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Sample records for stained optical microscopy

  1. Multimodal hyperspectral optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Irina V.; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Gong, Yu; Hu, Dehong; Hendricks, Leif; Evans, James E.; Bhattarai, Ashish; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-11-01

    We describe a unique approach to hyperspectral optical microscopy, herein achieved by coupling a hyperspectral imager to various optical microscopes. Hyperspectral fluorescence micrographs of isolated fluorescent beads are first employed to ensure spectral calibration of our detector and to gauge the attainable spatial resolution of our measurements. Different science applications of our instrument are then described. Spatially over-sampled absorption spectroscopy of a single lipid (18:1 Liss Rhod PE) layer reveals that optical densities on the order of 10-3 can be resolved by spatially averaging the recorded optical signatures. This is followed by three applications in the general areas of plasmonics and bioimaging. Notably, we deploy hyperspectral absorption microscopy to identify and image pigments within a simple biological system, namely, a single live Tisochrysis lutea cell. Overall, this work paves the way for multimodal spectral imaging measurements spanning the realms of several scientific disciplines.

  2. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

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    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  3. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  4. Waveguide optical microscopy

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    Egorov, Alexandre A.

    1997-08-01

    The theoretical aspects of the light scattering on the statistical irregularities of the planar optical waveguide are described. The analysis of direct and inverse light scattering problems is accomplished. The theoretical investigation predicts: the lateral resolution can attain approximately 20 nm and the vertical resolution (in rms height) can attain approximately 1 angstrom. The limiting lateral resolution is a approximately 15-times less than Abbe's diffraction limit. Thus the superresolution may be accomplished by the waveguide optical microscopy (WOM). The increasing of WOM's resolution depends on a-priori information of the irregularities and on a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. A possible using of WOM for bioecological researchers has been mentioned.

  5. Extraterrestrial optical microscopy.

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    Soffen, G A

    1969-07-01

    An examination of the literature concerned with the use of microscopy for planetary investigation reveals a serious deficiency of current efforts. Many scientists have recommended the use of a microscope for planetary investigation [Biology and the Exploration of Mars, C. S. Pittendrigh, W. Vishniac, and J. P. T. Pearman, Eds. (National Academy of Science-National Research Council, Washington, D. C., 1966), (a) D. Mazia, p. 31; (b) J. Lederberg, p. 137; (c) S. Fox, pp. 219, 226; (d) D. Glaser, p. 326; (e) D. Glaser, J. McCarthy, and M. Minsky, pp. 333, 341; (f) D. G. Rea, pp. 347-426; (g) P. G. Conger, pp. 409-414; (h) M. H. Fernandez, pp. 414-425; (i) D. Schwartz, pp.425-426 . H. P. Klein, Some Biological Problems in the Search for Extraterrestrial Life (American Astronautical Society, Washington, D. C., 1968).] but few are involved in developing the experiment. Since this is a particularly timely period for the preparation of planetary lander experiments, the reasons for this lack of effort would appear to be limited resources or an unclear course of action, rather than lack of interest. Microscopy used for planetary investigation is chiefly the interest of the biologist and the mineralogist. In both cases the desire to use magnifying optics in order to observe objects of submillimeter size is based upon the rich body of knowledge we have acquired from observing the terrestrial microcosm. In addition to purely imaging, certain special optical techniques, e.g., polarimetry, colorimetry, phase contrast, etc., can be used to enhance the interpretation of microscopic imaging data. This interaction of the optical with the chemical or structural aspects of nature can be used to great advantage in the exploration of extraterrestrial biology and mineralogy.

  6. Adaptive optics in microscopy.

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    Booth, Martin J

    2007-12-15

    The imaging properties of optical microscopes are often compromised by aberrations that reduce image resolution and contrast. Adaptive optics technology has been employed in various systems to correct these aberrations and restore performance. This has required various departures from the traditional adaptive optics schemes that are used in astronomy. This review discusses the sources of aberrations, their effects and their correction with adaptive optics, particularly in confocal and two-photon microscopes. Different methods of wavefront sensing, indirect aberration measurement and aberration correction devices are discussed. Applications of adaptive optics in the related areas of optical data storage, optical tweezers and micro/nanofabrication are also reviewed.

  7. Overview of optical microscopy and optical microspectroscopy

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    Ager, Joel W.

    1998-11-01

    Optical microscopy has historically been a major tool for semiconductor inspection. As the ULSI design rule continues to decline to 0.25 μm and below, standard optical microscopy methods will arrive at their resolution limit. In the first part of this paper an overview of currently used optical microscopy techniques will be given. The resolution limit for optical imaging will be discussed, and novel methods for increasing resolution, including deep UV microscopy and confocal laser microscopy, will be presented. The second part of the paper will discuss an emerging technology for contamination analysis in semiconductor processing, microspectroscopy. Three topics in this area will be discussed with an emphasis on applications to off-line defect identification in process development: (1) micro-Raman spectroscopy, (2) micro-fluorescence or micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, and (3) micro-reflectivity. It will be shown that these microspectroscopy methods can provide composition information for defects down to 1 μm in size that is not accessible through the more commonly used methods such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and scanning Auger microscopy. Classes of defects where optical micro-spectroscopy methods are useful include ceramic particles, thin films of organic material, and dielectric films.

  8. Near-field Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.G.T.

    1997-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is one of the most recent scanning probe techniques. In this technique, an optical probe is brought in the vicinity of the sample surface, in the near-field zone. The microscope can either work in illumination mode, in which the probe consists of a

  9. Real-time histological imaging of kidneys stained with food dyes using multiphoton microscopy.

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    Nagao, Yasuaki; Kimura, Kazushi; Wang, Shujie; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a real-time imaging technique for diagnosis of kidney diseases which is composed of two steps, staining renal cells safely with food dyes and optical sectioning of living renal tissue to obtain histological images by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Here, we demonstrated that the MPM imaging with food dyes, including erythrosine and indigo carmine, could be used as fluorescent agents to visualize renal functions and structures such as glomerular bloodstreams, glomerular filtration, and morphology of glomeruli and renal tubules. We also showed that the kidneys of IgA nephropathy model-mice stained with the food dyes presented histopathological characteristics different from those observed in normal kidneys. The use of the food dyes enhances the quality of tissue images obtained by MPM and offers the potential to contribute to a clinical real-time diagnosis of kidney diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Liang Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM has gained considerable attention within the biomedical imaging community during the past decade. Detecting laser-induced photoacoustic waves by optical sensing techniques facilitates the idea of all-optical PAM (AOPAM, which is of particular interest as it provides unique advantages for achieving high spatial resolution using miniaturized embodiments of the imaging system. The review presents the technology aspects of optical-sensing techniques for ultrasound detection, such as those based on optical resonators, as well as system developments of all-optical photoacoustic systems including PAM, photoacoustic endoscopy, and multi-modality microscopy. The progress of different AOPAM systems and their representative applications are summarized.

  11. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

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    Andreyan Osipov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977. The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine.

  12. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

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    Osipov, Andreyan; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Vinokurov, Alexei; Smetanina, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977). The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity) compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine. PMID:24727376

  13. Adaptive optics photoacoustic microscopy.

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    Jiang, Minshan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Puliafito, Carmen A; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2010-10-11

    We have developed an adaptive optics photoacoustic microscope (AO-PAM) for high-resolution imaging of biological tissues, especially the retina. To demonstrate the feasibility of AO-PAM we first designed the AO system to correct the wavefront errors of the illuminating light of PAM. The aberrations of the optical system delivering the illuminating light to the sample in PAM was corrected with a close-loop AO system consisting of a 141-element MEMS-based deformable mirror (DM) and a Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensor operating at 15 Hz. The photoacoustic signal induced by the illuminating laser beam was detected by a custom-built needle ultrasonic transducer. When the wavefront errors were corrected by the AO system, the lateral resolution of PAM was measured to be better than 2.5 µm using a low NA objective lens. We tested the system on imaging ex vivo ocular samples, e.g., the ciliary body and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of a pig eye. The AO-PAM images showed significant quality improvement. For the first time we were able to resolve single RPE cells with PAM.

  14. Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM).

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    Xu, Jianquan; Ma, Hongqiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy, a class of optical microscopy techniques at a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, has revolutionized the way we study biology, as recognized by the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), a widely used SR technique, is based on the principle of single molecule localization. STORM routinely achieves a spatial resolution of 20 to 30 nm, a ten-fold improvement compared to conventional optical microscopy. Among all SR techniques, STORM offers a high spatial resolution with simple optical instrumentation and standard organic fluorescent dyes, but it is also prone to image artifacts and degraded image resolution due to improper sample preparation or imaging conditions. It requires careful optimization of all three aspects-sample preparation, image acquisition, and image reconstruction-to ensure a high-quality STORM image, which will be extensively discussed in this unit. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

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    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  16. Melanin-targeted nonlinear microscopy for label-free molecular diagnosis and staining (Conference Presentation)

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    Warren, Warren S.

    2017-02-01

    Visible absorption in tissue is dominated by a very small number of chromophores (hemoglobins and melanins) with broad optical spectra; for melanins in particular, the optical absorption spectrum is typically featureless. In addition, scattering limits penetration depth. As a result, the most common microscopy application by far is with excised tissue, which can be stained. However, nonlinear optical methods have the additional advantages of greater penetration depth and reduced sensitivity to scattering. Traditional nonlinear microscopy relies on mechanisms which produce light of a different color than the irradiating lasers, such as second harmonic generation or two photon induced fluorescence, and this contrast is sparse in biological issue without expressing or injecting different chromophores. Recently, stable laser sources and pulse shaping/pulse train modulation methods have made it possible to detect a much wider range of nonlinear molecular signatures, even at modest laser powers (much less than a laser pointer). Here we show the utility of a variety of such signatures (pump-probe, pulse-shaped stimulated Raman, cross-phase modulation) to quantitatively image the biochemical composition of transparent or pigmented tissue in a variety of applications, ranging from thin, unstained tissue sections to live knockout mice. The rich biochemical information provided by this method can be used as an indicator of melanocyte activity, which in turn (for example) reflects the status of melanocytic lesions. Comparisons with model systems (synthetic melanin nanoparticles, sepia melanin) and analysis of melanin degradation pathways in vivo have led to a quantitative understanding of the molecular basis of these changes.

  17. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

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    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  18. The limitations of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis.

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    Stirling, Paul; Tahir, Mohammed; Atkinson, Henry Dushan

    2017-03-29

    Rapid diagnosis of septic arthritis from Gram-stain microscopy is limited by an inherent false-negative rate of 25-78%. The presence of concomitant crystal arthritis in 5% of cases represents a particular diagnostic challenge. This study aims to investigate the effects that a concomitant crystal arthropathy have on the ability of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid to diagnose a septic arthritis. This is a 12-year retrospective cohort study. Inclusion criteria were a positive synovial fluid culture result with a positive clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis. Results were correlated with presence or absence of urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals, and Gram-stain result. During this time our collection and analysis methods remained unchanged. All samples were collected in Lithium Heparin containers. Chi-squared test with a p value < 0.05 was considered significant. 602 synovial fluid samples were included. 162 cases of concomitant crystal arthritis were identified (27%). Of these, 16 (10%) had an initial negative Gram-stain. Of the 440 samples with no crystals detected, 18 (4%) had an initial negative Gram-stain microscopy result (p < 0.05). The incidence of concurrent septic and crystal arthritis may be higher than previously thought. Synovial fluid samples in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis are significantly less likely to have a positive Gram-stain at microscopy than in cases of an isolated septic arthritis. We would advise the clinician to maintain a high index of suspicion for septic arthritis in these patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

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    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  20. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-24

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14 th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19 th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  1. Quantitative three-dimensional evaluation of immunofluorescence staining for large whole mount spheroids with light sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrek, I; Stelzer, E H K

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional cell biology and histology of tissue sections strongly benefit from advanced light microscopy and optimized staining procedures to gather the full three-dimensional information. In particular, the combination of optical clearing with light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy simplifies fast high-quality imaging of thick biological specimens. However, verified in toto immunostaining protocols for large multicellular spheroids or for tissue sections have not been published. We present a method for the verification of immunostaining in three-dimensional spheroids. The analysis relies on three criteria to evaluate the immunostaining quality: quality of the antibody stain specificity, signal intensity achieved by the staining procedure and the correlation of the signal intensity with that of a homogeneously dispersed fluorescent dye. We optimized and investigated variations of five immunostaining protocols for three-dimensional cell biology. Our method is an important contribution to three-dimensional cell biology and the histology of tissues since it allows to evaluate the efficiency of immunostaining protocols for large three-dimensional specimens, and to study the distribution of protein expression and cell types within spheroids and spheroid-specific morphological structures without the need of physical sectioning.

  2. Immunogold Staining of London Resin (LR) White Sections for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

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    Skepper, Jeremy N; Powell, Janet M

    2008-06-01

    INTRODUCTIONIn post-embedding methods of immunogold staining, the cells or tissues are fixed chemically or cryoimmobilized, dehydrated, and embedded in epoxy or acrylic resins. Thin sections (50-70 nm in thickness) are cut using an ultramicrotome with a diamond knife, using a water bath to collect the sections as they slide off the knife. The sections are stretched with solvent vapor or a heat source and collected onto either bare or plastic-coated nickel grids. The sections are then stained immunochemically with primary antibodies raised against antigens exposed on the surface of the sections. The primary antibodies are visualized by staining immunochemically with secondary antibodies raised against the species and isotype of the primary antibodies, conjugated to colloidal gold particles. The immunochemically stained sections are then contrast stained with salts of uranium (uranyl acetate) and lead (lead citrate) to reveal the ultrastructure of the cells, and are finally viewed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). LR White was introduced as a low-toxicity alternative to epoxy resins, which frequently contained carcinogens. Unlike the simplest acrylic resins, in which monomers are polymerized to form long chains, the LR resins contain aromatic cross-linkers to improve the stability of the sections under the electron beam. LR White and Gold both have very low viscosity and readily penetrate, even into dense tissue. In this protocol, aldehyde-fixed tissue is dehydrated in ethanol, impregnated in LR White resin and polymerized under vacuum or in a nitrogen atmosphere before sectioning and immunogold staining.

  3. Optically sectioned imaging by oblique plane microscopy

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    Kumar, Sunil; Lin, Ziduo; Lyon, Alex R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. The first OPM results obtained using a high NA water immersion lens on a commercially available inverted microscope frame are presented, together with a measurement of the achievable optical resolution.

  4. Adaptive segmentation of nuclei in H&S stained tendon microscopy

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    Chuang, Bo-I.; Wu, Po-Ting; Hsu, Jian-Han; Jou, I.-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2015-12-01

    Tendiopathy is a popular clinical issue in recent years. In most cases like trigger finger or tennis elbow, the pathology change can be observed under H and E stained tendon microscopy. However, the qualitative analysis is too subjective and thus the results heavily depend on the observers. We develop an automatic segmentation procedure which segments and counts the nuclei in H and E stained tendon microscopy fast and precisely. This procedure first determines the complexity of images and then segments the nuclei from the image. For the complex images, the proposed method adopts sampling-based thresholding to segment the nuclei. While for the simple images, the Laplacian-based thresholding is employed to re-segment the nuclei more accurately. In the experiments, the proposed method is compared with the experts outlined results. The nuclei number of proposed method is closed to the experts counted, and the processing time of proposed method is much faster than the experts'.

  5. New versatile staining reagents for biological transmission electron microscopy that substitute for uranyl acetate.

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    Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Nishioka, Hideo; Katayama, Eisaku

    2011-12-01

    Aqueous uranyl acetate has been extensively used as a superb staining reagent for transmission electron microscopy of biological materials. However, recent regulation of nuclear fuel material severely restricts its use even for purely scientific purposes. Since uranyl salts are hazardous due to biological toxicity and remaining radioactivity, development of safe and non-radioactive substitutes is greatly anticipated. We examined two lanthanide salts, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate, and found that 1-10% solution of these reagents was safe but still possess excellent capability for staining thin sections of plastic-embedded materials of animal and plant origin. Although post-fixation with osmium tetroxide was essential for high-contrast staining, post-staining with lead citrate could be eliminated if a slow-scan CCD camera is available for observation. These lanthanide salts can also be utilized as good negative-staining reagents to study supramolecular architecture of biological macromolecules. They were not as effective as a fixative of protein assembly, reflecting the non-hazardous nature of the reagents.

  6. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  7. Super-resolution optical microscopy: multiple choices.

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    Huang, Bo

    2010-02-01

    The recent invention of super-resolution optical microscopy enables the visualization of fine features in biological samples with unprecedented clarity. It creates numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of previously obscured subcellular processes now can be directly observed. Rapid development in this field in the past two years offers many imaging modalities that address different needs but they also complicates the choice of the 'perfect' method for answering a specific question. Here I will briefly describe the principles of super-resolution optical microscopy techniques and then focus on comparing their characteristics in various aspects of practical applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. An investigation of the feasibility of applying Raman microscopy for exploring stained glass

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    Bouchard, Michel; Smith, David C.; Carabatos-Nédelec, Constantin

    2007-12-01

    Raman microscopy (RM) is widely used in archaeometrical studies of pigments, geomaterials and biomaterials in the Cultural Heritage, but one domain has received relatively less attention: the colouring of stained glass. This feasibility study investigates the advantages and disadvantages of employing RM alone in this field by means of a study of modern commercial glasses, modern commercial pigments, and a few archaeological stained glasses, but especially by an experimental project whereby the authors created stained glass. The different kinds of possible unreacted or reacted material are rigorously established. The distinction between Na, K, Ca glasses was explored, as well as the red colouring of an industrial glass which was proved to be due to the presence of (Zn, Cd)S xSe 1- x. Yellow, green, blue and maroon pigments were studied before and after an initial firing and then after heating on glass. The quality of the Raman spectra varied enormously and was sometimes disappointing. Nevertheless RM successfully identified various coloured products such as bindheimite, crocoite, cobalt aluminate, haematite; relict reactants such as corundum, eskolaite and oxides of Co or Pb; and provided indications of other phases such as maghemite or Co-olivine. One conclusion is that the amount of chemical reaction between the pigments and the glass is small compared to the amount in between the pigments. Comments are made on the potential for dating archaeological glass from the known age of synthesis of the pigments, and of the dangers of this approach. Overall it has been shown that RM can be useful for studying stained glass, especially for remote in situ analytical operations with mobile RM, but one must expect some problems either with fluorescence or weak spectra.

  9. CTC staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

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    Bartosch, S; Mansch, R; Knötzsch, K; Bock, E

    2003-01-01

    A method was established for staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone by using the tetrazolium salt 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyltetrazolium chloride (CTC) in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Applying 5 mM CTC for 2 h to pure cultures of representative stone-inhabiting microorganisms showed that chemoorganotrophic bacteria and fungi-in contrast to lithoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria-were able to reduce CTC to CTF, the red fluorescing formazan crystals of CTC. Optimal staining conditions for microorganisms in stone material were found to be 15 mM CTC applied for 24 h. The cells could be visualized on transparent and nontransparent mineral materials by means of CLSM. A semi-automated method was used to count the cells within the pore system of the stone. The percentage of CTC-stained bacteria was dependent on temperature and humidity of the material. At 28 degrees C and high humidity (maximum water holding capacity) in the laboratory, about 58% of the total bacterial microflora was active. On natural stone exposed for 9 years at an urban exposure site in Germany, 52-56% of the bacterial microflora was active at the east, west, and north side of the specimen, while only 18% cells were active at the south side. This is consistent with microclimatic differences on the south side which was more exposed to sunshine thus causing UV and water stress as well as higher temperatures on a microscale level. In combination with CLSM, staining by CTC can be used as a fast method for monitoring the metabolic activity of chemoorganotrophic bacteria in monuments, buildings of historic interest or any art objects of natural stone. Due to the small size of samples required, the damage to these objects and buildings can be minimized.

  10. Overview of electron crystallography of membrane proteins: crystallization and screening strategies using negative stain electron microscopy.

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    Nannenga, Brent L; Iadanza, Matthew G; Vollmar, Breanna S; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy, or cryoEM, is an emerging technique for studying the three-dimensional structures of proteins and large macromolecular machines. Electron crystallography is a branch of cryoEM in which structures of proteins can be studied at resolutions that rival those achieved by X-ray crystallography. Electron crystallography employs two-dimensional crystals of a membrane protein embedded within a lipid bilayer. The key to a successful electron crystallographic experiment is the crystallization, or reconstitution, of the protein of interest. This unit describes ways in which protein can be expressed, purified, and reconstituted into well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A protocol is also provided for negative stain electron microscopy as a tool for screening crystallization trials. When large and well-ordered crystals are obtained, the structures of both protein and its surrounding membrane can be determined to atomic resolution.

  11. Optical Monte Carlo modeling of a true portwine stain anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.; Smithies, Derek J.; Nelson, Jerry; van Gemert, Martin J.

    1998-04-01

    A unique Monte Carlo program capable of accommodating an arbitrarily complex geometry was used to determine the energy deposition in a true port wine stain anatomy. Serial histologic sections taken from a biopsy of a dark red, laser therapy resistant stain were digitized and used to create the program input for simulation at wavelengths of 532 and 585 nm. At both wavelengths, the greatest energy deposition occurred in the superficial blood vessels, and subsequently decreased with depth as the laser beam was attenuated. However, more energy was deposited in the epidermis and superficial blood vessels at 532 nm than at 585 nm.

  12. Fast segmentation of stained nuclei in terabyte-scale, time resolved 3D microscopy image stacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stegmaier

    Full Text Available Automated analysis of multi-dimensional microscopy images has become an integral part of modern research in life science. Most available algorithms that provide sufficient segmentation quality, however, are infeasible for a large amount of data due to their high complexity. In this contribution we present a fast parallelized segmentation method that is especially suited for the extraction of stained nuclei from microscopy images, e.g., of developing zebrafish embryos. The idea is to transform the input image based on gradient and normal directions in the proximity of detected seed points such that it can be handled by straightforward global thresholding like Otsu's method. We evaluate the quality of the obtained segmentation results on a set of real and simulated benchmark images in 2D and 3D and show the algorithm's superior performance compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. We achieve an up to ten-fold decrease in processing times, allowing us to process large data sets while still providing reasonable segmentation results.

  13. Fluorescence microscopy is superior to polarized microscopy for detecting amyloid deposits in Congo red-stained trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan; Sadimin, Evita; Richardson, Maurice; Goodell, Lauri; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-10-01

    The classic gold standard for detecting amyloid deposits is Congo red-stained bright field and polarized microscopy (CRPM). A prior study showed that Congo red fluorescence (CRF) microscopy had increased sensitivity compared with traditional CRPM when analyzing fat pad specimens. The purpose of the current study was to determine the sensitivity of CRF for evaluating Congo red-stained bone marrow biopsy specimens, and to compare these results with those of CRPM. We compared the CRPM and the CRF analyses of 33 trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens with clinical or morphologic suspicion of amyloid deposits. These results were verified against immunohistochemical staining with anti-amyloid P antibody. CRF achieved 100% sensitivity, and CRPM achieved 75% sensitivity. Both groups showed 100% specificity compared with amyloid P immunohistochemical staining. The results show that CRF is a sensitive method to analyze trephine bone marrow biopsy specimens for amyloid deposits.

  14. Comparison of Gram stain and Nomarski optics for screening sputum specimens before culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Reimer, L G; Kepas, A

    1986-01-01

    Although the Gram stain is usually used to screen sputum specimens prior to culture, wet mount observation with Nomarski optics has been suggested as a useful alternative. We compared the two methods and found that more specimens were rejected by the Gram stain technique without eliminating any that yielded important clinical information.

  15. False-negative rate of gram-stain microscopy for diagnosis of septic arthritis: suggestions for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Paul; Faroug, Radwane; Amanat, Suheil; Ahmed, Abdulkhaled; Armstrong, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Qamruddin, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the false-negative diagnostic rate of septic arthritis using Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid and compare this to values reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We propose a method of improving the diagnostic value of Gram-stain microscopy using Lithium Heparin containers that prevent synovial fluid coagulation. Retrospective study of the Manchester Royal Infirmary microbiology database of patients undergoing synovial fluid Gram-stain and culture between December 2003 and March 2012 was undertaken. The initial cohort of 1896 synovial fluid analyses for suspected septic arthritis was reduced to 143 after exclusion criteria were applied. Analysis of our Gram-stain microscopy yielded 111 false-negative results from a cohort size of 143 positive synovial fluid cultures, giving a false-negative rate of 78%. We report a false-negative rate of Gram-stain microscopy for septic arthritis of 78%. Clinicians should therefore avoid the investigation until a statistically significant data set confirms its efficacy. The investigation's value could be improved by using Lithium Heparin containers to collect homogenous synovial fluid samples. Ongoing research aims to establish how much this could reduce the false-negative rate.

  16. False-Negative Rate of Gram-Stain Microscopy for Diagnosis of Septic Arthritis: Suggestions for Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Stirling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the false-negative diagnostic rate of septic arthritis using Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid and compare this to values reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We propose a method of improving the diagnostic value of Gram-stain microscopy using Lithium Heparin containers that prevent synovial fluid coagulation. Retrospective study of the Manchester Royal Infirmary microbiology database of patients undergoing synovial fluid Gram-stain and culture between December 2003 and March 2012 was undertaken. The initial cohort of 1896 synovial fluid analyses for suspected septic arthritis was reduced to 143 after exclusion criteria were applied. Analysis of our Gram-stain microscopy yielded 111 false-negative results from a cohort size of 143 positive synovial fluid cultures, giving a false-negative rate of 78%. We report a false-negative rate of Gram-stain microscopy for septic arthritis of 78%. Clinicians should therefore avoid the investigation until a statistically significant data set confirms its efficacy. The investigation's value could be improved by using Lithium Heparin containers to collect homogenous synovial fluid samples. Ongoing research aims to establish how much this could reduce the false-negative rate.

  17. Chemical mechanism of the Gram stain and synthesis of a new electron-opaque marker for electron microscopy which replaces the iodine mordant of the stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J A; Anderson, G K; Beveridge, T J; Clark, H C

    1983-01-01

    Crystal violet (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline chloride) interacts with aqueous KI-I2 during the Gram stain via a simple metathetical anion exchange to produce a chemical precipitate. There is an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry between anion (I-) and cation (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline+) during the reaction and, since the small chloride anion is replaced by the bulkier iodide, the complex formed becomes insoluble in water. It is this same precipitate which forms in the cellular substance of bacteria (both gram-positive and gram-negative types) and which initiates the Gram reaction. Potassium trichloro(eta 2-ethylene)-platinum(II), as an electronopaque marker for electron microscopy, was chemically synthesized, and it produced an anion in aqueous solution which was compatible with crystal violet for the Gram stain. It interacted with crystal violet in a similar manner as iodide to produce an insoluble complex which was chemically and physically analogous to the dye-iodide precipitate. This platinum anion therefore allows the Gram staining mechanism to be followed by electron microscopy. Images PMID:6195147

  18. Chemical mechanism of the Gram stain and synthesis of a new electron-opaque marker for electron microscopy which replaces the iodine mordant of the stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J A; Anderson, G K; Beveridge, T J; Clark, H C

    1983-11-01

    Crystal violet (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline chloride) interacts with aqueous KI-I2 during the Gram stain via a simple metathetical anion exchange to produce a chemical precipitate. There is an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry between anion (I-) and cation (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline+) during the reaction and, since the small chloride anion is replaced by the bulkier iodide, the complex formed becomes insoluble in water. It is this same precipitate which forms in the cellular substance of bacteria (both gram-positive and gram-negative types) and which initiates the Gram reaction. Potassium trichloro(eta 2-ethylene)-platinum(II), as an electronopaque marker for electron microscopy, was chemically synthesized, and it produced an anion in aqueous solution which was compatible with crystal violet for the Gram stain. It interacted with crystal violet in a similar manner as iodide to produce an insoluble complex which was chemically and physically analogous to the dye-iodide precipitate. This platinum anion therefore allows the Gram staining mechanism to be followed by electron microscopy.

  19. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  20. Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Vobornik

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An average human eye can see details down to 0,07 mm in size. The ability to see smaller details of the matter is correlated with the development of the science and the comprehension of the nature. Today’s science needs eyes for the nano-world. Examples are easily found in biology and medical sciences. There is a great need to determine shape, size, chemical composition, molecular structure and dynamic properties of nano-structures. To do this, microscopes with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution are required. Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM is a new step in the evolution of microscopy. The conventional, lens-based microscopes have their resolution limited by diffraction. SNOM is not subject to this limitation and can offer up to 70 times better resolution.

  1. Light microscopy with differential staining techniques for the characterisation and discrimination of insects versus marine arthropods processed animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoboni, Matteo; Tretola, Marco; Cheli, Federica; Marchis, Daniela; Veys, Pascal; Baeten, Vincent; Pinotti, Luciano

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of light microscopy with differential staining techniques for the discrimination of insect material from marine arthropods - classified as fishmeal. Specifically, three samples of single-species insect material, Hermetia illucens (HI), Bombyx mori (BM) and Tenebrio molitor (TM), and two samples of marine arthropods, shrimp material and krill, were analysed and compared after staining by two reagents to enhance fragment identification. Alizarin Red (AR) and Chlorazol Black (CB), which react respectively with calcium salts and chitin, were tested for their potential efficacy in distinguishing between insect and marine materials. Results indicated that AR failed to stain HI, BM and TM materials. By contrast, the three insect species materials tested were stained by CB. When shrimp fragments and krill were considered, AR and CB stained marine materials reddish-pink and light blue to black, respectively. By combining these results, it can be suggested that CB staining may efficiently be used to mark insect materials; AR does stain shrimp fragments but does not stain the tested insect material, indicating a possible approach for discriminating between insects and marine arthropods. However, since the present study was performed on pure materials and a small set of samples, possible implementation of this technique still needs to be confirmed in complex matrices such as compound feed.

  2. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  3. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  4. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Lau, Janis E.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Tin, Padetha; Wilt, David M.; Pal, Anna Maria; Fahey, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the in situ optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials has become especially important as the size of device architectures has decreased and the development of complex microsystems has increased. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy, or STORM, can interrogate the optical bandgap as a function of its position within a semiconductor micro-structure. This technique uses a tunable solidstate titanium-sapphire laser whose output is "chopped" using a spatial light modulator and is coupled by a fiber-optic connector to a scanning tunneling microscope in order to illuminate the tip-sample junction. The photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current is spectroscopically measured using a lock-in technique. The capabilities of this technique were verified using semiconductor microstructure calibration standards that were grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Bandgaps characterized by STORM measurements were found to be in good agreement with the bulk values determined by transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence and with the theoretical values that were based on x-ray diffraction results.

  5. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  6. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...

  7. Volumetric optical coherence microscopy enabled by aberrated optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Siyang; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging technique that enables high resolution, non-invasive imaging of 3D cell cultures and biological tissues. Volumetric imaging with OCM suffers a trade-off between high transverse resolution and poor depth-of-field resulting from defocus, optical aberrations, and reduced signal collection away from the focal plane. While defocus and aberrations can be compensated with computational methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) or computational adaptive optics (CAO), reduced signal collection must be physically addressed through optical hardware. Axial scanning of the focus is one approach, but comes at the cost of longer acquisition times, larger datasets, and greater image reconstruction times. Given the capabilities of CAO to compensate for general phase aberrations, we present an alternative method to address the signal collection problem without axial scanning by using intentionally aberrated optical hardware. We demonstrate the use of an astigmatic spectral domain (SD-)OCM imaging system to enable single-acquisition volumetric OCM in 3D cell culture over an extended depth range, compared to a non-aberrated SD-OCM system. The transverse resolution of the non-aberrated and astigmatic imaging systems after application of CAO were 2 um and 2.2 um, respectively. The depth-range of effective signal collection about the nominal focal plane was increased from 100 um in the non-aberrated system to over 300 um in the astigmatic system, extending the range over which useful data may be acquired in a single OCM dataset. We anticipate that this method will enable high-throughput cellular-resolution imaging of dynamic biological systems over extended volumes.

  8. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, C.; Kim, K.I.; de Boer, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe simultaneous quantitative phase contrast and multiphoton fluorescence imaging by combined spectral-domain optical coherence phase and multiphoton microscopy. The instrument employs two light sources for efficient optical coherence microscopic and multiphoton imaging and can generate

  9. Biological applications of near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, Marco H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, Alain; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) is a true optical microscopic technique allowing fluorescence, absorption, reflection and polarization contrast with the additional advantage of nanometer lateral resolution, unlimited by diffraction and operation at ambient conditions. NSOM based on

  10. Identification of malaria parasites by fluorescence microscopy and acridine orange staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, G. T.; Sodeman, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The need for a technique that is more sensitive than the use of Romanowsky-stained thick blood films for detecting malaria parasites at low concentration in the blood is well recognized. One of the more promising methods appeared to be fluorochrome staining with acridine orange. However, reports on the efficacy of the technique were contradictory and it was not clear to what extent blood films taken under survey conditions would contain fluorescing artefacts that might confuse diagnosis. An investigation indicated that, provided reasonable care was taken, blood films made under survey conditions contained few confusing artefacts. However, it was found that, while acridine orange staining might have a slight advantage when large malaria parasites were present, it was inferior to routine Romanowsky staining for the detection of young trophozoites, the inferiority becoming more pronounced as the parasite concentration decreased. PMID:4130021

  11. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B; Costa, Leverson F L; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A; Almeida, Diogo B; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A L A; Cesar, Carlos L

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG∕THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium∕stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  12. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Almeida, Diogo B.; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG/THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium/stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  13. Introduction: Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xingde; Beard, Paul C.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, Florida, and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  14. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.A.; Vdovine, Gleb; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Kubby, Joel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light

  15. Optical biomarkers of serous and mucinous human ovarian tumor assessed with nonlinear optics microscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B; de Thomaz, Andre A; Baratti, Mariana O; Almeida, Diogo B; Andrade, L A L A; Bottcher-Luiz, Fátima; Carvalho, Hernandes F; Cesar, Carlos L

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy techniques have potential to improve the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. In this study we showed that multimodal NLO microscopies, including two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third-harmonic generation (THG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with ovarian cancer progression. We obtained strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals from fixed samples stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) and robust FLIM signal from fixed unstained samples. Particularly, we imaged 34 ovarian biopsies from different patients (median age, 49 years) including 5 normal ovarian tissue, 18 serous tumors and 11 mucinous tumors with the multimodal NLO platform developed in our laboratory. We have been able to distinguish adenomas, borderline, and adenocarcinomas specimens. Using a complete set of scoring methods we found significant differences in the content, distribution and organization of collagen fibrils in the stroma as well as in the morphology and fluorescence lifetime from epithelial ovarian cells. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns for serous and mucinous ovarian tumors. The results provide a basis to interpret future NLO images of ovarian tissue and lay the foundation for future in vivo optical evaluation of premature ovarian lesions.

  16. Optical biomarkers of serous and mucinous human ovarian tumor assessed with nonlinear optics microscopies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Adur

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical (NLO microscopy techniques have potential to improve the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. In this study we showed that multimodal NLO microscopies, including two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF, second-harmonic generation (SHG, third-harmonic generation (THG and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with ovarian cancer progression.We obtained strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals from fixed samples stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E and robust FLIM signal from fixed unstained samples. Particularly, we imaged 34 ovarian biopsies from different patients (median age, 49 years including 5 normal ovarian tissue, 18 serous tumors and 11 mucinous tumors with the multimodal NLO platform developed in our laboratory. We have been able to distinguish adenomas, borderline, and adenocarcinomas specimens. Using a complete set of scoring methods we found significant differences in the content, distribution and organization of collagen fibrils in the stroma as well as in the morphology and fluorescence lifetime from epithelial ovarian cells.NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns for serous and mucinous ovarian tumors. The results provide a basis to interpret future NLO images of ovarian tissue and lay the foundation for future in vivo optical evaluation of premature ovarian lesions.

  17. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.A.; Vdovine, Gleb; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Kubby, Joel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront senso...

  18. Calcium hydroxylapatite treatment of human skin: evidence of collagen turnover through picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerbinati N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Zerbinati,1 Alberto Calligaro2 1Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria (Varese and Polyspecialist Medical Center, Pavia, 2Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Unit of Histology and Embryology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA, Radiesse® is a biocompatible, injectable filler for facial soft-tissue augmentation that provides volume to tissues, followed by a process of neocollagenesis for improved skin quality. Objective: To examine the effects of CaHA treatment on the molecular organization of collagen using a combination of picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy.Methods: Five subjects received subdermal injection of 0.3 mL of CaHA in tissues scheduled for removal during abdominoplasty 2 months later. Tissue specimens from the CaHA injection site and a control untreated area were obtained from excised skin at the time of surgery. Processed tissue sections were stained with picrosirius red solution 0.1% and visualized under circularly polarized light microscopy for identification of thick mature (type I and thin newly formed (type III collagen fibers. Pixel signals from both the control and CaHA-treated areas were extracted from the images, and morphometric computerized hue analysis was performed to provide a quantitative evaluation of mature and newly formed collagen fibers.Results: Under picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy, green/yellow areas (thin newly formed collagen type III were visible among the collagen fibers in tissue sections from the area of CaHA injection. In contrast, the majority of the collagen fibers appeared red (thick mature collagen type I in control tissues. Morphometric analysis confirmed that, following CaHA treatment, the proportion of fibers represented by thin newly formed collagen type III increased significantly (p<0.01 in comparison with the

  19. Application of super-resolution optical microscopy in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiuhai; Du Jiancong; Huang Qing; Fan Chunhai; Deng Suhui

    2013-01-01

    Background: A noninvasive, real-time far-field optical microscopy is needed to study the dynamic function inside cells and proteins. However, the resolution limit of traditional optical microscope is about 200 nm due to the diffraction limit of light. So, it's hard to directly observe the subcellular structures. Over the past several years of microscopy development, the diffraction limit of fluorescence microscopy has been overcome and its resolution limit is about tens of nanometers. Methods: To overcome the diffraction limit of light, many super-resolution fluoresce microscopes, including stimulated emission of depletion microscopy (STED), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), have been developed. Conclusions: These methods have been applied in cell biology, microbiology and neurobiology, and the technology of super-resolution provides a new insight into the life science. (authors)

  20. Pre-embedding staining of single muscle fibers for light and electron microscopy studies of subcellular organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1996-01-01

    ) immunocytochemistry. Here we show that pre-embedding staining of single teased fibers, or of single enzymatically dissociated fibers, has several advantages over the use of sections for observing discrete patterns that extend over long distances in the cells. We report on an optimization study carried out......Skeletal muscle fibers are large, multinucleated cells which pose a challenge to the morphologist. In the course of studies of the distribution of the glucose transporter GLUT4, in muscle, we have compared different preparative procedures, for both light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM...

  1. A Comparative Study of Sample Preparation for Staining and Immunodetection of Plant Cell Walls by Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Walker, Jesse L.; Guillon, Fabienne; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2017-01-01

    Staining and immunodetection by light microscopy are methods widely used to investigate plant cell walls. The two techniques have been crucial to study the cell wall architecture in planta, its deconstruction by chemicals or cell wall-degrading enzymes. They have been instrumental in detecting the presence of cell types, in deciphering plant cell wall evolution and in characterizing plant mutants and transformants. The success of immunolabeling relies on how plant materials are embedded and sectioned. Agarose coating, wax and resin embedding are, respectively, associated with vibratome, microtome and ultramicrotome sectioning. Here, we have systematically carried out a comparative analysis of these three methods of sample preparation when they are applied for cell wall staining and cell wall immunomicroscopy. In order to help the plant community in understanding and selecting adequate methods of embedding and sectioning for cell wall immunodetection, we review in this article the advantages and limitations of these three methods. Moreover, we offer detailed protocols of embedding for studying plant materials through microscopy. PMID:28900439

  2. Optical parametrically gated microscopy in scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Adie, Steven G; Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Graf, Benedikt W; Chaney, Eric J; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A

    2014-09-22

    High-resolution imaging in turbid media has been limited by the intrinsic compromise between the gating efficiency (removal of multiply-scattered light background) and signal strength in the existing optical gating techniques. This leads to shallow depths due to the weak ballistic signal, and/or degraded resolution due to the strong multiply-scattering background--the well-known trade-off between resolution and imaging depth in scattering samples. In this work, we employ a nonlinear optics based optical parametric amplifier (OPA) to address this challenge. We demonstrate that both the imaging depth and the spatial resolution in turbid media can be enhanced simultaneously by the OPA, which provides a high level of signal gain as well as an inherent nonlinear optical gate. This technology shifts the nonlinear interaction to an optical crystal placed in the detection arm (image plane), rather than in the sample, which can be used to exploit the benefits given by the high-order parametric process and the use of an intense laser field. The coherent process makes the OPA potentially useful as a general-purpose optical amplifier applicable to a wide range of optical imaging techniques.

