinting. Molecular analysis of patients with varying deletions has localized the AS locus to the interval between D15S113 and GABRB3 and the PWS locus between D15S13 and D15S113. In the present study, DNA cloning and physical mapping techniques have been used to characterize the AS/PWS chromosome region in the vicinity of D15S10, a locus that is telomeric to D15S113 and centromeric to GABRB3. A CpG island near TD3-21 at D15S10 has been cloned, allowing the identification of a widely expressed 4.5-kb transcript and providing a novel DNA marker, OP3, at this locus. OP3 and TD3-21 have been used to construct a long-range physical map extending over approximately 2800 kb. Clusters of rare-cutting restriction sites on this map locate four other CpG islands. Since these CpG islands lie within the minimum deletion intervals for AS and PWS, they mark the possible locations of candidate genes for the two syndromes. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Chromosomal aberration frequencies determined by conventinal methods: Parallel increases over time in the region of a petrochemical industry and throughout the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Rössner st., Pavel; Beskid, Olena; Bavorová, H.; Očadlíková, D.; Solanský, I.; Albertini, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 166, 1-3 (2007), s. 239-244 ISSN 0009-2797 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Gene expression * Cytogenetic analysis * Chromosomal aberrations Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.090, year: 2007

  10. A C-banded karyotype of mitotic chromosomes in diploid purple coneflower (Echinacea purpureaL.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weizhen; Li, Qingling; Chen, Xiaolu; Ren, Yi; Chen, Rong; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yuesheng

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploid ermpglasm is an important resource for genetic studies and identification of individual chromosomes in the cells of the aneuploid is an important step. The karyotype has already been established for purple coneflower ( Echinacea purpurea L.), but due to the high similarity in the morphology of several pairs of chromosomes in this species, it cannot be used to identify individual chromosomes in its own complement. The objectives of this study are to develop and evaluate the Giemsa C-banding technique for the purpose of identifying the individual chromosomes in Echinacea purpurea . The established karyotype with C-bands showed that all the 11 pairs of chromosomes possessed centromeric bands. Telomeric bands appeared most frequently in almost all the chromosomes with only two exceptions, the short arm of the chromosome 9 and the long arm of the chromosome 10. Intercalary bands were found mainly in the long arm of some chromosomes with only two exceptions, the chromosomes 1 and 2 that had intercalary bands on both arms. The chromosome 4 was the only chromosome where intercalary bands were absent. Chromosomes in E. purpurea could be stained with Giemsa to bear C-bands. By classifying the chromosomes into groups and judging the C-bands, each chromosome could be identified. The methods established in this study might be used for the identification of chromosome constitution in aneuploid E. purpurea created in a breeding program.

  11. Standardization of Romanowsky stains. The relationship between stain composition and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1978-03-01

    A panel of 17 eminent haematologists has assessed the performance of 5 Romanowsky stains prepared from pure component dyes, comparing the suitability and acceptability of these stains for the preparation of routine blood and bone-marrow films. It was found that the results obtained using the stain described by Marshall et al (1975) were comparable to those obtained using a modification of the stain described by Wittekind et al (1976). The performance of the 3 other stains was less acceptable. Variations in stain formulation have been correlated with stain performance.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  13. Frequencies and distributions of sex chromosome abnormalities in females with the Turner phenotype: a long-term retrospective study in the southern region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrıverdi, Nilgün; Demirhan, Osman; Süleymanova, Dilara; Pazarbaşı, Ayfer

    2017-11-13

    Background/aim: The genetic background of Turner syndrome (TS) is highly variable. The correlation between genotype and phenotype is not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to describe the frequencies and distributions of Turner karyotypes and to discuss the phenotype/genotype relation in a very large group of individuals with TS. Materials and methods: The karyotype results of 248 female participants were evaluated retrospectively.Results: Of 248 females with the Turner phenotype, 14.5% had normal karyotypes and 85.5% had Turner karyotypes. About 72.2% of the abnormalities were numerical aberrations and 27.8% were structural aberrations. The most frequent karyotype was monosomy X, which was found in 135 females (63.7%), followed by 44 mosaics (21%), 40 isochromosomes of the long and short arms of chromosome X (19.1%), and 17 deletions of the short and long arms of chromosome X (8.0%). One case of Robertsonian translocation and one case of mosaic TS with marker chromosome were detected. Conclusion: This study shows the frequency and distribution of karyotypes in females with TS. There is great value to be gleaned from studies of females with TS in furthering our understanding of the atypical clinical features associated with TS. Studies involving genetic analyses will be necessary to examine gene expression profiles in girls with TS and identify potential candidate genes underlying the atypical clinical features associated with TS.

  14. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  15. Flow cytogenetics: progress toward chromosomal aberration detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrano, A.V.; Gray, J.W.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Using clonal derivatives of the Chinese hamster M3-1 cell line, we demonstrate the potential of flow systems to karyotype homogeneous aberrations (aberrations which are identical and present in every cell) and to detect heterogeneous aberrations (aberrations which occur randomly in a population and are not identical in every cell). Flow cytometry (FCM) of ethidium bromide stained isolated chromosomes from clone 650A of the M3-1 cells distinguishes nine chromosome types from the fourteen present in the actual karyotype. X-irradiation of this parent 650A clone produced two sub-clones with an altered flow karyotype, that is, their FCM distributions were characterized by the addition of new peaks and alterations in area under existing peaks. From the relative DNA content and area for each peak, as determined by computer analysis, we predicted that each clone had undergone a reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes from two peaks. This prediction was confirmed by Giemsa-banding the metaphase cells. Heterogeneous aberrations are reflected in the flow karyotype as an increase in background, that is, an increase in area underlying the chromosome peaks. This increase is dose dependent but, as yet, the sample variability has been too large for quantitative analysis. Flow sorting of the valleys between chromosome peaks produces enriched fractions of aberrant chromosomes for visual analysis. These approaches are potentially applicable to the analysis of chromsomal aberrations induced by environmental contaminants

  16. Bird-like sex chromosomes of platypus imply recent origin of mammal sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrunes, Frédéric; Waters, Paul D; Miethke, Pat; Rens, Willem; McMillan, Daniel; Alsop, Amber E; Grützner, Frank; Deakin, Janine E; Whittington, Camilla M; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Warren, Wes; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2008-06-01

    In therian mammals (placentals and marsupials), sex is determined by an XX female: XY male system, in which a gene (SRY) on the Y affects male determination. There is no equivalent in other amniotes, although some taxa (notably birds and snakes) have differentiated sex chromosomes. Birds have a ZW female: ZZ male system with no homology with mammal sex chromosomes, in which dosage of a Z-borne gene (possibly DMRT1) affects male determination. As the most basal mammal group, the egg-laying monotremes are ideal for determining how the therian XY system evolved. The platypus has an extraordinary sex chromosome complex, in which five X and five Y chromosomes pair in a translocation chain of alternating X and Y chromosomes. We used physical mapping to identify genes on the pairing regions between adjacent X and Y chromosomes. Most significantly, comparative mapping shows that, contrary to earlier reports, there is no homology between the platypus and therian X chromosomes. Orthologs of genes in the conserved region of the human X (including SOX3, the gene from which SRY evolved) all map to platypus chromosome 6, which therefore represents the ancestral autosome from which the therian X and Y pair derived. Rather, the platypus X chromosomes have substantial homology with the bird Z chromosome (including DMRT1) and to segments syntenic with this region in the human genome. Thus, platypus sex chromosomes have strong homology with bird, but not to therian sex chromosomes, implying that the therian X and Y chromosomes (and the SRY gene) evolved from an autosomal pair after the divergence of monotremes only 166 million years ago. Therefore, the therian X and Y are more than 145 million years younger than previously thought.

  17. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  18. How Romanowsky stains work and why they remain valuable - including a proposed universal Romanowsky staining mechanism and a rational troubleshooting scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horobin, R W

    2011-02-01

    An introduction to the nomenclature and concept of "Romanowsky stains" is followed by a brief account of the dyes involved and especially the crucial role of azure B and of the impurity of most commercial dye lots. Technical features of standardized and traditional Romanowsky stains are outlined, e.g., number and ratio of the acidic and basic dyes used, solvent effects, staining times, and fixation effects. The peculiar advantages of Romanowsky staining are noted, namely, the polychromasia achieved in a technically simple manner with the potential for stain intensification of "the color purple." Accounts are provided of a variety of physicochemically relevant topics, namely, acidic and basic dyeing, peculiarities of acidic and basic dye mixtures, consequences of differential staining rates of different cell and tissue components and of different dyes, the chemical significance of "the color purple," the substrate selectivity for purple color formation and its intensification in situ due to a template effect, effects of resin embedding and prior fixation. Based on these physicochemical phenomena, mechanisms for the various Romanowsky staining applications are outlined including for blood, marrow and cytological smears; G-bands of chromosomes; microorganisms and other single-cell entities; and paraffin and resin tissue sections. The common factors involved in these specific mechanisms are pulled together to generate a "universal" generic mechanism for these stains. Certain generic problems of Romanowsky stains are discussed including the instability of solutions of acidic dye-basic dye mixtures, the inherent heterogeneity of polychrome methylene blue, and the resulting problems of standardization. Finally, a rational trouble-shooting scheme is appended.

