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Sample records for stain root disease

  1. Studies on black stain root disease in ponderosa pine. pp. 236-240. M. Garbelotto & P. Gonthier (Editors). Proceedings 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots of Forest Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Otrosina; J. T. Kliejunas; S. S. Sung; S. Smith; D. R. Cluck

    2008-01-01

    Black stain root disease of ponderosa pine, caused by Lepfographium wageneri var. ponderosum (Harrington & Cobb) Harrington & Cobb, is increasing on many eastside pine stands in northeastern California. The disease is spread from tree to tree via root contacts and grafts but new infections are likely vectored by root...

  2. Detection and quantification of Leptographium wageneri, the cause of black-stain root disease, from bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North California using regular and real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Schweigkofler; William J. Otrosina; Sheri L. Smith; Daniel R. Cluck; Kevin Maeda; Kabir G. Peay; Matteo Garbelotto

    2005-01-01

    Black-stain root disease is a threat to conifer forests in western North America. The disease is caused by the ophiostomatoid fungus Leptographium wageneri (W.B. Kendr.) M.J. Wingf., which is associated with a number of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). We developed a polymerase chain reaction test...

  3. Root disease management guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Forest tree root pathogens are widespread throughout all forested ecosystems in British Columbia. This guidebook provides a background to forest root disease management (including why, where, and how to manage root disease) and describes the necessary tools for managing root disease. It includes a review of the distribution of major root diseases in the province, host susceptibility and symptomology, and root disease and stand dynamics. The tools described include disease hazard and risk assessment, stratification surveys, and treatment methods. The major root diseases covered in the guide are Armillaria root disease, laminated root rot, Tomentosus root rot, blackstain root disease, and Annosus root disease.

  4. Spinal nerve root β-APP staining in infants is not a reliable indicator of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, W; Scheimberg, I; Smith, C

    2011-10-10

    This preliminary communication describes seven babies with β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) positive axonal swellings in nerve roots at multiple levels of the spinal cord. All seven babies died of natural causes. Two died in utero providing evidence for nerve root injury in the absence of trauma, two died within one day of birth and the possibility of birth related injury has to be considered. Three babies were over one month of age and had no history or pathological evidence of trauma. These findings show that if axonal injury is carefully sought in every infant death, not just in babies where trauma is suspected, it will be found in a proportion of babies dying from natural diseases. While spinal nerve root axonal injury in infants may suggest trauma, it is not, in itself, diagnostic of trauma. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Rapid and reliable DNA extraction techniques from trypan-blue-stained mycorrhizal roots: comparison of two methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Loynachan, Thomas E

    2004-08-01

    Two improved DNA extraction techniques from trypan-blue-stained root fragments were developed and compared for rapid and reliable analyses. In Method A, 1 cm trypan-blue-stained mycorrhizal root fragments were individually isolated, crushed by bead beating, and purified with Chelex-100 (Bio-Rad). In Method B, DNA extraction was carried out using an UltraClean microbial DNA isolation kit (MoBio Laboratories). DNA was extracted from the mycorrhizal roots of four plant species, quantified by UV absorbance, and PCR-amplified with primers specific to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Although PCR inhibitors might still exist when using Method A, appropriate dilution and employment of nested-PCR overcame this problem. Method B removed PCR inhibitors, but sometimes, depending on the mycorrhizal colonization within the root fragments, it also required nested PCR. In conclusion, both methods enabled us to handle many samples in a short time. Method B provided greater reliability and Method A provided better cost performance. Both techniques can be useful for PCR-based applications to identify species and estimate species composition after measuring mycorrhizal colonization rate with trypan blue staining.

  6. Interactions of Root Disease and Bark Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Ferrell; J. Richard Parmeter Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Associations between root diseases and bark beetles (Scolytidae) constitute some of the most serious pest complexes affecting forests in North America and elsewhere. The interactive functioning of these pests derives from the following relationships: 1) root diseases predispose trees to bark beetle infestation by lowering resistance, and perhaps...