  3. Detection of stain formation on teeth by oral antiseptic solution using fiber optic displacement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, H. A.; Rahim, H. R. A.; Harun, S. W.; Yasin, M.; Apsari, R.; Ahmad, H.; Wan Abas, W. A. B.

    2013-02-01

    The application of a simple intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor for the detection of stain formation on human teeth is demonstrated. The proposed sensor uses a concentric type bundled plastic optical fiber (POF) as a probe in conjunction with the surfaces of five human teeth as the reflecting targets. Prior to the experiment, the stains were produced extrinsically by soaking the teeth in different concentrations of oral antiseptic solution containing hexetidine. The concentration of the oral antiseptic solution is measured in volume%. For a concentration change from 0% to 80%, the peak voltage decreases exponentially from 1.15 mV to 0.41 mV with a measured resolution of 0.48% and 1.75% for concentration ranges of 0-40% and 40-80%, respectively. The correlation between the detector output and variation in the color of human tooth surface has successfully been examined. Simple in design and low in cost, this sensor can detect color changes due to hexetidine-induced stain on a tooth surface in a fast and convenient way. Thus, this sensor will be very promising in esthetic dentistry, dental color matching techniques, chemical and biomedical applications.

  4. Aberrations and adaptive optics in super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin; Andrade, Débora; Burke, Daniel; Patton, Brian; Zurauskas, Mantas

    2015-08-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in the biological investigation of cellular structures and dynamic processes, fluorescence microscopy has undergone extraordinary developments in the past decades. The advent of super-resolution techniques has enabled fluorescence microscopy - or rather nanoscopy - to achieve nanoscale resolution in living specimens and unravelled the interior of cells with unprecedented detail. The methods employed in this expanding field of microscopy, however, are especially prone to the detrimental effects of optical aberrations. In this review, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy techniques based upon single-molecule switching, stimulated emission depletion and structured illumination each suffer from aberrations in different ways that are dependent upon intrinsic technical aspects. We discuss the use of adaptive optics as an effective means to overcome this problem. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy.

  5. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  6. Understanding the phase contrast optics to restore artifact-free microscopy images for segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast, a noninvasive microscopy imaging technique, is widely used to capture time-lapse images to monitor the behavior of transparent cells without staining or altering them. Due to the optical principle, phase contrast microscopy images contain artifacts such as the halo and shade-off that hinder image segmentation, a critical step in automated microscopy image analysis. Rather than treating phase contrast microscopy images as general natural images and applying generic image processing techniques on them, we propose to study the optical properties of the phase contrast microscope to model its image formation process. The phase contrast imaging system can be approximated by a linear imaging model. Based on this model and input image properties, we formulate a regularized quadratic cost function to restore artifact-free phase contrast images that directly correspond to the specimen's optical path length. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on microscopy image sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days. We also demonstrate that accurate restoration lays the foundation for high performance in cell detection and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Image correction in magneto-optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Larsen, B.H.; Jacobsen, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects...

  8. Optical Imaging and Microscopy Techniques and Advanced Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Török, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This text on contemporary optical systems is intended for optical researchers and engineers, graduate students and optical microscopists in the biological and biomedical sciences. This second edition contains two completely new chapters. In addition most of the chapters from the first edition have been revised and updated. The book consists of three parts: The first discusses high-aperture optical systems, which form the backbone of optical microscopes. An example is a chapter new in the second edition on the emerging field of high numerical aperture diffractive lenses which seems to have particular promise in improving the correction of lenses. In this part particular attention is paid to optical data storage. The second part is on the use of non-linear optical techniques, including nonlinear optical excitation (total internal reflection fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation and two photon microscopy) and non-linear spectroscopy (CARS). The final part of the book presents miscellaneous technique...

  9. Microscopy of Stained Urethral Smear in Male Urethritis; Which Cutoff Should be Used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Harald; Hartgill, Usha; Skullerud, Kristin Helene; Reponen, Elina J; Syvertsen, Line; Moghaddam, Amir

    2017-03-01

    The microscopical diagnosis of male urethritis was recently questioned by Rietmeijer and Mettenbrink, lowering the diagnostic criteria of the diagnosis to ≥2 polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) per high power field (HPF), and adopted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in their 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines. The European Non-Gonococcal Urethritis Guideline advocates a limit of ≥5 PMNL/HPF. To determine if syndromic treatment of urethritis should be considered with a cutoff value of ≥2 PMNL/HPF in urethral smear. The design was a cross-sectional study investigating the presence and degree of urethritis relative to specific infections in men attending an STI clinic as drop-in patients. The material included 2 cohorts: a retrospective study of 13,295 men and a prospective controlled study including 356 men. We observed a mean chlamydia prevalence of 2.3% in the 0-9 stratum, and a 12-fold higher prevalence (27.3%) in the strata above 9. Of the chlamydia cases, 89.8% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For Mycoplasma genitalium, the prevalence was 1.4% in the 0-9 stratum and 11.2% in the stratum ≥10, and 83.6% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For gonorrhea, a significant increase in the prevalence occurred between the 0-30 strata and >30 strata from 0.2% to 20.7%. The results of the prospective study were similar. Our data do not support lowering the cutoff to ≥2 PMNL/HPF. However, a standardization of urethral smear microscopy seems to be impossible. The cutoff value should discriminate between low and high prevalence of chlamydia, mycoplasma, and gonorrhea to include as many as possible with a specific infection in syndromic treatment, without overtreating those with few PMNL/HPF and high possibility of having nonspecific or no urethritis.

  10. Adaptive optical probe design for optical coherence tomography and microscopy using tunable optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Minseog; Lee, Seungwan; Chang, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Eunsung; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Kim, Woonbae

    2013-01-28

    We present a tunable, adaptive optical imaging probe for multimodal imaging such as optical coherence tomography and microscopy. The probe is compatible with forward-looking scanning laser imaging devices such as an endoscope. The lens configuration includes a tunable iris and two varifocal lenses, both driven by microelectrofluidics, as well as several conventional fixed focus lenses. The modulation transfer function and spot size in the focal plane is evaluated, and we show using optical simulations that there are three possible imaging modes with different transverse resolutions and focal depths.

  11. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  12. Imaging the chemical activity of single nanoparticles with optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2018-04-03

    Nanomaterials exhibit structural and functional heterogeneity among individual nanoparticles, thus requiring a capability to study single nanoparticles. While electron microscopes often provide static images of their chemical composition, morphology and structure, imaging the chemical activity of single nanoparticles is highly desirable for exploring the structure-activity relationship via a bottom-up strategy, to understand their microscopic reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and to identify a minority subpopulation with extraordinary activity. Recently, various optical microscopes have been emerging as powerful techniques towards this goal, owing to their non-invasive nature, excellent sensitivity, diversified spectroscopic principles and sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. In this review, we first introduce the motivational concept and the strength of using optical microscopy to study the chemical activity of single nanoparticles. In the second section, five types of commonly used optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, dark-field microscopy, surface plasmon resonance microscopy, Raman microscopy and photothermal microscopy are described, with an emphasis on their applicable nanomaterials and mechanisms for application. Recent achievements of these techniques in nanosensing, nanoelectrochemistry and nanocatalysis are surveyed and summarized in the subsequent sections, respectively. We finally conclude with our perspective on the remaining challenges and the future trends in this field.

  13. Molecular expressions: exploring the world of optics and microscopy. http://microscopy.fsu.edu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2004-08-01

    Our knowledge of the structure, dynamics and physiology of a cell has increased significantly in the last ten years through the emergence of new optical imaging modalities such as optical sectioning microscopy, computer- enhanced video microscopy and laser-scanning microscopy. These techniques together with the use of genetically engineered fluorophores have helped scientists visualize the 3-dimensional dynamic processes of living cells. However as powerful as these imaging tools are, they can often be difficult to understand and fully utilize. Below I will discuss my favorite website: The Molecular Expressions Web Site that endeavors to present the power of microscopy to its visitors. The Molecular Expressions group does a remarkable job of not only clearly presenting the principles behind these techniques in a manner approachable by lay and scientific audiences alike but also provides representative data from each as well.

  14. Aberrations and adaptive optics in super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin; Andrade, Débora; Burke, Daniel; Patton, Brian; Zurauskas, Mantas

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in the biological investigation of cellular structures and dynamic processes, fluorescence microscopy has undergone extraordinary developments in the past decades. The advent of super-resolution techniques has enabled fluorescence microscopy – or rather nanoscopy – to achieve nanoscale resolution in living specimens and unravelled the interior of cells with unprecedented detail. The methods employed in this expanding field of microscopy, however, are especially prone to the detrimental effects of optical aberrations. In this review, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy techniques based upon single-molecule switching, stimulated emission depletion and structured illumination each suffer from aberrations in different ways that are dependent upon intrinsic technical aspects. We discuss the use of adaptive optics as an effective means to overcome this problem. PMID:26124194

  15. Adaptive optics enables 3D STED microscopy in aberrating specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Travis J; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J

    2012-09-10

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy allows fluorescence far-field imaging with diffraction-unlimited resolution. Unfortunately, extending this technique to three-dimensional (3D) imaging of thick specimens has been inhibited by sample-induced aberrations. Here we present the first implementation of adaptive optics in STED microscopy to allow 3D super-resolution imaging in strongly aberrated imaging conditions, such as those introduced by thick biological tissue.

  16. Adaptive optics enables 3D STED microscopy in aberrating specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Travis J.; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy allows fluorescence far-field imaging with diffraction-unlimited resolution. Unfortunately, extending this technique to three-dimensional (3D) imaging of thick specimens has been inhibited by sample-induced aberrations. Here we present the first implementation of adaptive optics in STED microscopy to allow 3D super-resolution imaging in strongly aberrated imaging conditions, such as those introduced by thick biological tissue. PMID:23037223

  17. Observer Performance in the Use of Digital and Optical Microscopy for the Interpretation of Tissue-Based Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios A. Gavrielides

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a validation study of digital pathology for the quantitative assessment of tissue-based biomarkers with immunohistochemistry. Objective.\tTo examine observer agreement as a function of viewing modality (digital versus optical microscopy, whole slide versus tissue microarray (TMA review, biomarker type (HER2 incorporating membranous staining and Ki-67 with nuclear staining, and data type (continuous and categorical. Methods.\tEight pathologists reviewed 50 breast cancer whole slides (25 stained with HER2 and 25 with Ki-67 and 2 TMAs (1 stained with HER2, 1 with Ki-67, each containing 97 cores, using digital and optical microscopy. Results. Results showed relatively high overall interobserver and intermodality agreement, with different patterns specific to biomarker type. For HER2, there was better interobserver agreement for optical compared to digital microscopy for whole slides as well as better interobserver and intermodality agreement for TMAs. For Ki-67, those patterns were not observed. Conclusions. The differences in agreement patterns when examining different biomarkers and different scoring methods and reviewing whole slides compared to TMA stress the need for validation studies focused on specific pathology tasks to eliminate sources of variability that might dilute findings. The statistical uncertainty observed in our analyses calls for adequate sampling for each individual task rather than pooling cases.

  18. Adaptive optics for structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Débarre, Delphine; Botcherby, Edward J; Booth, Martin J; Wilson, Tony

    2008-06-23

    We implement wave front sensor-less adaptive optics in a structured illumination microscope. We investigate how the image formation process in this type of microscope is affected by aberrations. It is found that aberrations can be classified into two groups, those that affect imaging of the illumination pattern and those that have no influence on this pattern. We derive a set of aberration modes ideally suited to this application and use these modes as the basis for an efficient aberration correction scheme. Each mode is corrected independently through the sequential optimisation of an image quality metric. Aberration corrected imaging is demonstrated using fixed fluorescent specimens. Images are further improved using differential aberration imaging for reduction of background fluorescence.

  19. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality

  20. A Simple Method That Uses Differential Staining and Light Microscopy To Assess the Selectivity of Wood Delignification by White Rot Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebotnik, Ewald; Messner, Kurt

    1994-01-01

    Cryostat microtome sections of birch wood degraded by white rot fungi were examined by light microscopy after treatment with two stains: astra-blue, which stains cellulose blue only in the absence of lignin, and safranin, which stains lignin regardless of whether cellulose is present. The method provided a simple and reliable screening procedure that distinguishes between fungi that cause decay by selectively removing lignin and those that degrade both cellulose and lignin simultaneously. Moreover, morphological characteristics specific to selective delignification were revealed. Images PMID:16349245

  1. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Jakobsen, A. C.; Simons, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    A formalism is presented for dark‐field X‐ray microscopy using refractive optics. The new technique can produce three‐dimensional maps of lattice orientation and axial strain within millimetre‐sized sampling volumes and is particularly suited to in situ studies of materials at hard X‐ray energies...

  2. Understanding the optics to aid microscopy image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaozheng; Li, Kang; Kanade, Takeo; Chen, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Image segmentation is essential for many automated microscopy image analysis systems. Rather than treating microscopy images as general natural images and rushing into the image processing warehouse for solutions, we propose to study a microscope's optical properties to model its image formation process first using phase contrast microscopy as an exemplar. It turns out that the phase contrast imaging system can be relatively well explained by a linear imaging model. Using this model, we formulate a quadratic optimization function with sparseness and smoothness regularizations to restore the "authentic" phase contrast images that directly correspond to specimen's optical path length without phase contrast artifacts such as halo and shade-off. With artifacts removed, high quality segmentation can be achieved by simply thresholding the restored images. The imaging model and restoration method are quantitatively evaluated on two sequences with thousands of cells captured over several days.

  3. Chemical mechanism of the Gram stain and synthesis of a new electron-opaque marker for electron microscopy which replaces the iodine mordant of the stain.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, J A; Anderson, G K; Beveridge, T J; Clark, H C

    1983-01-01

    Crystal violet (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline chloride) interacts with aqueous KI-I2 during the Gram stain via a simple metathetical anion exchange to produce a chemical precipitate. There is an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry between anion (I-) and cation (hexamethyl-para-rosaniline+) during the reaction and, since the small chloride anion is replaced by the bulkier iodide, the complex formed becomes insoluble in water. It is this same precipitate which forms in the cellular substance of bacteria (b...

  4. Nanometrology using a through-focus scanning optical microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attota, Ravikiran; Silver, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial review of a novel through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM pronounced as 'tee-som') imaging method that produces nanometer-dimensional measurement sensitivity using a conventional bright-field optical microscope. In the TSOM method a target is scanned through the focus of an optical microscope, acquiring conventional optical images at different focal positions. The TSOM images are constructed using the through-focus optical images. A TSOM image is unique under given experimental conditions and is sensitive to changes in the dimensions of a target in a distinct way. We use this characteristic for nanoscale-dimensional metrology. This technique can be used to identify the dimension which is changing between two nanosized targets and to determine the dimensions using a library-matching method. This methodology has potential utility for a wide range of target geometries and application areas, including nanometrology, nanomanufacturing, defect analysis, inspection, process control and biotechnology

  5. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano; Blankenship, Steve; Sharma, Renu

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Characterization of ELISA Antibody-Antigen Interaction using Footprinting-Mass Spectrometry and Negative Staining Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Margaret; Krawitz, Denise; Callahan, Matthew D.; Deperalta, Galahad; Wecksler, Aaron T.

    2018-03-01

    We describe epitope mapping data using multiple covalent labeling footprinting-mass spectrometry (MS) techniques coupled with negative stain transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data to analyze the antibody-antigen interactions in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Our hydroxyl radical footprinting-MS data using fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) indicates suppression of labeling across the antigen upon binding either of the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) utilized in the ELISA. Combining these data with Western blot analysis enabled the identification of the putative epitopes that appeared to span regions containing N-linked glycans. An additional structural mapping technique, carboxyl group footprinting-mass spectrometry using glycine ethyl ester (GEE) labeling, was used to confirm the epitopes. Deglycosylation of the antigen resulted in loss of potency in the ELISA, supporting the FPOP and GEE labeling data by indicating N-linked glycans are necessary for antigen binding. Finally, mapping of the epitopes onto the antigen crystal structure revealed an approximate 90° relative spatial orientation, optimal for a noncompetitive binding ELISA. TEM data shows both linear and diamond antibody-antigen complexes with a similar binding orientation as predicted from the two footprinting-MS techniques. This study is the first of its kind to utilize multiple bottom-up footprinting-MS techniques and TEM visualization to characterize the monoclonal antibody-antigen binding interactions of critical reagents used in a quality control (QC) lot-release ELISA. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Acousto-optical tunable filter for combined wideband, spectral, and optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machikhin, Alexander S; Pozhar, Vitold E; Viskovatykh, Alexander V; Burmak, Ludmila I

    2015-09-01

    A multimodal technique for inspection of microscopic objects by means of wideband optical microscopy, spectral microscopy, and optical coherence microscopy is described, implemented, and tested. The key feature is the spectral selection of light in the output arm of an interferometer with use of the specialized imaging acousto-optical tunable filter. In this filter, two interfering optical beams are diffracted via the same ultrasound wave without destruction of interference image structure. The basic requirements for the acousto-optical tunable filter are defined, and mathematical formulas for calculation of its parameters are derived. Theoretical estimation of the achievable accuracy of the 3D image reconstruction is presented and experimental proofs are given. It is demonstrated that spectral imaging can also be accompanied by measurement of the quantitative reflectance spectra. Examples of inspection of optically transparent and nontransparent samples demonstrate the applicability of the technique.

  8. Nanometric locking of the tight focus for optical microscopy and tip-enhanced microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayazawa, N; Furusawa, K; Kawata, S

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully stabilized the tight focus onto the sample surface of an optical microscope within ±1.0 nm for a virtually unlimited time duration. The time-dependent thermal drift of the tight focus and the mechanical tilt of the sample surface were simultaneously sensed by a non-optical means based on a capacitive sensor and were compensated for in real-time. This non-optical scheme is promising for the suppression of background light sources for optical microscopy. The focus stabilization is crucial for microscopic measurement at an interface, particularly when scanning a large surface area, because there is always a certain amount of mechanical tilt of the sample substrate, which degrades the contrast of the image. When imaging nanoscopic materials such as carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires, more stringent nanometric stabilization of the focus position relative to such samples is required, otherwise it is often difficult to interpret the results from the observations. Moreover, the smaller the sample volume is, the smaller the signal becomes, resulting in a long exposure time at each position. In this sense, long-term stability of the tight focus is essential for both microscopic large area scanning and nanosized sample scanning (high-resolution/large-area imaging). In addition, the recently developed tip-enhanced microscopy requires long-term stability of the relative position of the tip, sample and focus position. We were able to successfully demonstrate a stability improvement for tip-enhanced microscopy in the same manner. The stabilization of the tight focus enables us to perform long-term and robust measurements without any degradation of optical signal, resulting in the capability of true nanometric optical imaging with good reproducibility and high precision. The technique presented is a simple add-on for any kind of optical microscope. (paper)

  9. Hybrid microscopy of human carotid atheroma by means of optical-resolution optoacoustic and non-linear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Markus; Karlas, Angelos; Soliman, Dominik; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2017-03-01

    Carotid atheromatosis is causally related to stroke, a leading cause of disability and death. We present the analysis of a human carotid atheroma using a novel hybrid microscopy system that combines optical-resolution optoacoustic (photoacoustic) microscopy and several non-linear optical microscopy modalities (second and third harmonic generation, as well as, two-photon excitation fluorescence) to achieve a multimodal examination of the extracted tissue within the same imaging framework. Our system enables the label-free investigation of atheromatous human carotid tissue with a resolution of about 1 μm and allows for the congruent interrogation of plaque morphology and clinically relevant constituents such as red blood cells, collagen, and elastin. Our data reveal mutual interactions between blood embeddings and connective tissue within the atheroma, offering comprehensive insights into its stage of evolution and severity, and potentially facilitating the further development of diagnostic tools, as well as treatment strategies.

  10. Sensorless adaptive optics implementation in widefield optical sectioning microscopy inside in vivo Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzani, Mélanie; Loriette, Vincent; Tchenio, Paul; Benrezzak, Sakina; Nutarelli, Daniele; Fragola, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    We present an implementation of a sensorless adaptive optics loop in a widefield fluorescence microscope. This setup is designed to compensate for aberrations induced by the sample on both excitation and emission pathways. It allows fast optical sectioning inside a living Drosophila brain. We present a detailed characterization of the system performances. We prove that the gain brought to optical sectioning by realizing structured illumination microscopy with adaptive optics down to 50 μm deep inside living Drosophila brain.

  11. Comparison of closed loop and sensorless adaptive optics in widefield optical microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgenot, C.; Saunter, C.D.; Love, G.D.; Girkin, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a closed loop widefield adaptive optics, optical microscopy system in which the feedback signal is provided by backscattered light from the sample acting as a guide star. The improvement in imaging performance is compared to an adaptive optics system controlled via an image optimisation routine commonly described as sensorless adaptive optics. The samples viewed were imaged without fluorescence to ensure that photobleaching and other potential variations did not affect the compar...

  12. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct in situ viability assessment of bacteria in probiotic dairy products using viability staining in conjunction with confocal scanning laser microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, M A; Gardiner, G E; McBrearty, S J; O'Sullivan, E O; Mulvihill, D M; Collins, J K; Fitzgerald, G F; Stanton, C; Ross, R P

    2001-01-01

    The viability of the human probiotic strains Lactobacillus paracasei NFBC 338 and Bifidobacterium sp. strain UCC 35612 in reconstituted skim milk was assessed by confocal scanning laser microscopy using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight viability stain. The technique was rapid (milk and fermented milk. These results indicate the value of the microscopic approach for rapid viability testing of such probiotic products. In contrast, the numbers obtained by direct microscopic counting for Cheddar cheese and spray-dried probiotic milk powder were lower than those obtained by plate counting. These results highlight the limitations of LIVE/DEAD BacLight staining and the need to optimize the technique for different strain-product combinations. The minimum detection limit for in situ viability staining in conjunction with confocal scanning laser microscopy enumeration was approximately 10(8) bacteria/ml (equivalent to approximately 10(7) CFU/ml), based on Bifidobacterium sp. strain UCC 35612 counts in maximum-recovery diluent.

  14. Spectroscopic imaging with spectral domain visible light optical coherence microscopy in Alzheimer's disease brain samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, Antonia; Harper, Danielle J; Augustin, Marco; Eugui, Pablo; Muck, Martina; Gesperger, Johanna; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Woehrer, Adelheid; Baumann, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    A visible light spectral domain optical coherence microscopy system was developed. A high axial resolution of 0.88 μm in tissue was achieved using a broad visible light spectrum (425 - 685 nm ). Healthy human brain tissue was imaged to quantify the difference between white (WM) and grey matter (GM) in intensity and attenuation. The high axial resolution enables the investigation of amyloid-beta plaques of various sizes in human brain tissue and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By performing a spectroscopic analysis of the OCM data, differences in the characteristics for WM, GM, and neuritic amyloid-beta plaques were found. To gain additional contrast, Congo red stained AD brain tissue was investigated. A first effort was made to investigate optically cleared mouse brain tissue to increase the penetration depth and visualize hyperscattering structures in deeper cortical regions.

  15. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  16. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip.......It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...

  17. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...... are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  18. Adaptive optics for enhanced signal in CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A J; Poland, S P; Girkin, J M; Freudiger, C W; Evans, C L; Xie, X S

    2007-12-24

    We report the use of adaptive optics with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for label-free deep tissue imaging based on molecular vibrational spectroscopy. The setup employs a deformable membrane mirror and a random search optimization algorithm to improve signal intensity and image quality at large sample depths. We demonstrate the ability to correct for both system and sample-induced aberrations in test samples as well as in muscle tissue in order to enhance the CARS signal. The combined system and sample-induced aberration correction increased the signal by an average factor of approximately 3x for the test samples at a depth of 700 microm and approximately 6x for muscle tissue at a depth of 260 microm. The enhanced signal and higher penetration depth offered by adaptive optics will augment CARS microscopy as an in vivo and in situ biomedical imaging modality.

  19. Cytology 3D structure formation based on optical microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronichev, A N; Polyakov, E V; Zaitsev, S M; Shabalova, I P; Djangirova, T V

    2017-01-01

    The article the article is devoted to optimization of the parameters of imaging of biological preparations in optical microscopy using a multispectral camera in visible range of electromagnetic radiation. A model for the image forming of virtual preparations was proposed. The optimum number of layers was determined for the object scan in depth and holistic perception of its switching according to the results of the experiment. (paper)

  20. Multiphoton multifocal microscopy exploiting a diffractive optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacconi, L.; Froner, E.; Antolini, R.; Taghizadeh, M. R.; Choudhury, A.; Pavone, F. S.

    2003-10-01

    Multiphoton multifocal microscopy (MMM) usually has been achieved through a combination of galvo scanners with microlens arrays, with rotating disks of microlens arrays, and cascaded beam splitters with asynchronous rastering of scanning mirrors. Here we describe the achievement of a neat and compact MMM by use of a high-diffraction-efficiency diffractive-optic element that generates a multiple-spot grid of uniform intensity to achieve higher fidelity in imaging of live cells at adequate speeds.

  1. Cytology 3D structure formation based on optical microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Shabalova, I. P.; Djangirova, T. V.; Zaitsev, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The article the article is devoted to optimization of the parameters of imaging of biological preparations in optical microscopy using a multispectral camera in visible range of electromagnetic radiation. A model for the image forming of virtual preparations was proposed. The optimum number of layers was determined for the object scan in depth and holistic perception of its switching according to the results of the experiment.

  2. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of poled silica waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Arentoft, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy (SHSOM) is performed on electric-field poled silica-based waveguides. Two operation modes of SHSOM are considered. Oblique transmission reflection and normal reflection modes are used to image the spatial distribution of nonlinear susceptibilities...... and limitations of the two operation modes when used for SHSOM studies of poled silica-based waveguides are discussed. The influence of surface defects on the resulting second-harmonic images is also considered. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Optical microscope illumination analysis using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Park, Haesung

    2017-06-15

    Misalignment of the aperture diaphragm present in optical microscopes results in angular illumination asymmetry (ANILAS) at the sample plane. Here we show that through-focus propagation of ANILAS results in a lateral image shift with a focus position. This could lead to substantial errors in quantitative results for optical methods that use through-focus images such as three-dimensional nanoparticle tracking, confocal microscopy, and through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM). A correlation exists between ANILAS and the slant in TSOM images. Hence, the slant in the TSOM image can be used to detect, analyze, and rectify the presence of ANILAS.

  4. Corneal optics after reading, microscopy and computer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael J; Buehren, Tobias; Bece, Andrej; Voetz, Stephanie C

    2006-04-01

    To compare lid-induced changes in corneal optics following reading, microscopy and computer work. Nine subjects with normal ocular health were recruited for the study. Five subjects were myopic, two were emmetropic, one was astigmatic and one was hyperopic. Corneal topography was measured before and after 60 mins of reading a novel, performing a blood cell counting task on a microscope and Internet searching. Corneal topography data were used to derive the corneal wavefront Zernike coefficients up to the fourth order. A meridian analysis of instantaneous corneal power along the upper 90-degree semi-meridian was performed to examine local changes caused by eyelid pressure. Digital photography was used to capture body posture and eyelid position during the tasks. Each of the three tasks showed systematically different effects on both the characteristics and location of corneal topography changes. Reading and microscopy generally exhibited larger and more centrally located changes compared with the computer task. Differences in wavefront aberration characteristics between the three tasks were apparent in both lower and higher order aberrations. The location of corneal distortions differed significantly between microscopy and computer work, with microscopy causing distortions to occur closer to the videokeratoscope measurement axis compared with computer work (p = 0.015). Reading, microscopy and computer work have different effects on corneal aberrations. The results are in agreement with the hypothesis that lid-induced corneal aberrations may play a role in myopia development.

  5. Proximal design for a multimodality endoscope with multiphoton microscopy, optical coherence microscopy and visual modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Kelli C.; Talarico, Olivia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    A multimodality endoscope system has been designed for early detection of ovarian cancer. Multiple illumination and detection systems must be integrated in a compact, stable, transportable configuration to meet the requirements of a clinical setting. The proximal configuration presented here supports visible light navigation with a large field of view and low resolution, high resolution multiphoton microscopy (MPM), and high resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM). All modalities are integrated into a single optical system in the endoscope. The system requires two light sources: a green laser for visible light navigation and a compact fiber based femtosecond laser for MPM and OCM. Using an inline wavelength division multiplexer, the two sources are combined into a single mode fiber. To accomplish OCM, a fiber coupler is used to separate the femtosecond laser into a reference arm and signal arm. The reflected reference arm and the signal from the sample are interfered and wavelength separated by a reflection grating and detected using a linear array. The MPM signal is collimated and goes through a series of filters to separate the 2nd and 3rd harmonics as well as twophoton excitation florescence (2PEF) and 3PEF. Each signal is independently detected on a photo multiplier tube and amplified. The visible light is collected by multiple high numerical aperture fibers at the endoscope tip which are bundled into one SMA adapter at the proximal end and connected to a photodetector. This integrated system design is compact, efficient and meets both optical and mechanical requirements for clinical applications.

  6. Superpenetration optical microscopy by iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianyong; Germain, Ronald N; Cui, Meng

    2012-05-29

    Biological tissues are rarely transparent, presenting major challenges for deep tissue optical microscopy. The achievable imaging depth is fundamentally limited by wavefront distortions caused by aberration and random scattering. Here, we report an iterative wavefront compensation technique that takes advantage of the nonlinearity of multiphoton signals to determine and compensate for these distortions and to focus light inside deep tissues. Different from conventional adaptive optics methods, this technique can rapidly measure highly complicated wavefront distortions encountered in deep tissue imaging and provide compensations for not only aberration but random scattering. The technique is tested with a variety of highly heterogeneous biological samples including mouse brain tissue, skull, and lymph nodes. We show that high quality three-dimensional imaging can be realized at depths beyond the reach of conventional multiphoton microscopy and adaptive optics methods, albeit over restricted distances for a given correction. Moreover, the required laser excitation power can be greatly reduced in deep tissues, deviating from the power requirement of ballistic light excitation and thus significantly reducing photo damage to the biological tissue.

  7. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  8. Breaking the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy by optical shelving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2007-05-25

    We report the breaking of the diffraction resolution barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy by transiently shelving the fluorophore in a metastable dark state. Using a relatively modest light intensity of several kW/cm(2) in a focal distribution featuring a local zero, we confine the fluorescence emission to a spot whose diameter is a fraction of the wavelength of light. Nanoscale far-field optical resolution down to 50 nm is demonstrated by imaging microtubules in a mammalian cell and proteins on the plasma membrane of a neuron. The presence of dark states in virtually any fluorescent molecule opens up a new venue for far-field microscopy with resolution that is no longer limited by diffraction.

  9. Optimal model-based sensorless adaptive optics for epifluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We report on a universal sample-independent sensorless adaptive optics method, based on modal optimization of the second moment of the fluorescence emission from a point-like excitation. Our method employs a sample-independent precalibration, performed only once for the particular system, to establish the direct relation between the image quality and the aberration. The method is potentially applicable to any form of microscopy with epifluorescence detection, including the practically important case of incoherent fluorescence emission from a three dimensional object, through minor hardware modifications. We have applied the technique successfully to a widefield epifluorescence microscope and to a multiaperture confocal microscope.

  10. Combined two-photon microscopy and angiographic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumju; Wang, Tae Jun; Li, Qingyun; Nam, Jutaek; Hwang, Sekyu; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Ki Hean

    2013-08-01

    A combined two-photon microscopy (TPM) and angiographic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is developed, which can provide molecular, cellular, structural, and vascular information of tissue specimens in vivo. This combined system is implemented by adding an OCT vasculature visualization method to the previous combined TPM and OCT, and then is applied to in vivo tissue imaging. Two animal models, a mouse brain cranial window model and a mouse ear cancer model, are used. Both molecular, cellular information at local regions of tissues, and structural, vascular information at relatively larger regions are visualized in the same sections. In vivo tissue microenvironments are better elucidated by the combined TPM and angiographic OCT.

  11. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  12. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration.

  13. Comparison of sensitivity and specificity of 4 methods for detection of Giardia duodenalis in feces: immunofluorescence and PCR are superior to microscopy of concentrated iodine-stained samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotfred-Rasmussen, Helle; Lund, Marianne; Enemark, Heidi L; Erlandsen, Mogens; Petersen, Eskild

    2016-03-01

    For decades, microscopy of feces after formol-ethylacetate (FEA) concentration and iodine staining has been the routine test for intestinal protozoa. Lately, polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence-labeled parasite-specific antibodies have been introduced, but their place in everyday routine diagnostics has not yet been established. We compared FEA and salt-sugar flotation (SSF) concentration followed by microscopy of iodine-stained concentrate and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for detection of Giardia duodenalis in human feces. The median number of Giardia cysts found by FEA in 19 Giardia-positive samples was 50 cysts per gram (CPG), by SSF 350 CPG, by IFA 76,700 CPG, and by qPCR 316,000 CPG. We next tested 455 consecutive samples for presence of Giardia cysts. Using IFA as reference, qPCR had a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95.1%, a false-positive rate of 50%, a false-negative rate of 0.48%, a positive predictive value of 50%, and a negative predictive value of 99.5%. In conclusion, qPCR and IFA were significantly more sensitive than microscopy of iodine-stained concentrates using either FEA or SSF. We suggest, when using qPCR, that positive samples are verified by IFA to prevent false-positive results. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  15. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    find the 3D orientation of stationary metallic anisotropic nanoparticles utilizing only long-axis SPR enhancement. The polarization direction of the illuminating light was rotated causing the relative intensity of p-polarized and s-polarized light within the evanescent field to change. The interaction of the evanescent field with the particles is dependent on the orientation of the particle producing an intensity curve. This curve and the in-plane angle can be compared with simulations to accurately determine the 3D orientation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is another non-invasive far-field technique based upon interferometry that does not rely on staining or other contrast enhancing techniques. In addition, high numerical aperture condensers and objectives can be used to give a very narrow depth of field allowing for the optical tomography of samples, which makes it an ideal candidate to study biological systems. DIC microscopy has also proven itself in determining the orientation of gold nanorods in both engineered environments and within cells. Many types of nanoparticles and nanostructures have been synthesized using lithographic techniques on silicon wafer substrates. Traditionally, reflective mode DIC microscopes have been developed and applied to the topographical study of reflective substrates and the imaging of chips on silicon wafers. Herein, a laser-illuminated reflected-mode DIC was developed for studying nanoparticles on reflective surfaces.

  16. A robotized six degree of freedom stage for optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramov, M. Z.; Ivanov, I.; Pavlov, V.; Zaharieva, K.

    2013-04-01

    This work represents an investigation of the possibility to use a hexapod system for optical microscopy investigation and measurements. An appropriate hexapod stage has been developed. The stage has been calibrated and used for several different optical microscopy applications. The construction of the stage is based on the classic Stewart platform and thus represents a parallel robot with 6 degree of freedom. Appropriate software is controlling the transformation of the 3 position coordinates of the moving plate and the 3 Euler angles in position velocities and accelerations of the plate motion. An embedded microcontroller is implementing the motion plan and the PID controller regulating the kinematics. By difference to the available in the market hexapods the proposed solution is with lower precision but is significantly cheaper and simple to maintain. The repeatability obtained with current implementation is 0,05 mm and 0,001 rad. A specialized DSP based video processing engine is used for both feedback computation and application specific image processing in real-time. To verify the concept some applications has been developed for specific tasks and has been used for specific measurements.

  17. Exploring lipids with nonlinear optical microscopy in multiple biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba

    Lipids are crucial biomolecules for the well being of humans. Altered lipid metabolism may give rise to a variety of diseases that affect organs from the cardiovascular to the central nervous system. A deeper understanding of lipid metabolic processes would spur medical research towards developing precise diagnostic tools, treatment methods, and preventive strategies for reducing the impact of lipid diseases. Lipid visualization remains a complex task because of the perturbative effect exerted by traditional biochemical assays and most fluorescence markers. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy enables interrogation of biological samples with minimum disturbance, and is particularly well suited for label-free visualization of lipids, providing chemical specificity without compromising on spatial resolution. Hyperspectral imaging yields large datasets that benefit from tailored multivariate analysis. In this thesis, CRS microscopy was combined with Raman spectroscopy and other label-free nonlinear optical techniques to analyze lipid metabolism in multiple biological systems. We used nonlinear Raman techniques to characterize Meibum secretions in the progression of dry eye disease, where the lipid and protein contributions change in ratio and phase segregation. We employed similar tools to examine lipid droplets in mice livers aboard a spaceflight mission, which lose their retinol content contributing to the onset of nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease. We also focused on atherosclerosis, a disease that revolves around lipid-rich plaques in arterial walls. We examined the lipid content of macrophages, whose variable phenotype gives rise to contrasting healing and inflammatory activities. We also proposed new label-free markers, based on lifetime imaging, for macrophage phenotype, and to detect products of lipid oxidation. Cholesterol was also detected in hepatitis C virus infected cells, and in specific strains of age-related macular degeneration diseased cells by

  18. Adaptive optics stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (AO-STORM) by particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F; Zhang, Yiwen; Shen, Ping; Kner, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) can achieve resolutions of better than 20nm imaging single fluorescently labeled cells. However, when optical aberrations induced by larger biological samples degrade the point spread function (PSF), the localization accuracy and number of localizations are both reduced, destroying the resolution of STORM. Adaptive optics (AO) can be used to correct the wavefront, restoring the high resolution of STORM. A challenge for AO-STORM microscopy is the development of robust optimization algorithms which can efficiently correct the wavefront from stochastic raw STORM images. Here we present the implementation of a particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach with a Fourier metric for real-time correction of wavefront aberrations during STORM acquisition. We apply our approach to imaging boutons 100 μm deep inside the central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila melanogaster larvae achieving a resolution of 146 nm.

  19. Submicron Confocal Raman Microscopy of Optical Holograms in Multicomponent Photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, C. R.; Harris, T. D.; Harris, A. L.; Schilling, M. L.

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate submicron chemical imaging of optical holograms in multicomponent photopolymers using a scanning confocal Raman microscope. Our microscope is sensitive to the submicron, <1 percent concentration variations of the polymeric components that form the refractive index modulation responsible for hologram diffraction. Photopolymers are attractive media for holographic data storage, yet the mechanisms for generating the refractive index modulations responsible for hologram diffraction remain poorly understood. We obtain the first direct chemical evidence showing that these concentration modulations are established both by monomer diffusion and by polymer matrix swelling during hologram writing. Spatial variations in both density and composition contribute to the refractive index modulation. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of submicron Raman microscopy in chemically imaging photodegradable organic and biological materials.

  20. Quantitative Image Restoration in Bright Field Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Sánchez Miranda, Manuel de Jesús

    2017-11-07

    Bright field (BF) optical microscopy is regarded as a poor method to observe unstained biological samples due to intrinsic low image contrast. We introduce quantitative image restoration in bright field (QRBF), a digital image processing method that restores out-of-focus BF images of unstained cells. Our procedure is based on deconvolution, using a point spread function modeled from theory. By comparing with reference images of bacteria observed in fluorescence, we show that QRBF faithfully recovers shape and enables quantify size of individual cells, even from a single input image. We applied QRBF in a high-throughput image cytometer to assess shape changes in Escherichia coli during hyperosmotic shock, finding size heterogeneity. We demonstrate that QRBF is also applicable to eukaryotic cells (yeast). Altogether, digital restoration emerges as a straightforward alternative to methods designed to generate contrast in BF imaging for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved.

  2. Micro-CT scan, electron microscopy and optical microscopy study of insertional traumas of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, Alexia; Jegoux, Franck; Pilet, Paul; Godey, Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of cochlear trauma resulting from the implantation of electrodes is important for the development of atraumatic surgical techniques. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the advantages of micro-CT scanning, back-scattered electron microscopy (BSEM) and optical microscopy (OM) in understanding the mechanisms of cochlear trauma due to cochlear implantation. Our study involved six petrous bones removed from fresh human cadavers: one control specimen plus five other specimens that were surgically implanted with Neurelec Digisonic SP EVO electrode arrays. All six specimens underwent glycol methyl methacrylate embedding, were examined via micro-CT scan and were then sectioned for histological analysis of undecalcified samples via BSEM and OM. The 2D micro-CT scan reconstructions did not display cochlear microtrauma due to a limited resolution and the loss of information caused by the metallic artifacts of the intracochlear electrodes. The 3D reconstructions displayed the quality of the electrode array positioning in the cochlea and enabled determining the axes on which to section the specimens for histological examination. BSEM afforded a clear view of the damage to the osseous structures of the cochlea, but did not display the soft tissue injuries. OM enabled viewing and grading the histological lesions resulting from insertion. In our opinion, the combination of 3D micro-CT scan reconstructions and histological analysis using OM appears to be the best method to analyze this type of trauma.