  19. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  20. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  1. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  2. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  3. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected.

  4. A YAC contig and an EST map in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13 surrounding the loci for neurosensory nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and Limb-Girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilford, P.; Crozet, F.; Blanchard, S. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Two forms of inherited childhood nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and a Duchenne-like form of progressive muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) have been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13. To clone the genes responsible for these diseases we constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig spanning an 8-cM region between the polymorphic markers D13S221. The contig comprises 24 sequence-tagged sites, among which 15 were newly obtained. This contig allowed us to order the polymorphic markers centromere- D13S175-D13S141-D13S143-D13S115-AFM128yc1-D13S292-D13S283-AFM323vh5-D13S221-telomere. Eight expressed sequence tags, previously assigned to 13q11-q12 (D13S182E, D13S183E, D13S502E, D13S504E, D13S505E, D13S837E, TUBA2, ATP1AL1), were localized on the YAC contig. YAC screening of a cDNA library derived from mouse cochlea allowed us to identify an {alpha}-tubulin gene (TUBA2) that was subsequently precisely mapped within the candidate region. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, S.; Kawano, S.; Michimoto, T.; Higashiyama, T.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, A.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  6. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of cultured neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbierato, Massimo; Argentini, Carla; Skaper, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is a technique allowing the visualization of a specific protein or antigen in cells or tissue sections by binding a specific antibody chemically conjugated with a fluorescent dye such as fluorescein isothiocyanate. There are two major types of immunofluorescence staining methods: (1) direct immunofluorescence staining in which the primary antibody is labeled with fluorescence dye and (2) indirect immunofluorescence staining in which a secondary antibody labeled with fluorochrome is used to recognize a primary antibody. This chapter describes procedures for the application of indirect immunofluorescence staining to neural cells in culture.

  7. Auditory function in the Tc1 mouse model of down syndrome suggests a limited region of human chromosome 21 involved in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Stephanie; Ingham, Neil; Pearson, Selina; Gribble, Susan M; Clayton, Stephen; Steel, Karen P; Marcotti, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is one of the most common congenital disorders leading to a wide range of health problems in humans, including frequent otitis media. The Tc1 mouse carries a significant part of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) in addition to the full set of mouse chromosomes and shares many phenotypes observed in humans affected by Down syndrome with trisomy of chromosome 21. However, it is unknown whether Tc1 mice exhibit a hearing phenotype and might thus represent a good model for understanding the hearing loss that is common in Down syndrome. In this study we carried out a structural and functional assessment of hearing in Tc1 mice. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements in Tc1 mice showed normal thresholds compared to littermate controls and ABR waveform latencies and amplitudes were equivalent to controls. The gross anatomy of the middle and inner ears was also similar between Tc1 and control mice. The physiological properties of cochlear sensory receptors (inner and outer hair cells: IHCs and OHCs) were investigated using single-cell patch clamp recordings from the acutely dissected cochleae. Adult Tc1 IHCs exhibited normal resting membrane potentials and expressed all K(+) currents characteristic of control hair cells. However, the size of the large conductance (BK) Ca(2+) activated K(+) current (I(K,f)), which enables rapid voltage responses essential for accurate sound encoding, was increased in Tc1 IHCs. All physiological properties investigated in OHCs were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. The normal functional hearing and the gross structural anatomy of the middle and inner ears in the Tc1 mouse contrast to that observed in the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome which shows otitis media. Genes that are trisomic in Ts65Dn but disomic in Tc1 may predispose to otitis media when an additional copy is active.

  8. Auditory function in the Tc1 mouse model of down syndrome suggests a limited region of human chromosome 21 involved in otitis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kuhn

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common congenital disorders leading to a wide range of health problems in humans, including frequent otitis media. The Tc1 mouse carries a significant part of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21 in addition to the full set of mouse chromosomes and shares many phenotypes observed in humans affected by Down syndrome with trisomy of chromosome 21. However, it is unknown whether Tc1 mice exhibit a hearing phenotype and might thus represent a good model for understanding the hearing loss that is common in Down syndrome. In this study we carried out a structural and functional assessment of hearing in Tc1 mice. Auditory brainstem response (ABR measurements in Tc1 mice showed normal thresholds compared to littermate controls and ABR waveform latencies and amplitudes were equivalent to controls. The gross anatomy of the middle and inner ears was also similar between Tc1 and control mice. The physiological properties of cochlear sensory receptors (inner and outer hair cells: IHCs and OHCs were investigated using single-cell patch clamp recordings from the acutely dissected cochleae. Adult Tc1 IHCs exhibited normal resting membrane potentials and expressed all K(+ currents characteristic of control hair cells. However, the size of the large conductance (BK Ca(2+ activated K(+ current (I(K,f, which enables rapid voltage responses essential for accurate sound encoding, was increased in Tc1 IHCs. All physiological properties investigated in OHCs were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. The normal functional hearing and the gross structural anatomy of the middle and inner ears in the Tc1 mouse contrast to that observed in the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome which shows otitis media. Genes that are trisomic in Ts65Dn but disomic in Tc1 may predispose to otitis media when an additional copy is active.

  9. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor: Localization to the proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 11 and association with CA/GT dinucleotide repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev, A.A.; Rosen, D.R.; Kos, C.; Brown, R.H. Jr.; Clifford, E.; Landes, G.; Hauser, S.L.

    1993-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes survival and differentiation of several types of sensory, motor, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify, clone, and partially sequence CNTF cDNA from human muscle. Using a rodent-human mapping panel and fluorescence in situ hybridization, they have localized a single copy of the gene for human CNTF to the proximal long arm of chromosome 11. They have also identified a polymorphic tandem CA/GT dinucleotide repeat associated with the human CNTF gene. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Tracking of chromosome and replisome dynamics in Myxococcus xanthus reveals a novel chromosome arrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Harms

    Full Text Available Cells closely coordinate cell division with chromosome replication and segregation; however, the mechanisms responsible for this coordination still remain largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatial arrangement and temporal dynamics of the 9.1 Mb circular chromosome in the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus. For chromosome segregation, M. xanthus uses a parABS system, which is essential, and lack of ParB results in chromosome segregation defects as well as cell divisions over nucleoids and the formation of anucleate cells. From the determination of the dynamic subcellular location of six genetic loci, we conclude that in newborn cells ori, as monitored following the ParB/parS complex, and ter regions are localized in the subpolar regions of the old and new cell pole, respectively and each separated from the nearest pole by approximately 1 µm. The bulk of the chromosome is arranged between the two subpolar regions, thus leaving the two large subpolar regions devoid of DNA. Upon replication, one ori region remains in the original subpolar region while the second copy segregates unidirectionally to the opposite subpolar region followed by the rest of the chromosome. In parallel, the ter region of the mother chromosome relocates, most likely passively, to midcell, where it is replicated. Consequently, after completion of replication and segregation, the two chromosomes show an ori-ter-ter-ori arrangement with mirror symmetry about a transverse axis at midcell. Upon completion of segregation of the ParB/parS complex, ParA localizes in large patches in the DNA-free subpolar regions. Using an Ssb-YFP fusion as a proxy for replisome localization, we observed that the two replisomes track independently of each other from a subpolar region towards ter. We conclude that M. xanthus chromosome arrangement and dynamics combine features from previously described systems with new features leading to a novel spatiotemporal arrangement pattern.

  11. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-01-01

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chrom...