  7. Forest root diseases across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Blakey Lockman; Holly S. J. Kearns

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance and impacts of root diseases on the forested ecosystems across the United States are documented in this report. Root diseases have long-term impacts on the ecosystems where they reside due to their persistence onsite. As a group of agents, they are a primary contributor to overall risk of growth loss and mortality of trees in the lower 48...

  8. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  9. A rapid nuclear staining test using cationic dyes contributes to efficient STR analysis of telogen hair roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Ha, Eun-Ju; Woo, Seung-Kyun; Lee, So-Min; Lim, Kyung-Hee; Eom, Yong-Bin

    2017-07-01

    Telogen hairs presented in the crime scene are commonly encountered as trace evidence. However, short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of the hairs currently have low and limited use due to poor success rate. To increase the success rate of STR profiling of telogen hairs, we developed a rapid and cost-effective method to estimate the number of nuclei in the hair roots. Five cationic dyes, Methyl green (MG), Harris hematoxylin (HH), Methylene blue (MB), Toluidine blue (TB), and Safranin O (SO) were evaluated in this study. We conducted a screening test based on microscopy and the percentage of loss with nuclear DNA, in order to select the best dye. MG was selected based on its specific nuclei staining and low adverse effect on the hair-associated nuclear DNA. We examined 330 scalp and 100 pubic telogen hairs with MG. Stained hairs were classified into five groups and analyzed by STR. The fast staining method revealed 70% (head hair) and 33.4% (pubic hair) of full (30 alleles) and high partial (18-29 alleles) STR profiling proportion from the lowest nuclei count group (one to ten nuclei). The results of this study demonstrated a rapid, specific, nondestructive, and high yield DNA profiling method applicable for screening telogen hairs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The evaluation of Lugol's iodine solution staining combined with endoscope for diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Xue, L; Liu, J; Zhang, H-Y; Zhang, D; Song, X-H; He, Y-X; Yang, T; Li, C-Q; Li, Y-Q

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the value of Lugol's iodine solution staining combined with endoscope on the diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). A total of 96 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients were selected to participate in this study. The patients were stained on esophageal mucosa by Lugol's iodine solution and examined at routine endoscopy. The shallow staining and/or non-staining group patients were treated with esomeprazole and mosapride citrate, and then the changes in Lugol's iodine staining, Gerd Q (Gerd questionnaire) scoring and histological characters of esophageal mucosa were recorded before and after treatment. As the results, a total of 68 patients were diagnosed as NERD, and 36 of 68 patients were observed with uniform staining and 32 of 68 patients were observed with shallow staining and/or non-staining. After 4 weeks for treatment, 28 of 32 patients with shallow staining and/or non-staining became uniform staining and 4 of 32 patients were still with shallow staining and/or non-staining. Before and after treatment, the Gerd Q scoring of uniform staining groups and shallow staining and/or non-staining groups all had a significant difference (p Lugol's iodine solution staining combined with endoscope. Lugol's iodine solution staining combined with routine endoscopy, Gerd Q scoring and histomorphology can be used to evaluate the diagnosis and therapeutic effect of NERD.

  11. [The application of Gallyas-Braak stainings in pathologic diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luning; Zhu, Mingwei; Li, Xianghong; Gui, Qiuping