  3. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  4. Silicon nitride grids are compatible with correlative negative staining electron microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for use in the detection of micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, V; Hermann, P; Laue, M; Bannert, N

    2014-06-01

    Successive application of negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a new correlative approach that could be used to rapidly and specifically detect and identify single pathogens including bioterrorism-relevant viruses in complex samples. Our objective is to evaluate the TERS-compatibility of commonly used electron microscopy (EM) grids (sample supports), chemicals and negative staining techniques and, if required, to devise appropriate alternatives. While phosphortungstic acid (PTA) is suitable as a heavy metal stain, uranyl acetate, paraformaldehyde in HEPES buffer and alcian blue are unsuitable due to their relatively high Raman scattering. Moreover, the low thermal stability of the carbon-coated pioloform film on copper grids (pioloform grids) negates their utilization. The silicon in the cantilever of the silver-coated atomic force microscope tip used to record TERS spectra suggested that Si-based grids might be employed as alternatives. From all evaluated Si-based TEM grids, the silicon nitride (SiN) grid was found to be best suited, with almost no background Raman signals in the relevant spectral range, a low surface roughness and good particle adhesion properties that could be further improved by glow discharge. Charged SiN grids have excellent particle adhesion properties. The use of these grids in combination with PTA for contrast in the TEM is suitable for subsequent analysis by TERS. The study reports fundamental modifications and optimizations of the negative staining EM method that allows a combination with near-field Raman spectroscopy to acquire a spectroscopic signature from nanoscale biological structures. This should facilitate a more precise diagnosis of single viral particles and other micro-organisms previously localized and visualized in the TEM. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Full-color structured illumination optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jia; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Yao, Baoli; Zhou, Xing; Yang, Yanlong; Yan, Shaohui; Min, Junwei; Yu, Xianghua

    2015-09-01

    In merits of super-resolved resolution and fast speed of three-dimensional (3D) optical sectioning capability, structured illumination microscopy (SIM) has found variety of applications in biomedical imaging. So far, most SIM systems use monochrome CCD or CMOS cameras to acquire images and discard the natural color information of the specimens. Although multicolor integration scheme are employed, multiple excitation sources and detectors are required and the spectral information is limited to a few of wavelengths. Here, we report a new method for full-color SIM with a color digital camera. A data processing algorithm based on HSV (Hue, Saturation, and Value) color space is proposed, in which the recorded color raw images are processed in the Hue, Saturation, Value color channels, and then reconstructed to a 3D image with full color. We demonstrated some 3D optical sectioning results on samples such as mixed pollen grains, insects, micro-chips and the surface of coins. The presented technique is applicable to some circumstance where color information plays crucial roles, such as in materials science and surface morphology.

  6. Large area laser scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a fibre optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas J; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    A laser scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (LS OR-PAM) system based on a stationary fibre optic sensor is described. The sensor comprises an optically resonant interferometric polymer cavity formed on the tip of a rounded single mode optical fibre. It provides low noise equivalent pressure (NEP = 68.7 Pa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth), a broad bandwidth that extends to 80 MHz and a near omnidirectional response. The latter is a significant advantage, as it allows large areas (>1cm 2 ) to be imaged without the need for translational mechanical scanning offering the potential for fast image acquisition. The system provides a lateral resolution of 8 µm, an axial resolution of 21 µm, and a field of view up to 10 mm × 10 mm. To demonstrate the system, in vivo 3D structural images of the microvasculature of a mouse ear were obtained, showing single capillaries overlaying larger vessels as well as functional images revealing blood oxygen saturation.

  7. Feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy in ultra-structural imaging of human colon tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Seo [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo June; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Hyuk; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Byeong Il [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    We demonstrated the imaging feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) in pathological diagnosis of human colon tissues. FF-OCM images with high transverse resolution were obtained at different depths of the samples without any dye staining or physical slicing, and detailed microstructures of human colon tissues were visualized. Morphological differences in normal tissues, cancer tissues, and tissues under transition were observed and matched with results seen in conventional optical microscope images. The optical biopsy based on FF-OCM could overcome the limitations on the number of physical cuttings of tissues and could perform high-throughput mass diagnosis of diseased tissues. The proved utility of FF-OCM as a comprehensive and efficient imaging modality of human tissues showed it to be a good alternative to conventional biopsy.

  8. Feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy in ultra-structural imaging of human colon tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Seo; Choi, Woo June; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Byeong Il

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated the imaging feasibility of full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) in pathological diagnosis of human colon tissues. FF-OCM images with high transverse resolution were obtained at different depths of the samples without any dye staining or physical slicing, and detailed microstructures of human colon tissues were visualized. Morphological differences in normal tissues, cancer tissues, and tissues under transition were observed and matched with results seen in conventional optical microscope images. The optical biopsy based on FF-OCM could overcome the limitations on the number of physical cuttings of tissues and could perform high-throughput mass diagnosis of diseased tissues. The proved utility of FF-OCM as a comprehensive and efficient imaging modality of human tissues showed it to be a good alternative to conventional biopsy.

  9. Phase-Contrast and High-Resolution Optics for X-Ray Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    von Hofsten, Olof

    2010-01-01

    X-ray microscopy is a well-established technique for nanoscale imaging. Zone plates are used as microscope objectives and provide high resolution, approaching 10 nm, currently limited by fabrication issues. This Thesis presents zone plate optics that achieve either high resolution or phase contrast in x-ray microscopy. The high-resolution optics use high orders of the zone plate, which alleviates the demands on fabrication, and the phase-contrast optics are single-element diffractive optical ...

  10. Automated interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and computational adaptive optics for improved optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Boppart, Stephen A.; Carney, P. Scott

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an algorithm framework for the automation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). Under this framework, common processing steps such as dispersion correction, Fourier domain resampling, and computational adaptive optics aberration correction are carried out as metrics-assisted parameter search problems. We further present the results of this algorithm applied to phantom and biological tissue samples and compare with manually adjusted results. With ...

  11. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginijus Barzda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red, which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  12. Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy with adaptive optics controlled multiplexed beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-09-09

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  13. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-01-01

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures. PMID:24022688

  14. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. 3D imaging of hematoxylin and eosin stained thick tissues with a sub-femtoliter resolution by using Cr:forsterite-laser-based nonlinear microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chien-Ting; Wei, Ming-Liang; Liao, Yi-Hua; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2017-02-01

    Intraoperative assessment of excision tissues during cancer surgery is clinically important. The assessment is used to be guided by the examination for residual tumor with frozen pathology, while it is time consuming for preparation and is with low accuracy for diagnosis. Recently, reflection confocal microscopy (RCM) and nonlinear microscopy (NLM) were demonstrated to be promising methods for surgical border assessment. Intraoperative RCM imaging may enable detection of residual tumor directly on skin cancers patients during Mohs surgery. The assessment of benign and malignant breast pathologies in fresh surgical specimens was demonstrated by NLM. Without using hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) that are common dyes for histopathological diagnosis, RCM was proposed to image in vivo by using aluminum chloride for nuclear contrast on surgical wounds directly, while NLM was proposed to detect two photon fluorescence nuclear contrast from acrdine orange staining. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate 3D imaging of H and E stained thick tissues with a sub-femtoliter resolution by using Cr:forsterite-laser-based NLM. With a 1260 nm femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser as the excitation source, the hematoxylin will strongly enhance the third-harmonic generation (THG) signals, while eosin will illuminate strong fluorescence under three photon absorption. Compared with previous works, the 1260 nm excitation light provide high penetration and low photodamage to the exercised tissues so that the possibility to perform other follow-up examination will be preserved. The THG and three-photon process provides high nonlinearity so that the super resolution in 3D is now possible. The staining and the contrast of the imaging is also fully compatible with the current clinical standard on frozen pathology thus facilitate the rapid intraoperative assessment of excision tissues. This work is sponsored by National Health Research Institutes and supported by National Taiwan University

  16. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The experimental use of the new photophysical effect is described. The applications of the new technique are manifold. Important mechanistic questions in solid-state chemistry (oxidation, diazotization, photodimerization, surface hydration, hydrolysis are answered with respect to simultaneous AFM (atomic force microscopy and detailed crystal packing. Prehistoric petrified bacteria and concomitant pyrite inclusions are also investigated with local RAMAN SNOM. Polymer beads and unstained biological objects (rabbit heart, shrimp eye allow for nanoscopic analysis of cell organelles. Similarly, human teeth and a cancerous tissue are analyzed. Bladder cancer tissue is clearly differentiated from healthy tissue without staining and this opens a new highly promising diagnostic tool for precancer diagnosis. Industrial applications are demonstrated at the corrosion behavior of dental alloys (withdrawal of a widely used alloy, harmless substitutes, improvement of paper glazing, behavior of blood bags upon storage, quality assessment of metal particle preparations for surface enhanced RAMAN spectroscopy, and determination of diffusion coefficient and light fastness in textile fiber dyeing. The latter applications include fluorescence SNOM. Local fluorescence SNOM is also used in the study of partly aggregating dye nanoparticles within resin/varnish preparations. Unexpected new insights are obtained in all of the various fields that cannot be obtained by other techniques.

  17. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  18. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  19. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  20. Understanding Alterations in Cell Nano-architecture during Early Carcinogenesis using Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil

    Carcinogenesis is a complex multi-step process which eventually results in a malignant phenotype that often progresses into a fatal metastatic stage. There are several molecular changes (e.g. DNA methylation, activation of proto-oncogenes, loss of tumor-suppressor genes, histone acetylation) that occur in cells prior to the microscopically detectable morphological alterations. Hence, it is intuitive that these molecular changes should impact various biochemical, biophysical and transport processes within the cell and therefore its nanoscale morphology. Furthermore, recent studies have established that apparently `normal' cells (i.e., away from the actual tumor location) undergo similar genetic/epigenetic changes as the actual cancer cells, giving rise to the phenomenon of field carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, traditional microscopy or histopathology cannot resolve structures below 300 nm due to diffraction-limited resolution. Hence, we developed a novel optical imaging technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy or optical nanocytology which quantifies the nanoscale refractive-index fluctuations (i.e. mass-density variations such as chromatin compaction) in an optically measured biomarker, disorder strength (Ld). This dissertation proves the nanoscale sensitivity of PWS nanocytology and shows that increase in Ld parallels neoplastic potential of a cell by using standardized cell-lines and animal-models. Based on concept of field carcinogenesis, we employ PWS nanocytology in a multi-center clinical study on approximately 450 patients in four different cancer-types (colon, ovarian, thyroid and lung) and we illustrate that nanoscale disorder increase is a ubiquitous phenomenon across different organs. We further demonstrate the potential of PWS nanocytology in predicting risk for developing future neoplasia. Biologically, we prove that cytoskeletal organization in both nucleus and cytoplasm plays a crucial role in governing L d-differences. Moreover, we

  1. Near field scanning optical microscopy of polycrystalline semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Mary Kay

    1999-09-01

    Photovoltaic devices are commonly used for space applications and remote terrestrial power requirements. Polycrystalline solar cell devices often have much lower efficiencies than their crystalline counterparts, but because they can be fabricated much more cheaply, they can still be cost-effective when compared to single crystal devices. The long term goal of this work is to provide information that will lead to higher quality devices with improved cost efficiency. In order to do this, a better understanding of the mechanisms that take place in these materials is needed. The goal of this thesis was to improve our understanding of these devices by adapting a novel characterization technique, Near Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM), to the study of polycrystalline films. Visible light NSOM is a relatively new technique that allows for optical characterization of materials with resolution beyond the far-field diffraction limit. By using NSOM to study the physical and electrical properties of polycrystalline solar cells, individual grains can be studied and more insight can be gained as to how various properties of the thin films affect the device efficiency. For this research, an NSOM was designed and built to be versatile enough to handle the sorts of samples and measurements required for studying a variety of photovoltaic devices. As a first step, the NSOM was used to characterize single crystal GaAs solar cell devices. Measurements of topography and NSOM-induced photocurrent were obtained simultaneously on cross sections of the material, allowing the p-n junction to be probed. Because the NSOM data could be compared to an expected result, this allowed verification of the new microscope's imaging capabilities and ensured accurate data interpretation. Effects of surface recombination were detected on the cleaved edges. The NSOM was used to characterize surface quality and study the effects of surface passivation treatments. Of the polycrystalline materials

  2. Automated interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and computational adaptive optics for improved optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, we introduce an algorithm framework for the automation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). Under this framework, common processing steps such as dispersion correction, Fourier domain resampling, and computational adaptive optics aberration correction are carried out as metrics-assisted parameter search problems. We further present the results of this algorithm applied to phantom and biological tissue samples and compare with manually adjusted results. With the automated algorithm, near-optimal ISAM reconstruction can be achieved without manual adjustment. At the same time, the technical barrier for the nonexpert using ISAM imaging is also significantly lowered.

  3. Evaluation of the capacity of Raman Microscopy in the mineralogical and physico-chemical characterization of archaeological material: corroded metals, stained-glass and pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard-Abouchacra, Michel

    2001-01-01

    This study is based on the evaluation of the capacity of non-destructive physico-chemical analysis by Raman Microscopy in three artistic and archaeological domains: metal corrosion, stained-glass and Prehistoric pigments. The study presents different levels of results depending on the field of application. In relation to Prehistoric pigments the results show clearly the capacity of distinguishing in black pigments, manganese oxide from amorphous carbon, or, the facility of identification of hematite in red pigments. Concerning the study of the corrosion products of metals, RM is indubitably an ideal technique for the identification and differentiation of the diverse alteration products observed on archaeological metallic material (sulphates, chlorides, oxides...). Finally, in the case of stained-glass, the positive results obtained in the study of the glass itself or in the study of the superficial coloration is counterbalanced by the complexity of identification of glass coloration due to metallic colloid particles, or by the fluorescent problem particularly important in this last application. However, the global result is clearly optimistic and demonstrate the utility of such a non-destructive technique for archaeologists, restorers or conservators. (author) [fr

  4. Multiscale imaging of human thyroid pathologies using integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. Thirty four thyroid gland specimens were imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology, ranging from normal thyroid to neoplasia and benign disease. The integrated OCT and OCM imaging system allows seamlessly switching between low and high magnifications, in a way similar to traditional microscopy. Good correspondence was observed between optical images and histological sections. The results provide a basis for interpretation of future OCT and OCM images of the thyroid tissues and suggest the possibility of future in vivo evaluation of thyroid pathology.

  5. Integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy imaging of human pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aquirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    Excisional biopsy is the current gold standard for disease diagnosis; however, it requires a relatively long processing time and it may also suffer from unacceptable false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising imaging technique that provide real-time, high resolution and three-dimensional (3D) images of tissue morphology. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an extension of OCT, combining both the coherence gating and the confocal gating techniques. OCM imaging achieves cellular resolution with deeper imaging depth compared to confocal microscopy. An integrated OCT/OCM imaging system can provide co-registered multiscale imaging of tissue morphology. 3D-OCT provides architectural information with a large field of view and can be used to find regions of interest; while OCM provides high magnification to enable cellular imaging. The integrated OCT/OCM system has an axial resolution of pathologic specimens, including colon (58), thyroid (43), breast (34), and kidney (19), were imaged with OCT and OCM within 2 to 6 hours after excision. The images were compared with H & E histology to identify characteristic features useful for disease diagnosis. The feasibility of visualizing human pathology using integrated OCT/OCM was demonstrated in the pathology laboratory settings.

  6. Optical model for port-wine stain skin and its Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanqing; Xiao, Zhengying; Chen, Rong; Wang, Ying

    2008-12-01

    Laser irradiation is the most acceptable therapy for PWS patient at present time. Its efficacy is highly dependent on the energy deposition rules in skin. To achieve optimal PWS treatment parameters a better understanding of light propagation in PWS skin is indispensable. Traditional Monte Carlo simulations using simple geometries such as planar layer tissue model can not provide energy deposition in the skin with enlarged blood vessels. In this paper the structure of normal skin and the pathological character of PWS skin was analyzed in detail and the true structure were simplified into a hybrid layered mathematical model to character two most important aspects of PWS skin: layered structure and overabundant dermal vessels. The basic laser-tissue interaction mechanisms in skin were investigated and the optical parameters of PWS skin tissue at the therapeutic wavelength. Monte Carlo (MC) based techniques were choused to calculate the energy deposition in the skin. Results can be used in choosing optical dosage. Further simulations can be used to predict optimal laser parameters to achieve high-efficacy laser treatment of PWS.

  7. Detection of amyloid in abdominal fat pad aspirates in early amyloidosis: Role of electron microscopy and Congo red stained cell block sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Devata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA of the abdominal fat pad is a minimally invasive procedure to demonstrate tissue deposits of amyloid. However, protocols to evaluate amyloid in fat pad aspirates are not standardized, especially for detecting scant amyloid in early disease. Materials and Methods: We studied abdominal fat pad aspirates from 33 randomly selected patients in whom subsequent tissue biopsy, autopsy, and/or medical history for confirmation of amyloidosis (AL were also available. All these cases were suspected to have early AL, but had negative results on abdominal fat pad aspirates evaluated by polarizing microscopy of Congo Red stained sections (CRPM. The results with CRPM between four reviewers were compared in 12 cases for studying inter observer reproducibility. 24 cases were also evaluated by ultrastructural study with electron microscopy (EM. Results: Nine of thirty-three (27% cases reported negative by polarizing microscopy had amyloidosis. Reanalysis of 12 mixed positive-negative cases, showed considerable inter-observer variability with frequent lack of agreement between four observers by CRPM alone (Cohen′s Kappa index of 0.1, 95% CI -0.1 to 0.36. EM showed amyloid in the walls of small blood vessels in fibroadipose tissue in four out of nine cases (44% with amyloidosis. Conclusion: In addition to poor inter-observer reproducibility, CRPM alone in cases with scant amyloid led to frequent false negative results (9 out of 9, 100%. For improved detection of AL, routine ultrastructural evaluation with EM of fat pad aspirates by evaluating at least 15 small blood vessels in the aspirated fibroadipose tissue is recommended. Given the high false negative rate for CRPM alone in early disease, routine reflex evaluation with EM is highly recommended to avert the invasive option of biopsying various organs in cases with high clinical suspicion for AL.

  8. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...... in a direct manner and has most often been inferred from the apparent quality of recorded optical images. Complicated near-field optical imaging characteristics, together with the possibility of topographically induced artefacts, however, has increased demands for a more reliable probe characterization...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  9. Comparison between optical techniques and confocal microscopy for defect detection on thin wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmann, Philip; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2004-11-15

    Conventional microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy (CM) are not suitable for on-line surface inspection of fine metallic wires. In the recent years, some optical techniques have been developed to be used for those tasks. However, they need a rigorous validation. In this work, we have used confocal microscopy to obtain the topography z(x,y) of wires with longitudinal defects, such as dielines. The topography has been used to predict the light scattered by the wire. These simulations have been compared with experimental results, showing a good agreement.

  10. Comparison between optical techniques and confocal microscopy for defect detection on thin wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, Philip; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2004-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy (CM) are not suitable for on-line surface inspection of fine metallic wires. In the recent years, some optical techniques have been developed to be used for those tasks. However, they need a rigorous validation. In this work, we have used confocal microscopy to obtain the topography z(x,y) of wires with longitudinal defects, such as dielines. The topography has been used to predict the light scattered by the wire. These simulations have been compared with experimental results, showing a good agreement

  11. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...... in transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  12. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    in transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We......Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...

  13. Near-Field Optical Microscopy of Fractal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coello, Victor; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Using a photon scanning tunnelling microscope combined with a shear-force feedback system, we image both topographical and near-field optical images (at the wavelengths of 633 and 594 nm) of silver colloid fractals. Near-field optical imaging is calibrated with a standing evanescent wave pattern...

  14. Near-field optical microscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, A.; Lopez-Rios, T.; Quemerais, P.

    2005-01-01

    A homemade apertureless near-field optical microscope using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is described. The experimental set-up simultaneously provides optical and topographic images of the sample. Technical details and features of the set-up are presented, together with results demonstrating the sub-wavelength resolution achieved as well as its sensitivity to dielectric contrasts. We show that the use of a STM permits to precisely control very small distances between the tip and the sample which is a great advantage to excite localized optical resonances between the tip and the surface

  15. Near-Field Optical Microscopy of Fractal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coello, Victor; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Using a photon scanning tunnelling microscope combined with a shear-force feedback system, we image both topographical and near-field optical images (at the wavelengths of 633 and 594 nm) of silver colloid fractals. Near-field optical imaging is calibrated with a standing evanescent wave pattern....... Near-field optical images exhibit spatially localized (within 150-250 nm) intensity enhancement (by up to 20 times) in the form of round bright spots, whose positions and brightness are found to be sensitive to the light wavelength, polarization and angle of incidence. The observed phenomenon...

  16. Pulse front adaptive optics in two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive optics has been extensively studied for the correction of phase front aberrations in optical systems. In systems using ultrafast lasers, distortions can also exist in the pulse front (contour of constant intensity in space and time), but until now their correction has been mostly unexplored due to technological limitations. In this Letter, we apply newly developed pulse front adaptive optics, for the first time to our knowledge, to practical compensation of a two-photon fluorescence microscope. With adaptive correction of the system-induced pulse front distortion, improvements beyond conventional phase correction are demonstrated.

  17. Quantitative optical microscopy: measurement of cellular biophysical features with a standard optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; McCarty, Owen J T

    2014-04-07

    We describe the use of a standard optical microscope to perform quantitative measurements of mass, volume, and density on cellular specimens through a combination of bright field and differential interference contrast imagery. Two primary approaches are presented: noninterferometric quantitative phase microscopy (NIQPM), to perform measurements of total cell mass and subcellular density distribution, and Hilbert transform differential interference contrast microscopy (HTDIC) to determine volume. NIQPM is based on a simplified model of wave propagation, termed the paraxial approximation, with three underlying assumptions: low numerical aperture (NA) illumination, weak scattering, and weak absorption of light by the specimen. Fortunately, unstained cellular specimens satisfy these assumptions and low NA illumination is easily achieved on commercial microscopes. HTDIC is used to obtain volumetric information from through-focus DIC imagery under high NA illumination conditions. High NA illumination enables enhanced sectioning of the specimen along the optical axis. Hilbert transform processing on the DIC image stacks greatly enhances edge detection algorithms for localization of the specimen borders in three dimensions by separating the gray values of the specimen intensity from those of the background. The primary advantages of NIQPM and HTDIC lay in their technological accessibility using "off-the-shelf" microscopes. There are two basic limitations of these methods: slow z-stack acquisition time on commercial scopes currently abrogates the investigation of phenomena faster than 1 frame/minute, and secondly, diffraction effects restrict the utility of NIQPM and HTDIC to objects from 0.2 up to 10 (NIQPM) and 20 (HTDIC) μm in diameter, respectively. Hence, the specimen and its associated time dynamics of interest must meet certain size and temporal constraints to enable the use of these methods. Excitingly, most fixed cellular specimens are readily investigated with

  18. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...

  19. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  20. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  1. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  2. Lasers, lenses and light curves : adaptive optics microscopy and peculiar transiting exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, Theodorus Isaak Mattheus van

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we present an adaptive optics implementation for multi-photon microscopy correcting sample-induced wavefront aberrations using either direct wavefront sensing to run a close-loop adaptive optics system (Chapter 3), or use a model-based sensorless approach to

  3. Adaptive optics stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (AO-STORM) using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F; Xu, Jianquan; Zhang, Yiwen; Shen, Ping; Kner, Peter

    2015-05-18

    The resolution of Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SML) is dependent on the width of the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the number of photons collected. However, biological samples tend to degrade the shape of the PSF due to the heterogeneity of the index of refraction. In addition, there are aberrations caused by imperfections in the optical components and alignment, and the refractive index mismatch between the coverslip and the sample, all of which directly reduce the accuracy of SML. Adaptive Optics (AO) can play a critical role in compensating for aberrations in order to increase the resolution. However the stochastic nature of single molecule emission presents a challenge for wavefront optimization because the large fluctuations in photon emission do not permit many traditional optimization techniques to be used. Here we present an approach that optimizes the wavefront during SML acquisition by combining an intensity independent merit function with a Genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize the PSF despite the fluctuating intensity. We demonstrate the use of AO with GA in tissue culture cells and through ~50µm of tissue in the Drosophila Central Nervous System (CNS) to achieve a 4-fold increase in the localization precision.

  4. Microsphere-aided optical microscopy and its applications for super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-12-01

    The spatial resolution of a standard optical microscope (SOM) is limited by diffraction. In visible spectrum, SOM can provide ∼ 200 nm resolution. To break the diffraction limit several approaches were developed including scanning near field microscopy, metamaterial super-lenses, nanoscale solid immersion lenses, super-oscillatory lenses, confocal fluorescence microscopy, techniques that exploit non-linear response of fluorophores like stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, etc. Recently, photonic nanojet generated by a dielectric microsphere was used to break the diffraction limit. The microsphere-approach is simple, cost-effective and can be implemented under a standard microscope, hence it has gained enormous attention for super-resolution imaging. In this article, we briefly review the microsphere approach and its applications for super-resolution imaging in various optical imaging modalities.

  5. Subdiffraction-limited radius measurements of microcylinders using conventional bright-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Douglas J; Kane, Deborah M

    2014-09-01

    A technique for measuring the radius of dielectric microcylinders with subdiffraction-limited precision is presented. Diffraction fringes arising from the dielectric cylinder are measured using conventional bright-field optical microscopy and compared with theory to deduce the radii. The technique has been demonstrated measuring the radii of the major-ampullate silks from Plebs eburnus spiders. Precision better than 50 nm is demonstrated, using a standard optical microscope with a numerical aperture of 0.6 for the objective. Accuracy was verified using scanning electron microscopy. This technique will facilitate rapid, precise measurement of dielectric microcylinder radii, enabling a new optical-microscopy-based measurement approach for these challenging micro-optics.

  6. Optical beam induced current microscopy at DC and radio frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fu-Jen

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept and technique of optical beam induced current (OBIC) generation at radio frequencies. The method is combined with lateral raster scanning of a tightly focused spot so as to generate a mapping of high spatial resolution. We demonstrate experimentally that if a mode-locked laser is used to excite the sample then the frequency transfer function of the optically active device is readily obtained with at least 1 µm spatial resolution, in real time. In addition, with the help of an appropriate electronic arrangement, we demonstrate how to obtain pseudocolored OBIC images of the sample.

  7. Adaptive optics confocal microscopy using direct wavefront sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Garcia, Denise; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Optical aberrations due to the inhomogeneous refractive index of tissue degrade the resolution and brightness of images in deep-tissue imaging. We introduce a confocal fluorescence microscope with adaptive optics, which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with a fluorescent bead used as a point source reference beacon. The results show a 4.3× improvement in the Strehl ratio and a 240% improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of up to 100 μm.

  8. Confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes for high speed measurements and better imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wanhee; Lee, SeungWoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-02-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) needs a scanning mechanism because only one point information of specimen can be obtained. Therefore the speed of the confocal scanning microscopy is limited by the speed of the scanning tool. To overcome this limitation from scanning tool we propose another scanning mechanism. We make three optical probes in the specimen under confocal condition of each point. Three optical probes are moved by beam scanning mechanism with shared resonant scanning mirror (RM) and galvanometer driven mirror (GM). As each optical probe scan allocated region of the specimen, information from three points is obtained simultaneously and image acquisition time is reduced. Therefore confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is expected to have three times faster speed of the image acquisition than conventional one. And as another use, multiple optical probes to which different light wavelength is applied can scan whole same region respectively. It helps to obtain better contrast image in case of specimens having different optical characteristics for specific light wavelength. In conclusion confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is useful technique for views of image acquisition speed and image quality.

  9. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  10. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  11. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  12. Periodontal plastic surgery: thermal effect analysis using Erbium:YAG Kesler's handpiece. Histochemical evaluation by Picrosirius red stain and polarization microscopy for collagen determination: in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Kesler, Anat; Kristt, Don; Gal, Rivka

    2000-03-01

    Recent technological advances lead to an increase in the options for the treatment of the periodontal diseases. Lasers utilized for gingival soft tissue resurfacing mainly for esthetics purposes, require careful histopathological evaluation of the effects on tissue. Up to date no comparative clinical or histological studies have been performed, aiming at demonstration of the effects of laser irradiation on connective tissue, especially its most important component -- the collagen fibers. The alteration in the structures of this tissue plays the most important role in the healing process. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of Erbium: YAG - Kesler's hand piece on gingival tissue. This handpiece is designed for gingival resurfacing, in cases of 'Gummy smile' and gingival pigmentation. The following irradiation parameters were used: energy per pulse -- 500 mJ, repetition rate 10 pps, spot size 3 mm. Gingival biopsies specimens of 10 patients, 6 with 'Gummy smile' and 4 with gingival pigmentation were examined before laser treatment, and at 7 and 14 days after laser treatment. The tissues were fixed in LNRS, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned into 5 micrometer thickness, dewaxed in xylol and stained with H&E and Picrosirius Red (PSR). The sections were examined by polarization microscopy. PSR is a collagen stain that differentiates collagen fiber density by the range of colors from green through yellow to red, and/or fiber size. This was utilized in the present study to evaluate the hypothesis that Erbium -- YAG (Er: YAG) laser energy is capable of remodeling the collagen fibers in the gingival connective tissue through a photothermal process. We found a significant difference between the structures of collagen fibers at the first week and at 14 days post treatment. In the normal gingiva the predominant polarization colors were in the red-orange range, signifying tightly packed, mature collagen. During the first postoperative week, collagen

  13. A minimal optical trapping and imaging microscopy system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available We report the construction and testing of a simple and versatile optical trapping apparatus, suitable for visualizing individual microtubules (∼25 nm in diameter and performing single-molecule studies, using a minimal set of components. This design is based on a conventional, inverted microscope, operating under plain bright field illumination. A single laser beam enables standard optical trapping and the measurement of molecular displacements and forces, whereas digital image processing affords real-time sample visualization with reduced noise and enhanced contrast. We have tested our trapping and imaging instrument by measuring the persistence length of individual double-stranded DNA molecules, and by following the stepping of single kinesin motor proteins along clearly imaged microtubules. The approach presented here provides a straightforward alternative for studies of biomaterials and individual biomolecules.

  14. Easy and versatile adaptive optics setup with deformable lens for high-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, P.; Quintavalla, M.; Verstraete, H.; Bijlsma, H.; Bonora, S.; Verhaegen, M.

    2017-06-01

    It has been widely proven in literature that most optical microscopy techniques can greatly benefit from the application of adaptive optics correction of phase aberrations through an adaptive optical element, such as a deformable mirror or a spatial light modulator. However, adaptive optics is not yet widely adopted in the life sciences community, mostly due to the lack of adaptive commercial microscopy systems, and the inherent technical difficulty in modifying an existing microscopy setup to integrate an adaptive element, both on the software and hardware sides. We present a plug-and-play adaptive optics module for generic optical microscopes, based on a prototype refractive 18 actuators adaptive optical element, which can be inserted in any microscope between the objective and the microscope body. Correction is performed in a sensorless fashion, optimizing image quality metrics of the image presented to the user on screen. The results presented show how an end-user oriented commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (Leica SP5) can be upgraded with adaptive optics with minor hardware modifications, and no changes to the microscope control software.

  15. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y; Gatel, C; Snoeck, E; Houdellier, F

    2017-04-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Precision 3-D microscopy with intensity modulated fibre optic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical 3-D imagers constitute a family of precision and useful instruments, easily available on the market in a wide variety of configurations and performances. However, besides their cost they usually provide an image of the object (i.e. a more or less faithful representation of the reality) instead of a truly object's reconstruction. Depending on the detailed working principles of the equipment, this reconstruction may become a challenging task. Here a very simple yet reliable device is described; it is able to form images of opaque objects by illuminating them with an optical fibre and collecting the reflected light with another fibre. Its 3-D capability comes from the spatial filtering imposed by the fibres together with their movement (scanning) along the three directions: transversal (surface) and vertical. This unsophisticated approach allows one to model accurately the entire optical process and to perform the desired reconstruction, finding that information about the surface which is of interest: its profile and its reflectance, ultimately related to the type of material.

  17. In situ microscopy using adjustment-free optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Hajo; Herkommer, Alois M

    2015-11-01

    In the past years, in situ microscopy has been demonstrated as a technique for monitoring the concentration and morphology of moving microparticles in agitated suspensions. However, up until now, this technique can only achieve a high resolution if a certain manual or automated effort is established for continuous precise focusing. Therefore, the application of in situ microscopes (ISMs) as sensors is inhibited in the cases where unattended operation is required. Here, we demonstrate a high-resolution ISM which, unlike others, is built as an entirely rigid construction, requiring no adjustments at all. This ISM is based on a specially designed water immersion objective with numerical aperture = 0.75 and a working distance of 15 μm. The objective can be built exclusively from off-the-shelf parts and the front surface directly interfaces with the moving suspension. We show various applications of the system and demonstrate the imaging performance with submicron resolution within moving suspensions of microorganisms.

  18. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics

  19. Adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy to study ex vivo ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Juan M; Gualda, Emilio J; Artal, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We develop an adaptive optics (AO) multiphoton microscope by incorporating a deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The AO module operating in closed-loop is used to correct for the aberrations of the illumination laser beam. This increases the efficiency of the nonlinear processes in reducing tissue photodamage, improves contrast, and enhances lateral resolution in images of nonstained ocular tissues. In particular, the use of AO in the multiphoton microscope provides a better visualization of ocular structures, which are relevant in ophthalmology. This instrument might be useful to explore the possible connections between changes in ocular structures and the associated pathologies.

  20. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  1. Optical microscopy techniques based on structured illumination and single-pixel detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Jiménez, Ángel David

    2017-01-01

    In this Thesis, we explore single-pixel microscopy to design and develop proof-of-principle experiments where the single-pixel detection strategy outperforms conventional optical array detection in wide-field microscopy. The ability of the single-pixel detection strategy to generate a spatially resolved image of an object hidden by arbitrary scattering media has been recently demonstrated. Strikingly, a sensor without spatial resolution is able to retrieve a high-resolution image of a sample ...

  2. Dynamic saturation optical microscopy: employing dark-state formation kinetics for resolution enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíčková, Jana; Benda, Aleš; Macháň, Radek; Enderlein, J.; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 39 (2010), s. 12457-12465 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : fluorescence microscopy * dunamic saturation optical microscopy * fluorescence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2010

  3. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    NEAUPORT, Jérôme; Cormont, P; Legros, P; Ambard, C; Destribats, J

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding...

  4. The use of staining metallograplic reagents in the optical analysis as contribution to the microscopical study of irradiated austenitic canning materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heylen-Geladi, M.

    1975-09-01

    Investigation by interference film microscopy is rather difficult to realize in post-irradiation studies because of the lack of suitable facilities. To enable comparison to be made between structural compounds of unirradiated and irradiated samples, tests on staining metallographic reagents were performed and the respective results compared with those obtained by interference film microscopy. Two solutions are particularly indicated to fulfil the condition of reliability for these canning materials; one is based on the reduction of selenic acid to selenium, the other on the decomposition of a metabisulphite in an acid medium. (author)

  5. Hybrid Microscopy: Enabling Inexpensive High-Performance Imaging through Combined Physical and Optical Magnifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Chang, Jae-Byum; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Aleman, Julio; Batzaya, Byambaa; Krishnadoss, Vaishali; Ramanujam, Aishwarya Aravamudhan; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Boyden, Edward S; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-15

    To date, much effort has been expended on making high-performance microscopes through better instrumentation. Recently, it was discovered that physical magnification of specimens was possible, through a technique called expansion microscopy (ExM), raising the question of whether physical magnification, coupled to inexpensive optics, could together match the performance of high-end optical equipment, at a tiny fraction of the price. Here we show that such "hybrid microscopy" methods--combining physical and optical magnifications--can indeed achieve high performance at low cost. By physically magnifying objects, then imaging them on cheap miniature fluorescence microscopes ("mini-microscopes"), it is possible to image at a resolution comparable to that previously attainable only with benchtop microscopes that present costs orders of magnitude higher. We believe that this unprecedented hybrid technology that combines expansion microscopy, based on physical magnification, and mini-microscopy, relying on conventional optics--a process we refer to as Expansion Mini-Microscopy (ExMM)--is a highly promising alternative method for performing cost-effective, high-resolution imaging of biological samples. With further advancement of the technology, we believe that ExMM will find widespread applications for high-resolution imaging particularly in research and healthcare scenarios in undeveloped countries or remote places.

  6. Axial range of conjugate adaptive optics in two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari P; Taranto, John; Mertz, Jerome; Bifano, Thomas

    2015-08-10

    We describe an adaptive optics technique for two-photon microscopy in which the deformable mirror used for aberration compensation is positioned in a plane conjugate to the plane of the aberration. We demonstrate in a proof-of-principle experiment that this technique yields a large field of view advantage in comparison to standard pupil-conjugate adaptive optics. Further, we show that the extended field of view in conjugate AO is maintained over a relatively large axial translation of the deformable mirror with respect to the conjugate plane. We conclude with a discussion of limitations and prospects for the conjugate AO technique in two-photon biological microscopy.

  7. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jennifer E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sussman, Aviva Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  8. Dynamics of solid lubrication as observed by optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    A bench metallograph was converted into a 'micro contact imager' by the addition of a tribometer employing a steel ball in sliding contact with a glass disk. The sliding contact was viewed in real time by means of projection microscope optics. The dynamics of abrasive particles and of solid lubricant particles within the contact were observed in detail. The contact was characterized by a constantly changing pattern of elastic strain with the passage of surface discontinuities and solid particles. Abrasive particles fragmented upon entering the contact, embedded in one surface and scratched the other; in contrast, the solid lubricant particles flowed plastically into thin films. The rheological behavior of the lubricating solids gave every appearance of a paste-like consistency within the Hertzian contact.

  9. Closed loop adaptive optics for microscopy without a wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kner, Peter; Winoto, Lukman; Agard, David A; Sedat, John W

    2010-02-24

    A three-dimensional wide-field image of a small fluorescent bead contains more than enough information to accurately calculate the wavefront in the microscope objective back pupil plane using the phase retrieval technique. The phase-retrieved wavefront can then be used to set a deformable mirror to correct the point-spread function (PSF) of the microscope without the use of a wavefront sensor. This technique will be useful for aligning the deformable mirror in a widefield microscope with adaptive optics and could potentially be used to correct aberrations in samples where small fluorescent beads or other point sources are used as reference beacons. Another advantage is the high resolution of the retrieved wavefont as compared with current Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Here we demonstrate effective correction of the PSF in 3 iterations. Starting from a severely aberrated system, we achieve a Strehl ratio of 0.78 and a greater than 10-fold increase in maximum intensity.

  10. Dynamics of solid lubrication as observed by optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    A bench metallograph was converted into a micro contact imager by the addition of a tribometer employing a steel ball in sliding contact with a glass disk. The sliding contact was viewed in real time by means of projection microscope optics. The dynamics of abrasive particles and of solid lubricant particles within the contact were observed in detail. The contact was characterized by a constantly changing pattern of elastic strain with the passage of surface discontinuities and solid particles. Abrasive particles fragmented upon entering the contact, embedded in one surface and scratched the other; in contrast, the solid lubricant particles flowed plastically into thin films. The rheological behavior of the lubricating solids gave every appearance of a paste-like consistency within the Hertzian contact.

  11. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  12. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. An introduction to optical super-resolution microscopy for the adventurous biologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangindertael, J.; Camacho, R.; Sempels, W.; Mizuno, H.; Dedecker, P.; Janssen, K. P. F.

    2018-04-01

    Ever since the inception of light microscopy, the laws of physics have seemingly thwarted every attempt to visualize the processes of life at its most fundamental, sub-cellular, level. The diffraction limit has restricted our view to length scales well above 250 nm and in doing so, severely compromised our ability to gain true insights into many biological systems. Fortunately, continuous advancements in optics, electronics and mathematics have since provided the means to once again make physics work to our advantage. Even though some of the fundamental concepts enabling super-resolution light microscopy have been known for quite some time, practically feasible implementations have long remained elusive. It should therefore not come as a surprise that the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to the scientists who, each in their own way, contributed to transforming super-resolution microscopy from a technological tour de force to a staple of the biologist’s toolkit. By overcoming the diffraction barrier, light microscopy could once again be established as an indispensable tool in an age where the importance of understanding life at the molecular level cannot be overstated. This review strives to provide the aspiring life science researcher with an introduction to optical microscopy, starting from the fundamental concepts governing compound and fluorescent confocal microscopy to the current state-of-the-art of super-resolution microscopy techniques and their applications.