  12. Reliable and durable Golgi staining of brain tissue from human autopsies and experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Petrushevski, Vladimir M; Stankov, Aleksandar; Dika, Ani; Jakovski, Zlatko; Pavlovski, Goran; Davcheva, Natasha; Lipkin, Richard; Schnieder, Tatiana; Scobie, Kimberley; Duma, Aleksej; Dwork, Andrew J

    2014-06-15

    Golgi stains are notoriously capricious, particularly when applied to human brain. The well-known difficulties, which include complete failure of impregnation, patchy staining, unstable staining, and extensive crystalline deposits in superficial sections, have discouraged many from attempting to use these techniques. A reliable method that produces uniform impregnation in tissue from human autopsies and experimental animals is needed. The method described, "NeoGolgi", modifies previous Golgi-Cox protocols (Glaser and Van der Loos, 1981). Changes include: much longer time (>10 weeks) in Golgi solution, agitation on a slowly rocking platform, more gradual infiltration with Parlodion, more thorough removal of excess staining solution during embedding, and shorter exposure to ammonia after infiltration. The procedure has successfully stained over 220 consecutive frontal or hippocampal blocks from more than 175 consecutive human autopsy cases. Dendritic spines are easily recognized, and background is clear, allowing examination of very thick (200 μm) sections. Stained neurons are evenly distributed within cortical regions. The stain is stable for at least eight years. Most importantly, all stained neurons are apparently well-impregnated, eliminating ambiguity between pathology and poor impregnation that is inherent to other methods. Most methods of Golgi staining are poorly predictable. They often fail completely, staining is patchy, and abnormal morphology is often indistinguishable from poor impregnation. "NeoGolgi" overcomes these problems. Starting with unfixed tissue, it is possible to obtain Golgi staining of predictably high quality in brains from human autopsies and experimental animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intrachromosomal rearrangements in two representatives of the genus Saltator (Thraupidae, Passeriformes) and the occurrence of heteromorphic Z chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Michelly da Silva; Kretschmer, Rafael; Silva, Fabio Augusto Oliveira; Ledesma, Mario Angel; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Del Valle Garnero, Analía; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2015-10-01

    Saltator is a genus within family Thraupidae, the second largest family of Passeriformes, with more than 370 species found exclusively in the New World. Despite this, only a few species have had their karyotypes analyzed, most of them only with conventional staining. The diploid number is close to 80, and chromosome morphology is similar to the usual avian karyotype. Recent studies using cross-species chromosome painting have shown that, although the chromosomal morphology and number are similar to many species of birds, Passeriformes exhibit a complex pattern of paracentric and pericentric inversions in the chromosome homologous to GGA1q in two different suborders, Oscines and Suboscines. Hence, considering the importance and species richness of Thraupidae, this study aims to analyze two species of genus Saltator, the golden-billed saltator (S. aurantiirostris) and the green-winged saltator (S. similis) by means of classical cytogenetics and cross-species chromosome painting using Gallus gallus and Leucopternis albicollis probes, and also 5S and 18S rDNA and telomeric sequences. The results show that the karyotypes of these species are similar to other species of Passeriformes. Interestingly, the Z chromosome appears heteromorphic in S. similis, varying in morphology from acrocentric to metacentric. 5S and 18S probes hybridize to one pair of microchromosomes each, and telomeric sequences produce signals only in the terminal regions of chromosomes. FISH results are very similar to the Passeriformes already analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics (Turdus species and Elaenia spectabilis). However, the paracentric and pericentric inversions observed in Saltator are different from those detected in these species, an observation that helps to explain the probable sequence of rearrangements. As these rearrangements are found in both suborders of Passeriformes (Oscines and Suboscines), we propose that the fission of GGA1 and inversions in GGA1q have occurred very

  14. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other human chromosomes. The presence of abnormal chromosomal number described in general as aneuploidy, here trisomy, is observed in certain other syndromes too. Trisomies of chromosome 18, 13,22,8,9 and X are known. Children with these 'numerical' anomalies have severe and complex malformations. Mental ...

  17. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  18. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  19. Supernumerary ring chromosome: an etiology for Pallister-Killian syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, E; Canellas, A; Cirigliano, V; Català, V; Cerdan, C; Plaja, A

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of marker chromosomes before the introduction of array CGH (aCGH) assays was only based on their banding patterns (G, C, and NOR staining) and fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques. The use of aCGH greatly improves the identification of marker chromosomes in some cases. We describe an atypical case of Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) detected at prenatal diagnosis with a very unusual cytogenetic presentation: a supernumerary ring chromosome including two copies of 12p. A similar anomaly described in a postnatal patient suggests ring chromosome as a possible cause of PKS. Extra ring chromosomes might be a more common etiology for PKS than previously thought, given the difficulty in their characterization before the advent of aCGH. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Chromosome banding of two Litoria species (Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanpen Kakampuy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was the first cytogenetic studies of green-eyed tree frog (Litoria genimaculata and Nyakala frog(L. nyakalensis. The mitotic chromosomes were prepared directly from bone marrow after in vivo colchicine treatment andanalysed following conventional, silver staining and C-banding techniques. These species showed similar karyotypes with2n=26, the fundamental number (NF are 52 chromosomes and Ag-NOR positions located in the short arm near centromeresof chromosome pair 7 in L. genimaculata and in the long arm near telomeres of chromosome pair 9 in L. nyakalensis. TheC-banded karyotypes showed heterochromatin bands at the centromeres and telomeres of all chromosomes. Both specieswere characterized by the number and position of constitutive heterochromatin in the karyotypes. The mitotic karyotypes ofL. genimaculata exhibited greater amounts of C-band positive heterochromatin than L. nyakalensis.

  1. Semi-automated detection of aberrant chromosomes in bivariate flow karyotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Manders, E. M.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described that is designed to compare, in a standardized procedure, bivariate flow karyotypes of Hoechst 33258 (HO)/Chromomycin A3 (CA) stained human chromosomes from cells with aberrations with a reference flow karyotype of normal chromosomes. In addition to uniform normalization of

  2. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L. [Salisbury District Hospital, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  3. Differential rates of genic and chromosomal evolution in bats of the family Rhinolophidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qumsiyeh, M B; Owen, R D; Chesser, R K

    1988-06-01

    Data for nondifferentially stained chromosomes from 10 species of Rhinolophus (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae) suggest a conserved chromosomal evolution. G-banded chromosomes for three well differentiated species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Rhinolophus blasii, and Rhinolophus acuminatus) corroborate a low level of gross chromosomal rearrangements. Additionally, a comparison between G-banded chromosomes of Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) and Hipposideros (Hipposideridae) suggests extreme conservatism in chromosomal arms between these two distantly related groups. On the other hand, we report extensive genic divergence as assayed by starch gel electrophoresis among these 10 species, and between Rhinolophus and two hipposiderid genera (Hipposideros and Aselliscus). The present chromosomal data are not sufficient for phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenies based on electrophoretic data are in many aspects discordant with those based on the classical morphological criteria. Different (and as yet not clearly understood) evolutionary forces affecting chromosomal, morphologic, and electrophoretic variation may be the reason for the apparent lack of concordance in these independent data sets.

  4. Physical mapping of a 330 X 10(3)-base-pair region of the Myxococcus xanthus chromosome that is preferentially labeled during spore germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komano, T.; Inouye, S.; Inouye, M.

    1985-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus was pulse-labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine immediately after germination of dimethyl sulfoxide-induced spores. The restriction enzyme digests of the total chromosomal DNA from the pulse- labeled cells were analyzed by one-dimensional as well as two- dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Four PstI fragments preferentially labeled at a very early stage of germination were cloned into the unique PstI site of pBR322. By using these clones as probes, a restriction enzyme map was established covering approximately 6% of the total M. xanthus genome (330 X 10(3) base pairs). The distribution of the specific activities of the restriction fragments pulse-labeled after germination suggests a bidirectional mode of DNA replication from a fixed origin

  5. Determination of chromosomal ploidy in Agave ssp. | Lingling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The root tips of 19 Agave ssp. germplasms were used as materials for determining their chromosomal ploidies. Through normal pre-treatment, fixation, digesting and Giemsa staining, the glass slides with expelled cells on them were obtained. Observed with a light microscope, the results showed that 10 germplasms are ...

  6. A rapid, non-sacrificial chromosome preparation technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A combination of colchicine, prolonged hypotonic treatment, dissociation of cells followed by Giemsa staining makes it possible to achieve good quality metaphase chromosome spreads using small fish without the use of sterile conditions, centrifuges or sacrificing the specimen. In situations such as the induction of triploidy ...