  14. Investigation of lasers based on coupled waveguides by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubavkina, Yu S.; Gordeev, N. Yu; Payusov, A. S.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Moiseev, E. I.; Zubov, F. I.; Mintairov, S. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Shernyakov, Yu M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated near field intensity distributions of InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs lasers possessing broadened waveguides based on coupled large optical cavity structures (CLOC) by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The concept allows effective suppressing of the transverse high-order mode lasing. The obtained results can be considered to be the direct proof of pure transverse single-mode emission of the CLOC lasers.

  15. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: Applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kaupp, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials) contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The ex...

  16. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Latour , Gaël; Echard , Jean-Philippe; Didier , Marie; Schanne-Klein , Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminate...

  17. Sensorless adaptive optics and the effect of field of view in biological second harmonic generation microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Vandendriessche, Stefaan; Vanbel, Maarten; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In light of the population aging in many developed countries, there is a great economical interest in improving the speed and cost-efficiency of healthcare. Clinical diagnosis tools are key to these improvements, with biophotonics providing a means to achieve them. Standard optical microscopy of in vitro biological samples has been an important diagnosis tool since the invention of the microscope, with well known resolution limits. Nonlinear optical imaging improves on the resolution limits o...

  18. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of the surface. A direct correlation with the optical image is obtained. We demonstrate that this reflection setup is suitable for dielectric samples. Images in fluorescence have been obtained o­n Lan...

  19. Generalized spectral method for near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, B.-Y.; Zhang, L. M.; Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Castro Neto, A. H. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Centre for Advanced 2D Materials and Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-02-07

    Electromagnetic interaction between a sub-wavelength particle (the “probe”) and a material surface (the “sample”) is studied theoretically. The interaction is shown to be governed by a series of resonances corresponding to surface polariton modes localized near the probe. The resonance parameters depend on the dielectric function and geometry of the probe as well as on the surface reflectivity of the material. Calculation of such resonances is carried out for several types of axisymmetric probes: spherical, spheroidal, and pear-shaped. For spheroids, an efficient numerical method is developed, capable of handling cases of large or strongly momentum-dependent surface reflectivity. Application of the method to highly resonant materials, such as aluminum oxide (by itself or covered with graphene), reveals a rich structure of multi-peak spectra and nonmonotonic approach curves, i.e., the probe-sample distance dependence. These features also strongly depend on the probe shape and optical constants of the model. For less resonant materials such as silicon oxide, the dependence is weak, so that the spheroidal model is reliable. The calculations are done within the quasistatic approximation with radiative damping included perturbatively.

  20. Coherent optical adaptive technique improves the spatial resolution of STED microscopy in thick samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Yang, Yanlong; Tan, Yu; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Qu, Junle; Ye, Tong

    2018-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) is one of far-field optical microscopy techniques that can provide sub-diffraction spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the STED microscopy is determined by the specially engineered beam profile of the depletion beam and its power. However, the beam profile of the depletion beam may be distorted due to aberrations of optical systems and inhomogeneity of specimens’ optical properties, resulting in a compromised spatial resolution. The situation gets deteriorated when thick samples are imaged. In the worst case, the sever distortion of the depletion beam profile may cause complete loss of the super resolution effect no matter how much depletion power is applied to specimens. Previously several adaptive optics approaches have been explored to compensate aberrations of systems and specimens. However, it is hard to correct the complicated high-order optical aberrations of specimens. In this report, we demonstrate that the complicated distorted wavefront from a thick phantom sample can be measured by using the coherent optical adaptive technique (COAT). The full correction can effectively maintain and improve the spatial resolution in imaging thick samples. PMID:29400356

  1. Coherent optical adaptive technique improves the spatial resolution of STED microscopy in thick samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Yang, Yanlong; Tan, Yu; Chen, Xun; Li, Yang; Qu, Junle; Ye, Tong

    2017-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) is one of far-field optical microscopy techniques that can provide sub-diffraction spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the STED microscopy is determined by the specially engineered beam profile of the depletion beam and its power. However, the beam profile of the depletion beam may be distorted due to aberrations of optical systems and inhomogeneity of specimens' optical properties, resulting in a compromised spatial resolution. The situation gets deteriorated when thick samples are imaged. In the worst case, the sever distortion of the depletion beam profile may cause complete loss of the super resolution effect no matter how much depletion power is applied to specimens. Previously several adaptive optics approaches have been explored to compensate aberrations of systems and specimens. However, it is hard to correct the complicated high-order optical aberrations of specimens. In this report, we demonstrate that the complicated distorted wavefront from a thick phantom sample can be measured by using the coherent optical adaptive technique (COAT). The full correction can effectively maintain and improve the spatial resolution in imaging thick samples.

  2. Stain-free histopathology by programmable supercontinuum pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Marjanovic, Marina; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Chaney, Eric J.; Zhao, Youbo; You, Sixian; Wilson, William L.; Xu, Bingwei; Dantus, Marcos; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    The preparation, staining, visualization and interpretation of histological images of tissue is well accepted as the gold standard process for the diagnosis of disease. These methods have a long history of development, and are used ubiquitously in pathology, despite being highly time- and labour-intensive. Here, we introduce a unique optical imaging platform and methodology for label-free multimodal multiphoton microscopy that uses a novel photonic-crystal fibre source to generate tailored chemical contrast based on programmable supercontinuum pulses. We demonstrate the collection of optical signatures of the tumour microenvironment, including evidence of mesoscopic biological organization, tumour cell migration and (lymph-) angiogenesis collected directly from fresh ex vivo mammary tissue. Acquisition of these optical signatures and other cellular or extracellular features, which are largely absent from histologically processed and stained tissue, combined with an adaptable platform for optical alignment-free programmable-contrast imaging, offers the potential to translate stain-free molecular histopathology into routine clinical use.

  3. Gram staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  4. 3D defect detection using optical wide-field microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tympel, Volker; Schaaf, Marko; Srocka, Bernd

    2007-06-01

    We report a method to detect signed differences in two similar data sets representing 3-dimensional intensity profiles recorded by optical wide-field microscopes. The signed differences describe missing or unexpected intensity values, defined as defects. In technical applications like wafer and mask inspection, data sets often represent surfaces. The reported method is able to describe the size and position especially in relation to the neighboring surface and is called Three-Dimension-Aberration (TDA)-Technology. To increase the tool performance and to handle different sizes of defects a scaled bottom-up method is implemented and started with high reduced data sets for the search of large defects. Each analysis contains three steps. The first step is a correlation to calculate the displacement vector between the similar data sets. In the second step a new data set is created. The new data set consists of intensity differences. Extreme values in the data set represent the position of defects. By the use of linear and non-linear filters the stability of detection can be improved. If all differences are below a threshold the bottom-up method starts with the next larger scaled data set. In the other case it is assumed that the defect is detected and step three starts with the detection of the convex hull of the defect and the search of the neighboring surface. As a result the defect is described by a parameter set including the relative position. Because of the layered structure of the data set and the bottom-up technique the method is suitable for multi-core processor architectures.

  5. 4D super-resolution microscopy with conventional fluorophores and single wavelength excitation in optically thick cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baddeley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical super-resolution imaging of fluorescently stained biological samples is rapidly becoming an important tool to investigate protein distribution at the molecular scale. It is therefore important to develop practical super-resolution methods that allow capturing the full three-dimensional nature of biological systems and also can visualize multiple protein species in the same sample. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that the use of a combination of conventional near-infrared dyes, such as Alexa 647, Alexa 680 and Alexa 750, all excited with a 671 nm diode laser, enables 3D multi-colour super-resolution imaging of complex biological samples. Optically thick samples, including human tissue sections, cardiac rat myocytes and densely grown neuronal cultures were imaged with lateral resolutions of ∼15 nm (std. dev. while reducing marker cross-talk to <1%. Using astigmatism an axial resolution of ∼65 nm (std. dev. was routinely achieved. The number of marker species that can be distinguished depends on the mean photon number of single molecule events. With the typical photon yields from Alexa 680 of ∼2000 up to 5 markers may in principle be resolved with <2% crosstalk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach is based entirely on the use of conventional, commercially available markers and requires only a single laser. It provides a very straightforward way to investigate biological samples at the nanometre scale and should help establish practical 4D super-resolution microscopy as a routine research tool in many laboratories.

  6. Characterization of Thermochemically Surface-Hardened Titanium by Light Optical Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft-Hansen, Niklas; Munch, Steffen S.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Thermochemically treated titanium grades 2 and 5 were investigated by light optical microscopy and hardness indentation. Gaseous oxidation in oxygen and N2O containing atmospheres resulted in a diffusion zone of oxygen in solid solution in titanium with a hardness up to 1000 HV. A surface scale...

  7. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The Special Section on Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy comprises two invited review papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’13, as well as contributed papers within...

  9. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  10. Imaging of matrix-disorder in normal and pathological human dermis using nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2009-11-01

    In dermis, collagen and elastin are important structural proteins of extracellular maxtrix. The matrix-disorder is associated with various physiologic processes, such as localized scleroderma, anetoderma, photoaging. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of nonlinear optical microscopy in imaging structural proteins in normal and pathological human dermis.

  11. Single molecule mapping of the optical field distribution of probes for near-field microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    The most difficult task in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is to make a high quality subwavelength aperture probe, Recently we have developed high definition NSOM probes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. These probes have a higher brightness, better polarization characteristics,

  12. Investigation of whispering gallery modes in microlasers by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubavkina, Yu S.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Mintairov, A. M.; Lipovsky, A. A.; Scherbak, S. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) with a spatial resolution below the light diffraction limit was used to study intensity distributions of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in quantum dot-based microdisk and microring lasers on GaAs with different outer diameters. Room temperature microphotoluminescence study (μPL) reveal lasing in microlasers of both geometries.

  13. SEM/EDS and optical microscopy analyses of microplastics in ocean trawl and fish guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Wagner, Jeff; Ghosal, Sutapa; Bedi, Gagandeep; Wall, Stephen

    2017-12-15

    Microplastic particles from Atlantic and Pacific Ocean trawls, lab-fed fish guts and ocean fish guts have been characterized using optical microscopy and SEM/EDS in terms of size, morphology, and chemistry. We assessed whether these measurements could serve as a rapid screening process for subsequent identification of the likely microplastic candidates by micro-spectroscopy. Optical microscopy enabled morphological classification of the types of particles or fibers present in the sample, as well as the quantification of particle size ranges and fiber lengths. SEM/EDS analysis was used to rule out non-plastic particles and screen the prepared samples for potential microplastic, based on their element signatures and surface characteristics. Chlorinated plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) could be easily identified with SEM/EDS due to their unique elemental signatures including chlorine, as could mineral species that are falsely identified as plastics by optical microscopy. Particle morphology determined by optical microscopy and SEM suggests the fish ingested particles contained both degradation fragments from larger plastic pieces and also manufactured microplastics. SEM images of microplastic particle surfaces revealed characteristic cracks consistent with environmental exposure, as well as pigment particles consistent with manufactured materials. Most of the microplastic surfaces in the fish guts and ocean trawls were covered with biofilms, radiolarians, and crustaceans. Many of the fish stomachs contained micro-shell pieces which visually resembled microplastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DMD-based LED-illumination Super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×107 pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens. PMID:23346373

  15. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of

  16. Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G; Hetherington, Craig L; Wang, Zhe; Precht, Jake T; Kaz, David M; Schlom, Darrell G; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a new nanoimaging platform in which optical excitations generated by a low-energy electron beam in an ultrathin scintillator are used as a noninvasive, near-field optical scanning probe of an underlying sample. We obtain optical images of Al nanostructures with 46 nm resolution and validate the noninvasiveness of this approach by imaging a conjugated polymer film otherwise incompatible with electron microscopy due to electron-induced damage. The high resolution, speed, and noninvasiveness of this "cathodoluminescence-activated" platform also show promise for super-resolution bioimaging.

  17. Group velocity measurement using spectral interference in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, John D.; Chaipiboonwong, Tipsuda; Brocklesby, William S.; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Netti, Caterina; Zoorob, Majd E.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy provides a tool for studying the behavior of optical fields inside waveguides. In this experiment the authors measure directly the variation of group velocity between different modes of a planar slab waveguide as the modes propagate along the guide. The measurement is made using the spectral interference between pulses propagating inside the waveguide with different group velocities, collected using a near-field scanning optical microscope at different points down the guide and spectrally resolved. The results are compared to models of group velocities in simple guides

  18. 3D imaging of optically cleared tissue using a simplified CLARITY method and on-chip microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yibo

    2017-08-12

    High-throughput sectioning and optical imaging of tissue samples using traditional immunohistochemical techniques can be costly and inaccessible in resource-limited areas. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) imaging and phenotyping in optically transparent tissue using lens-free holographic on-chip microscopy as a low-cost, simple, and high-throughput alternative to conventional approaches. The tissue sample is passively cleared using a simplified CLARITY method and stained using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine to target cells of interest, enabling bright-field optical imaging and 3D sectioning of thick samples. The lens-free computational microscope uses pixel super-resolution and multi-height phase recovery algorithms to digitally refocus throughout the cleared tissue and obtain a 3D stack of complex-valued images of the sample, containing both phase and amplitude information. We optimized the tissue-clearing and imaging system by finding the optimal illumination wavelength, tissue thickness, sample preparation parameters, and the number of heights of the lens-free image acquisition and implemented a sparsity-based denoising algorithm to maximize the imaging volume and minimize the amount of the acquired data while also preserving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. As a proof of concept, we achieved 3D imaging of neurons in a 200-μm-thick cleared mouse brain tissue over a wide field of view of 20.5 mm2. The lens-free microscope also achieved more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in raw data compared to a conventional scanning optical microscope imaging the same sample volume. Being low cost, simple, high-throughput, and data-efficient, we believe that this CLARITY-enabled computational tissue imaging technique could find numerous applications in biomedical diagnosis and research in low-resource settings.

  19. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit.

  1. The OPFOS Microscopy Family: High-Resolution Optical Sectioning of Biomedical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A. N. Buytaert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the recently emerging (laser light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy field (LSFM. The techniques used in this field allow to study and visualize biomedical objects nondestructively in high resolution through virtual optical sectioning with sheets of laser light. Fluorescence originating in the cross-section of the sheet and sample is recorded orthogonally with a camera. In this paper, the first implementation of LSFM to image biomedical tissue in three dimensions—orthogonal-plane fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy (OPFOS—is discussed. Since then many similar and derived methods have surfaced, (SPIM, ultramicroscopy, HR-OPFOS, mSPIM, DSLM, TSLIM, etc. which we all briefly discuss. All these optical sectioning methods create images showing histological detail. We illustrate the applicability of LSFM on several specimen types with application in biomedical and life sciences.

  2. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Wide-field two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Lidai; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Maslov, Konstantin; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an emerging technique that directly images optical absorption in tissue at high spatial resolution. To date, the majority of OR-PAM systems are based on single focused optical excitation and ultrasonic detection, limiting the wide-field imaging speed. While one-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM (1D-MFOR-PAM) has been developed, the potential of microlens and transducer arrays has not been fully realized. Here, we present the development of two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy (2D-MFOR-PACM), using a 2D microlens array and a full-ring ultrasonic transducer array. The 10 × 10 mm2 microlens array generates 1800 optical foci within the focal plane of the 512-element transducer array, and raster scanning the microlens array yields optical-resolution photoacoustic images. The system has improved the in-plane resolution of a full-ring transducer array from ≥100 µm to 29 µm and achieved an imaging time of 36 seconds over a 10 × 10 mm2 field of view. In comparison, the 1D-MFOR-PAM would take more than 4 minutes to image over the same field of view. The imaging capability of the system was demonstrated on phantoms and animals both ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24322226

  4. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Sednev, M.; Belov, V.; Hell, S.

    2015-01-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiment...

  5. Integration of optical clearing and optical sectioning microscopy for three-dimensional imaging of natural biomaterial scaffolds in thin sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, S.-Ja; Lee, Ying-Hui; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Lin, Hui-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    The intrinsic turbidity of scaffolds formed by natural biomaterials such as collagen fibers prevents high-resolution light microscopy in depth. In this research, we have developed a new method of using light microscopy for penetrative three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of scaffolds formed by collagen, chitosan, or cellulose. First, we applied an optical-clearing solution, FocusClear, to permeate and reduce the turbidity of the scaffolds. The improved photon penetration allowed fluorophores for efficient excitation and emission in the FocusClear solution. Confocal microscopy was applied to achieve cellular-level resolution up to 350 μm for both the fibroblast/collagen and the osteoblast/chitosan constructs and micrometer-level resolution up to 40 μm for the cellulose membrane. The depth of imaging of the cellulose membrane was further improved to 80 μm using two-photon microscopy. Significantly, these voxel-based confocal/two-photon micrographs allowed postrecording image processing via Amira projection algorithms for 3-D visualization and analysis of the scanned region. Although this optical method remains limited in viewing block scaffolds in thin sections, our approach provides a noninvasive way to microscopically examine the scaffold structure, which would be a valuable tool to studying biomaterials and their interactions with the molecule/cell of interest within the scaffold in an integrated fashion.

  6. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Katarzyna M; Last, Arndt; Korecki, Paweł

    2017-03-21

    Polycapillary devices focus X-rays by means of multiple reflections of X-rays in arrays of bent glass capillaries. The size of the focal spot (typically 10-100 μm) limits the resolution of scanning, absorption and phase-contrast X-ray imaging using these devices. At the expense of a moderate resolution, polycapillary elements provide high intensity and are frequently used for X-ray micro-imaging with both synchrotrons and X-ray tubes. Recent studies have shown that the internal microstructure of such an optics can be used as a coded aperture that encodes high-resolution information about objects located inside the focal spot. However, further improvements to this variant of X-ray microscopy will require the challenging fabrication of tailored devices with a well-defined capillary microstructure. Here, we show that submicron coded aperture microscopy can be realized using a periodic grid that is placed at the output surface of a polycapillary optics. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics does not rely on the specific microstructure of the optics but rather takes advantage only of its focusing properties. Hence, submicron X-ray imaging can be realized with standard polycapillary devices and existing set-ups for micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 μm, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu Kα. At higher energies such as Ag Kα, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection

  8. Illuminated up close: near-field optical microscopy of cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Sun, Jielin; Shao, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Invented in the 1990s, near-field optical microscopy (NSOM) was the first optical microscopy method to hold the promise of finally breaking the diffraction barrier in studies of biological samples. This promise, though, failed to materialize at that time, largely owing to the inability to image soft samples, such as cell surfaces, without damage. However, steady technical improvements have now produced NSOM devices that can routinely achieve images of cell surfaces with sub-100nm resolution in aqueous solution. Further, beyond just optical information, these instruments can also provide simultaneous topographic, mechanical, and/or chemical details of the sample, an ability not yet matched by any other optics-based methodology. With the long recognized important roles of many biological processes at cell surfaces in human health and disease, near-field probing of cell surfaces is indeed now well poised to directly illume in biomedicine what has, until recently, been unknowable with classic light microscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neauport, J; Cormont, P; Legros, P; Ambard, C; Destribats, J

    2009-03-02

    We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding induces a fluorescence that marks the subsurface damages and eases its observation. Such residual traces might also be involved in the laser damage process.

  10. Investigation of shape memory of red blood cells using optical tweezers and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-03-01

    RBC has been shown to possess shape memory subsequent to shear-induced shape transformation. However, this property of RBC may not be generalized to all kinds of stresses. Here, we report our observation on the action of radiation pressure forces on RBC's shape memory using optical manipulation and quantitative phase microscopy (OMQPM). QPM, based on Mach-Zehnder interferrometry, allowed measurement of dynamic changes of shape of RBC in optical tweezers at different trapping laser powers. In high power near-infrared optical tweezers (>200mW), the RBC was found to deform significantly due to optical forces. Upon removal of the tweezers, hysteresis in recovering its original resting shape was observed. In very high power tweezers or long-term stretching events, shape memory was almost erased. This irreversibility of the deformation may be due to temperature rise or stress-induced phase transformation of lipids in RBC membrane.

  11. Ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in exosporium of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A revealed by electron microscopy using optical diffraction and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K; Kawata, T; Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in the exosporium from spores of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained exosporium fragments using optical diffraction and filtration. The exosporium was composed of three or more lamellae showing and equilateral, hexagonal periodicity. Images of the single exosporium layer from which the noise had been filtered optically revealed that the hexagonally arranged, morphological unit of the exosporium was composed of three globular subunits about 2.1 nm in diameter which were arranged at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of about 2.4 nm. The morphological units were arranged with a spacing of about 4.5 nm. the adjacent globular subunits appeared to be interconnected by delicate linkers.

  12. Doppler optical coherence microscopy and tomography applied to inner ear mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Scott; Freeman, Dennis M. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Ghaffari, Roozbeh [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-12-31

    While it is clear that cochlear traveling waves underlie the extraordinary sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of mammalian hearing, the underlying micromechanical mechanisms remain unresolved. Recent advances in low coherence measurement techniques show promise over traditional laser Doppler vibrometry and video microscopy, which are limited by low reflectivities of cochlear structures and restricted optical access. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) both utilize a broadband source to limit constructive interference of scattered light to a small axial depth called a coherence gate. The coherence gate can be swept axially to image and measure sub-nanometer motions of cochlear structures throughout the cochlear partition. The coherence gate of DOCT is generally narrower than the confocal gate of the focusing optics, enabling increased axial resolution (typically 15 μm) within optical sections of the cochlear partition. DOCM, frequently implemented in the time domain, centers the coherence gate on the focal plane, achieving enhanced lateral and axial resolution when the confocal gate is narrower than the coherence gate. We compare these two complementary systems and demonstrate their utility in studying cellular and micromechanical mechanisms involved in mammalian hearing.

  13. Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a Fourier domain mode-locked laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Aguirre, Aaron D; Huber, Robert A; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-05-14

    Swept source optical coherence microscopy (OCM) enables cellular resolution en face imaging as well as integration with optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional imaging. A buffered Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser light source provides high speed, three dimensional imaging. Image resolutions of 1.6 microm x 8 microm (transverse x axial) with a 220 microm x 220 microm field of view and sensitivity higher than 98 dB are achieved. Three dimensional cellular imaging is demonstrated in vivo in the Xenopus laevis tadpole and ex vivo in the rat kidney and human colon.

  14. Oxidation study by Moessbauer and optic microscopy of steels from boiler tubes used in sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Aguilar, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Optic microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to study the fail and the inner rusted surface of two boiler tubes used in the sugar industry, respectively. The studied tubes, of the type ASTM A 192, were found to have cracks. By optic microscopy it was observed that the failure begins in the inner surface with circumferential cracking. Also, inside and around the surface close to the cracks a rusted layer was detected. Powder from these layers was collected for Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis. By this method the presence of two or three types of Fe oxides such as wuestite, magnetite and hematite, was proved. These results permit to conclude that the failure mechanism was the thermal fatigue due to a hot work in an O 2 -rich vapor atmosphere. The rusted products are stable at high temperatures

  15. Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Route to Femtosecond Ångstrom Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Yamashita, Mikio; Morita, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    "Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy" deals with both the ultrashort laser-pulse technology in the few- to mono-cycle region and the laser-surface-controlled scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) extending into the spatiotemporal extreme technology. The former covers the theory of nonlinear pulse propagation beyond the slowly-varing-envelope approximation, the generation and active chirp compensation of ultrabroadband optical pulses, the amplitude and phase characterization of few- to mono-cycle pulses, and the feedback field control for the mono-cycle-like pulse generation. In addition, the wavelength-multiplex shaping of ultrabroadband pulse is described. The latter covers the CW-laser-excitation STM, the femtosecond-time-resolved STM and atomic-level surface phenomena controlled by femtosecond pulses.

  16. Combination of widefield fluorescence imaging and nonlinear optical microscopy of oral epithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Edward, Kert; Brown, Tyra; Ma, Liang; Yang, Jinping; McCammon, Susan; Motamedi, Massoud; Vargas, Gracie

    2013-03-01

    Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) have shown the potential for noninvasive assessment of oral precancers and cancers. We have explored a combination of these nonlinear optical microscopic imaging techniques with widefield fluorescence imaging to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as information from endogenous fluorophores, which are altered with neoplastic transformation. Widefield fluorescence revealed areas of interest corresponding to sites with precancers or early tumors, generally resulting in a decrease in green emission or increase in red emission. Subsequent microscopy revealed significant differences in morphology between normal, dysplastic/neoplastic mucosa for all layers. Combination of a widefield and a microscopic technique provides a novel approach for tissue morphometric analysis along with large area assessment of tissue autofluorescence properties.

  17. In vivo corneal neovascularization imaging by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wenzhong; Schultz, Kathryn M.; Zhang, Kevin; Sasman, Amy; Gao, Fengli; Kume, Tsutomu; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Corneal neovascularization leads to blurred vision, thus in vivo visualization is essential for pathological studies in animal models. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging can delineate microvasculature and hemodynamics noninvasively, which is suitable for investigating corneal neovascularization. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo imaging of corneal neovascularization in the mouse eye by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), where corneal neovascularization is induced by deliberate ...

  18. Segmentation of Drosophila Heart in Optical Coherence Microscopy Images Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lian; Qin, Xi; He, Yuanhao; Sang, Xialin; Pan, Jinda; Xu, Tao; Men, Jing; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Li, Airong; Ma, Yutao; Zhou, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks are powerful tools for image segmentation and classification. Here, we use this method to identify and mark the heart region of Drosophila at different developmental stages in the cross-sectional images acquired by a custom optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system. With our well-trained convolutional neural network model, the heart regions through multiple heartbeat cycles can be marked with an intersection over union (IOU) of ~86%. Various morphological and dyn...

  19. Digital adaptive optics confocal microscopy based on iterative retrieval of optical aberration from a guidestar hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Thapa, Damber; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-04-03

    Guidestar hologram based digital adaptive optics (DAO) is one recently emerging active imaging modality. It records each complex distorted line field reflected or scattered from the sample by an off-axis digital hologram, measures the optical aberration from a separate off-axis digital guidestar hologram, and removes the optical aberration from the distorted line fields by numerical processing. In previously demonstrated DAO systems, the optical aberration was directly retrieved from the guidestar hologram by taking its Fourier transform and extracting the phase term. For the direct retrieval method (DRM), when the sample is not coincident with the guidestar focal plane, the accuracy of the optical aberration retrieved by DRM undergoes a fast decay, leading to quality deterioration of corrected images. To tackle this problem, we explore here an image metrics-based iterative method (MIM) to retrieve the optical aberration from the guidestar hologram. Using an aberrated objective lens and scattering samples, we demonstrate that MIM can improve the accuracy of the retrieved aberrations from both focused and defocused guidestar holograms, compared to DRM, to improve the robustness of the DAO.

  20. The mechanism of borax crystallization using in situ optical microscopy and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharso, G.; Parkinson, M.; Ogden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The quality of high-purity borax depends both on the concentrations of the impurities and the product appearance, which are mainly determined by the size and morphology of the crystals. Thus, knowledge about crystallization of borax is of direct relevance to the industrial production of borax. In addition, fundamental studies of borax crystallization will provide results of relevance to the crystallization of other economically important materials. An investigation into the fundamental mechanism of crystal growth of borax from aqueous solution was carried out, as a model system. The investigation focussed on the growth mechanism, and the influence of factors such as solution supersaturation, temperature, crystal size and solution flow on the rate of crystal growth. In situ optical microscopy was used to determine growth rates of three different faces of borax crystals at 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg C, at various concentrations. It was found that the growth rate increases with increasing temperature and supersaturation. At low concentration , growth on the (010), (001), and (111) faces occurs via a spiral growth mechanism and at high concentration birth and spread is the principal mechanism operating. The activation energy for the different mechanisms was determined. Examination by ex situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) showed features suggesting that the (100), (010), (001) faces of borax crystals grow by spiral mechanism at low concentration and two dimensional nucleation at high concentration. These experiments support the data obtained from in situ optical microscopy. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  1. Harmonic optical microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging platform for multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegati, Vitor B; Adur, Javier; De Thomaz, André A; Almeida, Diogo B; Baratti, Mariana O; Andrade, Liliana A L A; Bottcher-Luiz, Fátima; Cesar, Carlos L

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we proposed and built a multimodal optical setup that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Olympus VF300) to include nonlinear second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) optical (NLO) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We explored all the flexibility offered by this commercial confocal microscope to include the nonlinear microscopy capabilities. The setup allows image acquisition with confocal, brightfield, NLO/multiphoton and FLIM imaging. Simultaneously, two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and SHG are well established in the biomedical imaging area, because one can use the same ultrafast laser and detectors set to acquire both signals simultaneously. Because the integration with FLIM requires a separated modulus, there are fewer reports of TPEF+SHG+FLIM in the literature. The lack of reports of a TPEF+SHG+THG+FLIM system is mainly due to difficulties with THG because the present NLO laser sources generate THG in an UV wavelength range incompatible with microscope optics. In this article, we report the development of an easy-to-operate platform capable to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPFE), SHG, THG, and FLIM using a single 80 MHz femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser source. We described the modifications over the confocal system necessary to implement this integration and verified the presence of SHG and THG signals by several physical evidences. Finally, we demonstrated the use of this integrated system by acquiring images of vegetables and epithelial cancer biological samples. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Investigating the transverse optical structure of spider silk micro-fibers using quantitative optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Douglas J.; Kane, Deb M.

    2017-01-01

    The transverse optical structure of two orb-weaver (family Araneidae) spider dragline silks was investigated using a variant of the inverse-scattering technique. Immersing the silks in a closely refractive index-matched liquid, the minimum achievable image contrast was greater than expected for an optically homogeneous silk, given what is currently known about the optical absorption of these silks. This "excess contrast" indicated the presence of transverse optical structure within the spider silk. Applying electromagnetic scattering theory to a transparent double cylinder, the minimum achievable irradiance contrast for the Plebs eburnus and Argiope keyserlingi dragline silks was determined to be consistent with step index refractive index contrasts of 1-4×10-4 and 6-7×10-4, respectively, supposing outer-layer thicknesses consistent with previous TEM studies (50 nm and 100 nm, respectively). The possibility of graded index refractive index contrasts within the spider silks is also discussed. This is the strongest evidence, to date, that there is a refractive index contrast associated with the layered morphology of spider silks and/or variation of proportion of nanocrystalline components within the spider silk structure. The method is more generally applicable to optical micro-fibers, including those with refractive index variations on a sub-wavelength scale.

  3. Investigating the transverse optical structure of spider silk micro-fibers using quantitative optical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Douglas J.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The transverse optical structure of two orb-weaver (family Araneidae spider dragline silks was investigated using a variant of the inverse-scattering technique. Immersing the silks in a closely refractive index-matched liquid, the minimum achievable image contrast was greater than expected for an optically homogeneous silk, given what is currently known about the optical absorption of these silks. This “excess contrast” indicated the presence of transverse optical structure within the spider silk. Applying electromagnetic scattering theory to a transparent double cylinder, the minimum achievable irradiance contrast for the Plebs eburnus and Argiope keyserlingi dragline silks was determined to be consistent with step index refractive index contrasts of 1−4×10−4 and 6–7×10−4, respectively, supposing outer-layer thicknesses consistent with previous TEM studies (50 nm and 100 nm, respectively. The possibility of graded index refractive index contrasts within the spider silks is also discussed. This is the strongest evidence, to date, that there is a refractive index contrast associated with the layered morphology of spider silks and/or variation of proportion of nanocrystalline components within the spider silk structure. The method is more generally applicable to optical micro-fibers, including those with refractive index variations on a sub-wavelength scale.

  4. All-optical optoacoustic microscopy based on probe beam deflection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saher M. Maswadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoacoustic (OA microscopy using an all-optical system based on the probe beam deflection technique (PBDT for detection of laser-induced acoustic signals was investigated as an alternative to conventional piezoelectric transducers. PBDT provides a number of advantages for OA microscopy including (i efficient coupling of laser excitation energy to the samples being imaged through the probing laser beam, (ii undistorted coupling of acoustic waves to the detector without the need for separation of the optical and acoustic paths, (iii high sensitivity and (iv ultrawide bandwidth. Because of the unimpeded optical path in PBDT, diffraction-limited lateral resolution can be readily achieved. The sensitivity of the current PBDT sensor of 22 μV/Pa and its noise equivalent pressure (NEP of 11.4 Pa are comparable with these parameters of the optical micro-ring resonator and commercial piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers. Benefits of the present prototype OA microscope were demonstrated by successfully resolving micron-size details in histological sections of cardiac muscle.

  5. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  6. Nanohybrids Near-Field Optical Microscopy: From Image Shift to Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayla El-Kork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-Field Optical Microscopy is a valuable tool for the optical and topographic study of objects at a nanometric scale. Nanoparticles constitute important candidates for such type of investigations, as they bear an important weight for medical, biomedical, and biosensing applications. One, however, has to be careful as artifacts can be easily reproduced. In this study, we examined hybrid nanoparticles (or nanohybrids in the near-field, while in solution and attached to gold nanoplots. We found out that they can be used for wavelength modulable near-field biosensors within conditions of artifact free imaging. In detail, we refer to the use of topographic/optical image shift and the imaging of Local Surface Plasmon hot spots to validate the genuineness of the obtained images. In summary, this study demonstrates a new way of using simple easily achievable comparative methods to prove the authenticity of near-field images and presents nanohybrid biosensors as an application.

  7. Spectroscopic infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR-SNOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vobornik, D.; Margaritondo, G.; Sanghera, J.S.; Thielen, P.; Aggarwal, I.D.; Ivanov, B.; Tolk, N.H.; Manni, V.; Grimaldi, S.; Lisi, A.; Rieti, S.; Piston, D.W.; Generosi, R.; Luce, M.; Perfetti, P.; Cricenti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM or NSOM) is the technique with the highest lateral optical resolution available today, while infrared (IR) spectroscopy has a high chemical specificity. Combining SNOM with a tunable IR source produces a unique tool, IR-SNOM, capable of imaging distributions of chemical species with a 100 nm spatial resolution. We present in this paper boron nitride (BN) thin film images, where IR-SNOM shows the distribution of hexagonal and cubic phases within the sample. Exciting potential applications in biophysics and medical sciences are illustrated with SNOM images of the distribution of different chemical species within cells. We present in this article images with resolutions of the order of λ/60 with SNOM working with infrared light. With our SNOM setup, we routinely get optical resolutions between 50 and 150 nm, regardless of the wavelength of the light used to illuminate the sample

  8. Field of view advantage of conjugate adaptive optics in microscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Jerome; Paudel, Hari; Bifano, Thomas G

    2015-04-10

    The imaging performance of an optical microscope can be degraded by sample-induced aberrations. A general strategy to undo the effect of these aberrations is to apply wavefront correction with a deformable mirror (DM). In most cases the DM is placed conjugate to the microscope pupil, called pupil adaptive optics (AO). When the aberrations are spatially variant an alternative configuration involves placing the DM conjugate to the main source of aberrations, called conjugate AO. We provide a theoretical and experimental comparison of both configurations for the simplified case where spatially variant aberrations are produced by a well-defined phase screen. We pay particular attention to the resulting correction field of view (FOV). Conjugate AO is found to provide a significant FOV advantage. While this result is well known in the astronomical community, our goal here is to recast it specifically for the optical microscopy community.

  9. Integrated local binary pattern texture features for classification of breast tissue imaged by optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Sunhua; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Huang, Xiaolei; Xu, Ting; Xu, Tao; Zeng, Xianxu; Zhang, Zhan; Sheikine, Yuri; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G; Zhou, Chao

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a texture analysis technique that can effectively classify different types of human breast tissue imaged by Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM). OCM is an emerging imaging modality for rapid tissue screening and has the potential to provide high resolution microscopic images that approach those of histology. OCM images, acquired without tissue staining, however, pose unique challenges to image analysis and pattern classification. We examined multiple types of texture features and found Local Binary Pattern (LBP) features to perform better in classifying tissues imaged by OCM. In order to improve classification accuracy, we propose novel variants of LBP features, namely average LBP (ALBP) and block based LBP (BLBP). Compared with the classic LBP feature, ALBP and BLBP features provide an enhanced encoding of the texture structure in a local neighborhood by looking at intensity differences among neighboring pixels and among certain blocks of pixels in the neighborhood. Fourty-six freshly excised human breast tissue samples, including 27 benign (e.g. fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and usual ductal hyperplasia) and 19 breast carcinoma (e.g. invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ) were imaged with large field OCM with an imaging area of 10 × 10 mm 2 (10, 000 × 10, 000 pixels) for each sample. Corresponding H&E histology was obtained for each sample and used to provide ground truth diagnosis. 4310 small OCM image blocks (500 × 500 pixels) each paired with corresponding H&E histology was extracted from large-field OCM images and labeled with one of the five different classes: adipose tissue (n = 347), fibrous stroma (n = 2,065), breast lobules (n = 199), carcinomas (pooled from all sub-types, n = 1,127), and background (regions outside of the specimens, n = 572). Our experiments show that by integrating a selected set of LBP and the two new variant (ALBP and BLBP) features at multiple scales, the

  10. Fault localization and analysis in semiconductor devices with optical-feedback infrared confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, Raymund; Cemine, Vernon Julius; Tagaca, Imee Rose; Salvador, Arnel; Mar Blanca, Carlo; Saloma, Caesar

    2007-01-01

    We report on a cost-effective optical setup for characterizing light-emitting semiconductor devices with optical-feedback confocal infrared microscopy and optical beam-induced resistance change.We utilize the focused beam from an infrared laser diode to induce local thermal resistance changes across the surface of a biased integrated circuit (IC) sample. Variations in the multiple current paths are mapped by scanning the IC across the focused beam. The high-contrast current maps allow accurate differentiation of the functional and defective sites, or the isolation of the surface-emittingp-i-n devices in the IC. Optical beam-induced current (OBIC) is not generated since the incident beam energy is lower than the bandgap energy of the p-i-n device. Inhomogeneous current distributions in the IC become apparent without the strong OBIC background. They are located at a diffraction-limited resolution by referencing the current maps against the confocal reflectance image that is simultaneously acquired via optical-feedback detection. Our technique permits the accurate identification of metal and semiconductor sites as well as the classification of different metallic structures according to thickness, composition, or spatial inhomogeneity

  11. Active control of bright electron beams with RF optics for femtosecond microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A frontier challenge in implementing femtosecond electron microscopy is to gain precise optical control of intense beams to mitigate collective space charge effects for significantly improving the throughput. Here, we explore the flexible uses of an RF cavity as a longitudinal lens in a high-intensity beam column for condensing the electron beams both temporally and spectrally, relevant to the design of ultrafast electron microscopy. Through the introduction of a novel atomic grating approach for characterization of electron bunch phase space and control optics, we elucidate the principles for predicting and controlling the phase space dynamics to reach optimal compressions at various electron densities and generating conditions. We provide strategies to identify high-brightness modes, achieving ∼100 fs and ∼1 eV resolutions with 106 electrons per bunch, and establish the scaling of performance for different bunch charges. These results benchmark the sensitivity and resolution from the fundamental beam brightness perspective and also validate the adaptive optics concept to enable delicate control of the density-dependent phase space structures to optimize the performance, including delivering ultrashort, monochromatic, high-dose, or coherent electron bunches.

  12. Active control of bright electron beams with RF optics for femtosecond microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Zhou, F; Sun, T; Tao, Z; Chang, K; Makino, K; Berz, M; Duxbury, P M; Ruan, C-Y

    2017-07-01

    A frontier challenge in implementing femtosecond electron microscopy is to gain precise optical control of intense beams to mitigate collective space charge effects for significantly improving the throughput. Here, we explore the flexible uses of an RF cavity as a longitudinal lens in a high-intensity beam column for condensing the electron beams both temporally and spectrally, relevant to the design of ultrafast electron microscopy. Through the introduction of a novel atomic grating approach for characterization of electron bunch phase space and control optics, we elucidate the principles for predicting and controlling the phase space dynamics to reach optimal compressions at various electron densities and generating conditions. We provide strategies to identify high-brightness modes, achieving ∼100 fs and ∼1 eV resolutions with 10 6 electrons per bunch, and establish the scaling of performance for different bunch charges. These results benchmark the sensitivity and resolution from the fundamental beam brightness perspective and also validate the adaptive optics concept to enable delicate control of the density-dependent phase space structures to optimize the performance, including delivering ultrashort, monochromatic, high-dose, or coherent electron bunches.

  13. Structured Illumination-Based Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy for Hemato- and Cyto-Pathology Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieqiao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy utilizes interfering light and the moiré effect to enhance spatial resolution to about a half of that of conventional light microscopy, i.e. approximately 90 nm. In addition to the enhancement in the x and y directions, it also allows enhancement of resolution in the z- direction by the same factor of two (to approximately 220 nm, making it a powerful tool for 3-D morphology studies of fluorescently labeled cells or thin tissue sections. In this report, we applied this technique to several types of blood cells that are commonly seen in hematopathology. Compared with standard brightfield and ordinary fluorescence microscopy images, the 3-D morphology results clearly reveal the morphological features of different types of normal blood cells. We have also used this technique to evaluate morphologies of abnormal erythrocytes and compare them with those recorded on normal cells. The results give a very intuitive presentation of morphological structures of erythrocytes with great details. This research illustrates the potential of this technique to be used in hematology and cyto-pathology studies aimed at identifying nanometer-sized features that cannot be distinguished otherwise with conventional optical microscopy.

  14. Evaluating biomechanical properties of murine embryos using Brillouin microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Raksha; Zhang, Jitao; Wu, Chen; Rippy, Justin; Singh, Manmohan; Larin, Kirill V.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2017-08-01

    Embryogenesis is regulated by numerous changes in mechanical properties of the cellular microenvironment. Thus, studying embryonic mechanophysiology can provide a more thorough perspective of embryonic development, potentially improving early detection of congenital abnormalities as well as evaluating and developing therapeutic interventions. A number of methods and techniques have been used to study cellular biomechanical properties during embryogenesis. While some of these techniques are invasive or involve the use of external agents, others are compromised in terms of spatial and temporal resolutions. We propose the use of Brillouin microscopy in combination with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure stiffness as well as structural changes in a developing embryo. While Brillouin microscopy assesses the changes in stiffness among different organs of the embryo, OCT provides the necessary structural guidance.

  15. High resolution double-sided diffractive optics for hard X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Karvinen, Petri; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Müller, Elisabeth; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andrea; David, Christian

    2015-01-26

    The fabrication of high aspect ratio metallic nanostructures is crucial for the production of efficient diffractive X-ray optics in the hard X-ray range. We present a novel method to increase their structure height via the double-sided patterning of the support membrane. In transmission, the two Fresnel zone plates on the two sides of the substrate will act as a single zone plate with added structure height. The presented double-sided zone plates with 30 nm smallest zone width offer up to 9.9% focusing efficiency at 9 keV, that results in a factor of two improvement over their previously demonstrated single-sided counterparts. The increase in efficiency paves the way to speed up X-ray microscopy measurements and allows the more efficient utilization of the flux in full-field X-ray microscopy.

  16. 3D automatic quantification applied to optically sectioned images to improve microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Diaz-Zamboni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available New fluorescence microscopy techniques, such as confocal or digital deconvolution microscopy, allow to easily obtain three-dimensional (3D information from specimens. However, there are few 3D quantification tools that allow extracting information of these volumes. Therefore, the amount of information acquired by these techniques is difficult to manipulate and analyze manually. The present study describes a model-based method, which for the first time shows 3D visualization and quantification of fluorescent apoptotic body signals, from optical serial sections of porcine hepatocyte spheroids correlating them to their morphological structures. The method consists on an algorithm that counts apoptotic bodies in a spheroid structure and extracts information from them, such as their centroids in cartesian and radial coordinates, relative to the spheroid centre, and their integrated intensity. 3D visualization of the extracted information, allowed us to quantify the distribution of apoptotic bodies in three different zones of the spheroid.

  17. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  18. Massively parallel data processing for quantitative total flow imaging with optical coherence microscopy and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Marchand, Paul J.; Kumar, Ashwin S.; Lasser, Theo

    2017-08-01

    We present an application of massively parallel processing of quantitative flow measurements data acquired using spectral optical coherence microscopy (SOCM). The need for massive signal processing of these particular datasets has been a major hurdle for many applications based on SOCM. In view of this difficulty, we implemented and adapted quantitative total flow estimation algorithms on graphics processing units (GPU) and achieved a 150 fold reduction in processing time when compared to a former CPU implementation. As SOCM constitutes the microscopy counterpart to spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT), the developed processing procedure can be applied to both imaging modalities. We present the developed DLL library integrated in MATLAB (with an example) and have included the source code for adaptations and future improvements. Catalogue identifier: AFBT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 913552 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270876249 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: CUDA/C, MATLAB. Computer: Intel x64 CPU, GPU supporting CUDA technology. Operating system: 64-bit Windows 7 Professional. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, CPU code has been vectorized in MATLAB, CUDA code has been parallelized. RAM: Dependent on users parameters, typically between several gigabytes and several tens of gigabytes Classification: 6.5, 18. Nature of problem: Speed up of data processing in optical coherence microscopy Solution method: Utilization of GPU for massively parallel data processing Additional comments: Compiled DLL library with source code and documentation, example of utilization (MATLAB script with raw data) Running time: 1,8 s for one B-scan (150 × faster in comparison to the CPU

  19. Apertureless near-field optical microscopy with differential and close-proximity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Yuriko

    1997-07-01

    A new method of apertureless near-field optical microscopy that combines laterally differential detection with close-proximity detection has been developed. The laterally differential detection allows the light scattered from the probe apex to be distinguished from the background light. The close-proximity detection is done using a microfabricated photosensitive cantilever; it is thought to be a form of heterodyne detection, which provides a high signal level. This method makes it possible to detect the light scattered from the probe apex, which depends on the coupling between the probe apex dipole and the sample feature dipole.

  20. What Happened when a Superhydrophobic Surface was Immersed in Water? A Study by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a simple and fast optical transmission microscopy study on the wetting transitions on hierarchical polymer surfaces immersed in water. We analyze the influence of immersion time and the liquid pressure on wetting states of individual micro-cavities on these surfaces, as well...... repellent properties of the two materials to a difference in the wetting of their nanostructures. The experimental observations indicate that both the diffusion of gas molecules in water, and the geometry of nanostructures influence the sustainability of superhydrophobicity of surfaces under water...

  1. Nucleation site in CVD graphene growth investigated by radiation-mode optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Takanobu; Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the graphene nucleation site in real space using radiation-mode optical microscopy (Rad-OM), which we have developed for the real-time observation of the graphene growth in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions. We found the bright spot in the Rad-OM image worked as a nucleation site through continuous observation of a Cu substrate from pretreatment to graphene growth. The bright spot, considered as a C impurity, was effectively removed by Ar bombardment, which significantly reduced the nucleation density. The present result directly elucidates the role of C impurities and provides a means to grow single-crystalline and large-area graphene via CVD.

  2. In-vivo monitoring rat skin wound healing using nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Chungen; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) was employed for imaging and evaluating the wound healing process on rat skin in vivo. From the high-resolution nonlinear optical images, the morphology and distribution of specific biological markers in cutaneous wound healing such as fibrin clot, collagens, blood capillaries, and hairs were clearly observed at 1, 5 and 14 days post injury. We found that the disordered collagen in the fibrin clot at day 1 was replaced by regenerative collagen at day 5. By day 14, the thick collagen with well-network appeared at the original margin of the wound. These findings suggested that NLOM is ideal for noninvasively monitoring the progress of wound healing in vivo.

  3. Plasmonic optical antenna design for performing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharintsev, S S; Fishman, A I; Salakhov, M Kh; Hoffmann, G G

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights optical plasmonic antennas designed with dc-pulsed low-voltage electrochemical etching of a gold wire for implementing tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements. We demonstrate a versatile electrochemical system that allows one to engineer TERS-active metallic gold tips with diverse shapes and sizes in a highly reproducible fashion. The underlying etching mechanism at a voltage-driven meniscus around a gold wire immersed into an electrolyte is discussed in detail. We show that the developed method is suitable to produce not only the simplest geometries such as cones and spheroids, but more complex designs. Attempts have been made to design plasmonic tapered antennas with quasi-uniformly spaced nano-sized bumps on the mesoscopic zone for the extra surface plasmon-light coupling. The capability of the patterned antenna to enhance and localize optical fields is demonstrated with near-field Raman microscopy and spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes bundles. (paper)

  4. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, Emilio J; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez-García, M Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2011-11-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures.

  5. Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor-based adaptive optics system for multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae Won; Ballesta, Jerome; So, Peter T C

    2010-01-01

    The imaging depth of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy is partly limited by the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in biological specimens. This inhomogeneity results in a distortion of the wavefront of the excitation light. This wavefront distortion results in image resolution degradation and lower signal level. Using an adaptive optics system consisting of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror, wavefront distortion can be measured and corrected. With adaptive optics compensation, we demonstrate that the resolution and signal level can be better preserved at greater imaging depth in a variety of ex-vivo tissue specimens including mouse tongue muscle, heart muscle, and brain. However, for these highly scattering tissues, we find signal degradation due to scattering to be a more dominant factor than aberration.

  6. 3D in vivo imaging with extended-focus optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Trinh, Le A; Fingler, Jeff; Fraser, Scott E

    2017-11-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) has unique advantages of non-invasive 3D imaging without the need of exogenous labels for studying biological samples. However, the imaging depth of this technique is limited by the tradeoff between the depth of focus (DOF) and high lateral resolution in Gaussian optics. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an extended-focus OCM (xf-OCM) imaging system using quasi-Bessel beam illumination to extend the DOF to ∼100 μm, about 3-fold greater than standard OCM. High lateral resolution of 1.6 μm ensured detailed identification of structures within live animal samples. The insensitivity to spherical aberrations strengthened the capability of our xf-OCM system in 3D biological imaging. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...

  8. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette; Meesters, Arne A.; Paasch, Uwe; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-induced

  9. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo . The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque ™ ) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque ™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µ m for Omnipaque ™ and 40 µ m for glycerol ( p   ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque ™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque ™ . However, Omnipaque ™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure. (paper)

  11. Simulation of image formation in x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P; Roszczynialski, T P; Sowa, K M

    2015-04-06

    In x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics (XCAMPO), the microstructure of focusing polycapillary optics is used as a coded aperture and enables depth-resolved x-ray imaging at a resolution better than the focal spot dimensions. Improvements in the resolution and development of 3D encoding procedures require a simulation model that can predict the outcome of XCAMPO experiments. In this work we introduce a model of image formation in XCAMPO which enables calculation of XCAMPO datasets for arbitrary positions of the object relative to the focal plane as well as to incorporate optics imperfections. In the model, the exit surface of the optics is treated as a micro-structured x-ray source that illuminates a periodic object. This makes it possible to express the intensity of XCAMPO images as a convolution series and to perform simulations by means of fast Fourier transforms. For non-periodic objects, the model can be applied by enforcing artificial periodicity and setting the spatial period larger then the field-of-view. Simulations are verified by comparison with experimental data.

  12. Quantitative lateral and axial flow imaging with optical coherence microscopy and tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Arno; Szlag, Daniel; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Bolmont, Tristan; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Lasser, Theo

    2013-07-29

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) allow the acquisition of quantitative three-dimensional axial flow by estimating the Doppler shift caused by moving scatterers. Measuring the velocity of red blood cells is currently the principal application of these methods. In many biological tissues, blood flow is often perpendicular to the optical axis, creating the need for a quantitative measurement of lateral flow. Previous work has shown that lateral flow can be measured from the Doppler bandwidth, albeit only for simplified optical systems. In this work, we present a generalized model to analyze the influence of relevant OCT/OCM system parameters such as light source spectrum, numerical aperture and beam geometry on the Doppler spectrum. Our analysis results in a general framework relating the mean and variance of the Doppler frequency to the axial and lateral flow velocity components. Based on this model, we present an optimized acquisition protocol and algorithm to reconstruct quantitative measurements of lateral and axial flow from the Doppler spectrum for any given OCT/OCM system. To validate this approach, Doppler spectrum analysis is employed to quantitatively measure flow in a capillary with both extended focus OCM and OCT.

  13. An integrated optical coherence microscopy imaging and optical stimulation system for optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is the clinical standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling cardiac rhythm, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its applications. Optogenetic pacing of the heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids the shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Drosophila melanogaster, which is a powerful model organism with orthologs of nearly 75% of human disease genes, has not been studied for optogenetic pacing in the heart. Here, we developed a non-invasive integrated optical pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging system to control the heart rhythm of Drosophila at different developmental stages using light. The OCM system is capable of providing high imaging speed (130 frames/s) and ultrahigh imaging resolutions (1.5 μm and 3.9 μm for axial and transverse resolutions, respectively). A light-sensitive pacemaker was developed in Drosophila by specifically expressing the light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in transgenic Drosophila heart. We achieved non-invasive and specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm throughout the fly's life cycle (larva, pupa, and adult) by stimulating the heart with 475 nm pulsed laser light. Heart response to stimulation pulses was monitored non-invasively with OCM. This integrated non-invasive optogenetic control and in vivo imaging technique provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology.

  14. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; Pfiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  15. DMD-based random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Zhou, Yong; Winkler, Amy W.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The scanning mechanism is a major technical focus in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Flexible scanning access with fast scanning speed is desired to monitor biological and physiological dynamics with high temporal resolution. We developed random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (RA-OR-PAM) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Each micromirror on the DMD can be independently controlled, allowing imaging of regions of interest with arbitrary user-selected shapes without extraneous information. A global structural image is first acquired, and the regions of interest are selected. The laser beam then scans these regions exclusively, resulting in a faster frame rate than in a conventional raster scan. This system can rapidly scan arbitrarily shaped regions of interest with a lateral resolution of 3.6 μm within a 40×40 μm2 imaging area, a size comparable to the focal spot size of a 50 MHz ultrasound transducer. We demonstrated the random-access ability of RA-OR-PAM by imaging a monolayer of red blood cells. This system was then used to monitor blood flow in vivo within user-selected capillaries in a mouse ear. By imaging only the capillary of interest, the frame rate was increased by up to 13.3 times.

  16. Multiphoton imaging microscopy at deeper layers with adaptive optics control of spherical aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Juan M; Skorsetz, Martin; Palacios, Raquel; Gualda, Emilio J; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Despite the inherent confocality and optical sectioning capabilities of multiphoton microscopy, three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of thick samples is limited by the specimen-induced aberrations. The combination of immersion objectives and sensorless adaptive optics (AO) techniques has been suggested to overcome this difficulty. However, a complex plane-by-plane correction of aberrations is required, and its performance depends on a set of image-based merit functions. We propose here an alternative approach to increase penetration depth in 3-D multiphoton microscopy imaging. It is based on the manipulation of the spherical aberration (SA) of the incident beam with an AO device while performing fast tomographic multiphoton imaging. When inducing SA, the image quality at best focus is reduced; however, better quality images are obtained from deeper planes within the sample. This is a compromise that enables registration of improved 3-D multiphoton images using nonimmersion objectives. Examples on ocular tissues and nonbiological samples providing different types of nonlinear signal are presented. The implementation of this technique in a future clinical instrument might provide a better visualization of corneal structures in living eyes.

  17. Correlation between polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography and second harmonic generation microscopy in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Viet-Hoan; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Bumju; Yoon, Yeoreum; Yoon, Calvin J; Chung, Wan Kyun; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-07-01

    Both polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are 3D optical imaging methods providing information related to collagen in the skin. PS-OCT provides birefringence information which is due to the collagen composition of the skin. SHG microscopy visualizes collagen fibers in the skin based on their SHG property. These two modalities have been applied to the same skin pathologies associated with collagen changes, but their relationship has not been examined. In this study, we tried to find the relationship by imaging the same skin samples with both modalities. Various parts of the normal rat skin and burn damaged skin were imaged ex vivo, and their images were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. PS-OCT images were analyzed to obtain tissue birefringence. SHG images were analyzed to obtain collagen orientation indices by applying 2D Fourier transform. The skin samples having higher birefringence values had higher collagen orientation indices, and a linear correlation was found between them. Burn damaged skin showed decreases in both parameters compared to the control skins. This relationship between the bulk and microscopic properties of skin may be useful for further skin studies.

  18. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation of ''twins'' observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in YBa2Cu3O7/sub -//sub x/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, H.A.; Singh, A.K.; Pande, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    By using transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy on the same specimens, the patterns of light- and dark-contrast lines seen in reflected polarized light were shown to be an interference pattern due to the variable spacing of suboptical microtwins. These microtwins are mostly [110] reflection twins. The [110] twinning was observed to be cyclic and occasionally pseudotetragonal because of the progressive cycling of contact twin domains. Within a domain, and occasionally in a whole grain, the [110] reflection twins occurred as polysynthetic lamellae. The morphology of the domain structure can be explained from the theory of martensitic transformation

  20. Full-field illumination approach with multiple speckle for optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Florian; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy (OR-PAE) allows going beyond the limited penetration depth of conventional optical-resolution photoacoustic systems. Recently, it has been shown that OR-PAE may be performed through minimally invasive multimode fibers, by raster scanning a focus spot with optical wavefront shaping [1]. Here we introduce for the first time an approach to perform OR-PAE through a multimode fiber with a full-field illumination approach. By using multiple known speckle patterns, we show that it is possible to obtain optical-diffraction limited photoacoustic images, with the same resolution as that obtained by raster scanning a focus spot, i.e that of the speckle grain size. The fluctuations patterns of the photoacoustic amplitude at each pixel in the sample plane with the series of multiple speckle illumination were used to encode each pixel. This approach with known speckle illumination requires an initial calibration stage, that consists in learn a set of fluctuation patterns pixel per pixel, which will encode patterns each pixel of the scanned area. A point-like absorber was scanned across the filed-of-view during the calibration stage to acquire the reference patterns. Image reconstruction may be carried out by cross-correlating the series of photoacoustic amplitude measured with the sample to the reference patterns obtained during the calibration stage. In this work, the approach above was carried out both theoretically with Monte-carlo simulations and experimentally through a multi-mode fiber with samples made of absorbing spheres. [1] Papadopoulos et al., " Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy by use of a multimode fiber", Appl. Phys. Lett., 102(21), 2013

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

  2. Live endothelial cells imaged by Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM): capabilities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Katarzyna; Rygula, Anna; Szafraniec, Ewelina; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2017-06-01

    The scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) shows a potential to study details of biological samples, since it provides the optical images of objects with nanometric spatial resolution (50-200 nm) and the topographic information at the same time. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the capabilities of SNOM in transmission configuration to study human endothelial cells and their morphological changes, sometimes very subtle, upon inflammation. Various sample preparations were tested for SNOM measurements and promising results are collected to show: 1) the influence of α tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) on EA.hy 926 cells (measurements of the fixed cells); 2) high resolution images of various endothelial cell lines, i.e. EA.hy 926 and HLMVEC (investigations of the fixed cells in buffer environment); 3) imaging of live endothelial cells in physiological buffers. The study demonstrate complementarity of the SNOM measurements performed in air and in liquid environments, on fixed as well as on living cells. Furthermore, it is proved that the SNOM is a very useful method for analysis of cellular morphology and topography. Changes in the cell shape and nucleus size, which are the symptoms of inflammatory reaction, were noticed in TNF-α activated EA.hy 926 cells. The cellular structures of submicron size were observed in high resolution optical images of cells from EA.hy 926 and HLMVEC lines. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... mixing it with a violet stain (called a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to ... reveals an abnormal collection of pleural fluid. The Gram stain can help identify the bacteria that might ...

  4. Study of environmental biodegradation of LDPE films in soil using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Tabassum; Khan, M R; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2010-07-01

    An outdoor soil burial test was carried out to evaluate the degradation of commercially available LDPE carrier bags in natural soil for up to 2 years. Biodegradability of low density polyethylene films in soil was monitored using both optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 7-9 months of soil exposure, microbial colonization was evident on the film surface. Exposed LDPE samples exhibit progressive changes towards degradation after 17-22 months. SEM images reveal signs of degradation such as exfoliation and formation of cracks on film leading to disintegration. The possible degradation mode and consequences on the use and disposal of LDPE films is discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  6. Study of Transitions between Wetting States on Microcavity Arrays by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple and fast optical method based on transmission microscopy to study the stochastic wetting transitions on micro- and nanostructured polymer surfaces immersed in water. We analyze the influence of immersion time and the liquid pressure on the degree of water...... this threshold, the transitions between the Cassie and the Cassie-impregnating states are reversible, whereas above this threshold, irreversible transitions to the Wenzel state start to occur. The transitions between the different wetting states can be explained by taking into account both the Young-Laplace...... compared the contact angle properties of two polymeric materials (COC and PP) with moderate hydrophobicity. We attributed the difference in the water repellency of the two materials to a difference in the wetting of their nanostructures. Our experimental observations thus indicate that both the diffusion...

  7. Macro-optical trapping for sample confinement in light sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Piksarv, Peeter; Ferrier, David E K; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-08-01

    Light sheet microscopy is a powerful approach to construct three-dimensional images of large specimens with minimal photo-damage and photo-bleaching. To date, the specimens are usually mounted in agents such as agarose, potentially restricting the development of live samples, and also highly mobile specimens need to be anaesthetized before imaging. To overcome these problems, here we demonstrate an integrated light sheet microscope which solely uses optical forces to trap and hold the sample using a counter-propagating laser beam geometry. Specifically, tobacco plant cells and living Spirobranchus lamarcki larvae were successfully trapped and sectional images acquired. This novel approach has the potential to significantly expand the range of applications for light sheet imaging.

  8. Discriminating red spray paints by optical microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaert, Filip; Bernard, Magali

    2004-02-10

    Red spray paints from different European suppliers were characterised to determine the discriminating power of a sequence of analysing techniques. A total of 51 red spray paints were analysed with the help of three techniques: (1) optical microscopy, (2) Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and (3) X-ray fluorescence. Infrared spectra were classified according to binder type, filler and pigment composition and a searchable spectral library was created. Due to the difference in the elemental composition of spray paints, a further discrimination was possible. The microscopic analysis was not taken into consideration for classification purposes. The structure of the substrate under a paint coating strongly affects the surface characteristics of this spray paint. Together with the spectral library, a database of information of spray paints was build.

  9. Phase sensitive optical coherence microscopy for photothermal imaging of gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Dobre, George

    2018-03-01

    We describe a swept source based phase sensitive optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system for photothermal imaging of gold nanorods (GNR). The phase sensitive OCM system employed in the study has a displacement sensitivity of 0.17 nm to vibrations at single frequencies below 250 Hz. We demonstrate the generation of phase maps and confocal phase images. By displaying the difference between successive confocal phase images, we perform the confocal photothermal imaging of accumulated GNRs behind a glass coverslip and behind the scattering media separately. Compared with two-photon luminescence (TPL) detection techniques reported in literature, the technique in this study has the advantage of a simplified experimental setup and provides a more efficient method for imaging the aggregation of GNR. However, the repeatability performance of this technique suffers due to jitter noise from the swept laser source.

  10. Widefield fluorescence microscopy with sensor-based conjugate adaptive optics using oblique back illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Bifano, Thomas G; Mertz, Jerome

    2016-12-01

    We describe a wavefront sensor strategy for the implementation of adaptive optics (AO) in microscope applications involving thick, scattering media. The strategy is based on the exploitation of multiple scattering to provide oblique back illumination of the wavefront-sensor focal plane, enabling a simple and direct measurement of the flux-density tilt angles caused by aberrations at this plane. Advantages of the sensor are that it provides a large measurement field of view (FOV) while requiring no guide star, making it particularly adapted to a type of AO called conjugate AO, which provides a large correction FOV in cases when sample-induced aberrations arise from a single dominant plane (e.g., the sample surface). We apply conjugate AO here to widefield (i.e., nonscanning) fluorescence microscopy for the first time and demonstrate dynamic wavefront correction in a closed-loop implementation.

  11. Second harmonic generation in 3-d uniform arrangement of type I collagen on nonlinear optics microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Z F; Zhu, M F; Guo, Z Y; Liu, S H

    2013-01-01

    Second harmonic microscopic imaging and spectroscopy technology has become a powerful tool for biomedical studies, especially in fibrosis-related diseases research. And type I collagen is the major risk factors for fibrotic diseases. In this study, model for three-dimensional (3-D) uniform arrangement type I collagen is set up for researching the second harmonic generation (SHG) on nonlinear optics microscopy. Based on this model, we discuss the influence of different length and size collagen in 3-D arrangement type I collagen. Results can guide us to neatly judge the size, length, and molecules density effect on SHG. For practical application, this theoretical approach can lead us to analyze different severity of collagen diseases. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Double-Exposure Optical Sectioning Structured Illumination Microscopy Based on Hilbert Transform Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Yao, Baoli; Qian, Jia; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Min, Junwei; Peng, Tong; Ye, Tong; Chen, Guangde

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with axially optical sectioning capability has found widespread applications in three-dimensional live cell imaging in recent years, since it combines high sensitivity, short image acquisition time, and high spatial resolution. To obtain one sectioned slice, three raw images with a fixed phase-shift, normally 2π/3, are generally required. In this paper, we report a data processing algorithm based on the one-dimensional Hilbert transform, which needs only two raw images with arbitrary phase-shift for each single slice. The proposed algorithm is different from the previous two-dimensional Hilbert spiral transform algorithm in theory. The presented algorithm has the advantages of simpler data processing procedure, faster computation speed and better reconstructed image quality. The validity of the scheme is verified by imaging biological samples in our developed DMD-based LED-illumination SIM system. PMID:25799234

  13. Tunable optical setup with high flexibility for spectrally resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, G; Akimov, D; Bartelt, H; Dietzek, B; Popp, J; Schlücker, S

    2011-01-01

    A simplified setup for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is introduced, which allows for recording CARS images with 30 cm -1 excitation bandwidth for probing Raman bands between 500 and 900 cm -1 with minimal requirements for alignment. The experimental arrangement is based on electronic switching between CARS images recorded at different Raman resonances by combining a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as broadband light source and an acousto-optical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) as tunable wavelength filter. Such spatial light modulator enables selection of a narrow-band spectrum to yield high vibrational contrast and hence chemical contrast in the resultant CARS images. Furthermore, an experimental approach to reconstruct spectral information from CARS image contrast is introduced

  14. Laser treatment of port wine stains: three-dimensional simulation using biopsy-defined geometry in an optical-thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Barton, Jennifer K.; Smithies, Derek J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1998-07-01

    The efficacy of laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS) has been shown to be highly dependent on the patient-specific structure of vascular lesions. To improve the accuracy of PWS numerical models, an optical-thermal model simulating an arbitrarily complex, three dimensional tissue geometry has been developed. In this model, the distribution of absorbed radiant energy -- determined using a modified Monte Carlo technique -- is used as the source term in a finite difference thermal model that predicts transient temperature rise. The Arrhenius rate process integral is then used to calculate thermal damage. Simulations based on a tomographic reconstruction of a PWS biopsy were performed for laser pulse durations of 0.5, 5.0 and 50.0 ms and a wavelength of 585 nm. Irradiances that produced maximum tissue temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius were used. The simulations indicated that energy deposition in blood is primarily a function of depth in skin. Thermal diffusion effects increased with longer pulse duration, leading to collateral damage observed at 5.0 and 50.0 ms. A pulse duration of 0.5 ms resulted in confinement of thermal damage to blood regions. Clusters of small vessels tended to behave similarly to larger vessels, reaching higher temperatures and creating more damage in the surrounding dermis than isolated vessels. The incorporation of realistic geometry into an optical-thermal model represents a significant advance in computer modeling of laser surgery.

  15. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Naresh

    2017-01-12

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with <20 nm spatial resolution by combining plasmonic optical signal enhancement with electrical-mode scanning probe microscopy. We demonstrate that this combined approach offers subsurface sensitivity that can be exploited to provide molecular information with a nanoscale resolution in all three spatial dimensions. By applying the technique to an organic solar cell device, we show that the inferred surface and subsurface composition distribution correlates strongly with the local photocurrent generation and explains macroscopic device performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  16. Microsphere imaging with confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung Su; An, Kyung Won; Lee, Jai Hyung

    2002-01-01

    We have acquired images of polystyrene and fused-silica microsphere by using conventional optical microscopy, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, and performed comparative analysis of these images. Different from conventional optical microscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy had good optical sectioning capability. In addition, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had better lateral resolution than conventional optical microscopy. These results are attributed to confocality and nonlinearity of confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy, respectively.

  17. A high throughput spectral image microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, M.; Puri, R.

    2018-01-01

    A high throughput spectral image microscopy system is configured for rapid detection of rare cells in large populations. To overcome flow cytometry rates and use of fluorophore tags, a system architecture integrates sample mechanical handling, signal processors, and optics in a non-confocal version of light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy. Spectral images with native contrast do not require the use of exogeneous stain to render cells with submicron resolution. Structure may be characterized without restriction to cell clusters of differentiation.

  18. Nonlinear optical microscopy and microspectroscopy of oral precancers and early cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Gracie; Edward, Kert

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) offers the ability to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as biochemical information from endogenous fluorophores which are altered with neoplastic transformation. In this study the spectroscopic properties of normal and neoplastic oral epithelium were evaluated toward the goal of identifying image/spectroscopic based indicators of neoplastic transformation using nonlinear optical microscopy. Results indicated measureable differences between normal, dysplasia, and SCC that could be helpful in delineating between the three conditions. In particular, a blue shift in autofluorescence emission was experienced for dysplasia relative to normal. However, in the case of SCC the epithelial emission experienced a significant red shift relative to both dysplasia and normal and displayed in an additional red peak that was not present in either normal or dysplastic mucosa. Results were consistent with published results for SCC in the single-photon literature. The study demonstrates that multiphoton autofluorescence spectroscopy may reveal features of oral mucosa that can be useful for differentiating normal and neoplastic mucosa. When combined with morphometry provided by MPAM, a potentially powerful technique for imaging of the oral cavity could be developed which provides both morphometric and spectroscopic information.

  19. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  20. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  1. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, A Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  2. Refractometry of melanocyte cell nuclei using optical scatter images recorded by digital Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Nieminen, Timo A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2009-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the dominant optical scatterer in the cell. Neoplastic cells are characterized by cell nucleus polymorphism and polychromism-i.e., the nuclei exhibits an increase in the distribution of both size and refractive index. The relative size parameter, and its distribution, is proportional to the product of the nucleus size and its relative refractive index and is a useful discriminant between normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells. We demonstrate a recently introduced holographic technique, digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), to provide a sensitive measure of this relative size parameter. Fourier holograms were recorded and optical scatter of individual scatterers were extracted and modeled with Mie theory to determine the relative size parameter. The relative size parameter of individual melanocyte cell nuclei were found to be 16.5+/-0.2, which gives a cell nucleus refractive index of 1.38+/-0.01 and is in good agreement with previously reported data. The relative size parameters of individual malignant melanocyte cell nuclei are expected to be greater than 16.5.

  3. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminated by exploiting their different emission spectral ranges as in luminescence linear spectroscopy. We then demonstrate SHG imaging of a filler, plaster, composed of bassanite particles which exhibit a non centrosymmetric crystal structure. We also show that SHG/2PEF imaging enables the visualization of wood microstructure through typically 60 µm-thick coatings by revealing crystalline cellulose (SHG signal) and lignin (2PEF signal) in the wood cell walls. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as a promising non-destructive and contactless tool for in situ 3D investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  4. Fluorescent nanoscale detection of biotin-streptavidin interaction using near-field scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Gokarna, Anisha; Hulme, John P; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2008-01-01

    We describe a nanoscale strategy for detecting biotin-streptavidin binding using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) that exploits the fluorescence properties of single polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomes. NSOM is more useful to observe nanomaterials having optical properties with the help of topological information. We synthesized amine-terminated 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) monomer (PCDA-NH 2 ) and used this derivatized monomer to prepare PCDA liposomes. PCDA-NH 2 liposomes were immobilized on an aldehyde-functionalized glass surface followed by photopolymerization by using a 254 nm light source. To measure the biotin-streptavidin binding, we conjugated photoactivatable biotin to immobilized PCDA-NH 2 liposomes by UV irradiation (365 nm) and subsequently allowed them to interact with streptavidin. We analyzed the fluorescence using a fluorescence scanner and observed single liposomes using NSOM. The average height and NSOM signal observed in a single liposome after binding were ∼31.3 to 8.5 ± 0.5 nm and 0.37 to 0.16 ± 0.6 kHz, respectively. This approach, which has the advantage of not requiring a fluorescent label, could prove highly beneficial for single molecule detection technology

  5. Improving the visualization of electron-microscopy data through optical flow interpolation

    KAUST Repository

    Carata, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Technical developments in neurobiology have reached a point where the acquisition of high resolution images representing individual neurons and synapses becomes possible. For this, the brain tissue samples are sliced using a diamond knife and imaged with electron-microscopy (EM). However, the technique achieves a low resolution in the cutting direction, due to limitations of the mechanical process, making a direct visualization of a dataset difficult. We aim to increase the depth resolution of the volume by adding new image slices interpolated from the existing ones, without requiring modifications to the EM image-capturing method. As classical interpolation methods do not provide satisfactory results on this type of data, the current paper proposes a re-framing of the problem in terms of motion volumes, considering the depth axis as a temporal axis. An optical flow method is adapted to estimate the motion vectors of pixels in the EM images, and this information is used to compute and insert multiple new images at certain depths in the volume. We evaluate the visualization results in comparison with interpolation methods currently used on EM data, transforming the highly anisotropic original dataset into a dataset with a larger depth resolution. The interpolation based on optical flow better reveals neurite structures with realistic undistorted shapes, and helps to easier map neuronal connections. © 2011 ACM.

  6. Scanning second-harmonic optical microscopy of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    or in the illumination itself. Thus, a combination of scanning microscopy with SH detection may be a highly suitable candidate to reveal the presence of QD's embedded in an otherwise isotropic material. We have used scanning far-field (SFOM) and scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) techniques to locally probe......Microscopy provides a suitable technique for local probing of small ensembles of (or even individual) QD's, and when combined with the detection of second-harmonic (SH) generation the technique becomes suitable to reveal tiny changes of symmetry originating either in the material structures...

  7. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  8. Noninvasive label-free monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in human skin using nonlinear optical microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, nonlinear optical microscopy has seen a dramatic rise in its use in research settings due to its noninvasiveness, enhanced penetration depth, intrinsic optical sectioning, and the ability to probe chemical compounds with molecular specificity without exogenous contrast agents. Nonlinear optical techniques including two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), second harmonic generation (SHG), coherent anti-Stokes and stimulated Raman scattering (CARS and SRS, respectively), as well as transient and sum frequency absorption (TA and SFA, respectively), have been widely used to explore the physiology and microanatomy of skin. Recently, these modalities have shed light on dermal processes that could not have otherwise been observed, including the spatiotemporal monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. However, a challenge quickly arises when studying such chemicals in a dermatological context: many exogenous compounds have optical signatures that can interfere with the signals that would otherwise be acquired from intact skin. For example, oily solvents exhibit strong signals when probing CH2 vibrations with CARS/SRS; chemical sun filters appear bright in 2PEF microscopy; and darkly colored compounds readily absorb light across a broad spectrum, producing strong TA/SFA signals. Thus, this discussion will first focus on the molecular contrast in skin that can be probed using the aforementioned nonlinear optical techniques. This will be followed by an overview of strategies that take advantage of the exogenous compounds' optical signatures to probe spatiotemporal dynamics while preserving endogenous information from skin.

  9. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sednev, Maksim V; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-10-22

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe's diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20-40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH.

  10. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sednev, Maksim V; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-01-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20–40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH. (topical review)

  11. Characterization of Si3N4/SiO2 optical channel waveguides by photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chudgar, Mona H.; Jackson, Howard E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1993-01-01

    Photon scanning tunneling microscopy (PSTM) is used to characterize Si3N4/Si02 optical channel waveguides being used for integrated optical-micromechanical sensors. PSTM utilizes an optical fiber tapered to a fine point which is piezoelectrically positioned to measure the decay of the evanescent field intensity associated with the waveguide propagating mode. Evanescent field decays are recorded for both ridge channel waveguides and planar waveguide regions. Values for the local effective refractive index are calculated from the data for both polarizations and compared to model calculations.

  12. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-15

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  13. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  14. Transmission electron and optical microscopy of the domain structure of Ni3B7O13Br ferroic boracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos-Guzman, A.G.; Trujillo-Torrez, M.; Czank, M.

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated the domain structure of nickel bromine boracite single crystals, by means of polarised-light in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of Ni 3 B 7 O 13 Br were grown by chemical transport reactions in closed quartz ampoules, in the temperature range of 1130 K and were examined by polarising optical microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PLM was also used in order to study the behaviour of birefringence as a function of temperature. For TEM the single crystals were crushed and mounted on holey carbon films. Comparative electron microscope images were useful for revealing the domain structure of this fully ferroelectric/fully ferroelastic material previously observed between the crossed polars of an optical microscope. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal under study was performed at room temperature

  15. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM) system for remote characterization of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2014-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) employs light pulses to produce a photoacoustic (PA) effect and detects the resulting acoustic waves using an ultrasound transducer acoustically coupled to the target. The resolution of conventional PAM is limited by the sensitivity and bandwidth of the ultrasound transducer. We investigated a versatile, all-optical PAM (AOPAM) system for characterizing in vivo as well as ex vivo biological specimens. The system employs non-contact interferometric detection of PA signals that overcomes limitations of conventional PAM. A 532-nm pump laser with a pulse duration of 5 ns excites the PA effect in tissue. Resulting acoustic waves produce surface displacements that are sensed using a 532-nm continuous-wave (CW) probe laser in a Michelson interferometer with a 1- GHz bandwidth. The pump and probe beams are coaxially focused using a 50X objective giving a diffraction-limited spot size of 0.48 μm. The phase-encoded probe beam is demodulated using homodyne methods. The detected timedomain signal is time reversed using k-space wave-propagation methods to produce a spatial distribution of PA sources in the target tissue. A minimum surface-displacement sensitivity of 0.19 pm was measured. PA-induced surface displacements are very small; therefore, they impose stringent detection requirements and determine the feasibility of implementing an all-optical PAM in biomedical applications. 3D PA images of ex vivo porcine retina specimens were generated successfully. We believe the AOPAM system potentially is well suited for assessing retinal diseases and other near-surface biomedical applications such as sectionless histology and evaluation of skin burns and pressure or friction ulcers.

  16. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Onur Urs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  17. Experimental estimation of dij coefficients of piezoelectric materials by means of optical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamopoulos D.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The properties of multiferroic and specifically piezoelectric (PE materials are, nowadays, intensively investigated by means of well established, however relatively complicate methods. In this work we present a method for the direct visual demonstration of the underlying electro-mechanical processes occurring in PE materials and the estimation of the respective coefficients dij. The method is based on the utilization of optical microscopy for the local observation of the deformation of a PE specimen upon application of an electric field. The direct comparison of the snapshots obtained before and after application of the electric field and simple algebraic calculations enables the estimation of the dij coefficients. The method was evaluated in unpoled single crystals of 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3O3–0.29PbTiO3, at room temperature. Various locations of each crystal surface were surveyed. Non-homogeneous electro-mechanical response was observed. Accordingly, the estimated dij coefficients depended on the specific location of the crystal surface. Specifically, the dzx coefficient ranged within 500-1000 pm/V over the investigated locations (for electric fields E<1kV/mm. The present method directly unveils non-homogeneous electro-mechanical processes occurring at the surface of PE crystals and clarifies how these observations can be quantified through the respective dij coefficients.

  18. Line-scan Raman microscopy complements optical coherence tomography for tumor boundary detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Qi, Ji; Young, Eric D.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Lev, Dina C.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Larin, Kirill V.; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    Current technique for tumor resection requires biopsy of the tumor region and histological confirmation before the surgeon can be certain that the entire tumor has been resected. This confirmation process is time consuming both for the surgeon and the patient and also requires sacrifice of healthy tissue, motivating the development of novel technologies which can enable real-time detection of tumor-healthy tissue boundary for faster and more efficient surgeries. In this study, the potential of combining structural information from optical coherence tomography (OCT) and molecular information from line-scan Raman microscopy (LSRM) for such an application is presented. The results show a clear presence of boundary between myxoid liposarcoma and normal fat which is easily identifiable both from structural and molecular information. In cases where structural images are indistinguishable, for example, in normal fat and well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS) or gastrointestinal sarcoma tumor (GIST) and myxoma, distinct molecular spectra have been obtained. The results suggest LSRM can effectively complement OCT to tumor boundary demarcation with high specificity.

  19. Rigorous numerical modeling of scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinzhong; Lo, Chiu Fan Bowen; Zheng, William; Hu, Hai; Dai, Qing; Liu, Mengkun

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy have been widely used in nano-photonics and material research due to their fine spatial resolution and broad spectral range. A number of simplified analytical models have been proposed to quantitatively understand the tip-scattered near-field signal. However, a rigorous interpretation of the experimental results is still lacking at this stage. Numerical modelings, on the other hand, are mostly done by simulating the local electric field slightly above the sample surface, which only qualitatively represents the near-field signal rendered by the tip-sample interaction. In this work, we performed a more comprehensive numerical simulation which is based on realistic experimental parameters and signal extraction procedures. By directly comparing to the experiments as well as other simulation efforts, our methods offer a more accurate quantitative description of the near-field signal, paving the way for future studies of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  20. Combined two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography using individually optimized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Bosu; Lee, Byunghak; Jang, Min Seong; Nam, Hyoseok; Kim, Hae Koo; Yoon, Sang June; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang-Joon; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kim, Ki Hean

    2011-03-01

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are 3D tissue imaging techniques based on different contrast mechanisms. We developed a combined system of TPM and OCT to provide information of both imaging modalities for in-vivo tissue study. TPM and OCT were implemented by using separate light sources, a Ti-Sapphire laser and a wavelength-swept source centered at 1300 nm respectively, and scanners. Light from the two sources was combined for the simultaneous imaging of tissue samples. TPM provided molecular, cellular information of tissues in the region of a few hundred microns on one side at a sub-cellular resolution, and ran at approximately 40 frames per second. OCT provided structural information in the tissue region larger than TPM images at a sub-tenth micron resolution by using 0.1 numerical aperture. OCT had the field of view of 800 um × 800 um based on a 20x objective, the sensitivity of 97dB, and the imaging speed of 0.8 volumes per second. This combined system was tested with simple microsphere specimens, and then was applied to image the explanted intestine of a mouse model and the plant leaves. Morphology and micro-structures of the intestine villi and immune cells within the villi were shown in the intestine image, and chloroplasts and various microstructures of the maize leaves were visualized in 3D by the combined system.