  7. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  8. Isolation of anonymous, polymorphic DNA fragments from human chromosome 22q12-qter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dumanski (Jan); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); M. Ruttledge (Martin); A. Wladis (Andreas); N. Sugawa (Noriaki); V.P. Collins (Peter); M. Nordenskjöld

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 195 random chromosome 22-specific probes, equivalent to approximately 1% of the size of this chromosome, have been isolated from a chromosome 22-specific bacteriophage lambda genomic library. These probes were mapped to four different regions of chromosome 22 on a panel of

  9. Multicenter Assessment of Gram Stain Error Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Linoj P; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Harrington, Amanda; Cavagnolo, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Gram stains remain the cornerstone of diagnostic testing in the microbiology laboratory for the guidance of empirical treatment prior to availability of culture results. Incorrectly interpreted Gram stains may adversely impact patient care, and yet there are no comprehensive studies that have evaluated the reliability of the technique and there are no established standards for performance. In this study, clinical microbiology laboratories at four major tertiary medical care centers evaluated Gram stain error rates across all nonblood specimen types by using standardized criteria. The study focused on several factors that primarily contribute to errors in the process, including poor specimen quality, smear preparation, and interpretation of the smears. The number of specimens during the evaluation period ranged from 976 to 1,864 specimens per site, and there were a total of 6,115 specimens. Gram stain results were discrepant from culture for 5% of all specimens. Fifty-eight percent of discrepant results were specimens with no organisms reported on Gram stain but significant growth on culture, while 42% of discrepant results had reported organisms on Gram stain that were not recovered in culture. Upon review of available slides, 24% (63/263) of discrepant results were due to reader error, which varied significantly based on site (9% to 45%). The Gram stain error rate also varied between sites, ranging from 0.4% to 2.7%. The data demonstrate a significant variability between laboratories in Gram stain performance and affirm the need for ongoing quality assessment by laboratories. Standardized monitoring of Gram stains is an essential quality control tool for laboratories and is necessary for the establishment of a quality benchmark across laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  11. Defining the anatomy of the Rangifer tarandus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Griffin, D K; O'Brien, P C; Yang, F; Lin, C C; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1998-03-01

    A comprehensive cytogenetic characterization of the unusally large reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) sex chromosomes is presented for the purpose of studying the evolution of these atypical gonosomes. Sex chromosome idiograms were constructed from G-banded and C-banded chromosomes to illustrate the relative amounts and locations of euchromatin and heterochromatin. Hybridization with a Mazama gouazoubira X whole-chromosome paint revealed that essentially all reindeer X-linked euchromatin and most reindeer Y-linked euchromatin is conserved interspecifically. Subsequently, painting probes were generated from flow-sorted reindeer X chromosomes, flow-sorted reindeer Y chromosomes, and from microdissections of specific gonosomal regions to establish specific segment-to-segment homologies between these gonosomes. In particular, one microdissection-generated paint demonstrated that certain constituent repetitive DNAs, found in C-band region Xq31, were also present in essentially all heterochromatin blocks of the Y chromosome. Microdissection-generated paints from other X-linked heterochromatin blocks revealed the presence of DNA sequences that lacked homologous sequences on the Y chromosomes and were more specific for their region of origin. These characteristics of the reindeer sex chromosomes are consistent with the notion that mammalian sex chromosomes were derived from homologous progenitor chromosome pairs and provide insights into the evolution of these atypical mammalian gonosomes.

  12. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  13. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  14. Purified azure B as a reticulocyte stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1976-01-01

    A comparison has been made between reticulocyte preparations stained with purified azure B and with several commerically available batches of brilliant cresyl blue and new methylene blue. Marked variations were observed in the composition and staining performances of the various batches of the two commerically available dyes. Although there were no significant differences in reticulocyte counts obtained with these two dyes, varying amounts of an extraneous, particulate dye deposit were present in these preparations, making accuracte counting both tedious and timeconsuming. Purified azure B, on the other hand, gave reproducibly stained, deposit-free preparations. Reticulocyte counts obtained from azure B preparations correlated almost exactly with those determined using new methylene blue. Purified azure B is therefore recommended as a convenient reticulocyte stain for routine use. Images PMID:64475

  15. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  16. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A. [Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  17. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  18. New Grocott Stain without Using Chromic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiogama, Kazuya; Kitazawa, Kayo; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Onouchi, Takanori; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We established a new “ecological” Grocott stain for demonstrating fungi, based upon a 4R principle of refusal, reduction, reuse, and recycle of waste management. Conventional Grocott stain employs environmentally harsh 5% chromic acid for oxidization. Initially, we succeeded in reducing the concentration of chromic acid from 5% to 1% by incubating the solution at 60°C and using five-fold diluted chromic acid solution at which point it was reusable. Eventually, we reached the refusal level where 1% periodic acid oxidization was efficient enough, when combined with preheating of sections in the electric jar, microwave oven, or pressure pan. For convenience sake, we recommend pressure pan heating in tap water for 10 min. Stainability of fungi in candidiasis and aspergillosis was comparable with conventional Grocott stain, while Mucor hyphae showed enhanced staining. The modified sequence was further applicable to detecting a variety of mycotic pathogens in paraffin sections. Our environmentally-friendly Grocott stain also has the advantage of avoiding risk of human exposure to hexavalent chromium solution in the histopathology laboratory. The simple stain sequence is can be easily applied worldwide

  19. Mosaicism for a chromosome 8-derived minute marker chromosome in a patient with manifestations of trisomy 8 mosaicism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Grace, K.R.; Owens, N.L. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    We describe a patient with manifestations of the mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome and mosaicism for a minute marker chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a chromosome 8 probe confirmed that the marker was derived from chromosome 8. This is the smallest piece of chromosome 8 to be reported in a patient with mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome. When the clinical picture is strongly suggestive of trisomy for a specific chromosome region, we believe that FISH can be used to test markers in a guided, rather than random, fashion. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89,. 307–313]. Introduction. Sex-chromosome ..... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well- aerated population cages, linkage group I-Y chromosomes.

  1. Interrelationship between chromosome 8 aneuploidy, C-MYC amplification and increased expression in individuals from northern Brazil with gastric adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Seabra, Aline Damaceno; Khayat, André Salim; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Faria, Mario Henrique Girão; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Ferreira, Márcia Valéria Pitombeira; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate chromosome 8 numerical aberrations, C-MYC oncogene alterations and its expression in gastric cancer and to correlate these findings with histopathological characteristics of gastric tumors. METHODS: Specimens were collected surgically from seven patients with gastric adenocarcinomas. Immunostaining for C-MYC and dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for C-MYC gene and chromosome 8 centromere were performed. RESULTS: All the cases showed chromosome 8 aneuploidy and C-MYC amplification, in both the diffuse and intestinal histopathological types of Lauren. No significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between the level of chromosome 8 ploidy and the site, stage or histological type of the adenocarcinomas. C-MYC high amplification, like homogeneously stained regions (HSRs) and double minutes (DMs), was observed only in the intestinal-type. Structural rearrangement of C-MYC, like translocation, was observed only in the diffuse type. Regarding C-MYC gene, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between the two histological types. The C-MYC protein was expressed in all the studied cases. In the intestinal-type the C-MYC immunoreactivity was localized only in the nucleus and in the diffuse type in the nucleus and cytoplasm. CONCLUSION: Distinct patterns of alterations between intestinal and diffuse types of gastric tumors support the hypothesis that these types follow different genetic pathways. PMID:17036397

  2. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA in the fish Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ricardo Vicari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We used differential staining techniques (BSG, GTG, AgNO3, DAPI and CMA3 banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with 5S and 18S probes to investigated the karyotypic and cytogenetic chracteristics of Prochilodus lineatus specimens from a population in Vila Velha state park (Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná state, southern Brazil. The specimens studied showed the same karyotype as that found in other P. lineatus populations, i.e. 2n = 54 biarmed chromosomes (40m + 14 sm and c-positive heterochromatin preferentially located pericentromerically in all chromosomes. The presence of partial or totally heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes with numeric intra-individual variation was confirmed in the analyzed population. The nucleolar organizing regions (NORs were interstitially situated on the long arm of chromosome pair 4 directly beneath the centromere. The differential banding techniques and FISH revealed NOR size polymorphism due to structural events such as breaks and duplication of the larger rDNA site cluster. We also observed syntenic localization of the 5S ribosomal genes in the distal segment of the 45S cluster.

  3. Sequence analysis of the MYC oncogene involved in the t(8;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation in a human leukemia T-cell line indicates that putative regulatory regions are not altered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finver, S.N.; Nishikura, K.; Finger, L.R.; Haluska, F.G.; Finan, J.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned the translocation-associated and homologous normal MYC alleles from SKW-3, a leukemia T-cell line with the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) translocation, and determined the sequence of the MYC oncogene first exon and flanking 5' putative regulatory regions. S1 nuclease protection experiments utilizing a MYC first exon probe demonstrated transcriptional deregulation of the MYC gene associated with the T-cell receptor α locus on the 8q + chromosome of SKW-3 cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the translocation-associated (8q +) MYC allele identified a single base substitution within the upstream flanking region; the homologous nontranslocated allele contained an additional substitution and a two-base deletion. None of the deletions or substitutions localized to putative 5' regulatory regions. The MYC first exon sequence was germ line in both alleles. These results demonstrate that alterations within the putative 5' MYC regulatory regions are not necessarily involved in MYC deregulation in T-cell leukemias, and they show that juxtaposition of the T-cell receptor α locus to a germ-line MYC oncogene results in MYC deregulation