  1. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  2. Fabrication of Cantilevered Tip-on-Aperture Probe for Enhancing Resolution of Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kim, Dae-Chul; Kim, Jeongyong

    2007-08-01

    The scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) system achieves a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopy system by subwavelength aperture probe scanning. The problem is that the light throughput decreases very markedly with decreasing aperture diameter. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopes obtain a much better resolution by concentrating light field near the tip apex. However, far-field illumination by a focused laser beam generates a large background scattering signal. Both disadvantages are overcome using the tip-on-aperture (TOA) approach presented in previous works. In this study, the fabrication of a cantilevered tip for SNOM and scanning force microscopy (SFM) has been described. The nano-probes are batch-fabricated on a silicon wafer. The Si3N4 has excellent optical transparent characteristics, higher Young’s modulus and yield strength so that it should provide a better probe for SNOM and SFM. For this purpose, a Si3N4 thin film was deposited using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). To form the aperture and TOA in the probe, we applied focused ion beam (FIB) machining at the end of the sharpened tip. For verification of the efficiency of the micromachined TOA probes, numerical analysis using the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurement using an inverted microscope based the SNOM system were performed.

  3. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Ray-tracing study on the post-scanner variable beam expansion optics in a two-photon microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Welle, Cristin; Krauthamer, Victor

    2012-03-01

    Due to the low signal levels typical of two-photon microscopy (TPM) in biological samples, optical design optimization is critical. One of the most important factors is overfilling of the back aperture of the objective lens. A variable beam expander is commonly placed before the scanning mirrors to achieve this goal, however, this may cause degradation of image quality due to increased dispersion. Additionally, scanning mirror size restricts the degree of expansion, which often prevents the overfilling of objective lens back aperture. We investigated the implementation of variable beam expansion optics after the scanning mirrors. Ray-tracing analyses confirmed that the post-scanner beam expansion has two key advantages over the conventional pre-scanner beam expansion approach: decreasing the number of optical elements reduces pulse dispersion and reducing the size of the scanning mirror enables faster scanning. Resolution and aberration of a TPM with post-scanner beam expansion optics were analysed.

  5. Port-Wine Stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Port-Wine Stains KidsHealth / For Parents / Port-Wine Stains What's ... Manchas de vino de oporto What Are Port-Wine Stains? A port-wine stain is a type ...

  6. Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images via semi-supervised classification over optics-related features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Yin, Zhaozheng; Huh, Seungil; Kanade, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Phase-contrast microscopy is one of the most common and convenient imaging modalities to observe long-term multi-cellular processes, which generates images by the interference of lights passing through transparent specimens and background medium with different retarded phases. Despite many years of study, computer-aided phase contrast microscopy analysis on cell behavior is challenged by image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose (1) a phase contrast microscopy image restoration method that produces phase retardation features, which are intrinsic features of phase contrast microscopy, and (2) a semi-supervised learning based algorithm for cell segmentation, which is a fundamental task for various cell behavior analysis. Specifically, the image formation process of phase contrast microscopy images is first computationally modeled with a dictionary of diffraction patterns; as a result, each pixel of a phase contrast microscopy image is represented by a linear combination of the bases, which we call phase retardation features. Images are then partitioned into phase-homogeneous atoms by clustering neighboring pixels with similar phase retardation features. Consequently, cell segmentation is performed via a semi-supervised classification technique over the phase-homogeneous atoms. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach produces quality segmentation of individual cells and outperforms previous approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solvothermally Synthesized Sb2Te3 Platelets Show Unexpected Optical Contrasts in Mid-Infrared Near-Field Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Benedikt; Saltzmann, Tobias; Simon, Ulrich; Taubner, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    We report nanoscale-resolved optical investigations on the local material properties of Sb2Te3 hexagonal platelets grown by solvothermal synthesis. Using mid-infrared near-field microscopy, we find a highly symmetric pattern, which is correlated to a growth spiral and which extends over the entire platelet. As the origin of the optical contrast, we identify domains with different densities of charge carriers. On Sb2Te3 samples grown by other means, we did not find a comparable domain structure.

  8. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  9. Deliquescence and Efflorescence of Organic and Mixed Organic-Inorganic Particles: An FTIR/Optical Microscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M. T.; Fok, A.; Mak, J.; Lipetz, S. R.; Pant, A.; Bertram, A. K.; Haddrell, A.; Agnes, G. R.

    2003-12-01

    Organic aerosols have recently gained attention as a significant component of the atmosphere and as such have been the focus of a number of studies regarding phase transitions. We have focussed on the deliquescence and efflorescence behaviour of dicarboxylic acids using optical microscopy in conjunction with a flow cell containing particles with diameters ranging from 2 - 40 microns. Deliquescence of malonic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid and adipic acid particles were tested over a range of temperature from 253 K to 293 K. In all cases, we observed deliquescence below the eutectic point, suggesting that these species are not good ice nuclei above 253 K. Our deliquescence data is also in good agreement with calculations based on solubility and the UNIFAC model. Deliquescence and efflorescence data for ammonium sulphate - glutaric acid and sodium chloride - glutaric acid mixtures were also measured at 293 K using both optical and FTIR microscopy techniques. FTIR microscopy allows us to make visual observations, while monitoring the chemical content of a single particle or a collection of particles. Additionally, we have extended the FTIR microscopy technique to study phase transition behaviour of single electrodynamically levitated particles. Some preliminary results from this new technique are also discussed.

  10. Investigation of optical nanostructures for photovoltaics with near-field scanning microscopy; Untersuchung optischer Nanostrukturen fuer die Photovoltaik mit Nahfeldmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Thomas

    2011-09-26

    Textured and rough surfaces are known to increase light trapping in solar cells significantly. The development and optimization of these nano-structures is essential to improve the energy conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. In the past, first research approaches covered classical and macroscopic investigations, e.g. determining the haze or angularly resolved scattering. These methods do not provide precise explanation for the optical improvement of the devices, because layer thicknesses and structure sizes in thin-film solar cells are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The impact of local nano-structures and their contribution to the local absorption enhancement is not resolved by macroscopic measurements. In this thesis, near-field scanning optical microscopy is introduced as first near-field investigations of nano-structures for photovoltaics. This provides an insight into local optical effects for relevant surfaces of photovoltaic devices. Investigating the distribution of the electric fields in layer stacks is crucial to understand the absorption in solar cells. Evanescent fields, which occur due to total internal reflection at the interfaces, are measurable by near-field scanning optical microscopy and yield important information about local light trapping. Within the framework of this thesis, correlations between local surface structures and optical near-field effects are shown. In this case structure features of randomly textured surfaces, which optimize local light trapping, are identified. It paves the way to connect microscopic optical effects on the surface with the macroscopic performance of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, the measurement yields a 3D illustration of the electric field distribution over the sample surface. It is an important criterion to prove the results of rigorous diffraction theory. An excellent agreement between experiment and simulation is found. The simulations provide an insight into the material, which is

  11. Nanoscale investigation of the organic semiconductor tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum by near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credo, Grace Mangulabnan

    2001-07-01

    We have used the high-resolution optical microscopy technique near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe the local optical and morphological properties in thin films (10 to 500 nm thick) and clusters of the luminescent molecule tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3). Organic semiconductors such as Alq3 are attractive materials for light-emitting diode (LED) and flat panel display technology due to their desirable properties: facile wide-area deposition, self-emission, and versatile color selection. Despite the numerous spectroscopic studies being conducted on Alq3 and Alq3-based devices, few studies examine the relationship of the morphology of the film to its optical properties. Using NSOM our typical optical and topographical resolution is better than 100 nm, the length scale of important optical processes and interesting structural domains. We use the combination of NSOM and concurrent shear force (SF) microscopy (analogous to atomic force microscopy or AFM) to correlate the morphology of different regions to intensity variations in film fluorescence as well as variations in localized fluorescence spectra. We have examined the fluorescence and topography variations of as-deposited vacuum-evaporated Alq3, drop-cast Alq3, spin-cast Alq3, thermally annealed Alq 3 films, and Alq3 clusters. In addition, we have used the near-field optical probe tip as an active probe to examine localized photo-oxidation as a function of time, position and environment free from the limits of far-field spatial averaging. From these experiments we obtain a direct measurement of excited carrier or exciton diffusion. Finally, as a means of understanding the nanoscale properties of Alq3, we have examined the topography and fluorescence of single clusters of five to ten Alq3 molecules deposited on glass from solution. At higher concentrations, we observed unexpected film morphologies due to highly favorable Alq3-Alq3 interactions that dominated Alq3-substrate interactions. At

  12. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy with GRIN objective aberration correction by low order adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoletto, Favio; Bonoli, Carlotta; Panizzolo, Paolo; Ciubotaru, Catalin D; Mammano, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Graded Index (GRIN) rod microlenses are increasingly employed in the assembly of optical probes for microendoscopy applications. Confocal, two-photon and optical coherence tomography (OCT) based on GRIN optical probes permit in-vivo imaging with penetration depths into tissue up to the centimeter range. However, insertion of the probe can be complicated by the need of several alignment and focusing mechanisms along the optical path. Furthermore, resolution values are generally not limited by diffraction, but rather by optical aberrations within the endoscope probe and feeding optics. Here we describe a multiphoton confocal fluorescence imaging system equipped with a compact objective that incorporates a GRIN probe and requires no adjustment mechanisms. We minimized the effects of aberrations with optical compensation provided by a low-order electrostatic membrane mirror (EMM) inserted in the optical path of the confocal architecture, resulting in greatly enhanced image quality.

  13. Optical Saturation as a Versatile Tool to Enhance Resolution in Confocal Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíčková, Jana; Benda, Aleš; Enderlein, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 9 (2009), s. 2623-2629 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : fluorescence microscopy * reconstruction microscopy * cassettes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2009

  14. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.

    2001-01-01

    microscope (SNOM) has been used. The laser modifications locally changes the optical properties of the waveguide. The change in the effective refractive index is attributed to a TE to TM mode conversion, Thus, the laser modification might be a new way to fabricate optical mode converters.......By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...

  15. In vivo multiphoton-microscopy of picosecond-laser-induced optical breakdown in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Lentsch, Griffin; Korta, Dorota Z; König, Karsten; Kelly, Kristen M; Tromberg, Bruce J; Zachary, Christopher B

    2017-08-01

    Improvements in skin appearance resulting from treatment with fractionated picosecond-lasers have been noted, but optimizing the treatment efficacy depends on a thorough understanding of the specific skin response. The development of non-invasive laser imaging techniques in conjunction with laser therapy can potentially provide feedback for guidance and optimizing clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the capability of multiphoton microscopy (MPM), a high-resolution, label-free imaging technique, to characterize in vivo the skin response to a fractionated non-ablative picosecond-laser treatment. Two areas on the arm of a volunteer were treated with a fractionated picosecond laser at the Dermatology Clinic, UC Irvine. The skin response to treatment was imaged in vivo with a clinical MPM-based tomograph at 3 hours and 24 hours after treatment and seven additional time points over a 4-week period. MPM revealed micro-injuries present in the epidermis. Pigmented cells were particularly damaged in the process, suggesting that melanin is likely the main absorber for laser induced optical breakdown. Damaged individual cells were distinguished as early as 3 hours post pico-laser treatment with the 532 nm wavelength, and 24 hours post-treatment with both 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. At later time points, clusters of cellular necrotic debris were imaged across the treated epidermis. After 24 hours of treatment, inflammatory cells were imaged in the proximity of epidermal micro-injuries. The epidermal injuries were exfoliated over a 4-week period. This observational and descriptive pilot study demonstrates that in vivo MPM imaging can be used non-invasively to provide label-free contrast for describing changes in human skin following a fractionated non-ablative laser treatment. The results presented in this study represent the groundwork for future longitudinal investigations on an expanded number of subjects to understand the response to treatment

  16. Determining the molecular origin of radiation damage/enhancement in electro-optic polymeric materials through polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Moreno, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies on the radiation effects upon polymer and polymer-based photonic materials suggest that the radiation resistance of the material is heavily dependent on the choice of polymer-host and guest-chromophore. The best results to date have been achieved with electro optic polymeric materials based on CLD1 doped in APC, which has resulted in improved performance at the device level upon gamma-ray irradiation at moderate doses. Still, our understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the enhancement of the performance is unclear. In this paper, we discuss how polarized light microscopy could be used as a means to quantify the effect of the different physical parameters that influence the optical response of electro-optic polymeric thin film samples.

  17. A spatio-temporally compensated acousto-optic scanner for two-photon microscopy providing large field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Y; Léger, J-F; Lapole, R; Honnorat, N; Candela, Y; Dieudonné, S; Bourdieu, L

    2008-07-07

    Acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) are promising ultrafast scanners for non-linear microscopy. Their use has been limited until now by their small scanning range and by the spatial and temporal dispersions of the laser beam going through the deflectors. We show that the use of AOD of large aperture (13mm) compared to standard deflectors allows accessing much larger field of view while minimizing spatio-temporal distortions. An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at distance of the AOD is used to compensate spatial and temporal dispersions. Fine tuning of the AOM-AOD setup using a frequency-resolved optical gating (GRENOUILLE) allows elimination of pulse front tilt whereas spatial chirp is minimized thanks to the large aperture AOD.

  18. Adaptive optics microscopy enhances image quality in deep layers of CLARITY processed brains of YFP-H mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinig, Marc R.; Novack, Samuel W.; Tao, Xiaodong; Ermini, Florian; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Roberts, Dustin G.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Godshalk, S. E.; Raven, M. A.; Kubby, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Optical sectioning of biological tissues has become the method of choice for three-dimensional histological analyses. This is particularly important in the brain were neurons can extend processes over large distances and often whole brain tracing of neuronal processes is desirable. To allow deeper optical penetration, which in fixed tissue is limited by scattering and refractive index mismatching, tissue-clearing procedures such as CLARITY have been developed. CLARITY processed brains have a nearly uniform refractive index and three-dimensional reconstructions at cellular resolution have been published. However, when imaging in deep layers at submicron resolution some limitations caused by residual refractive index mismatching become apparent, as the resulting wavefront aberrations distort the microscopic image. The wavefront can be corrected with adaptive optics. Here, we investigate the wavefront aberrations at different depths in CLARITY processed mouse brains and demonstrate the potential of adaptive optics to enable higher resolution and a better signal-to-noise ratio. Our adaptive optics system achieves high-speed measurement and correction of the wavefront with an open-loop control using a wave front sensor and a deformable mirror. Using adaptive optics enhanced microscopy, we demonstrate improved image quality wavefront, point spread function, and signal to noise in the cortex of YFP-H mice.

  19. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  20. Super-resolution optical microscopy for studying membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc

    2017-07-12

    Investigation of cell membrane structure and dynamics requires high spatial and temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of conventional light microscopy is limited due to the diffraction of light. However, recent developments in microscopy enabled us to access the nano-scale regime spatially, thus to elucidate the nanoscopic structures in the cellular membranes. In this review, we will explain the resolution limit, address the working principles of the most commonly used super-resolution microscopy techniques and summarise their recent applications in the biomembrane field.

  1. Improvement in spatial frequency characteristics of magneto-optical Kerr microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional magneto-optical Kerr microscope, compared with those of conventional optical microscopes, inevitably deteriorates owing to oblique illumination. An approach to obtaining the maximum spatial resolution using multiple images with different illumination directions is demonstrated here. The method was implemented by rotating the illumination path around the optical axis using a motorized stage. The Fourier transform image of the observed magnetic domain indicates that the spatial frequency component that is lost in the conventional method is restored.

  2. Three-dimensional STED microscopy of aberrating tissue using dual adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Brian R; Burke, Daniel; Owald, David; Gould, Travis J; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J

    2016-04-18

    When imaging through tissue, the optical inhomogeneities of the sample generate aberrations that can prevent effective Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) imaging. This is particularly problematic for 3D-enhanced STED. We present here an adaptive optics implementation that incorporates two adaptive optic elements to enable correction in all beam paths, allowing performance improvement in thick tissue samples. We use this to demonstrate 3D STED imaging of complex structures in Drosophila melanogaster brains.

  3. Polarization contrast in reflection near-field optical microscopy with uncoated fibre tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using cross-hatched, patterned semiconductor surfaces and round 20-nm-thick gold pads on semiconductor wafers, we investigate the imaging characteristics of a reflection near-field optical microscope with an uncoated fibre tip for different polarization configurations and light wavelengths....... Is is shown that cross-polarized detection allows one to effectively suppress far-field components in the detected signal and to realise imaging of optical contrast on the sub-wavelength scale. The sensitivity window of our microscope, i.e. the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...

  4. Adaptive optics for fluorescence wide-field microscopy using spectrally independent guide star and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Pierre; Muro, Eleonora; Pons, Thomas; Loriette, Vincent; Fragola, Alexandra

    2011-07-01

    We describe the implementation and use of an adaptive optics loop in the imaging path of a commercial wide field microscope. We show that it is possible to maintain the optical performances of the original microscope when imaging through aberrant biological samples. The sources used for illuminating the adaptive optics loop are spectrally independent, in excitation and emission, from the sample, so they do not appear in the final image, and their use does not contribute to the sample bleaching. Results are compared with equivalent images obtained with an identical microscope devoid of adaptive optics system.

  5. Revealing t-tubules in striated muscle with new optical super-resolution microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru D. Jayasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM, has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  6. Optics clustered to output unique solutions: a multi-laser facility for combined single molecule and ensemble microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David T; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin C; Needham, Sarah R; Roberts, Selene K; Rolfe, Daniel J; Tynan, Christopher J; Ward, Andrew D; Webb, Stephen E D; Yadav, Rahul; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L

    2011-09-01

    Optics clustered to output unique solutions (OCTOPUS) is a microscopy platform that combines single molecule and ensemble imaging methodologies. A novel aspect of OCTOPUS is its laser excitation system, which consists of a central core of interlocked continuous wave and pulsed laser sources, launched into optical fibres and linked via laser combiners. Fibres are plugged into wall-mounted patch panels that reach microscopy end-stations in adjacent rooms. This allows multiple tailor-made combinations of laser colours and time characteristics to be shared by different end-stations minimising the need for laser duplications. This setup brings significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, ease of operation, and user safety. The modular nature of OCTOPUS also facilitates the addition of new techniques as required, allowing the use of existing lasers in new microscopes while retaining the ability to run the established parts of the facility. To date, techniques interlinked are multi-photon/multicolour confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging for several modalities of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and time-resolved anisotropy, total internal reflection fluorescence, single molecule imaging of single pair FRET, single molecule fluorescence polarisation, particle tracking, and optical tweezers. Here, we use a well-studied system, the epidermal growth factor receptor network, to illustrate how OCTOPUS can aid in the investigation of complex biological phenomena. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection

  8. Photonic Torque Microscopy of the Nonconservative Force Field for Optically Trapped Silicon Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Irrera, A.; Maggazu, A.; Artoni, P.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Hanna, S.; Jones, P.H.; Priolo, F.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Marago, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2016), s. 4181-4188 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * silicon nanowires * nonequilibrium dynamics * Brownian motion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  9. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  10. An optical investigation of dentinal discoloration due to commonly endodontic sealers, using the transmitted light polarizing microscopy and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Ioana; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Dimitriu, Bogdan Alexandru; Bartok, Ruxandra Ioana; Moldoveanu, Georgiana Florentina; Gheorghiu, Irina Maria; Suciu, Ileana; Ciocîrdel, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the degree of tooth crown staining by commonly used endodontic sealers. Crown discolorations by tooth canal sealers [AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); Endofill (Produits Dentaires SA, Vevey, Switzerland); Apexit (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); and MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil)] were tested on extracted human premolars. The samples were divided into five groups of five samples each, after root canal sealing. Five teeth were used as control groups. The spectrophotometric method was performed in order to quantify in terms of color change of the coronal part (it was also recorded a track on how the color changes over time). For the microscopic study of the extracted dental specimens subjected to this study, polarized transmitted light microscopy was used. This method involves the development of special microscopic preparations, called "thin sections". In our case, the thin section was performed on 20 prepared and obturated recently extracted teeth. The degree of discoloration was determined after one week and three months using spectrophotometry and polarized light microscopy. All sealers usually cause some degree of discoloration on the cervical aspect of the crowns that increases in time. AH Plus and Endofill caused the greatest discoloration, followed by Apexit and MTA Fillapex.

  11. Measurement of time-varying displacement fields in cell culture for traction force optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanobiology is an emerging field which seeks to link mechanical forces and properties to the behaviors of cells and tissues in cancer, stem cell growth, and other processes. Traction force microscopy (TFM) is an imaging technique that enables the study of traction forces exerted by cells on their environment to migrate as well as sense and manipulate their surroundings. To date, TFM research has been performed using incoherent imaging modalities and, until recently, has been largely confined to the study of cell-induced tractions within two-dimensions using highly artificial and controlled environments. As the field of mechanobiology advances, and demand grows for research in physiologically relevant 3D culture and in vivo models, TFM will require imaging modalities that support such settings. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging modality which enables 3D cellular resolution imaging in highly scattering environments. Moreover, optical coherence elastography (OCE) enables the measurement of tissue mechanical properties. OCE relies on the principle of measuring material deformations in response to artificially applied stress. By extension, similar techniques can enable the measurement of cell-induced deformations, imaged with OCM. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a natural extension and partner to existing OCM and OCE methods. We report the first use of OCM data and digital image correlation to track temporally varying displacement fields exhibited within a 3D culture setting. These results mark the first steps toward the realization of TF-OCM in 2D and 3D settings, bolstering OCM as a platform for advancing research in mechanobiology.

  12. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal...

  13. Atomic force microscopy for the determination of refractive index profiles of optical fibres and waveguides: a quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Mulvaney, P.; Roberts, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of preferential etching and atomic force microscopy to measure refractive index profiles of optical fibres is investigated. Both the etch rate and the position of lateral features are shown to be independent of etch time. An elliptical core fibre has been studied and the resultant profile found to be in qualitative agreement with the preform index profile. It is shown, however, that the ellipticity of the core has changed during the drawing process. The method has been extended to fluorine and germanium doped planar waveguides and the results correlated with the fabrication process

  14. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array

    OpenAIRE

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ∼9 fold higher density of fiber opt...

  15. Real-time monitoring of tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma by nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Wang, Xingfu; Jiang, Weizhong; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-03-01

    The continuing advancement of nonlinear optical imaging techniques has opened many new windows in biological exploration. In this work, the nonlinear optical microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was extended to probe tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal carcinoma. It was found that MPM has the ability of direct visualization of histopathologic changes in rectal carcinoma following preoperative RCT including stromal fibrosis, colloid response and residual tumors. Our results also showed the capability of MPM using the quantitative analyses of images to quantify these changes. This work may provide the groundwork for further exploration into the application of multiphoton-based endoscopy in a clinical setting.

  16. Establishing the suitability of quantitative optical CT microscopy of PRESAGE® radiochromic dosimeters for the verification of synchrotron microbeam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Simon J; Abdul Rahman, A T; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Brochard, Thierry; Adamovics, John; Nisbet, Andrew; Bradley, David

    2013-09-21

    Previous research on optical computed tomography (CT) microscopy in the context of the synchrotron microbeam has shown the potential of the technique and demonstrated high quality images, but has left two questions unanswered: (i) are the images suitably quantitative for 3D dosimetry? and (ii) what is the impact on the spatial resolution of the system of the limited depth-of-field of the microscope optics? Cuvette and imaging studies are reported here that address these issues. Two sets of cuvettes containing the radiochromic plastic PRESAGE® were irradiated at the ID17 biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation facility over the ranges 0-20 and 0-35 Gy and a third set of cuvettes was irradiated over the range 0-20 Gy using a standard medical linac. In parallel, three cylindrical PRESAGE® samples of diameter 9.7 mm were irradiated with test patterns that allowed the quantitative capabilities of the optical CT microscope to be verified, and independent measurements of the imaging modulation transfer function (MTF) to be made via two different methods. Both spectrophotometric analysis and imaging gave a linear dose response, with gradients ranging from 0.036-0.041 cm(-1) Gy(-1) in the three sets of cuvettes and 0.037 (optical CT units) Gy(-1) for the imaging. High-quality, quantitative imaging results were obtained throughout the 3D volume, as illustrated by depth-dose profiles. These profiles are shown to be monoexponential, and the linear attention coefficient of PRESAGE® for the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam is measured to be (0.185 ± 0.02) cm(-1) in excellent agreement with expectations. Low-level (microscopy images from our scanner do indeed have intensities that are proportional to spectrophotometric optical density and can thus be used as the basis for accurate dosimetry. However, further investigations are necessary before the microscopy images can be used to make the quantitative measures of peak-to-valley ratios for small

  17. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Feng; Streets, Aaron M; Fei, Peng; Quan, Junmin; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-06-07

    We directly observe non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label-free technology provides a novel modality to study the dynamic behavior of nanodiamonds inside the cells with intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability. We apply this method to capture the cellular uptake of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism.

  18. Deep Learning Segmentation of Optical Microscopy Images Improves 3-D Neuron Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongjian; Zeng, Tao; Peng, Hanchuan; Ji, Shuiwang

    2017-07-01

    Digital reconstruction, or tracing, of 3-D neuron structure from microscopy images is a critical step toward reversing engineering the wiring and anatomy of a brain. Despite a number of prior attempts, this task remains very challenging, especially when images are contaminated by noises or have discontinued segments of neurite patterns. An approach for addressing such problems is to identify the locations of neuronal voxels using image segmentation methods, prior to applying tracing or reconstruction techniques. This preprocessing step is expected to remove noises in the data, thereby leading to improved reconstruction results. In this paper, we proposed to use 3-D convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting the neuronal microscopy images. Specifically, we designed a novel CNN architecture, that takes volumetric images as the inputs and their voxel-wise segmentation maps as the outputs. The developed architecture allows us to train and predict using large microscopy images in an end-to-end manner. We evaluated the performance of our model on a variety of challenging 3-D microscopy images from different organisms. Results showed that the proposed methods improved the tracing performance significantly when combined with different reconstruction algorithms.

  19. Diagnosis of Blastocystis hominis by different staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, A M

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and fifty stool samples were collected from diarrheic patients of different ages, and examined for Blastocystis hominis by direct smears and concentrated by Sheather's sugar flotation. Staining was done by: Giemsa, two modifications of trichrome stain, modified Ziehl-Neelsen, safranin-methylene blue and two-auramine stains. Out of the 150 cases nine were positive for blastocystosis. The best stains were safranin-methylene blue and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. They had the advantage of staining cysts and amoeboid forms besides being rapid and easy to perform. The modified trichrome stains identified 8 ie, less specific and were time consuming. The auramine dyes stained the cyst, both the wall and internal body fluoresced brightly. Giemsa stain was not an efficient stain. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) were performed to study the fine ultrastructure.

  20. Design of angle-resolved illumination optics using nonimaging bi-telecentricity for 193 nm scatterfield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Martin Y; Barnes, Bryan M; Silver, Richard M

    2018-03-01

    Accurate optics-based dimensional measurements of features sized well-below the diffraction limit require a thorough understanding of the illumination within the optical column and of the three-dimensional scattered fields that contain the information required for quantitative metrology. Scatterfield microscopy can pair simulations with angle-resolved tool characterization to improve agreement between the experiment and calculated libraries, yielding sub-nanometer parametric uncertainties. Optimized angle-resolved illumination requires bi-telecentric optics in which a telecentric sample plane defined by a Köhler illumination configuration and a telecentric conjugate back focal plane (CBFP) of the objective lens; scanning an aperture or an aperture source at the CBFP allows control of the illumination beam angle at the sample plane with minimal distortion. A bi-telecentric illumination optics have been designed enabling angle-resolved illumination for both aperture and source scanning modes while yielding low distortion and chief ray parallelism. The optimized design features a maximum chief ray angle at the CBFP of 0.002° and maximum wavefront deviations of less than 0.06 λ for angle-resolved illumination beams at the sample plane, holding promise for high quality angle-resolved illumination for improved measurements of deep-subwavelength structures using deep-ultraviolet light.

  1. A SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-PROBE DETECTION LABEL-FREE OPTICAL-RESOLUTION PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE BASED ON MICROCAVITY TRANSDUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGBO WU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous multi-probe detection for an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM system. OR-PAM has elicited the attention of biomedical imaging researchers because of its optical absorption contrast and high spatial resolution with great imaging depth. OR-PAM allows label-free and noninvasive imaging by maximizing the optical absorption of endogenous biomolecules. However, given the inadequate absorption of some biomolecules, detection sensitivity at the same incident intensity requires improvement. In this study, a modulated continuous wave with power density less than 3 mW/cm2 (1/4 of the ANSI safety limit excited the weak photoacoustic (PA signals of biological cells. A microcavity transducer is developed based on the bulk modulus of gas five orders of magnitude lower than that of solid; air pressure variation is inversely proportional to cavity volume at the same temperature increase. Considering that a PA wave expands in various directions, detecting PA signals from different positions and adding them together can increase detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we employ four detectors to acquire tiny PA signals simultaneously. Experimental results show that the developed OR-PAM system allows the label-free imaging of cells with weak optical absorption.

  2. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications.

  3. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  4. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  5. Stabilized Romanowsky blood stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, J W; Dean, W W; Stastny, M; Lubrano, G J

    1979-05-01

    It has been shown that the degradation of thiazine dyes which normally occurs in methanolic solution, as in the case of Romanowsky blood stains, can be prevented by making the solution acidic. In a certain range of acidity, the stain precipitates in the form of monothiazine eosinate, but by making the solution sufficiently acidic, eosin is protonated and the precipitate cannot form. These observations have been used to develop a blood stain which is stable, even at elevated temperatures, for several months. For use the stain is neutralized by a specially formulated fixative solution.

  6. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M.P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evolution of the laser induced crater and ablation features by in situ homemade optical microscope. • Performance comparison between confocal microscope for material characterization and homemade optical microscope. • Coupled system of laser ablation setup with a low cost optical microscope. - Abstract: A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  7. Nanoscale Spatial Organization of Prokaryotic Cells Studied by Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Andrea Lynn

    All cells spatially organize their interiors, and this arrangement is necessary for cell viability. Until recently, it was believed that only eukaryotic cells spatially segregate their components. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that bacteria also assemble their proteins into complex patterns. In eukaryotic cells, spatial organization arises from membrane bound organelles as well as motor transport proteins which can move cargos within the cell. To date, there are no known motor transport proteins in bacteria and most microbes lack membrane bound organelles, so it remains a mystery how bacterial spatial organization emerges. In hind-sight it is not surprising that bacteria also exhibit complex spatial organization considering much of what we have learned about the basic processes that take place in all cells, such as transcription and translation was first discovered in prokaryotic cells. Perhaps the fundamental principles that govern spatial organization in prokaryotic cells may be applicable in eukaryotic cells as well. In addition, bacteria are attractive model organism for spatial organization studies because they are genetically tractable, grow quickly and much biochemical and structural data is known about them. A powerful tool for observing spatial organization in cells is the fluorescence microscope. By specifically tagging a protein of interest with a fluorescent probe, it is possible to examine how proteins organize and dynamically assemble inside cells. A significant disadvantage of this technology is its spatial resolution (approximately 250 nm laterally and 500 nm axially). This limitation on resolution causes closely spaced proteins to look blurred making it difficult to observe the fine structure within the complexes. This resolution limit is especially problematic within small cells such as bacteria. With the recent invention of new optical microscopies, we now can surpass the existing limits of fluorescence imaging. In some cases, we can

  8. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-02

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  9. Defect-Assisted Hard-X-Ray Microscopy with Capillary Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, Paweł; Sowa, Katarzyna M; Jany, Benedykt R; Krok, Franciszek

    2016-06-10

    Polycapillary x-ray focusing devices are built from hundreds of thousands of bent microcapillaries that are stacked into hexagonal arrays. We show that intrinsic point defects of the optics (e.g., missing or larger capillaries) lead to the formation of multiple x-ray images of an object positioned in the focal plane. These images can be recorded in parallel, and can provide spatial resolution that is limited by the defect size and not by the focal spot size. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate submicron resolution, which has not yet been achieved with polycapillary focusing optics. Tailored optics with a controlled distribution of "defects" could be used for multimodal nanoscale x-ray imaging with laboratory setups.

  10. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Graft, M.; van Graft, Marja; Oosterhuis, B.; Oosterhuis, Bernard; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical

  11. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  12. Endocervical gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no symptoms. Alternative Names Gram stain of cervix; Gram stain of cervical secretions References Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  13. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  14. Super-resolution imaging of subcortical white matter using stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, A H; Lee, S; Foot, P; Patel, A; Poon, W W; Knight, A E

    2017-07-11

    The spatial resolution of light microscopy is limited by the wavelength of visible light (the 'diffraction limit', approximately 250 nm). Resolution of sub-cellular structures, smaller than this limit, is possible with super resolution methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). We aimed to resolve subcellular structures (axons, myelin sheaths and astrocytic processes) within intact white matter, using STORM and SOFI. Standard cryostat-cut sections of subcortical white matter from donated human brain tissue and from adult rat and mouse brain were labelled, using standard immunohistochemical markers (neurofilament-H, myelin-associated glycoprotein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP). Image sequences were processed for STORM (effective pixel size 8-32 nm) and for SOFI (effective pixel size 80 nm). In human, rat and mouse, subcortical white matter high-quality images for axonal neurofilaments, myelin sheaths and filamentous astrocytic processes were obtained. In quantitative measurements, STORM consistently underestimated width of axons and astrocyte processes (compared with electron microscopy measurements). SOFI provided more accurate width measurements, though with somewhat lower spatial resolution than STORM. Super resolution imaging of intact cryo-cut human brain tissue is feasible. For quantitation, STORM can under-estimate diameters of thin fluorescent objects. SOFI is more robust. The greatest limitation for super-resolution imaging in brain sections is imposed by sample preparation. We anticipate that improved strategies to reduce autofluorescence and to enhance fluorophore performance will enable rapid expansion of this approach. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  15. Fabrication and Atomic Force Microscopy Characterization of Molecular Composites of Fullerenes in Aerogel Matrix for Optical Limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W. J .; Sunkara, H. B.; Shi, D.; Morgan, S. H.; Penn, B.; Frazier, D.; Collins, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    An optical limiter is a device which exhibits a decrease in the transmittance in a material with an increase in intensity of light. Sol-gel techniques offer many advantages in the fabrication of materials. These materials possess many desirable properties for nonlinear optical (NLO) device applications which include transparency, high thermal and chemical stabilities, very low refractive index and dielectric constants. C60 shows a higher excited state absorption cross section than the ground state absorption cross section over the complete visible spectrum, and the spectrum of the excited state absorption of C60 has the same general shape as the ground state absorption. This fact suggests that fullerenes are ideal optical limiting materials. Aerogels are fabricated by sol-gel processing. One of the key issues is the dispersion of fullerenes into small and uniform pores of silica aerogel host matrices. The aerogel network was characterized by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is a technique with many advantages to characterize the aerogel materials. The morphology of the cleaved surface for a C60/aerogel sample shows that there are long paralleled shaped stripes with 20-30 nm in width and about 500 nm in length on the cleaved surface. The cleaved surface also was etched by 5% HF solution for one minutes, and it became smoother after HF etching. The main feature in on the surface is the spherical particles with the size of few nanometers, and no aggregated fullerenes appear. The fullerenes are well dispersed in the aerogel matrices.

  16. Zernike phase contrast in high-energy x-ray transmission microscopy based on refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falch, Ken Vidar; Lyubomirsky, Mikhail; Casari, Daniele; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Detlefs, Carsten; Michiel, Marco Di; Lyatun, Ivan; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H

    2018-01-01

    The current work represents the first implementation of Zernike phase contrast for compound refractive lens based x-ray microscopy, and also the first successful Zernike phase contrast experiment at photon energies above 12 keV. Phase contrast was achieved by fitting a compound refractive lens with a circular phase plate. The resolution is demonstrated to be sub-micron, and can be improved using already existing technology. The possibility of combining the technique with polychromatic radiation is considered, and a preliminary test experiment was performed with positive results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Temperature and microwave near field imaging by thermo-elastic optical indicator microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanju; Arakelyan, Shant; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2016-12-01

    A high resolution imaging of the temperature and microwave near field can be a powerful tool for the non-destructive testing of materials and devices. However, it is presently a very challenging issue due to the lack of a practical measurement pathway. In this work, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a practical method resolving the issue by using a conventional CCD-based optical indicator microscope system. The present method utilizes the heat caused by an interaction between the material and an electromagnetic wave, and visualizes the heat source distribution from the measured photoelastic images. By using a slide glass coated by a metal thin film as the indicator, we obtain optically resolved temperature, electric, and magnetic microwave near field images selectively with a comparable sensitivity, response time, and bandwidth of existing methods. The present method provides a practical way to characterize the thermal and electromagnetic properties of materials and devices under various environments.

  18. Adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy: comparison of two, three and four photon fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P; Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Bifano, Thomas G; Xu, Chris

    2015-11-30

    We demonstrate adaptive optics system based on nonlinear feedback from 3- and 4-photon fluorescence. The system is based on femtosecond pulses created by soliton self-frequency shift of a 1550-nm fiber-based femtosecond laser together with micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) phase spatial light modulator (SLM). We perturb the 1020-segment SLM using an orthogonal Walsh sequence basis set with a modified version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. We show the improvement after aberrations correction in 3-photon signal from fluorescent beads. In addition, we compare the improvement obtained in the same adaptive optical system for 2-, 3- and 4-photon fluorescence using dye pool. We show that signal improvement resulting from aberration correction grows exponentially as a function of the order of nonlinearity.

  19. Tissue imaging using full field optical coherence microscopy with short multimode fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Eto, Kai; Goto, Tetsuhiro; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2018-03-01

    In achieving minimally invasive accessibility to deeply located regions the size of the imaging probes is important. We demonstrated full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCM) using an ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber (SMMF) probe of 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm diameter, and 7.4 mm length for optical communications. The axial resolution was measured to be 2.14 μm and the lateral resolution was also evaluated to be below 4.38 μm using a test pattern (TP). The spatial mode and polarization characteristics of SMMF were evaluated. Inserting SMMF to in vivo rat brain, 3D images were measured and 2D information of nerve fibers was obtained. The feasibility of an SMMF as an ultrathin forward-imaging probe in FF-OCM has been demonstrated.

  20. Toward endoscopes with no distal optics: video-rate scanning microscopy through a fiber bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bouwmans, Géraud; Monneret, Serge; Rigneault, Hervé

    2013-03-01

    We report a step toward scanning endomicroscopy without distal optics. The focusing of the beam at the distal end of a fiber bundle is achieved by imposing a parabolic phase profile across the exit face with the aid of a spatial light modulator. We achieve video-rate images by galvanometric scanning of the phase tilt at the proximal end. The approach is made possible by the bundle, designed to have very low coupling between cores.

  1. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  2. Optimization of s-Polarization Sensitivity in Apertureless Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a general belief in apertureless near-field microscopy that the so-called p-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized parallel to the axis of the probe, is advantageous to its counterpart, the s-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized perpendicular to the probe axis. While this is true for most samples under common near-field experimental conditions, there are samples which respond better to the s-polarization configuration due to their orientations. Indeed, there have been several reports that have discussed such samples. This leads us to an important requirement that the near-field experimental setup should be equipped with proper sensitivity for measurements with s-polarization configuration. This requires not only creation of effective s-polarized illumination at the near-field probe, but also proper enhancement of s-polarized light by the probe. In this paper, we have examined the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity of near-field probes by measuring and evaluating the near-field Rayleigh scattering images constructed by a variety of probes. We found that the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity strongly depends on the sharpness of the apex of near-field probes. We have discussed the efficient value of probe sharpness by considering a balance between the enhancement and the spatial resolution, both of which are essential requirements of apertureless near-field microscopy.