  4. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  5. Satellite DNA Sequences in Canidae and Their Chromosome Distribution in Dog and Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozdova, Miluse; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Fröhlich, Jan; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Satellite DNA is a characteristic component of mammalian centromeric heterochromatin, and a comparative analysis of its evolutionary dynamics can be used for phylogenetic studies. We analysed satellite and satellite-like DNA sequences available in NCBI for 4 species of the family Canidae (red fox, Vulpes vulpes, VVU; domestic dog, Canis familiaris, CFA; arctic fox, Vulpes lagopus, VLA; raccoon dog, Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides, NPR) by comparative sequence analysis, which revealed 86-90% intraspecies and 76-79% interspecies similarity. Comparative fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the red fox and dog showed signals of the red fox satellite probe in canine and vulpine autosomal centromeres, on VVUY, B chromosomes, and in the distal parts of VVU9q and VVU10p which were shown to contain nucleolus organiser regions. The CFA satellite probe stained autosomal centromeres only in the dog. The CFA satellite-like DNA did not show any significant sequence similarity with the satellite DNA of any species analysed and was localised to the centromeres of 9 canine chromosome pairs. No significant heterochromatin block was detected on the B chromosomes of the red fox. Our results show extensive heterogeneity of satellite sequences among Canidae and prove close evolutionary relationships between the red and arctic fox. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Chromosome polymorphism in the Brazilian dwarf brocket deer, Mazama nana (Mammalia, Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Veltrini Abril

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian dwarf brocket deer (Mazama nana is the smallest deer species in Brazil and is considered threatened due to the reduction and alteration of its habitat, the Atlantic Rainforest. Moreover, previous work suggested the presence of intraspecific chromosome polymorphisms which may contribute to further population instability because of the reduced fertility arising from the deleterious effects of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis. We used G- and C-banding, and nucleolus organizer regions localization by silver-nitrate staining (Ag-NOR to investigate the causes of this variation. Mazama nana exhibited eight different karyotypes (2n = 36 through 39 and FN = 58 resulting from centric fusions and from inter and intraindividual variation in the number of B chromosomes (one to six. Most of the animals were heterozygous for a single fusion, suggesting one or several of the following: a genetic instability in a species that has not reached its optimal karyotypic evolutionary state yet; b negative selective pressure acting on accumulated rearrangements; and c probable positive selection pressure for heterozygous individuals which maintains the polymorphism in the population (in contrast with the negative selection for many rearrangements within a single individual.

  7. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  8. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  9. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  10. Origin and Evolution of the Neo-Sex Chromosomes in Pamphagidae Grasshoppers through Chromosome Fusion and Following Heteromorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrov, Alexander Gennadievich; Buleu, Olesya Georgievna; Bogomolov, Anton Gennadievich; Rubtsov, Nikolay Borisovich

    2017-01-01

    In most phylogenetic lineages, the evolution of sex chromosomes is accompanied by their heteromorphization and degradation of one of them. The neo-sex chromosomes are useful model for studying early stages of these processes. Recently two lineages of the neo-sex chromosomes on different stages of heteromorphization was discovered in Pamphagidae family. The neo-sex chromosome heteromorphization was analyzed by generation of DNA probes derived from the neo-Xs and neo-Ys followed with chromosome painting in nineteen species of Pamphagidae family. The homologous regions of the neo-sex chromosomes were determined in closely related species with the painting procedure and image analysis with application of the Visualization of the Specific Signal in Silico software package. Results of these analyses and distribution of C-positive regions in the neo-sex chromosomes revealed details of the heteromorphization of the neo-sex chromosomes in species from both phylogenetic lineages of Pamphagidae grasshoppers. The hypothetical mechanism of the neo-Y degradation was suggested. It includes expansion of different repeats from the proximal neo-Y chromosome region by inversions, spreading them towards distal region. Amplification of these repeats leads to formation of C-positive regions and elimination of the C-negative regions located between them. PMID:29137168

  11. Sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization profiling reveals novel gains and losses of chromosomal regions in Hodgkin Lymphoma and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Wan L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL, are forms of malignant lymphoma defined by unique morphologic, immunophenotypic, genotypic, and clinical characteristics, but both overexpress CD30. We used sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization to screen HL-derived cell lines (KMH2 and L428 and ALCL cell lines (DEL and SR-786 in order to identify disease-associated gene copy number gains and losses. Results Significant copy number gains and losses were observed on several chromosomes in all four cell lines. Assessment of copy number alterations with 26,819 DNA segments identified an average of 20 genetic alterations. Of the recurrent minimally altered regions identified, 11 (55% were within previously published regions of chromosomal alterations in HL and ALCL cell lines while 9 (45% were novel alterations not previously reported. HL cell lines L428 and KMH2 shared gains in chromosome cytobands 2q23.1-q24.2, 7q32.2-q36.3, 9p21.3-p13.3, 12q13.13-q14.1, and losses in 13q12.13-q12.3, and 18q21.32-q23. ALCL cell lines SR-786 and DEL, showed gains in cytobands 5p15.32-p14.3, 20p12.3-q13.11, and 20q13.2-q13.32. Both pairs of HL and ALCL cell lines showed losses in 18q21.32-18q23. Conclusion This study is considered to be the first one describing HL and ALCL cell line genomes at sub-megabase resolution. This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of HL and ALCL. FISH was used to confirm the amplification of all three isoforms of the trypsin gene (PRSS1/PRSS2/PRSS3 in KMH2 and L428 (HL and DEL (ALCL cell lines. These are novel findings that have not been previously reported in the lymphoma literature, and opens up an entirely new area of research that has not been previously associated with lymphoma biology. The findings raise interesting possibilities about the role of signaling

  12. Geographical changes in relative frequency of inversions in chromosome III of Drosophila pseudoobscura among natural populations from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal polymorphism in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura have been broadly studied in the USA but scarcely in Mexico where only about 60 localities have been analyzed. Differences among both regions are notorious with respect to their chromosomal constitution. Northern populations, those of USA, have as representative inversions the sequences ST, AR and CH contrasting with those in Southern populations (Mexico in which prevail the gene arrangements TL, CU and SC. Assuming as a probable mechanism that has allowed these substitutions the flow generated by the presence of a North - South clines, we took as a goal find out if such clines really exist. With that objective in mind we studied 29 populations of this species distributed along four North - South transects. Specimens of D. pseudoobscura caught by attracting them with fermenting bananas were carried to the laboratory where from each female an isofemale line was established. When their offspring appeared a single larva from each isofemale was taken, its salivary glands extracted and stained with a solution of lacto-aceto- orcein, by these means the polytene chromosomes were obtained. On these chromosomes we identified, for each larva, the inversion (s carried in the third chromosome, in such a way 3439 third chromosomes were analyzed. Among the 29 localities we identified 17 different inversions but the number of them varied from population to population from three to eleven. Relative frequencies of each inversion at every location were calculated and with them for each transect the presence or absence of clines was determined. Among each transect the existence of clines was observed only between two or three near by populations, but we were not able to find a clear manifestation of the presence of clines along a complete transect. Our results at this respect are similar to those previously reported for USA populations. A mechanism that explains North - South substitutions

  13. Twenty-year cytogenetic and molecular follow-up of a patient with ring chromosome 15: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Roberta S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ring chromosome 15 is a rare disorder, with only a few over 40 cases reported in the literature. There are only two previous reports of cases where patients with ring chromosome 15 have been followed-up. Case presentation We report here on the 20-year clinical and cytogenetic follow-up of a patient with a ring chromosome 15. Our patient, a Caucasoid Asian woman, presented with short stature, microcephaly, minor dysmorphic features, hyperextensible knees, generalized hirsutism, café-au-lait and small hypochromic spots spread over her face and the front of her chest and abdomen, dorsolumbar scoliosis and mild intellectual disability. She was followed-up from the age of eight to 28 years. When she was 27 years old, she was reported by her mother to present with compulsive overeating and an aggressive mood when challenged. Karyotyping revealed that the majority of her cells harbored one normal chromosome and one ring chromosome. Silver staining revealed the presence of the nucleolar organizer region in the ring chromosome. Ring loss and/or secondary aberrations exhibited a slight increase over time, from 4.67% in 1989 to 7.67% in 2009, with the presence of two monocentric rings, cells with interlocked rings, a dicentric ring, and broken or open rings. A genome-wide array technique detected a 5.5Mb deletion in 15q26.2. Conclusions We observed that some phenotypic alterations in our patient can be associated with gene loss and haploinsufficiency. Other features may be related to different factors, including ring instability and epigenetic factors.

  14. The mating type locus (MAT and sexual reproduction of Cryptococcus heveanensis: insights into the evolution of sex and sex-determining chromosomal regions in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Metin

    2010-05-01

    transitions in sexuality concomitant with emergence of a pathogenic clade. These studies provide insight into convergent processes that independently punctuated evolution of sex-determining loci and sex chromosomes in fungi, plants, and animals.

  15. Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by a deletion in the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial chromosome region (DGCR) in 22q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budarf, M.L.; Michaud, D.; Emanuel, B. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Unmasking an autosomal recessive disorder by constitutional hemizygosity is well documented for the embryonal tumors RB and WAGR, where the second hit is a somatic event. Few deletion-mediated recessive conditions have been reported in patients with germline mutations. The major platelet receptor for von Willebrand factor, Glycoprotein Ib (GpIb), is a complex of two plasma membrane glycoproteins, Ib{alpha} and Ib{beta}, covalently linked by disulfide bonds. Defects in this receptor have been associated with the rare congenital autosomal recessive bleeding disorder, Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS). BSS is characterized by prolonged bleeding times, thrombocytopenia and very large platelets. The GpIb{beta} gene has been cloned and we have mapped it within the DGCR. We have identified a patient with phenotypic features of both BSS and VCFS. The patient was referred for 22q11-deletion FISH studies because of a conventricular VSD and mild dysmorphia. FISH with the N25 DiGeorge cosmid demonstrated a deletion in 22q11.2. Western blot analysis of the patient`s platelet proteins demonstrates a complete absence of GpIb{beta}. We suggest that haploinsufficiency for the DGCR in this patient unmasks a mutation in the remaining GpIb{beta} allele, resulting in manifestations of BSS. This mechanism, haploinsufficiency coupled with a mutation of the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} chromosome, might explain some of the phenotypic variability seen amongst patients with 22q11.2 microdeletions. These results further suggest that patients with contiguous gene deletion syndromes are at increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders and that they provide the opportunity to {open_quotes}map{close_quotes}disease loci.

  16. Study of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfring, E.

    2004-06-01

    A method for determining chromosomal aberrations was established for the purpose of examining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of photon radiation with respect to mammary epithelium cells. Cells were exposed to 25 kV X-radiation and to 200 kV X-radiation for comparison and the resulting concentrations of chromosomal aberrations were compared. The RBE M value for radiation-induced fragmentation was found to be 4.2 ± 2.4, while the RBE M value for radiation-induced generation of dicentric chromosomes was found to be 0.5 ± 0.5. In addition to the evaluation of chromosomal aberrations the number of cell cycles undergone by the cells was monitored by means of BrDU staining. As expected, the proportion of cells which underwent more than one cell cycle following exposure to 5 Gy was very low in both cases, amounting to 1.9% (25 kV) and 3.2 (200 kV). Non-radiated cells yielded control values of 26.0% and 12.6%, suggesting variations in external conditions from day to day

  17. Comparison of algorithms for blood stain detection applied to forensic hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Messinger, David W.; Mathew, Jobin J.; Dube, Roger R.

    2016-05-01

    Blood stains are among the most important types of evidence for forensic investigation. They contain valuable DNA information, and the pattern of the stains can suggest specifics about the nature of the violence that transpired at the scene. Early detection of blood stains is particularly important since the blood reacts physically and chemically with air and materials over time. Accurate identification of blood remnants, including regions that might have been intentionally cleaned, is an important aspect of forensic investigation. Hyperspectral imaging might be a potential method to detect blood stains because it is non-contact and provides substantial spectral information that can be used to identify regions in a scene with trace amounts of blood. The potential complexity of scenes in which such vast violence occurs can be high when the range of scene material types and conditions containing blood stains at a crime scene are considered. Some stains are hard to detect by the unaided eye, especially if a conscious effort to clean the scene has occurred (we refer to these as "latent" blood stains). In this paper we present the initial results of a study of the use of hyperspectral imaging algorithms for blood detection in complex scenes. We describe a hyperspectral imaging system which generates images covering 400 nm - 700 nm visible range with a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Three image sets of 31 wavelength bands were generated using this camera for a simulated indoor crime scene in which blood stains were placed on a T-shirt and walls. To detect blood stains in the scene, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Subspace Reed Xiaoli Detection (SRXD), and Topological Anomaly Detection (TAD) algorithms were used. Comparison of the three hyperspectral image analysis techniques shows that TAD is most suitable for detecting blood stains and discovering latent blood stains.

  18. Potential Value of YAP Staining in Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Atif A; Habeebu, Sultan S; Sherman, Ashley K; Ye, Shui Q; Wood, Nicole; Chastain, Katherine M; Tsokos, Maria G

    2018-03-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a common malignancy of soft tissue, subclassified as alveolar (ARMS), pleomorphic (PRMS), spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS), and embryonal (ERMS) types. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a member of the Hippo pathway and a transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of YAP in different RMSs, arranged in tissue microarray (TMA) and whole slide formats. Pertinent clinical data including patient age, gender, tumor location, and clinical stage were collected. Out of 96 TMA cases, 30 cases (31%) were pleomorphic, 27 (28%) were embryonal, 24 (25%) alveolar, and 15 (16%) spindle cell. Positive nuclear YAP staining was seen in the PRMS (17/30, 56.7%), SRMS (7/15, 46.7%), ERMS (19/27 or 70%), and less in ARMS (37.5%). YAP nuclear staining was significantly more prevalent in ERMS than ARMS ( p=0.02). Of the 41 whole slide cases, nuclear staining was detected in all ARMS but was restricted in distribution to 30% staining. These results highlight the role of YAP in RMS tumorigenesis, a fact that can be useful in engineering targeted therapy. Restricted nuclear YAP staining (<30% of cells) may be of value in the diagnosis of ARMS.

  19. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In each of our cells there is about 6 feet long DNA packed. Into 46 units called chromosomes. Chromosome: is a long thread of DNA wrapped around proteins. ... application of. Mendel's 'gene' concept to a human trait was' by the physician A. Garrod. He described the genetic disease alkaptonuria as an alteration In specific.

  20. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These pieces of DNA which are clusters of several genes are called linkages groups or chromosomes. Therefore chromosomes are nothing but long. Cen. DNA. A,denin~ .... and as precursors for other biomolecules like hormones, purines and pyrimidines. ... in the history of science, Garrod's contributions to human genet-.

  2. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    Full Text Available The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure.To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study.Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil.Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test.Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of

  3. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alexandra; Hildur, Kristin; Barberà, Joan Albert; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Monyarch, Gemma; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Emma; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Souto, Ana; Gómez, Federico P; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Templado, Cristina; Fuster, Carme

    2016-01-01

    The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31) were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure. To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study. Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill. Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages. Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil. Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length) were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of 251

  4. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  5. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  6. Hematoxylin: a simple, multiple-use dye for chromosome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra Marcelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A staining mixture of hematoxylin-iron alum combined with a strong hydrochloric hydrolysis was successfully applied for chromosome observation of several kinds of plants and some animals. Slightly different procedures were developed for different materials and objectives. For plant cells, the most important technical aspect was the use of 5 N HCl hydrolysis, which resulted in a very transparent cytoplasm, combined with an intense, specific hematoxylin stain. This technique is recommended for cytogenetical analysis in general, and it is especially indicated for practical classes, due to its simplicity and high reproducibility of results. Moreover, the deep contrast observed makes this technique very useful for sequential staining of cells previously analyzed with other stains, as well as for materials with fixation problems.

  7. Adversarial Stain Transfer for Histopathology Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentaieb, Aicha; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2018-03-01

    It is generally recognized that color information is central to the automatic and visual analysis of histopathology tissue slides. In practice, pathologists rely on color, which reflects the presence of specific tissue components, to establish a diagnosis. Similarly, automatic histopathology image analysis algorithms rely on color or intensity measures to extract tissue features. With the increasing access to digitized histopathology images, color variation and its implications have become a critical issue. These variations are the result of not only a variety of factors involved in the preparation of tissue slides but also in the digitization process itself. Consequently, different strategies have been proposed to alleviate stain-related tissue inconsistencies in automatic image analysis systems. Such techniques generally rely on collecting color statistics to perform color matching across images. In this work, we propose a different approach for stain normalization that we refer to as stain transfer. We design a discriminative image analysis model equipped with a stain normalization component that transfers stains across datasets. Our model comprises a generative network that learns data set-specific staining properties and image-specific color transformations as well as a task-specific network (e.g., classifier or segmentation network). The model is trained end-to-end using a multi-objective cost function. We evaluate the proposed approach in the context of automatic histopathology image analysis on three data sets and two different analysis tasks: tissue segmentation and classification. The proposed method achieves superior results in terms of accuracy and quality of normalized images compared to various baselines.

  8. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and chromosome 15q26: Determination of a candidate region by use of fluorescent in situ hybridization and array-based comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Klaassens (Merel); M.F. van Dooren (Marieke); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert); H. Douben (Hannie); A. Dekker (Anita); C. Lee (Charles); P.K. Donahoe; R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan); N.N.T. Goemaere (Natascha); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); C.H. Wouters (Cokkie); J. Wauters (Jan); B.A. Oostra (Ben); D. Tibboel (Dick); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractCongenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has an incidence of 1 in 3,000 births and a high mortality rate (33%-58%). Multifactorial inheritance, teratogenic agents, and genetic abnormalities have all been suggested as possible etiologic factors. To define candidate regions for CDH, we

  9. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  10. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  11. News from the biological stain commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiernan, J.A.; Lyon, Hans Oluf

    2008-01-01

    In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems of the Internati......In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems...