  3. Pattern recognition with machine learning on optical microscopy images of typical metallurgical microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S; Tsukamoto, Susumu; Kasuya, Tadashi; Demura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Makoto

    2018-02-01

    For advanced materials characterization, a novel and extremely effective approach of pattern recognition in optical microscopic images of steels is demonstrated. It is based on fast Random Forest statistical algorithm of machine learning for reliable and automated segmentation of typical steel microstructures. Their percentage and location areas excellently agreed between machine learning and manual examination results. The accurate microstructure pattern recognition/segmentation technique in combination with other suitable mathematical methods of image processing and analysis can help to handle the large volumes of image data in a short time for quality control and for the quest of new steels with desirable properties.

  4. Diffuse optical microscopy for quantification of depth-dependent epithelial backscattering in the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Lam, Sylvia; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Miller, Dianne M.; McAlpine, Jessica N.; Lee, Marette; Kienle, Alwin; MacAulay, Calum

    2016-06-01

    A fiber optic imaging approach is presented using structured illumination for quantification of almost pure epithelial backscattering. We employ multiple spatially modulated projection patterns and camera-based reflectance capture to image depth-dependent epithelial scattering. The potential diagnostic value of our approach is investigated on cervical ex vivo tissue specimens. Our study indicates a strong backscattering increase in the upper part of the cervical epithelium caused by dysplastic microstructural changes. Quantization of relative depth-dependent backscattering is confirmed as a potentially useful diagnostic feature for detection of precancerous lesions in cervical squamous epithelium.

  5. Adaptive optics microscopy with direct wavefront sensing using fluorescent protein guide stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a direct wavefront sensing method using structures labeled with fluorescent proteins in tissues as guide stars. An adaptive optics confocal microscope using this method is demonstrated for imaging of mouse brain tissue. A dendrite and a cell body of a neuron labeled with yellow fluorescent protein are tested as guide stars without injection of other fluorescent labels. Photobleaching effects are also analyzed. The results shows increased image contrast and 3× improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of 70 μm.

  6. Label-free optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of superficial microvasculature using a compact visible laser diode excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lvming; Piao, Zhonglie; Huang, Shenghai; Jia, Wangcun; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We have developed laser-diode-based optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (LD-OR-PAM) of superficial microvasculature which has the desirable properties of being compact, low-cost, and label-free. A 300-mW visible pulsed laser diode was operated at a 405 ± 5 nm wavelength with a pulse energy as low as 52 nJ. By using a 3.6 MHz ultrasound transducer, the system was tested on carbon fibers with a lateral resolution of 0.95 µm and an SNR of 38 dB. The subcutaneous microvasculature on a mouse back was imaged without an exogenous contrast agent which demonstrates the potential of the proposed prototype for skin chromophores. Our eventual goal is to offer a practical and affordable multi-wavelength functional LD-OR-PAM instrument suitable for clinical applications. PMID:26698732

  7. Characterization of mechanical properties of hybrid contrast agents by combining atomic force microscopy with acoustic/optic assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gepu; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Huang, Pintong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2016-02-08

    Multi-parameter fitting algorithms, which are currently used for the characterization of coated-bubbles, inevitably introduce uncertainty into the results. Therefore, a better technique that can accurately determine the microbubbles' mechanical properties is urgently needed. A comprehensive technology combining atomic force microscopy, optical, and acoustic measurements with simulations of coated-bubble dynamics was developed. Using this technique, the mechanical parameters (size distribution, shell thickness, elasticity, and viscosity) of hybrid (ultrasound/magnetic-resonance-imaging) contrast microbubbles and their structure-property relationship were determined. The measurements indicate that when more superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are embedded in the microbubbles' shells, their mean diameter and effective viscosity increase, and their elastic modulus decreases. This reduces the microbubbles' resonance frequency and thus enhances acoustic scattering and attenuation effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultra-fast 3D scanning and holographic illumination in non-linear microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Ventalon, Cathie; Léger, Jean-François; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Blochet, Baptiste; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Decoding of information in the brain requires the imaging of large neuronal networks using e.g. two-photon microscopy (TPM). Fast control of the focus in 3D can be achieved with phase shaping of the light beam using acoustooptic deflectors (AODs). However, beam shaping using AODs is not straightforward because of non-stationary of acousto-optic diffraction. Here, we demonstrated a new stable AOD-based phase modulator, which operates at a rate of up to about hundred kHz. It provides opportunity for 3D scanning in TPM with the possibility to correct aberrations independently for every focus position or to achieve refocusing of scattered photons in rapidly decorrelating tissues.

  9. Real-time and non-invasive measurements of cell mechanical behaviour with optical coherence phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D.; Gamal, W.; Downes, A.; Reinwald, Y.; Yang, Y.; El Haj, A.; Bagnaninchi, P. O.

    2017-02-01

    There is an unmet need in tissue engineering for non-invasive, label-free monitoring of cell mechanical behaviour in their physiological environment. Here, we describe a novel optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) set-up which can map relative cell mechanical behaviour in monolayers and 3D systems non-invasively, and in real-time. 3T3 and MCF-7 cells were investigated, with MCF-7 demonstrating an increased response to hydrostatic stimulus indicating MCF-7 being softer than 3T3. Thus, OCPM shows the ability to provide qualitative data on cell mechanical behaviour. Quantitative measurements of 6% agarose beads have been taken with commercial Cell Scale Microsquisher system demonstrating that their mechanical properties are in the same order of magnitude of cells, indicating that this is an appropriate test sample for the novel method described.

  10. Characterization of Byzantine pottery from Oltina (Constanţa County), Romania, using PIXE and Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugoi, Roxana; Talmaţchi, Cristina; Haitǎ, Constantin; Ceccato, Daniele

    2018-02-01

    An assemblage of 58 ceramic shards discovered in archaeological excavations at Oltina, Romania, dated to the 10th-11th century CE, was subjected to archaeometric investigations in order to reveal the raw materials and manufacturing techniques employed by the potters from the Lower Danube zone during the Byzantine ruling. The initial grouping of the shards according to stylistic criteria was refined by the subsequent petrographic study. Optical Microscopy (OM) detailed the general mineralogy and the pottery fabric, i.e. the textural characteristics, porosity and microstructure, surface treatments and firing. The PIXE analyses of potteries performed at AN2000 accelerator of LNL, INFN, Italy led to the identification of the chemical composition of the ceramic shards. The Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of the PIXE data evidenced several categories of shards with distinct compositional signatures, the main division being the one separating the ceramic fragments made of kaolinitic clays from the rest of the Oltina potteries.

  11. Optical Sectioning and High Resolution in Single-Slice Structured Illumination Microscopy by Thick Slice Blind-SIM Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Jost

    Full Text Available The microscope image of a thick fluorescent sample taken at a given focal plane is plagued by out-of-focus fluorescence and diffraction limited resolution. In this work, we show that a single slice of Structured Illumination Microscopy (two or three beam SIM data can be processed to provide an image exhibiting tight sectioning and high transverse resolution. Our reconstruction algorithm is adapted from the blind-SIM technique which requires very little knowledge of the illumination patterns. It is thus able to deal with illumination distortions induced by the sample or illumination optics. We named this new algorithm thick slice blind-SIM because it models a three-dimensional sample even though only a single two-dimensional plane of focus was measured.

  12. Stool Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stool; Feces Gram stain References Allos BM. Campylobacter infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ... Bacterial Infections Read more Foodborne Illness Read more Gastroenteritis Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  13. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-06-01

    A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  14. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Hui; Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method

  15. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  16. Correlation of micro-Raman and optical microscopy analysis of polycrystalline YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J. M.; Finlayson, T. R.; Lim, C. S.; Mernagh, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    Optical microscopy has proven to be a useful technique for obtaining general, qualitative information from the entire surface of YBCO samples. When observed through crossed polarisers, both orthorhombic and tetragonal YBCO show characteristic colours, allowing the observation and detection of superconducting and nonsuperconducting regions. Certain impurities also have characteristic colours. Once the colours of the various phases are calibrated, one can determine their distribution throughout a whole surface. Both the observation of colour and the twin patterns can indicate textured regions, or grains of similar orientation in an untextured material. We present an example of the complementary use of both techniques for a more complete analysis of polycrystalline YBCO. Observed colours of polarisation on YBCO were correlated with information provided by MRS on individual grains to deduce microstructural characteristics (including texture, chemistry, and impurities) across the whole surface of a sample. Grains of similar orientation were observed by both methods. It was also found that Raman results can be misleading unless the sample is also observed by polarised light microscopy and the two sets of results correlated. These techniques would be quite useful for the analysis of large, textured samples, especially where material is produced in large quantities

  17. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, X; Cawley, J.; Rainforth, W.M.; Chen, L.

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 μm). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 μm), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). GDOES proved to be an excellent tool for the quantification of oxidation and element distribution as a function of depth, particularly when combined with SEM and TEM to identify oxide type and morphology

  18. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  19. Structural aspects of displacive transformations: what can optical microscopy contribute? Dehydration of Sm2(C2O43·10H2O as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Matvienko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For martensitic transformations the macroscopic crystal strain is directly related to the corresponding structural rearrangement at the microscopic level. In situ optical microscopy observations of the interface migration and the change in crystal shape during a displacive single crystal to single crystal transformation can contribute significantly to understanding the mechanism of the process at the atomic scale. This is illustrated for the dehydration of samarium oxalate decahydrate in a study combining optical microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  20. Retinal cell imaging in myopic chickens using adaptive optics multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Juan M; Palacios, Raquel; Giakoumaki, Anastasia; Gualda, Emilio J; Schaeffel, Frank; Artal, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Abnormal eye growth induced by visual deprivation can modify the structure and density of the retinal cells. We have used an adaptive optics multiphoton microscope to image photoreceptors (PRs) and ganglion cells (GCs) at different retinal locations in unstained retinas of chicken eyes with about 10D of myopia and their normal-sighted fellow eyes. In all samples, the local averaged inter-PR distance increased with eccentricity. No significant differences in PR density were found between control and myopic eyes. GC density declined in myopic eyes compared to control eyes and the inter-cell distance increased. In normal eyes, the size of the GC cell bodies increased approximately two-fold between the area centralis and the peripheral retina. In myopic eyes, this trend was preserved but the GC bodies were larger at each retinal location, compared to control eyes. Obviously, GC morphology is changing when the retinal area is enlarged in myopic eyes.

  1. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  2. Super-resolution optical microscopy resolves network morphology of smart colloidal microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Stephan; Wrede, Oliver; Huser, Thomas; Hellweg, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    We present a new method to resolve the network morphology of colloidal particles in an aqueous environment via super-resolution microscopy. By localization of freely diffusing fluorophores inside the particle network we can resolve the three dimensional structure of one species of colloidal particles (thermoresponsive microgels) without altering their chemical composition through copolymerization with fluorescent monomers. Our approach utilizes the interaction of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G with the polymer network to achieve an indirect labeling. We calculate the 3D structure from the 2D images and compare the structure to previously published models for the microgel morphology, e.g. the fuzzy sphere model. To describe the differences in the data an extension of this model is suggested. Our method enables the tailor-made fabrication of colloidal particles which are used in various applications, such as paints or cosmetics, and are promising candidates for drug delivery, smart surface coatings, and nanocatalysis. With the precise knowledge of the particle morphology an understanding of the underlying structure-property relationships for various colloidal systems is possible.

  3. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  4. Optical coherence tomography and non-linear microscopy for paintings - a study of the complementary capabilities and laser degradation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haida; Mari, Meropi; Cheung, Chi Shing; Kogou, Sotiria; Johnson, Phillip; Filippidis, George

    2017-08-07

    This paper examines for the first time the potential complementary imaging capabilities of Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and non-linear microscopy (NLM) for multi-modal 3D examination of paintings following the successful application of OCT to the in situ, non-invasive examination of varnish and paint stratigraphy of historic paintings and the promising initial studies of NLM of varnish samples. OCT provides image contrast through the optical scattering and absorption properties of materials, while NLM provides molecular information through multi-photon fluorescence and higher harmonics generation (second and third harmonic generation). OCT is well-established in the in situ non-invasive imaging of the stratigraphy of varnish and paint layers. While NLM examination of transparent samples such as fresh varnish and some transparent paints showed promising results, the ultimate use of NLM on paintings is limited owing to the laser degradation effects caused by the high peak intensity of the laser source necessary for the generation of non-linear phenomena. The high intensity normally employed in NLM is found to be damaging to all non-transparent painting materials from slightly scattering degraded varnish to slightly absorbing paint at the wavelength of the laser excitation source. The results of this paper are potentially applicable to a wide range of materials given the diversity of the materials encountered in paintings (e.g. minerals, plants, insects, oil, egg, synthetic and natural varnish).

  5. Microscopy system of atomic force based on a digital optical reading unit and a buzzer-scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabirian, R.; Loza M, D.; Wang, W. M.; Hwu, E. T.

    2015-01-01

    An astigmatic detection system (Ads) based on a compact disk/digital-versatile-disk (Cd-DVD) astigmatic optical pickup unit is presented. It can achieve a resolution better than 0.3 nm in detection of the vertical displacement and is able to detect the two-dimensional angular tilt of the object surface. Furthermore, a novel scanner design actuated by piezoelectric disk buzzers is presented. The scanner is composed of a quad-rod actuation structure and several piezoelectric disks. It can be driven directly with low-voltage and low-current sources, such as analogue outputs of a data acquisition card and enables a sufficient scanning range of up to μm. In addition, an economic, high-performance streamlined atomic force microscopy (AFM) was constructed, using the buzzer-scanner to move the sample relative to the probe, and using a Cd/DVD optical pickup unit to detect the mechanical resonance of a micro fabricated cantilever. The performance of the AFM is evaluated. The high sensitivity and high bandwidth of the detection system makes the equipment suitable for characterizing nano scale elements. An AFM using our detection system for detecting the deflection of micro fabricated cantilevers can resolve individual atomic steps on graphite surfaces. (Author)

  6. Imaging of nanoparticle-labeled stem cells using magnetomotive optical coherence tomography, laser speckle reflectometry, and light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimalla, Peter; Werner, Theresa; Winkler, Kai; Mueller, Claudia; Wicht, Sebastian; Gaertner, Maria; Mehner, Mirko; Walther, Julia; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Wittig, Dierk; Karl, Mike O.; Ader, Marius; Funk, Richard H. W.; Koch, Edmund

    2015-03-01

    Cell transplantation and stem cell therapy are promising approaches for regenerative medicine and are of interest to researchers and clinicians worldwide. However, currently, no imaging technique that allows three-dimensional in vivo inspection of therapeutically administered cells in host tissues is available. Therefore, we investigate magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) of cells labeled with magnetic particles as a potential noninvasive cell tracking method. We develop magnetomotive imaging of mesenchymal stem cells for future cell therapy monitoring. Cells were labeled with fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles, embedded in tissue-mimicking agar scaffolds, and imaged using a microscope setup with an integrated MM-OCT probe. Magnetic particle-induced motion in response to a pulsed magnetic field of 0.2 T was successfully detected by OCT speckle variance analysis, and cross-sectional and volumetric OCT scans with highlighted labeled cells were obtained. In parallel, fluorescence microscopy and laser speckle reflectometry were applied as two-dimensional reference modalities to image particle distribution and magnetically induced motion inside the sample, respectively. All three optical imaging modalities were in good agreement with each other. Thus, magnetomotive imaging using iron oxide nanoparticles as cellular contrast agents is a potential technique for enhanced visualization of selected cells in OCT.

  7. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process.

  8. Developing and Incorporating Instructional Videos and Quizzes as a Blended and Online Learning Component in an Undergraduate Optical Microscopy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Claiborne, L. L.; Brame, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optical mineralogy is not an easy skill to master as an undergraduate, but it is crucial for understanding what the Earth is made out of. It is a supplementary and specific skillset typically taught in a microscope lab supporting lessons on crystallography, chemistry and mineral analysis in the classroom. Mastering the basic skills is required for advancement in courses that utilize thin sections in teaching igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. This project asks: Will exposing undergraduate Earth and environmental studies students to optical microscopy figures in videos prior to lab assist in the acquisition of skills required to describe and distinguish Earth materials? This project is conducted in conjunction with the Blended and Online Learning Design (BOLD) Fellowship offered through the Center for Teaching (CFT) at Vanderbilt University. Eight videos and accompanying pre-lab questions were hosted online weekly in a semester-long, undergraduate Earth materials course. The focus of the design of the videos and supporting questions is specifically on microscopy skills rather than on optics concepts, which is taught post-video. The videos were made available prior to a weekly lab with the intent of familiarizing the student with the types of images and information he/she should obtain with the microscope. Multiple choice, formative-style questions accompany the videos in an online-hosted assignment. These questions are graded on basis of completion and are intended to aid in student metacognition. Subjects include students in the Vanderbilt University Earth Materials course and students from the Hanover College Mineralogy course. The effectiveness of the videos is assessed in two parts: (1) Comparing the homework and lab final grades of the students this year with those of the students last year (2) Analysis of a weekly questionnaire. The answers after each week will be compiled and compared. Collecting data from Vanderbilt University students and Hanover

  9. Stained glasses under the nuclear microprobe: A window into history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarigues, M. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: mgv@fct.unl.pt; Fernandes, P. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da [Dep. Fisica, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    Stained glass fragments from the 15th, 16th and 20th centuries, belonging to Mosteiro de Santa Maria da Vitoria, Batalha (Portugal), were characterised non-destructively in a nuclear microprobe. The work aimed at finding the composition of the glasses and glass paintings and relating these with the corresponding production periods. The elemental compositions of the glass fragments were obtained by means of scanning micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) spectrometry in selected cross-sections. These were complemented by micro X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Characterisation of colour was performed by optical absorption spectroscopy in the UV-vis range, while the corrosion products were identified by optical microscopy and {mu}-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) spectroscopy in combination with the data generated by {mu}-PIXE. Nuclear microprobe analysis allowed unveiling the compositions and structures, in particular of glass paintings and corrosion products. While it is not surprising that Fe, Cu and Pb were the main elements identified in the grisaille paintings of all studied periods, as well as Ag and Cu found in the glasses decorated with yellow silver painting, their distribution gave important clues on the materials and techniques used to manufacture these stained glasses. Furthermore, it allowed establishing a definite relation between the compositions found and the periods of production, with the added bonus of correctly reassigning the manufacturing period of some samples.

  10. Applicability of quantitative optical imaging techniques for intraoperative perfusion diagnostics: a comparison of laser speckle contrast imaging, sidestream dark-field microscopy, and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Dobbe, Iwan J. G. G.; Heeg, Erik; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Strackee, Simon D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2017-08-01

    Patient morbidity and mortality due to hemodynamic complications are a major problem in surgery. Optical techniques can image blood flow in real-time and high-resolution, thereby enabling perfusion monitoring intraoperatively. We tested the feasibility and validity of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and sidestream dark-field microscopy (SDF) for perfusion diagnostics in a phantom model using whole blood. Microvessels with diameters of 50, 100, and 400 μm were constructed in a scattering phantom. Perfusion was simulated by pumping heparinized human whole blood at five velocities (0 to 20 mm/s). Vessel diameter and blood flow velocity were assessed with LSCI, OCT, and SDF. Quantification of vessel diameter was feasible with OCT and SDF. LSCI could only visualize the 400-μm vessel, perfusion units scaled nonlinearly with blood velocity. OCT could assess blood flow velocity in terms of inverse OCT speckle decorrelation time. SDF was not feasible to measure blood flow; however, for diluted blood the measurements were linear with the input velocity up to 1 mm/s. LSCI, OCT, and SDF were feasible to visualize blood flow. Validated blood flow velocity measurements intraoperatively in the desired parameter (mL·g-1) remain challenging.

  11. Optical and Atomic Force Microscopy Characterization of PbI2 Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.

    1997-01-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) clusters were synthesized from the chemical reaction of NaI (or KI) with Pb(NO3)2 in H2O, D2O, CH3OH, and C3H7OH media. The observation of the absorption features above 350 nm with the help of integrating sphere accessory strongly suggests the quantum dot formation of PbI2 in solution. Spectral comparison between the synthesized PbI2 clusters in solution and PbI2 nanophase by impregnation of PbI2 in four different pore-sized porous silica indicates that the PbI2 cluster size in solution is less than 2.5 nm in lateral dimension. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the PbL clusters deposited onto three different molecularly flat surfaces are single-layered. The measured height is 1.0 - 0.1 nm. The swollen layer thickness can be attributed to the intralayer contraction from the strong lateral interaction among PbI2 molecules, which is supported by ab initio calculation. Raman scattering measurement of LO and TO modes of PbI2 in bulk and in the confined state were also conducted in 50-150 cu cm region. The observed three bands at 74, %, 106 1/cm are assigned to TO2, LO2, and LO, mode, respectively. The relatively small red-shift in LO modes may be caused by the surface phonon polaritons of PbI2 nanophase in the porous silica.

  12. Apparatus for Direct Optical Fiber Through-Lens Illumination of Microscopy or Observational Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadogawa, Hiroshi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In one embodiment of the invention, a microscope or other observational apparatus, comprises a hollow tube, a lens mounted to the tube, a light source and at least one flexible optical fiber having an input end and an output end. The input end is positioned to receive light from the light source, and the output end is positioned within the tube so as to directly project light along a straight path to the lens to illuminate an object to be viewed. The path of projected light is uninterrupted and free of light deflecting elements. By passing the light through the lens, the light can be diffused or otherwise defocused to provide more uniform illumination across the surface of the object, increasing the quality of the image of the object seen by the viewer. The direct undeflected and uninterrupted projection of light, without change of direction, eliminates the need for light-deflecting elements, such as beam-splitters, mirrors, prisms, or the like, to direct the projected light towards the object.

  13. Visible spectrum extended-focus optical coherence microscopy for label-free sub-cellular tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Paul J; Bouwens, Arno; Szlag, Daniel; Nguyen, David; Descloux, Adrien; Sison, Miguel; Coquoz, Séverine; Extermann, Jérôme; Lasser, Theo

    2017-07-01

    We present a novel extended-focus optical coherence microscope (OCM) attaining 0.7 μm axial and 0.4 μm lateral resolution maintained over a depth of 40 μm, while preserving the advantages of Fourier domain OCM. Our system uses an ultra-broad spectrum from a supercontinuum laser source. As the spectrum spans from near-infrared to visible wavelengths (240 nm in bandwidth), we call the system visOCM. The combination of such a broad spectrum with a high-NA objective creates an almost isotropic 3D submicron resolution. We analyze the imaging performance of visOCM on microbead samples and demonstrate its image quality on cell cultures and ex-vivo brain tissue of both healthy and alzheimeric mice. In addition to neuronal cell bodies, fibers and plaques, visOCM imaging of brain tissue reveals fine vascular structures and sub-cellular features through its high spatial resolution. Sub-cellular structures were also observed in live cells and were further revealed through a protocol traditionally used for OCT angiography.

  14. Endoscopic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Sokolov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM and optical coherence tomography (OCT. However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices.

  15. Image scanning microscopy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E N; Pal, R

    2017-05-01

    For almost a century, the resolution of optical microscopy was thought to be limited by Abbé's law describing the diffraction limit of light. At the turn of the millennium, aided by new technologies and fluorophores, the field of optical microscopy finally surpassed the diffraction barrier: a milestone achievement that has been recognized by the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Many super-resolution methods rely on the unique photophysical properties of the fluorophores to improve resolution, posing significant limitations on biological imaging, such as multicoloured staining, live-cell imaging and imaging thick specimens. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) is one branch of super-resolution microscopy that requires no such special properties of the applied fluorophores, making it more versatile than other techniques. Since its introduction in biological imaging, SIM has proven to be a popular tool in the biologist's arsenal for following biological interaction and probing structures of nanometre scale. SIM continues to see much advancement in design and implementation, including the development of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM), which uses patterned excitation via either predefined arrays or raster-scanned single point-spread functions (PSF). This review aims to give a brief overview of the SIM and ISM processes and subsequent developments in the image reconstruction process. Drawing from this, and incorporating more recent achievements in light shaping (i.e. pattern scanning and super-resolution beam shaping), this study also intends to suggest potential future directions for this ever-expanding field. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. CARS microscopy for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanyan Grigory; Voskanyan Karine

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy grows in its importance with the development of modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, methods of diagnostics and treatment of most dangerous diseases for mankind. There are several important goals of optical microscopy for biomedical studies among which the next three may be distinguished: fast imaging with high lateral spatial resolution, 3-D sectioning capability and high contrast for chemical selectivity. To meet these specific requirements, various types of both linear and nonlinear optical microscopy were elaborated. (authors)

  17. Description of the cave organ in three species of the genus Belminus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Claudia Magaly; Nieves, Elsa; Angulo, Víctor Manuel; Aldana, Elis

    2011-09-01

    The cave organ is a sensory receptor in the antenna pedicel of some Reduviidae. This paper describes this organ for the first time in three species of the genus Belminus, Belminus corredori, Belminus ferroae and Belminus herreri, by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The structures presented a general pattern similar to one reported for other species of Triatominae.

  18. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) Spacecraft Silicone Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Under a microscope, atomic oxygen (AO) exposed silicone surfaces are crazed and seen as "islands" separated by numerous crack lines, much analogous to mud-tile cracks. This research characterized and compared the degree of AO degradation of silicones by analyzing optical microscope images of samples exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) AO as part of the Spacecraft Silicone Experiment. The Spacecraft Silicone Experiment consisted of eight DC 93-500 silicone samples exposed to eight different AO fluence levels (ranged from 1.46 to 8.43 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm) during two different Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) missions. Image analysis software was used to analyze images taken using a digital camera. To describe the morphological degradation of each AO exposed flight sample, three different parameters were selected and estimated: (1) average area of islands was determined and found to be in the 1000 to 3100 sq mm range; (2) total length of crack lines per unit area of the sample surface were determined and found to be in the range of 27 to 59 mm of crack length per sq mm of sample surface; and (3) the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines was determined and found to be in the 25 to 56 percent range. In addition, average crack width can be estimated from crack length and crack area measurements and was calculated to be about 10 mm. Among the parameters studied, the fraction of sample surface area that is occupied by crack lines is believed to be most useful in characterizing the degree of silicone conversion to silicates by AO because its value steadily increases with increasing fluence over the entire fluence range. A series of SEM images from the eight samples exposed to different AO fluences suggest a complex sequence of surface stress due to surface shrinkage and crack formation, followed by re-distribution of stress and shrinking rate on the sample surface. Energy dispersive spectra (EDS) indicated that upon AO

  19. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  20. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  1. Port-wine stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Port-wine stain URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ...

  2. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy with integrated dual-axis MEMS scanner for fast 3D imaging and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Santhanam, Anand P.; Tankam, Patrice; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for characterization of microscopic structures in industrial and clinical applications. A custom micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner system was developed to achieve 55 kHz A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) instrument with a novel multilevel GPU architecture for high-speed imaging. GD-OCM yields high-definition volumetric imaging with dynamic depth of focusing through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, which has no moving parts and is suitable for use in a manufacturing setting or in a medical environment. A dual-axis MEMS mirror was chosen to replace two single-axis galvanometer mirrors; as a result, the astigmatism caused by the mismatch between the optical pupil and the scanning location was eliminated and a 12x reduction in volume of the scanning system was achieved. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm was demonstrated throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. The MEMS-based scanner resulted in improved image quality, increased robustness and lighter weight of the system - all factors that are critical for on-field deployment. A custom integrated feedback system consisting of a laser diode and a position-sensing detector was developed to investigate the impact of the resonant frequency of the MEMS and the driving signal of the scanner on the movement of the mirror. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and characterization of tissue samples with GD-OCM are presented.

  3. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E.; Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M.; Maldonado, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient (ε) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl 3 , their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  4. Handheld optical coherence tomography-reflectance confocal microscopy probe for detection of basal cell carcinoma and delineation of margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Yélamos, Oriol; Chen, Chih-Shan J.; Maguluri, Gopi; Cordova, Miguel A.; Sahu, Aditi; Park, Jesung; Fox, William; Alessi-Fox, Christi; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-07-01

    We present a hand-held implementation and preliminary evaluation of a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) probe for detecting and delineating the margins of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in human skin in vivo. A standard OCT approach (spectrometer-based) with a central wavelength of 1310 nm and 0.11 numerical aperture (NA) was combined with a standard RCM approach (830-nm wavelength and 0.9 NA) into a common path hand-held probe. Cross-sectional OCT images and enface RCM images are simultaneously displayed, allowing for three-dimensional microscopic assessment of tumor morphology in real time. Depending on the subtype and depth of the BCC tumor and surrounding skin conditions, OCT and RCM imaging are able to complement each other, the strengths of each helping overcome the limitations of the other. Four representative cases are summarized, out of the 15 investigated in a preliminary pilot study, demonstrating how OCT and RCM imaging may be synergistically combined to more accurately detect BCCs and more completely delineate margins. Our preliminary results highlight the potential benefits of combining the two technologies within a single probe to potentially guide diagnosis as well as treatment of BCCs.

  5. Parallelized multi–graphics processing unit framework for high-speed Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankam, Patrice; Santhanam, Anand P.; Lee, Kye-Sung; Won, Jungeun; Canavesi, Cristina; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) is a volumetric high-resolution technique capable of acquiring three-dimensional (3-D) skin images with histological resolution. Real-time image processing is needed to enable GD-OCM imaging in a clinical setting. We present a parallelized and scalable multi-graphics processing unit (GPU) computing framework for real-time GD-OCM image processing. A parallelized control mechanism was developed to individually assign computation tasks to each of the GPUs. For each GPU, the optimal number of amplitude-scans (A-scans) to be processed in parallel was selected to maximize GPU memory usage and core throughput. We investigated five computing architectures for computational speed-up in processing 1000×1000 A-scans. The proposed parallelized multi-GPU computing framework enables processing at a computational speed faster than the GD-OCM image acquisition, thereby facilitating high-speed GD-OCM imaging in a clinical setting. Using two parallelized GPUs, the image processing of a 1×1×0.6  mm3 skin sample was performed in about 13 s, and the performance was benchmarked at 6.5 s with four GPUs. This work thus demonstrates that 3-D GD-OCM data may be displayed in real-time to the examiner using parallelized GPU processing. PMID:24695868

  6. Comparison of rigorous modelling of different structure profiles on photomasks for quantitative linewidth measurements by means of UV- or DUV-optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Gerd; Bodermann, Bernd; Woehler, Martin

    2007-06-01

    The optical microscopy is an important instrument for dimensional characterisation or calibration of micro- and nanostructures, e.g. chrome structures on photomasks. In comparison to scanning electron microscopy (possible contamination of the sample) and atomic force microscopy (slow, risk of damage) optical microscopy is a fast and non destructive metrology method. The precise quantitative determination of the linewidth from the microscope image is, however, only possible by knowledge of the geometry of the structures and their consideration in the optical modelling. We compared two different rigorous model approaches, the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and the Finite Elements Method (FEM) for modelling of structures with different edge angles, linewidths, line to space ratios and polarisations. The RCWA method can adapt inclined edges profiles only by a staircase approximation leading to increased modelling errors of the RCWA method. Even today's sophisticated rigorous methods still show problems with TM-polarisation. Therefore both rigorous methods are compared in terms of their convergence for TE and TM- polarisation. Beyond that also the influence of typical illumination wavelengths (365 nm, 248 nm and 193 nm) on the microscope images and their contribution to the measuring uncertainty budget will be discussed.

  7. The influence of Romanowsky-Giemsa type stains on nuclear and cytoplasmic features of cytological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E; Wittekind, D

    1989-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the staining pattern of the standard azure B-eosin Y stain with commercial May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stains on cytological specimens by means of high resolution image analysis. Several cytological specimens (blood smears, abdominal serous effusions, bronchial scrape material) were air dried, methanol fixed and stained with the standard azure B-eosin Y stain and with commercial May-Grünwald-Giemsa stains. Integrated optical density (IOD) and colour intensities of cell nuclei and cytoplasm were measured with the IBAS 2000 image analyser. Commercial MGG stains gave much higher coefficients of variation for all parameters than the standard stain. Reproducibility of cell nuclei segmentation versus cytoplasm was significantly better for the standard stain. Contamination of the standard stain with methylene blue partly copied the staining pattern of commercial stains. The standard azure B-eosin Y stain is recommended for high resolution image analysis (HRIA) of cytological samples.

  8. Evaluation and Comparison of the Biopathology of Collagen and Inflammation in the Extracellular Matrix of Oral Epithelial Dysplasias and Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia Using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscopy: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Soma Susan; Sarojini, Sreenivasan Bargavan; George, Giju Baby; Vinod, Sankar; Mathew, Philips; Babu, Anulekh; Sebastian, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The role of tumour inflammation and the dysplastic epithelial-stromal interactions on the nature of collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of dysplastic epithelium is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the inflammation and pathological stromal collagen (loosely packed thin disorganized collagen) present in mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasias with that of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias. The basement membrane intactness of epithelial dysplasias was also evaluated to determine if dysplastic epithelial mesenchymal interaction has any role in the integrity of stromal collagen in epithelial dysplasia. Oral epithelial dysplasias, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and normal oral mucosal samples were used for the study. Packing, thickness and orientation of collagen fibres in mild, moderate and severe grades of oral epithelial dysplasias (n = 24), inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (n = 8) and normal oral mucosal samples (n = 8) were analysed based on the polarisation of collagen fibres in picrosirius red polarising stain under polarising microscope. All the grades of epithelial dysplasias showed greenish yellow birefringence confirming the presence of loosely arranged pathological collagen in the presence of moderate inflammation. All the cases of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia showed red polarisation hue and moderate inflammation. A statistically significant difference was found in the packing and orientation of collagen when epithelial dysplasias and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia were compared (P epithelial dysplasia, a statistically significant result was obtained (P epithelial dysplasia suggests that tumourigenic factors are released to connective tissue stroma much earlier than expected. Hence we suggest considering the integrity of extracellular matrix collagen, intactness of basement membrane and inflammation associated with dysplasia along with the anaplasia of epithelial cells in the microscopic

  9. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhaf, Christina A; Wind, Bas S; Mogensen, Mette; Meesters, Arne A; Paasch, Uwe; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 mJ/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged individual laser channels of the entire laser grid, and RCM imaged epidermal cellular and structural changes around a single laser channel to the depth of the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ) and upper papillary dermis. OCT images visualized a heterogeneous material in the lower part of open laser channels, indicating tissue fluid. By OCT the median percentage of open channels was evaluated at several time points within the first 24 hours and laser channels were found to gradually close, depending on the used energy level. Thus, at 5 mJ/microbeam, 87% (range 73-100%) of channels were open one hour after laser exposure, which declined to 27% (range 20-100%) and 20% (range 7-93%) at 12 and 24 hours after laser exposure, respectively. At 25 mJ/microbeam, 100% (range 100-100%) of channels were open 1 hour after laser exposure while 53% (range 33-100%) and 40% (range 0-100%) remained open at 12 and 24 hours after exposure. Median depth and width of open channels decreased over time depending of applied energy. RCM verified initial re-epithelialization from day 2 for all energy levels used. Morphology of ablation defects by OCT and

  10. Real-time observation of growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases on a Sm-211 whisker substrate by high-temperature optical microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sun, J.L.; Huang, Y.B.; Cheng, L.; Yao, X.; Lai, Y.J.; Jirsa, Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2009), 898-902 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0722 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : high-temperature optical microscopy * growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases * Sm-211 whisker substrate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.162, year: 2009

  11. Quantitative plane-resolved crystal growth and dissolution kinetics by coupling in situ optical microscopy and diffusion models : the case of salicylic acid in aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Amelia R.; Peruffo, Massimo; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of salicylic acid crystals are investigated in situ by focusing on individual microscale crystals. From a combination of optical microscopy and finite element method (FEM) modeling, it was possible to obtain a detailed quantitative picture of dissolution and growth dynamics for individual crystal faces. The approach uses real-time in situ growth and dissolution data (crystal size and shape as a function of time) to parametrize a FEM model incorporating surf...

  12. Theoretical assessment of optical resolution enhancement and background fluorescence reduction by three-dimensional nonlinear structured illumination microscopy using stimulated emission depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, Fumihiro

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (SIM) enlarges frequency cutoff laterally and axially by a factor of two, compared with conventional microscopy. However, its optical resolution is still fundamentally limited. It is necessary to introduce nonlinearity to enlarge frequency cutoff further. We propose three-dimensional nonlinear structured illumination microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED) effect, which has a structured excitation pattern and a structured STED pattern, and both three-dimensional illumination patterns have the same lateral pitch and orientation. Theoretical analysis showed that nonlinearity induced by STED effect, which causes harmonics and contributes to enlarging frequency cutoff, depends on the phase difference between two structured illuminations and that the phase difference of π is the most efficient to increase nonlinearity. We also found that undesirable background fluorescence, which degenerates the contrast of structured pattern and limits the ability of SIM, can be reduced by our method. These results revealed that optical resolution improvement and background fluorescence reduction would be compatible. The feasibility study showed that our method will be realized with commercially available laser, having 3.5 times larger frequency cutoff compared with conventional microscopy.

  13. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described. Images PMID:1688872

  14. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    OpenAIRE

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described.

  15. Gram stain of urethral discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral discharge Gram stain; Urethritis - Gram stain ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . ...

  16. Investigations of laser-induced damages in fused silica optics using x-ray laser interferometric microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Rus, Bedřich; Kozlová, Michaela; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Mocek, Tomáš; Homer, Pavel; Polan, Jiří; Stupka, Michal; Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Lagron, J.C.; Ros, D.; Danson, C.; Hawkes, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 10 (2010), 103103/1-103103/7 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08099; GA AV ČR IAA100100911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser beam effects * light interferometry * mirrors * optical materials * optical self-focusing * optical arrays * optical beam splitters Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.064, year: 2010 http://jap.aip.org/japiau/v107/i10/p103103_s1

  17. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Edward Carlo; Blanca, Carlo Mar

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89-96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy

  18. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  19. Staining properties and stability of a standardised Romanowsky stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1978-03-01

    An evaluation of the standardised Romanowsky stain of Marshall et al. has been made in a routine haematology laboratory. It was noted that this stain had several advantages over the May-Grünwald Giemsa stain used in most British laboratories. These advantages include ease and speed of preparation, a shorter staining time, and reproducibility of results. These results are described in detail. The stability of the stock stain solution and of the 'working' stain (stock + buffer) has been studied by, respectively, thin-layer chromatography and visible spectroscopy. No change was detected in the composition of the stock solution at ambient temperature over a period of six months. Stability was unaffected by the composition of the container (polyethylene, PyrexTM, or soda-glass) or by daylight. The 'working' solution was stable for 3 hours. Thereafter a precipitate is formed, consisting of thiazine dyes and eosin in a molar ratio of approximately 2:1.

  20. Three-band, 1.9-μm axial resolution full-field optical coherence microscopy over a 530-1700 nm wavelength range using a single camera

    OpenAIRE

    Federici, Antoine; Dubois, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Full-field optical coherence microscopy is an established optical technology based on low-coherence interference microscopy for high-resolution imaging of semitransparent samples. In this Letter, we demonstrate an extension of the technique using a visible to short-wavelength infrared camera and a halogen lamp to image in three distinct bands centered at 635, 870, and 1170 nm. Reflective microscope objectives are employed to minimize chromatic aberrations of the imagin...

  1. Near-field and far-field modeling of scattered surface waves. Application to the apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, J.; Parent, G.; Fumeron, S.; Jeandel, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of surface waves through scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is a promising technique for thermal measurements at very small scales. Recent studies have shown that electromagnetic waves, in the vicinity of a scattering structure such as an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, can be scattered from near to far-field and thus detected. In the present work, a model based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and the near-field to far-field (NFTFF) transformation for electromagnetic waves propagation is presented. This model has been validated by studying the electromagnetic field of a dipole in vacuum and close to a dielectric substrate. Then simulations for a tetrahedral tip close to an interface are presented and discussed.

  2. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2 nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  3. Applying a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope for Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy Techniques and Investigation of Cell-cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Ayon, Gabriela Monserratt

    The field of research of this thesis is Condensed Matter Physics applied to Biology. Specifically it describes the development of different Atomic Force Microscopy techniques and tools towards the study of living cells in physiological solution. Particular interest is put into the understanding of the influence of noise in the determination of ordered liquid layers above a mica surface - as work towards the study of the role of water and ions in biological processes - and the influence of "diving bell" to boost the Q factor and allow stable imaging and force spectroscopy with tips based on Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy [LeDue, 2010 and LeDue, 2008]. By combining SNOM techniques as a local illumination method (and thus avoiding photo bleaching of individual molecules) and high resolution AFM techniques we will be able to investigate mechano-transduction and associated signaling in living cells and individual proteins.