  12. Identification of Cyclospora cayetanensis in stool using different stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, A Y

    1998-08-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis, a newly emerging coccidian protozoa is world-wide in distribution. In the present study, different concentrations and staining techniques were used for identification of Cyclospora. Formol-ether sedimentation and Sheather's sugar flotation were used as concentration techniques and the different stains used were: the modified Ziehl-Neelsen, Giemsa, safranin-methylene blue, modifications of trichrome stain, calcoflour white and finally phenol-auramine. The safranin stain was the best, as it stained all the oocysts of Cyclospora uniformly, besides being rapid and easily applicable in the laboratories. Phenol-auramine stained the oocysts well, where both the wall and internal contents fluoresced brightly. With the calcoflour white stain, only the wall of oocysts took that fluorescent stain. The modified Ziehl-Neelsen stained some of the oocysts well, yet great variability in the staining pattern was noticed. Cyclospora oocysts were not efficiently stained with either trichrome modifications or Giemsa stains.

  13. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  14. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  15. Haplotype frequencies in a sub-region of chromosome 19q13.3, related to risk and prognosis of cancer, differ dramatically between ethnic groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M.H.; Mailund, T.; Li, H.

    2009-01-01

    caused either by genetic drift overruling selection against the susceptibility variant or a positive selection for the same haplotype. The data does not allow us to distinguish between these two scenarios. The analysis suggests that the region is not involved in cancer risk in Africans...... response to external damaging agents and markers in it are associated with risk of several cancers. Methods: We downloaded the genotypes of all markers typed in the 19q13.3 region in the HapMap populations of European, Asian and African descent and inferred haplotypes. We combined the European Hap......Map individuals with a Danish breast cancer case-control data set and inferred the association between HapMap haplotypes and disease risk. Results: We found that the susceptibility haplotype in our European sample had increased from 2 to 50 percent very recently in the European population, and to almost the same...

  16. A Narrow and Highly Significant Linkage Signal for Severe Bipolar Disorder in the Chromosome 5q33 Region in Latin American Pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, A.J.; Service, S.; Jawaheer, D.; DeYoung, J.; Levinson, M.; Zhang, Z.; Kremeyer, B.; Muller, H.; Aldana, I.; Garcia, J.; Restrepo, G.; Lopez, C.; Palacio, C.; Duque, C.; Parra, M.; Vega, J.; Ortiz, D.; Bedoya, G.; Mathews, C.; Davanzo, P.; Fournier, E.; Bejarano, J.; Ramirez, M.; Ortiz, C. Araya; Araya, X.; Molina, J.; Sabatti, C.; Reus, V.; Ospina, J.; Macaya, G.; Ruiz-Linares, A.; Freimer, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported linkage of bipolar disorder to 5q33-q34 in families from two closely related population isolates, the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) and Antioquia, Colombia (CO). Here we present follow up results from fine-scale mapping in large CVCR and CO families segregating severe bipolar disorder, BP-I, and in 343 population trios/duos from CVCR and CO. Employing densely spaced SNPs to fine map the prior linkage peak region increases linkage evidence and clarifies the position of the putative BP-I locus. We performed two-point linkage analysis with 1134 SNPs in an approximately 9 Mb region between markers D5S410 and D5S422. Combining pedigrees from CVCR and CO yields a LOD score of 4.9 at SNP rs10035961. Two other SNPs (rs7721142 and rs1422795) within the same 94 kb region also displayed LOD scores greater than 4. This linkage peak coincides with our prior microsatellite results and suggests a narrowed BP-I susceptibility regions in these families. To investigate if the locus implicated in the familial form of BP-I also contributes to disease risk in the population, we followed up the family results with association analysis in duo and trio samples, obtaining signals within 2 Mb of the peak linkage signal in the pedigrees; rs12523547 and rs267015 (P = 0.00004 and 0.00016, respectively) in the CO sample and rs244960 in the CVCR sample and the combined sample, with P = 0.00032 and 0.00016, respectively. It remains unclear whether these association results reflect the same locus contributing to BP susceptibility within the extended pedigrees. PMID:19319892

  17. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth: serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF binding protein-3, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone in 109 males with 47,XXY, 47,XYY, or sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY)-positive 46,XX karyotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, L.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Juul, A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of abnormal chromosome constitution for longitu...

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is necessary to detect an association between chromosome aberrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in utero and reveals nonrandom chromosome involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskay, Kirsti A; Orjuela, Manuela A; Tang, Deliang; Liu, Xinhua; Warburton, Dorothy; Perera, Frederica P

    2007-03-01

    Chromosome aberrations are associated with environmental exposures in infants and children. Recently we reported that prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was significantly (P al. [ 2005]: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:506-511). To determine whether the environmental exposures may be targeting specific chromosomes and to compare various methods for measuring chromosome aberrations, we further evaluated this same subset of subjects composed of African-American and Dominican nonsmoking mother-newborn pairs residing in low-income neighborhoods of New York City, and exposed to varying levels of airborne PAHs. Chromosome aberrations were measured in cord blood lymphocytes, both by whole chromosome probe (WCP) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and traditional Giemsa-staining. Prenatal exposures were assessed by personal air monitoring. Breaks in chromosomes 1-6, as detected by WCP FISH, were nonrandomly distributed, underscoring the importance of appropriate chromosome probe selection to capture cytogenetic damage in response to exposure. FISH for stable aberrations was found to be a more sensitive method for detecting aberration frequencies associated with environmental exposures, when compared with FISH for unstable aberrations or Giemsa-staining for aberrations. Together, these results suggest that PAHs may be targeting specific chromosomes and highlight the importance of using the more sensitive detection methods to assess risk in populations with low levels of exposure. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The significance of chromosome deletions in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Shigeta, Chiharu; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Deng, Z.; Niimi, Masanobu; Aisaka, Tadaichi.

    1986-01-01

    In 39 A-bomb survivors 40 years after exposure at ≤ 1,000 m from ground zero, the frequency and features of chromosome deletions in peripheral lymphocytes were examined using a differential staining technique. Simultaneously, in vitro irradiation experiment with Cf-252 was made to infer chromosome aberrations occuring immediately after exposure. Californium-252 with 100 rad induced dicentric and ring chromosomes in 40 % of the cells and acentric fragments in 44 %. Among the A-bomb survivors, chromosome aberrations were observed in 651 (21 %) of the total 3,136 cells. There were 146 cells with deletions (22 % of abnormal cells; 5 % of the total cells), and 10 cells with acentric fragment (0.3 % of the total cells). The figure for deletions was far higher than that reported in the literature. A large number of deletions were seen in chromosomes no.4, no.21, and no.22, and a few deletions in chromosomes no.7 and no.20. Significance of chromosome deletions is discussed. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of port-wine stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: PAI uses pulsed

  1. Photoacoustic Imaging of Port-Wine Stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Mulder, M.J.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. - Study Design/Materials and Methods: PAI uses

  2. A comparative assessment of commonly employed staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following an increase in the number of reports of Cryptosporidium infections and the problems encountered in detecting these organisms in faecal smears, a comparative assessment of a modification of the Sheather's flotation technique and other commonly employed staining procedures proved the modified Sheather's ...

  3. A comparative assessment of commonly employed staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-16

    Mar 16, 1991 ... methylene blue;8 fluorescence (auramine-phenoI9 and direct immunofluorescence1o. • ll. ); negative staining (periodic acid-. Schiff12. ); and flotation (Sheather's ..... using a direct immunofluorescence assay. Pediatr Infect Dis 1986; 5: 139-142. 12. Horen WP. Detection of Cryptosporidium in human faecal ...

  4. The Language of Stained-Glass Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Charl Anne

    2010-01-01

    The splendor and beauty of stained glass punctuates any room. In this article, the author describes a cross-curriculum project which incorporated the French classes' research and written study of France in the Middle Ages. For the project the author suggested Sainte-Chapelle which is considered a reliquary and was built by Louis IX to house the…

  5. Corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Slomovic, Allan R.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to report a case of corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline. METHODS: A patient with crystalline keratopathy caused by Streptococcus viridans after corneal transplantation was treated topically with tetracycline eye drops, based on results of

  6. X-derived marker chromosome in patient with mosaic Turner syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telepova, Alena S; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Maksimova, Yulia V; Shorina, Asia R; Yudkin, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes can be derived from autosomes and sex chromosomes and can accompany chromosome pathologies, such as Turner syndrome. Here, we present a case report of a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome carrying a marker chromosome. We showed the presence of the marker chromosome in 33.8% of blood cells. FISH of the probe derived from the marker chromosome by microdissection revealed that it originated from the centromeric region of chromosome X. Additionally, we showed no telomeric sequences and no XIST sequence in the marker chromosome. This is the first report of these two syndromes accompanied by the presence of a marker chromosome. Marker chromosome was X-derived and originated from centromeric region. Patient has mild symptoms but there is no XIST gene in marker chromosome. CPG137. Registered 03 March 2017.

  7. Rapid divergence and expansion of the X chromosome in papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, Andrea R.; Yu, Qingyi; Tong, Eric J.; Zeng, Fanchang; Han, Jennifer; VanBuren, Robert; Aryal, Rishi; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Paterson, Andrew H.; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    X chromosomes have long been thought to conserve the structure and gene content of the ancestral autosome from which the sex chromosomes evolved. We compared the recently evolved papaya sex chromosomes with a homologous autosome of a close relative, the monoecious Vasconcellea monoica, to infer changes since recombination stopped between the papaya sex chromosomes. We sequenced 12 V. monoica bacterial artificial chromosomes, 11 corresponding to the papaya X-specific region, and 1 to a papaya autosomal region. The combined V. monoica X-orthologous sequences are much shorter (1.10 Mb) than the corresponding papaya region (2.56 Mb). Given that the V. monoica genome is 41% larger than that of papaya, this finding suggests considerable expansion of the papaya X; expansion is supported by a higher repetitive sequence content of the X compared with the papaya autosomal sequence. The alignable regions include 27 transcript-encoding sequences, only 6 of which are functional X/V. monoica gene pairs. Sequence divergence from the V. monoica orthologs is almost identical for papaya X and Y alleles; the Carica-Vasconcellea split therefore occurred before the papaya sex chromosomes stopped recombining, making V. monoica a suitable outgroup for inferring changes in papaya sex chromosomes. The papaya X and the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome and V. monoica have all gained and lost genes, including a surprising amount of changes in the X. PMID:22869742

  8. Ommexecha virens (Thunberg, 1824) and Descampsacris serrulatum (Serville, 1831) (Orthoptera, Ommexechidae): karyotypes, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizing regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, D B; Rocha, M F; Loreto, V; Silva, A E B; Souza, M J

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomes of Ommexecha virens and Descampsacris serrulatum (Ommexechidae) were analyzed through conventional staining, C-banding, base specific fluorochromes, silver nitrate impregnation (AgNO3), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probe for 45S rDNA. The two species presented diploid number 2n= 23,X0 in males and acrocentric autosomes, except the pair one that presented submetacentric morphology. The X chromosome has distinct morphology in the two analyzed species, being a medium acrocentric in Ommexecha virens and large submetacentric in Descampsacris serrulatum. The C-banding revealed pericentromeric blocks of constitutive heterochromatin (CH) in all the chromosomes of Descampsacris serrulatum. For Ommexecha virens it was evidenced that the blocks of CH are preferentially located in the pericentromeric area (however some bivalents presents additional blocks) or in different positions. The staining with CMA3/DA/DAPI showed GC rich CH blocks (CMA3+) in some chromosomes of the two species. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were located in the bivalents L2, S9, S10 of Ommexecha virens and M5, M6, M7, S11 of Descampsacris serrulatum. The FISH for rDNA showed coincident results with the pattern of active NORs revealed by AgNO3. This work presents the first chromosomal data, obtained through differential cytogenetics techniques in Ommexechidae, contributing to a better characterization of karyotypic evolution for this grasshopper family.

  9. Six HLA-D region alpha-chain genes on human chromosome 6: polymorphisms and associations of DC alpha-related sequences with DR types.

    OpenAIRE

    Spielman, R S; Lee, J; Bodmer, W F; Bodmer, J G; Trowsdale, J

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of cosmid clones containing genes related to the HLA-DR alpha chain calls for at least six HLA-D region alpha-chain coding sequences in man; namely, DR alpha, DC alpha, DX alpha (very closely related to DC alpha), SB alpha 1, SB alpha 2 (two closely linked genes on the same cosmid clones), and DZ alpha. The first four genes have been described previously. SB alpha 2 and DZ alpha are recently identified genes, characterized by their unique and, from a limited study, nonpolymorphic ban...

  10. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Yukinori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus using microsatellite markers. Results A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. Conclusions High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution.

  11. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Takahito; Natri, Heini M; Shimada, Yukinori; Merilä, Juha

    2011-09-29

    Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius) and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) using microsatellite markers. A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution. © 2011 Shikano et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. The tilapias' chromosomes influencing sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaani, A

    2013-01-01

    The sex chromosomes of tilapias (family Cichlidae; genera Oreochromis, Sarotherodon and Tilapia) have been studied for over 50 years, which has gained interest from both agricultural and basic scientific perspectives. Several closely related tilapia species which can interbreed have been studied, and it has been repeatedly demonstrated that there is variation within and between species in the chromosomal sex-determination mechanism. Both male and female heterogametic sex-determination systems have been characterized, as well as epistatic and environmental influences on sex determination. Three different linkage groups (LG1, LG3 and LG23) have been identified as sex-associated chromosomes and have been subjected to further cytogenetic research and analyses of the genes located around the sex-determining region. Variation in the genetic and physical characteristics of the sex chromosomes makes tilapias an excellent model system for studying the evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes. This review summarizes the progress made along 5 decades of research and the current knowledge of the tilapias' sex chromosomes.

  13. Centrosome clustering and cyclin D1 gene amplification in double minutes are common events in chromosomal unstable bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Javier del; Prat, Esther; Ponsa, Immaculada; Lloreta, Josep; Gelabert, Antoni; Algaba, Ferran; Camps, Jordi; Miró, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Aneuploidy, centrosome abnormalities and gene amplification are hallmarks of chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer. Yet there are no studies of the in vivo behavior of these phenomena within the same bladder tumor. Twenty-one paraffin-embedded bladder tumors were analyzed by conventional comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cyclin D1 gene (CCND1)/centromere 11 dual-color probe. Immunofluorescent staining of α, β and γ tubulin was also performed. Based on the CIN index, defined as the percentage of cells not displaying the modal number for chromosome 11, tumors were classified as CIN-negative and CIN-positive. Fourteen out of 21 tumors were considered CIN-positive. All T1G3 tumors were included in the CIN-positive group whereas the majority of Ta samples were classified as CIN-negative tumors. Centrosome clustering was observed in six out of 12 CIN-positive tumors analyzed. CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions was present in six out of 14 CIN-positive tumors; three of them also showed amplification of this gene in double minutes. Complex in vivo behavior of CCND1 amplicon in bladder tumor cells has been demonstrated by accurate FISH analysis on paraffin-embedded tumors. Positive correlation between high heterogeneity, centrosome abnormalities and CCND1 amplification was found in T1G3 bladder carcinomas. This is the first study to provide insights into the coexistence of CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions and double minutes in primary bladder tumors. It is noteworthy that those patients whose tumors showed double minutes had a significantly shorter overall survival rate (p < 0.001)

  14. Vernalization requirement and the chromosomal VRN1-region can affect freezing tolerance and expression of cold-regulated genes in Festuca pratensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åshild eErgon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapted to cold winters go through annual cycles of gain followed by loss of freezing tolerance (cold acclimation and deacclimation. Warm spells during winter and early spring can cause deacclimation, and if temperatures drop, freezing damage may occur. Many plants are vernalized during winter, a process making them competent to flower in the following summer. In winter cereals, a coincidence in the timing of vernalization saturation, deacclimation, downregulation of cold-induced genes, and reduced ability to reacclimate, occurs under long photoperiods and is under control of the main regulator of vernalization requirement in cereals, VRN1, and/or closely linked gene(s. Thus, the probability of freezing damage after a warm spell may depend on both vernalization saturation and photoperiod. We investigated the role of vernalization and the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds., a perennial grass species. Two F2 populations, divergently selected for high and low vernalization requirement, were studied. Each genotype was characterized for the copy number of one of the four parental haplotypes of the VRN1-region. Clonal plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks or vernalized/cold acclimated for a total of 9 weeks, after which the F2 populations reached different levels of vernalization saturation. Vernalized and cold acclimated plants were deacclimated for 1 week and then reacclimated for 2 weeks. All treatments were given at 8 h photoperiod. Flowering response, freezing tolerance and expression of the cold-induced genes VRN1, MADS3, CBF6, COR14B, CR7 (BLT14, LOS2 and IRI1 was measured. We found that some genotypes can lose some freezing tolerance after vernalization and a deacclimation-reacclimation cycle. The relationship between vernalization and freezing tolerance was complex. We found effects of the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance in plants cold acclimated for 2 weeks, timing of heading after 9 weeks

  15. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  17. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  18. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...... who want it, is discussed. Screening for chromosome disease in all pregnancies is not without problems, but may be reasonable in some localitie