  4. High-vacuum optical platform for cryo-CLEM (HOPE): A new solution for non-integrated multiscale correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuoguo; Ji, Gang; Shi, Yang; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Niu, Tongxin; Wang, Shengliu; Huang, Xiaojun; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Mingdong; Xu, Wei; Sun, Fei

    2018-01-01

    Cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM) offers a unique way to analyze the high-resolution structural information of cryo-vitrified specimen by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) with the guide of the search for unique events by cryo-fluorescence microscopy (cryo-FM). To achieve cryo-FM, a trade-off must be made between the temperature and performance of objective lens. The temperature of specimen should be kept below devitrification while the distance between the objective lens and specimen should be short enough for high resolution imaging. Although special objective lens was designed in many current cryo-FM approaches, the unavoided frosting and ice contamination are still affecting the efficiency of cryo-CLEM. In addition, the correlation accuracy between cryo-FM and cryo-EM would be reduced during the current specimen transfer procedure. Here, we report an improved cryo-CLEM technique (high-vacuum optical platform for cryo-CLEM, HOPE) based on a high-vacuum optical stage and a commercial cryo-EM holder. The HOPE stage comprises of a special adapter to suit the cryo-EM holder and a high-vacuum chamber with an anti-contamination system. It provides a clean and enduring environment for cryo specimen, while the normal dry objective lens in room temperature can be used via the optical windows. The 'touch-free' specimen transfer via cryo-EM holder allows least specimen deformation and thus maximizes the correlation accuracy between cryo-FM and cryo-EM. Besides, we developed a software to perform semi-automatic cryo-EM acquisition of the target region localized by cryo-FM. Our work provides a new solution for cryo-CLEM and can be adapted for different commercial fluorescence microscope and electron microscope. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  6. Advanced microscopy of microbial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  7. Cleaning of endodontic root canal by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG laser beam with fiber optic delivery: scanning electron microscopy, endoscopic and microradiographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Norberto; Melis, Marco; Benvenuti, Alessandro; Tosto, Sebastiano; Pierdominici, Fabrizio

    1997-05-01

    12 teeth have been extracted and treated 'in vitro' by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG pulsed laser with fiber optic delivery to compare the cleaning efficiency of the root canal. The optic fiber was equipped with a water-air coaxial cooling system. The ultrasonic device was equipped with a 3 percent NaCl solution douche system. The samples have been prepared according to the technical specifications of the suppliers of laser and ultrasonics and observed by an endodontic endoscope. Cross sections of the samples have been utilized for microradiographic investigations and scanning electron microscopy observations. Local melting has been observed after laser irradiation.Also, vitrification preferentially occurred in the apical zones. The occurrence of vitrification was found strongly dependent on the translation velocity of the laser beam inside the root canal. The laser beam has shown a cleaning efficiency greater than that obtained by ultrasonic procedure.

  8. Scanning microscopy of magnetic domains using the Fe 3p core level transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Rozhko, I.; Voss, J.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.; Wedemeier, V.

    1999-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum ultraviolet analog to visible-light magneto-optical imaging of magnetic structures using the resonantly enhanced transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect at core level thresholds with incident p-polarized radiation. The advantages are element specificity and a variable information depth. We used the scanning x-ray microscope at HASYLAB capable of obtaining about 1 μm resolution by means of its focusing ellipsoidal ring mirror. The p-polarized component of the reflected light was selected using multilayer reflection at an additional plane mirror downstream to the sample. Micrographs of the optical reflectivity were taken in the vicinity of the Fe 3p core level threshold at 53.7 and 56.5 eV photon energy where the magneto-optical effect is of opposite sign. Magnetic domains are visible in the difference of both recorded images.

  9. Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, J E; Seka, W; Featherstone, J D B; Rechmann, P

    2012-04-01

    The selective ablation of extrinsic dental enamel stains using a 400-nm laser is evaluated at several fluences for completely removing stains with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser (400-nm wavelength, 60-nanosecond pulse duration, 10-Hz repetition rate) was used to treat 10 extracted human teeth with extrinsic enamel staining. Each tooth was irradiated perpendicular to the surface in a back-and-forth motion over a 1-mm length using an ∼300-µm-diam 10th-order super-Gaussian beam with fluences ranging from 0.8 to 6.4 J/cm(2) . Laser triangulation determined stain depth and volume removed by measuring 3D surface images before and after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy evaluated the surface roughness of enamel following stain removal. Fluorescence spectroscopy measured spectra of unbleached and photobleached stains in the spectral range of 600-800 nm. Extrinsic enamel stains are removed with laser fluences between 0.8 and 6.4 J/cm(2) . Stains removed on sound enamel leave behind a smooth enamel surface. Stain removal in areas with signs of earlier cariogenic acid attacks resulted in isolated and randomly located laser-induced, 50-µm-diam enamel pits. These pits contain 0.5-µm diam, smooth craters indicative of heat transfer from the stain to the enamel and subsequent melting and water droplet ejection. Ablation stalling of enamel stains is typically observed at low fluences (<3 J/cm(2) ) and is accompanied by a drastic reduction in porphyrin fluorescence from the Soret band. Laser ablation of extrinsic enamel stains at 400 nm is observed to be most efficient above 3 J/cm(2) with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. Unsound underlying enamel is also observed to be selectively removed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Optical versus Virtual: Teaching Assistant Perceptions of the Use of Virtual Microscopy in an Undergraduate Human Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Larissa; Dunham, Stacey; Braun, Mark W.; O'Loughlin, Valerie Dean

    2012-01-01

    Many studies that evaluate the introduction of technology in the classroom focus on student performance and student evaluations. This study focuses on instructor evaluation of the introduction of virtual microscopy into an undergraduate anatomy class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with graduate teaching assistants (TA) and analyzed…

  11. A new bacterial staining method involving Gram stain with theoretical considerations of the staining mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Y; Tôei, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Gram staining of bacteria, tests with anionic dyes followed by treatment with cationic octyltrimethylammonium (OTMA) were carried out. The study revealed that tetrabromophenolphthalein ethylester (TBPE) gave the most reliable staining of Gram-negative bacteria with negative staining of Gram-positive bacteria. Tests on many species of bacteria showed that TBPE positive bacteria were Gram-negative and vice versa, without exception.

  12. Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, George; Difilippantonio, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Bieber, Frederick R

    2017-07-11

    This unit provides an overview of light microscopy, including objectives, light sources, filters, film, and color photography for fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We believe there are excellent opportunities for cytogeneticists, pathologists, and other biomedical readers, to take advantage of specimen optical clearing techniques and expansion microscopy-we briefly point to these new opportunities. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  14. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  15. An evaluation of some commerical Romanowsky stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1975-08-01

    The staining properties of 43 commerical Romanowsky-type stains have been studied. Considerable differences in the appearance of stained blood films were observed with different batches of these stains, the staining of red cells being particularly variable. Attempts have been made to correlate staining patterns with stain composition as revealed by thin-layer chromatography and sulphated ash analyses. In this way it has been possible to define some essential requirements for satisfactory staining.

  16. Swept source optical coherence tomography Gabor fusion splicing technique for microscopy of thick samples using a deformable mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher; Bradu, Adrian; Rogers, John; Phelan, Pauline; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    We present a swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1060 nm equipped with a wavefront sensor at 830 nm and a deformable mirror in a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) system. Due to the AO correction, the confocal profile of the interface optics becomes narrower than the OCT axial range, restricting the part of the B-scan (cross section) with good contrast. By actuating on the deformable mirror, the depth of the focus is changed and the system is used to demonstrate Gabor filtering in order to produce B-scan OCT images with enhanced sensitivity throughout the axial range from a Drosophila larvae. The focus adjustment is achieved by manipulating the curvature of the deformable mirror between two user-defined limits. Particularities of controlling the focus for Gabor filtering using the deformable mirror are presented.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy and time resolved optical spectroscopy study of the electronic and structural interactions of ZnO nanorods with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaumünzer, M; Weichsel, U; Mačković, M; Spiecker, E; Peukert, W; Kryschi, C

    2013-08-22

    The adsorption behavior and electronic interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with ZnO nanorod surfaces were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO nanorod surfaces are surrounded by a homogeneous amorphous BSA film with thicknesses between ~2.5 and 5.0 nm. The electronic structure and adsorption geometry of BSA were examined using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The adsorption process was observed to result into an unfolded conformation of BSA becoming predominantly bound in the side-on orientation at the ZnO surface. This adsorption mode of the BSA molecules allows for a strong interaction with surface states of the ZnO nanorods. This is obvious from its efficient quenching of the defect-center photoluminescence of ZnO. Complementary information of electronic interactions across the ZnO nanorod interface was obtained from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiments. The rise dynamics of the measured transients revealed altered hole trapping dynamics and, thus, indicated to heterogeneous charge transfer as emerging from adsorbed BSA molecules to defect centers of the ZnO interface.

  18. In-vivo nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) of epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) reveals quantitative measures of neoplasia in hamster oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Yang, Jinping; Ortiz, Daniel; Qiu, Suimin; Resto, Vicente; McCammon, Susan; Vargas, Gracie

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) plays an integral role in epithelial neoplasia, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This interface undergoes significant alterations due to hyperproliferating epithelium that supports the transformation of normal epithelium to precancers and cancer. We present a method based on nonlinear optical microscopy to directly assess the ECTI and quantify dysplastic alterations using a hamster model for oral carcinogenesis. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic normal mucosa were imaged in-vivo by both multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) to obtain cross-sectional reconstructions of the oral epithelium and lamina propria. Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histopathological grading and measurement of ECTI parameters. An ECTI shape parameter was calculated based on deviation from the linear geometry (ΔLinearity) seen in normal mucosa was measured using MPAM-SHGM and histology. The ECTI was readily visible in MPAM-SHGM and quantitative shape analysis showed ECTI deformation in dysplasia but not in normal mucosa. ΔLinearity was significantly (p epithelial thickness was seen with increasing grade of dysplasia. MPAM-SHGM provides new noninvasive ways for direct characterization of ECTI which may be used in preclinical studies to investigate the role of this interface in early transformation. Further development of the method may also lead to new diagnostic approaches to differentiate non-neoplastic tissue from precancers and neoplasia, possibly with other cellular and layer based indicators of abnormality.

  19. Characterization and fabrication of fully metal-coated scanning near-field optical microscopy SiO2 tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschimann, L; Akiyama, T; Staufer, U; De Rooij, N F; Thiery, L; Eckert, R; Heinzelmann, H

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication of silicon cantilever-based scanning near-field optical microscope probes with fully aluminium-coated quartz tips was optimized to increase production yield. Different cantilever designs for dynamic- and contact-mode force feedback were implemented. Light transmission through the tips was investigated experimentally in terms of the metal coating and the tip cone-angle. We found that transmittance varies with the skin depth of the metal coating and is inverse to the cone angle, meaning that slender tips showed higher transmission. Near-field optical images of individual fluorescing molecules showed a resolution thermocouple showed no evidence of mechanical defect or orifice formation by thermal effects.

  20. Alpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasmacher, U.A.; Lang, M.; Klemme, S.; Moine, B.; Barbero, L.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-recoil tracks (ART) are lattice defects caused by the α-decay of 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th, and daughter products. Visualization of etched ARTs in dark mica by phase-contrast microscopy allows dating of Quaternary geological as well as archaeological materials. Visualization of etched ARTs by Nomarski-differential-interference-contrast microscopy (NDICM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM) enables the access to areal densities (ρ a ) of ART etch pits beyond 10 4 mm -2 and thus the extension of the new ART-dating technique to an age range >1 Ma. The successful application of SFM as a new tool in geochronology could open the way to a field to be characterized as nanogeochronology. In order to visualize ARTs by NDICM and SFM, dark mica was etched with 4% HF at 21 deg. C for 5-107 min. A linear relationship between ρ a and etching time (t e ) was observed for phlogopites from the Kerguelen Islands (French territory, Indian Ocean), and the Kovdor magmatic complex (Russia). The volume density (ρ v ) of ART is a function of etching speed (v eff ) and slope of the ρ a -growth curve. The ART-age equation allows the calculation of an individual ρ v -growth curve for the phlogopite analysed by us using the uranium and thorium content. The ART-ages were determined by combining the experimentally obtained volume density with the individual ρ v -growth curve

  1. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the acute healing phase using tissue clearing and optical microscopy in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yookyung; Ng, Joanna H; Keating, Cameron P; Senthil-Kumar, Prabhu; Zhao, Jie; Randolph, Mark A; Winograd, Jonathan M; Evans, Conor L

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI), a common injury in both the civilian and military arenas, is usually associated with high healthcare costs and with patients enduring slow recovery times, diminished quality of life, and potential long-term disability. Patients with PNI typically undergo complex interventions but the factors that govern optimal response are not fully characterized. A fundamental understanding of the cellular and tissue-level events in the immediate postoperative period is essential for improving treatment and optimizing repair. Here, we demonstrate a comprehensive imaging approach to evaluate peripheral nerve axonal regeneration in a rodent PNI model using a tissue clearing method to improve depth penetration while preserving neural architecture. Sciatic nerve transaction and end-to-end repair were performed in both wild type and thy-1 GFP rats. The nerves were harvested at time points after repair before undergoing whole mount immunofluorescence staining and tissue clearing. By increasing the optic depth penetration, tissue clearing allowed the visualization and evaluation of Wallerian degeneration and nerve regrowth throughout entire sciatic nerves with subcellular resolution. The tissue clearing protocol did not affect immunofluorescence labeling and no observable decrease in the fluorescence signal was observed. Large-area, high-resolution tissue volumes could be quantified to provide structural and connectivity information not available from current gold-standard approaches for evaluating axonal regeneration following PNI. The results are suggestive of observed behavioral recovery in vivo after neurorrhaphy, providing a method of evaluating axonal regeneration following repair that can serve as an adjunct to current standard outcomes measurements. This study demonstrates that tissue clearing following whole mount immunofluorescence staining enables the complete visualization and quantitative evaluation of axons throughout nerves in a PNI model

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the acute healing phase using tissue clearing and optical microscopy in a rodent model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yookyung Jung

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury (PNI, a common injury in both the civilian and military arenas, is usually associated with high healthcare costs and with patients enduring slow recovery times, diminished quality of life, and potential long-term disability. Patients with PNI typically undergo complex interventions but the factors that govern optimal response are not fully characterized. A fundamental understanding of the cellular and tissue-level events in the immediate postoperative period is essential for improving treatment and optimizing repair. Here, we demonstrate a comprehensive imaging approach to evaluate peripheral nerve axonal regeneration in a rodent PNI model using a tissue clearing method to improve depth penetration while preserving neural architecture. Sciatic nerve transaction and end-to-end repair were performed in both wild type and thy-1 GFP rats. The nerves were harvested at time points after repair before undergoing whole mount immunofluorescence staining and tissue clearing. By increasing the optic depth penetration, tissue clearing allowed the visualization and evaluation of Wallerian degeneration and nerve regrowth throughout entire sciatic nerves with subcellular resolution. The tissue clearing protocol did not affect immunofluorescence labeling and no observable decrease in the fluorescence signal was observed. Large-area, high-resolution tissue volumes could be quantified to provide structural and connectivity information not available from current gold-standard approaches for evaluating axonal regeneration following PNI. The results are suggestive of observed behavioral recovery in vivo after neurorrhaphy, providing a method of evaluating axonal regeneration following repair that can serve as an adjunct to current standard outcomes measurements. This study demonstrates that tissue clearing following whole mount immunofluorescence staining enables the complete visualization and quantitative evaluation of axons throughout

  4. Distinguishing the parallel and vertical orientations and optic axis characteristics determination of azobenzene mesogen by conoscopic polarized microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, M; Dong, M; Gao, L; Tian, J

    2011-11-01

    Orientational behaviours under the action of linearly polarized light and circularly polarized light of a side-chain azobenzene containing polymer were studied by conoscopic polarized microscopy. The results suggest that the linearly polarized light (473 nm, 20 mW cm(-2)) results in an in-plane orientation of the azobenzene groups. The irradiation with circularly polarized light (473 nm, 20 mW cm(-2)) leads to a tilt orientation (out-of-plane) of the azobenzene groups with the long axis of mesogens aligned along the propagation direction of the actinic light. Characteristic features of the in-plane and out-of-plane orientated films were obtained from their interference figures. The in-plane orientated film shows an interference cross consisting of a broad fuzzy bar, and the cross-centre lies in the centre of view field. In-plane orientated film also yields a flash figure upon a less than 10° rotation of the sample under polarized microscopy. The interference figures yielded from the out-of-plane orientated films consist of narrow bar cross. The locations of those interference figures depend on the oblique angle of the irradiation light. A method for distinguishing the in-plane orientation of the mesogens from the vertically out-of-plane orientation is demonstrated, which is based on comparing the bar width of their interference figures, and by whether they can produce a flash figure upon a small angle rotation of the film. The liquid crystalline film is identified as positive and uniaxial anisotropy after annealing of the perpendicularly irradiated film. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. High-resolution, label-free imaging of living cells with direct electron-beam-excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    High spatial resolution microscope is desired for deep understanding of cellular functions, in order to develop medical technologies. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging of un-labelled organelles in living cells, in which live cells on a 50 nm thick silicon nitride membrane are imaged by autofluorescence excited with a focused electron beam through the membrane. Electron beam excitation enables ultrahigh spatial resolution imaging of organelles, such as mitochondria, nuclei, and various granules. Since the autofluorescence spectra represent molecular species, this microscopy allows fast and detailed investigations of cellular status in living cells.

  6. Image-based stained glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present a method of restyling an image so that it approximates the visual appearance of a work of stained glass. To this end, we develop a novel approach which involves image warping, segmentation, querying, and colorization along with texture synthesis. In our method, a given input image is first segmented. Each segment is subsequently transformed to match real segments of stained glass queried from a database of image exemplars. By using real sources of stained glass, our method produces high quality results in this nascent area of nonphotorealistic rendering. The generation of the stained glass requires only modest amounts of user interaction. This interaction is facilitated with a unique region-merging tool.

  7. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  8. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  9. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  10. An in vitro comparison of a combined FOTI/Visual examination of occlusal caries with other caries diagnostic methods and the effect of stain on their diagnostic performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K.R.; Côrtes, D.F.; Ellwood, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Occlusal caries, detection, fibre optic transillumination, visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, laser fluorescence, electrical caries monitor, electrical resistance, stain......Occlusal caries, detection, fibre optic transillumination, visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, laser fluorescence, electrical caries monitor, electrical resistance, stain...

  11. Mapping exciton quenching in photovoltaic-applicable polymer blends using time-resolved scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadby, A.; Khalil, G.; Fox, A. M.; Lidzey, D. G.

    2008-05-01

    We have used time-resolved scanning near-field microscopy to image the fluorescence decay lifetime across a phase-separated blend of the photovoltaic-applicable polymers poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-alt-bis- N ,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N ,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB). We show that the efficiency of local fluorescence quenching is composition dependent, with excitons on F8BT molecules being more effectively quenched when F8BT is trapped at a low concentration in a PFB-rich phase. Despite such presumed differences in charge-carrier generation efficiency, our results demonstrate that charge extraction from F8BT:PFB devices is the most dominant mechanism limiting their operational efficiency.

  12. High-resolution wide-field microscopy with adaptive optics for spherical aberration correction and motionless focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kner, P; Sedat, J W; Agard, D A; Kam, Z

    2010-02-01

    Live imaging in cell biology requires three-dimensional data acquisition with the best resolution and signal-to-noise ratio possible. Depth aberrations are a major source of image degradation in three-dimensional microscopy, causing a significant loss of resolution and intensity deep into the sample. These aberrations occur because of the mismatch between the sample refractive index and the immersion medium index. We have built a wide-field fluorescence microscope that incorporates a large-throw deformable mirror to simultaneously focus and correct for depth aberration in three-dimensional imaging. Imaging fluorescent beads in water and glycerol with an oil immersion lens we demonstrate a corrected point spread function and a 2-fold improvement in signal intensity. We apply this new microscope to imaging biological samples, and show sharper images and improved deconvolution.

  13. The exact solution of self-consistent equations in the scanning near-field optic microscopy problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozovski, Valeri; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    for solving the self-consistent integral equation. The method developed is applied to calculations of near-field optical images obtained in illumination mode. It is assumed that the system under consideration consists of an object illuminated by the field scattered by a small probe. This assumption allows us...... to consider multiple scattering between a (point-like) probe and an extended object as well as inside the object. The exact solution for the self-consistent field is then obtained in terms of effective susceptibility of the probe-object system. Application of our method to the description of orientation...

  14. Chain end distribution of block copolymer in two-dimensional microphase-separated structure studied by scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Ryojun; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2009-10-01

    The chain end distribution of a block copolymer in a two-dimensional microphase-separated structure was studied by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). In the monolayer of poly(octadecyl methacrylate)-block-poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PODMA-b-PiBMA), the free end of the PiBMA subchain was directly observed by SNOM, and the spatial distributions of the whole block and the chain end are examined and compared with the convolution of the point spread function of the microscope and distribution function of the model structures. It was found that the chain end distribution of the block copolymer confined in two dimensions has a peak near the domain center, being concentrated in the narrower region, as compared with three-dimensional systems.

  15. Scanning near-field optical microscopy-based study of local dynamics of receptor-ligand interactions at the single molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensi, M.; Dukenbayev, K.; Sekatskii, S. K.; Dietler, G.

    2010-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM)—based modification of the method to study the dynamics of single molecule receptor—ligand interactions exploiting the fluorescence imaging by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is introduced. The main advantage of this approach consists in the possibility to study the single molecule interaction dynamics with a subwavelength spatial resolution and a submillisecond time resolution. Additionally, due to the much smaller irradiation area and some other technical features, such a modification enables to enlarge the scope of the receptor—ligand pairs to be investigated and to improve the temporal resolution. We briefly discuss corresponding experimental set up with a special accent on the SNOM operation in liquid and present some preliminary results of related investigations.

  16. LANTHANUM STAINING OF THE SURFACE COAT OF CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Stephen M.

    1971-01-01

    Among the techniques which have been reported to stain the surface coat of cells, for electron microscopy, is lanthanum staining en bloc. Similarly, the presence of the cationic dye, Alcian blue 8GX, in a primary glutaraldehyde fixative has been reported to improve the preservation of the surface coat of cells of many types; however, the preserved coat is not very electron opaque unless thin sections are counterstained. The present paper shows that for several rat tissues lanthanum staining en bloc is an effective electron stain for the cell surface, giving excellent contrast, if combined sequentially with prefixation in an aldehyde fixative containing Alcian blue. The cationic substance cetylpyridinium chloride was found to have a similar effect to that of Alcian blue in enhancing the lanthanum staining of the surface coat material of the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. The patterns of lanthanum staining obtained for the tissues studied strikingly resemble those reported in the literature where tissues are stained by several standard methods for demonstrating mucosubstances at the ultrastructural level. This fact and the reproduction of the effect of Alcian blue by cetylpyridinium chloride constitute a persuasive empirical argument that the material visualized is a mucopolysaccharide or mucopolysaccharide-protein complex. PMID:4108476

  17. Application of Optical Coherence Tomography Freeze-Drying Microscopy for Designing Lyophilization Process and Its Impact on Process Efficiency and Product Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Srinivasan, Charudharshini; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Awotwe-Otoo, David; Cruz, Celia N; Muhammad, Ashraf

    2018-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography freeze-drying microscopy (OCT-FDM) is a novel technique that allows the three-dimensional imaging of a drug product during the entire lyophilization process. OCT-FDM consists of a single-vial freeze dryer (SVFD) affixed with an optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system. Unlike the conventional techniques, such as modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) and light transmission freeze-drying microscopy, used for predicting the product collapse temperature (Tc), the OCT-FDM approach seeks to mimic the actual product and process conditions during the lyophilization process. However, there is limited understanding on the application of this emerging technique to the design of the lyophilization process. In this study, we investigated the suitability of OCT-FDM technique in designing a lyophilization process. Moreover, we compared the product quality attributes of the resulting lyophilized product manufactured using Tc, a critical process control parameter, as determined by OCT-FDM versus as estimated by mDSC. OCT-FDM analysis revealed the absence of collapse even for the low protein concentration (5 mg/ml) and low solid content formulation (1%w/v) studied. This was confirmed by lab scale lyophilization. In addition, lyophilization cycles designed using Tc values obtained from OCT-FDM were more efficient with higher sublimation rate and mass flux than the conventional cycles, since drying was conducted at higher shelf temperature. Finally, the quality attributes of the products lyophilized using Tc determined by OCT-FDM and mDSC were similar, and product shrinkage and cracks were observed in all the batches of freeze-dried products irrespective of the technique employed in predicting Tc.

  18. Non-invasive red light optogenetic pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging for drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac pacing could be a powerful tool for investigating mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, traditional electrical pacing using pacemaker requires an invasive surgical procedure. Electrical currents from the implanted electrodes can also cause damage to heart tissue, further restricting its utility. Optogenetic pacing has been developed as a promising, non-invasive alternative to electrical stimulation for controlling animal heart rhythms. It induces heart contractions by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins, which in turn activate the light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins in optogenetic pacing, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we performed optogenetic pacing by expression of recently engineered red-shifted microbial opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in a well-established animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, using the 617 nm stimulation light pulses. The OCM technique enables non-invasive optical imaging of animal hearts with high speed and ultrahigh axial and transverse resolutions. We integrated a customized OCM system with the optical stimulation system to monitor the optogenetic pacing noninvasively. The use of red-sifted opsins enabled deeper penetration of simulating light at lower power, which is promising for applications of optogenetic pacing in mammalian cardiac pathology studies or clinical treatments in the future.

  19. New microscopy for nanoimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kinjo, Y; Watanabe, M

    2002-01-01

    Two types of new microscopy, namely, X-ray contact microscopy (XRCM) in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray projection microscopy (XRPM) using synchrotron radiation and zone plate optics were used to image the fine structures of human chromosomes. In the XRCM plus AFM system, location of X-ray images on a photoresist has become far easier than that with our previous method using transmission electron microscopy coupled with the replica method. In addition, the images obtained suggested that the conformation of chromatin fiber differs from the current textbook model regarding the architecture of a eukaryotic chromosome. X-ray images with high contrast of the specimens could be obtained with XRPM. The resolution of each microscopy was about 30 and 200-300 nm for XRCM plus AFM and XRPM, respectively. (author)

  20. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  1. Provenance study through analysis of microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy for Goryeo celadon excavated from the seabed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-su, Han

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims at identifying the provenance of Goryeo celadons by understanding its microstructural characteristics, such as particles, blisters, forms and amount of pores, and the presence of crystal formation, bodies, and glazes and its boundary, using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis of the reproduced samples shows that the glazed layer of the sherd fired at higher temperatures has lower viscosity and therefore it encourages the blisters to be combined together and the layer to become more transparent. In addition, the result showed that the vitrification and melting process of clay minerals such as feldspars and quartzs on the bodies was accelerated for those samples. To factor such characteristics of the microstructure and apply it to the sherds, the samples could be divided into six categories based on status, such as small particles with many small pores or mainly large and small circular pores in the bodies, only a limited number of varied sized blisters in the glazes, and a few blisters and needle-shaped crystals on the boundary surface. In conclusion, the analysis of the microstructural characteristics using an optical microscope and SEM have proven to be useful as a categorizing reference factor in a provenance study on Goryeo celadons.

  2. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  3. In-vivo nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM of epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI reveals quantitative measures of neoplasia in hamster oral mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pal

    Full Text Available The epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI plays an integral role in epithelial neoplasia, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. This interface undergoes significant alterations due to hyperproliferating epithelium that supports the transformation of normal epithelium to precancers and cancer. We present a method based on nonlinear optical microscopy to directly assess the ECTI and quantify dysplastic alterations using a hamster model for oral carcinogenesis. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic normal mucosa were imaged in-vivo by both multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy (MPAM and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM to obtain cross-sectional reconstructions of the oral epithelium and lamina propria. Imaged sites were biopsied and processed for histopathological grading and measurement of ECTI parameters. An ECTI shape parameter was calculated based on deviation from the linear geometry (ΔLinearity seen in normal mucosa was measured using MPAM-SHGM and histology. The ECTI was readily visible in MPAM-SHGM and quantitative shape analysis showed ECTI deformation in dysplasia but not in normal mucosa. ΔLinearity was significantly (p < 0.01 higher in dysplasia (0.41±0.24 than normal (0.11±0.04 as measured in MPAM-SHGM and results were confirmed in histology which showed similar trends in ΔLinearity. Increase in ΔLinearity was also statistically significant for different grades of dysplasia. In-vivo ΔLinearity measurement alone from microscopy discriminated dysplasia from normal tissue with 87.9% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity, while calculations from histology provided 96.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity. Among other quantifiable architectural changes, a progressive statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness was seen with increasing grade of dysplasia. MPAM-SHGM provides new noninvasive ways for direct characterization of ECTI which may be used in preclinical studies to investigate the role of this

  4. Study of NaCl:Mn2+ nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V.; Kolokoltsev, O.; Navarrete Montesinos, M.; Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H.

    2015-01-01

    NaCl:Mn 2+ nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm 2 and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn 2+ single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C

  5. Optical and electron microscopy study of laser-based intracellular molecule delivery using peptide-conjugated photodispersible gold nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawinkel, Judith; Richter, Undine; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Westermann, Martin; Gamrad, Lisa; Rehbock, Christoph; Barcikowski, Stephan; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2016-01-08

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can act as carriers for therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genetic constructs for medical applications. The triggered release of the molecule into the cytoplasm can be crucial to its effective delivery. Hence, we implemented and characterized laser interaction with defined gold nanoparticle agglomerates conjugated to CPPs which enables efficient endosomal rupture and intracellular release of molecules transported. Gold nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in liquid were conjugated with CPPs forming agglomerates and the intracellular release of molecules was triggered via pulsed laser irradiation (γ = 532 nm, τ pulse = 1 ns). The CPPs enhance the uptake of the agglomerates along with the cargo which can be co-incubated with the agglomerates. The interaction of incident laser light with gold nanoparticle agglomerates leads to heat deposition and field enhancement in the vicinity of the particles. This highly precise effect deagglomerates the nanoparticles and disrupts the enclosing endosomal membrane. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed this rupture for radiant exposures of 25 mJ/cm2 and above. Successful intracellular release was shown using the fluorescent dye calcein. For a radiant exposure of 35 mJ/cm2 we found calcein delivery in 81 % of the treated cells while maintaining a high percentage of cell viability. Furthermore, cell proliferation and metabolic activity were not reduced 72 h after the treatment. CPPs trigger the uptake of the gold nanoparticle agglomerates via endocytosis and co-resident molecules in the endosomes are released by applying laser irradiation, preventing their intraendosomal degradation. Due to the highly localized effect, the cell membrane integrity is not affected. Therefore, this technique can be an efficient tool for spatially and temporally confined intracellular release. The utilization of specifically designed photodispersible gold nanoparticle agglomerates (65 nm

  6. Efficient methodology to correlate structural with optical properties of GaAs nanowires based on scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsien; Jahn, Uwe; Küpers, Hanno; Luna, Esperanza; Lewis, Ryan B.; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    Twin boundaries and boundaries between zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) segments of GaAs-related nanowires (NWs) form intrinsic heterointerfaces with essential consequences for the application of such nanomaterials in optoelectronic devices. We show that for GaAs and GaAs/(Al, Ga)As core/shell NWs, crystal twinning along the NW axis can be imaged with a spatial resolution of 10 nm using secondary electrons in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Changes of the crystal structure from the ZB to the WZ phase have been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. In addition to these methods, we employ spectrally and spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements in the same SEM to study the correlation between the structural and optical properties in single NWs. Two GaAs/AlAs/GaAs core/shell/shell NWs differing significantly in the crystal structure along their axis have been investigated combining these three techniques in order to demonstrate the strength of the employed methodology. Our experiments show that based on commonly available SEM methods, an overview of the structural properties along an entire NW and their impact on the spectral and spatial luminescence distribution can be efficiently obtained providing a quick feedback for the optimization of growth conditions.

  7. Optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy as a combined method for studying morphological changes in lung dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Knels, Lilla; Meissner, Sven; Schnabel, Christian; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe pulmonary disease leading to hypoxemia accompanied by a reduced compliance and partial edema of the lung. Most of the patients have to be ventilated to compensate for the lack of oxygen. The treatment is strongly connected with ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), which is believed to introduce further stress to the lung and changes in its elastic performance. A thorough understanding of the organs micro-structure is crucial to gain more insight into the course of the disease. Due to backscattering of near-infrared light, detailed description of lung morphology can be obtained using optical coherence tomography (OCT), a non-invasive, non-contact, high resolution and fast three-dimensional imaging technique. One of its drawbacks lies in the non-specificity of light distribution in relation to defined substances, like elastic biomolecules. Using fluorescence detection, these chemical components can be visualized by introducing specifically binding fluorophores. This study presents a combined setup for studying alveolar compliance depending on volume changes and elastic fiber distributions. Simultaneously acquired OCT and confocal fluorescence images allow an entire view into morphological rearrangements during ventilation for an ex vivo mouse model using continuous pulmonary airway pressure at different values.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of highly complex microscopic samples using scanning electron microscopy and optical flow estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM as one of the major research and industrial equipment for imaging of micro-scale samples and surfaces has gained extensive attention from its emerge. However, the acquired micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D. In the current work a novel and highly accurate approach is proposed to recover the hidden third-dimension by use of multi-view image acquisition of the microscopic samples combined with pre/post-processing steps including sparse feature-based stereo rectification, nonlocal-based optical flow estimation for dense matching and finally depth estimation. Employing the proposed approach, three-dimensional (3D reconstructions of highly complex microscopic samples were achieved to facilitate the interpretation of topology and geometry of surface/shape attributes of the samples. As a byproduct of the proposed approach, high-definition 3D printed models of the samples can be generated as a tangible means of physical understanding. Extensive comparisons with the state-of-the-art reveal the strength and superiority of the proposed method in uncovering the details of the highly complex microscopic samples.

  9. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of

  10. Performance evaluation of spot detection algorithms in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Detection of messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) spots in fluorescence microscopy images is of great importance for biologists seeking better understanding of cell functionality. Fluorescence microscopy and specific staining methods make biological...

  11. Basics of Digital Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Callen T; Jessup, Morgan; Bernas, Tytus; Peña, Karina A; Calderon, Michael J; Loughran, Patricia A

    2018-01-18

    Modern digital microscopy combines the equipment of classical light microscopy with a computerized imaging system. The technique comprises image formation by optics, image registration by a camera, and saving of image data in a computer file. This chapter describes limitations that are particular to each of these processes, including optical resolution, efficiency of image registration, characteristics of image file formats, and data management. Further suggestions are given which serve, in turn, to help construct a set of guidelines aimed at optimization of digital microscopic imaging. © 2018 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Fading of auramine-stained mycobacterial smears and implications for external quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Jessica; Shenai, Shubhada; Vadwai, Viral; Tipnis, Tejashree; Greenaway, Christina; Menzies, Dick; Ramsay, Andrew; Rodrigues, Camilla; Pai, Madhukar

    2011-05-01

    Light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy is being scaled up for tuberculosis control, but fading of auramine-stained slides could compromise external quality assurance. We stored auramine-stained slides and reexamined them over time. Slides stored in all environments faded quickly, with significant changes in the proportion of positive slides in as little as 1 week.

  13. Determination of Fission Gas Inclusion Pressures in High Burnup Nuclear Fuel using Laser Ablation ICP-MS combined with SEM/EPMA and Optical Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, Matthias I.; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kivel, Niko; Restani, Renato [Laboratory for Materials Behavior, Nuclear Energy and Safety, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Guillong, Marcel [Institute for Isotope Geology/Mineralogic Elements, ETH Zuerich, CH-8092 (Switzerland); Izmer, Andrei [Environmental and Resource Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Hellwig, Christian [Nuclear Technology Department, Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG (NOK), Baden, CH-5401 (Switzerland); Guenther, Detlef [Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry, Trace Elements and Microanalysis Group, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    In approximately 20% of all fissions at least one of the fission products is gaseous. These are mainly xenon and krypton isotopes contributing up to 90% by the xenon isotopes. Upon reaching a burn-up of 60 - 75 GWd/tHM a so called High Burnup Structure (HBS) is formed in the cooler rim of the fuel. In this region a depletion of the noble fission gases (FG) in the matrix and an enrichment of FG in {mu}m-sized pores can be observed. Recent calculations show that in these pores the pressure at room temperature can be as large as 30 MPa. The knowledge of the FG pressure in pores is important to understand the high burn-up fuel behavior under accident conditions (i.e. RIA or LOCA). With analytical methods routinely used for the characterization of solid samples, i.e. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), the quantification of gaseous inclusions is very difficult to almost impossible. The combination of a laser ablation system (LA) with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) offers a powerful tool for quantification of the gaseous pore inventory. This method offers the advantages of high spatial resolution with laser spot sizes down to 10 {mu}m and low detection limits. By coupling with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the pore size distribution, EPMA for the FG inventory in the fuel matrix and optical microscopy for the LA-crater sizes, the pressures in the pores and porosity was calculated. As a first application of this calibration technique for gases, measurements were performed on pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel with a rod average of 105 GWd/tHM to determine the local FG pressure distribution. (authors)

  14. Comparison of the decameric structure of peroxiredoxin-II by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, J. Robin; Schröder, Ewald; Isupov, Michail N.

    2001-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting......Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting...

  15. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  16. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jason J.; Kunde, Yuliya A.; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  17. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  18. Etika Berbusana Mahasiswa Stain Samarinda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Suryani Wijaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethics is about behavior of human being, such as which one is right or wrong. The ethics is always affecting the human life. The ethics gives people orientation how he/she do manything every time every day. Islamic ethics consists of the way how someone interact each other; how someone should do or not to do, how to sit, how to walk, how to eat or drink, how to sleep, or how to get dressed. Al-Qur’an uses three terms to define about dressing, they are: libas, tsiyah, and sarahi. Dressing has a function as covering the body, as assessoris, as the way to do Islamic taqwa, and as an identiy. Dressing ethics of the female students of STAIN Samarinda has been regulated by the rector regulation No 19 of the year 2002 about relation and dressing ethics for the students of STAIN Samarinda.

  19. Enhanced Emission from Single Isolated Gold Quantum Dots Investigated Using Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, Neranga; Kumar, Santosh; Sun, Kai; Mansfield, John F; Jin, Rongchao; Goodson, Theodore

    2016-12-21

    New approaches in molecular nanoscopy are greatly desired for interrogation of biological, organic, and inorganic objects with sizes below the diffraction limit. Our current work investigates emergent monolayer-protected gold quantum dots (nanoclusters, NCs) composed of 25 Au atoms by utilizing two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) at single NC concentrations. Here, we demonstrate an approach to synthesize and isolate single NCs on solid glass substrates. Subsequent investigation of the NCs using TPEF NSOM reveals that, even when they are separated by distances of several tens of nanometers, we can excite and interrogate single NCs individually. Interestingly, we observe an enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section for single Au 25 NCs that can be attributed to few-atom local field effects and to local field-induced microscopic cascading, indicating their potential for use in ultrasensitive sensing, disease diagnostics, cancer cell therapy, and molecular computers. Finally, we report room-temperature aperture-based TPEF NSOM imaging of these NCs for the first time at 30 nm point resolution, which is a ∼5-fold improvement compared to the previous best result for the same technique. This report unveils the unique combination of an unusually large TPA cross section and the high photostability of Au NCs to (non-destructively) investigate stable isolated single NCs using TPEF NSOM. This is the first reported optical study of monolayer-protected single quantum clusters, opening some very promising opportunities in spectroscopy of nanosized objects, bioimaging, ultrasensitive sensing, molecular computers, and high-density data storage.

  20. Fast and compact optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a water-proofing two-axis MEMS scanner, and a step forward to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel microscopic tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. Conventional OR-PAM systems are typically slow and bulky because of the linear scanning stages with stepping motors. For practical purposes, however, fast imaging speed and small footprint are crucial. To address these issues, we have developed a real-time compact OR-PAM system equipped with a waterproof two-axis MEMS scanner. The OR-PAM system consists of key components such as an ultrasonic transducer with a bandwidth of 50 MHz, an opto-acoustic beam combiner (BC), and an MEMS scanner. These are all installed inside a small water tank, with dimensions of 30 mm × 90 mm × 30 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. A pulsed laser with a repetition rate of 50 kHz is confocally aligned with the photoacoustic (PA) waves in the BC to maximize the SNRs. The fast scanning ability of the MEMS scanner fully utilizes the A-scan speed of 50 kHz. For instance, the B- and C-scan imaging speeds are 125 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively, when the acquired PA maximum amplitude projection image has 200 × 200 pixels along the x- and y-axes, respectively. The measured lateral resolution of 3.6 μm and axial resolution of 27 μm are sufficient to resolve the small capillaries. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of iris microvasculatures in mice. This real-time and compact OR-PAM system is optimized to examine small animals in clinical studies.