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the role of Gallyas silver staining in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. Modified Gallyas-Braak staining method was used to investigate samples of the brain and spinal cord of 22 cases with neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's diseas (PD), Pick's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), diagnosed by clinical and routine pathologic method. 10 cases without clinical symptoms and pathologic abnormalities of the nervous system served as control. As compared with Bodian staining, Gallyas-Braak staining demonstrated clearly neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus and the cortex of frontal and temperal lobe in all the cases with Alzheimer's disease, 6 cases with dementia of other causes and 3 normal aged. However, global neurofibrillary tangles in the midbrain and the basal ganglia were found only with Gallyas-Braak staining in 4 cases with both dementia and extrapyramidal features. In addition, tuft-shaped astrocytes were shown with this method in the motor cortex, basal ganglia, midbrain of the above 4 cases and astrocytic plaques in the same area in 2 cases of the 4 cases. In this connexion, pathologic findings in 2 of the 4 cases corresponded to PSP and those of the other two cases fufiled the diagnostic criteria of corticobasal degeneration (CBD) Oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions in the white matter of the brain and the spinal cord were founded in 3 of the 4 cases with multiple system atrophy (MSA). This silver staining demonstrated as well a lot of argyrophilic grains in the neuropil of the temporal lobe and the hippocampus in one case with AD. Gallyas silver staining could better reveal not only Alzheimer-like neurofibrillary tangles but also different glial inclusions in other neurodegenerative diseases such as PSP, CBD and MSA. Consequently, it is of great value in the pathologic diagnosis and study of such degenerative diseases.

  12. Diagnosis of Annosus Root Disease in Mixed Conifer Forests in the Northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig L. Schmitt

    1989-01-01

    Recognizing annosus root disease affecting conifers in northwestern United States forests is discussed. Field diagnosis can bemade by observing characteristic stand patterns, wood stain and decay, ectotrophic mycelium, and sporophores. Most seriously affected trees include hemlocks, grand fir, white fir and Pacific silver fir. Ponderosa pine and other true firs may...

  13. Armillaria root disease in the western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hanna; Sara Ashiglar; Anna Case; Mary Lou Fairweather; Chris Hoffman; Mee-Sook Kim; Helen Maffei; Robert Mathiasen; Geral McDonald; Erik Nelson; Amy Ross-Davis; John Shaw; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological behaviors from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes, a causal agent of Armillaria root disease (ARD), is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range. ARD is responsible for reduced forest productivity as a result of direct tree mortality and non-lethal cryptic infections that impact growth....

  14. Stereomicroscopic examination of stained rectal biopsies in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1980-01-01

    Rectal biopsy samples from 22 healthy control subjects, 54 patients with ulcerative colitis, and 34 with Crohn's disease with involvement of the colon or rectum were investigated in a stereomicroscopic study. Samples were stained as whole mounts with Alcian Green before the stereomicroscopic...... the stereomicroscopic findings and the clinical disease activity, the sigmoidoscopic findings, and the histologic activity. Apart from the stereomicroscopic observation of small superficial erosions in one fourth of the biopsies, no changes of diagnostic value were observed in Crohn's disease....

  15. Root diseases, climate change and biomass productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, G.R.; Cruickshank, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tree growth and yield in eastern boreal spruce fir forests are both greatly affected by root and butt rots. These pests are also prevalent in western coniferous species and boreal-sub-boreal forests. Infections are difficult to detect, but reduced growth, tree mortality, wind throw and scaled butt cull contribute to considerable forest gaps. Harvesting and stand tending practices in second growth stands are creating conditions for increased incidence. Tree stress is one of the major factors affecting the spread of root disease. It is expected that climate change will create abnormal stress conditions that will further compound the incidence of root disease. A comparison was made between natural and managed stands, including harvesting and stand practices such as commercial thinning. Studies of Douglas-fir forests in British Columbia were presented, with results indicating that managed forests contain one third to one half less carbon biomass than unmanaged forests. It was concluded that root diseases must be recognized and taken into account in order to refine and improve biomass estimates, prevent overestimation of wood supply models and avoid potential wood fibre losses. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Using chemical markers to detect root disease in stressed ponderosa pine stands with a low incidence of disease in eastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Walter G. Thies; Craig L. Schmitt

    2006-01-01

    A total of 284 ponderosa pine growing near the southern edge of the Blue Mountains in eastern Oregon were categorized into one of three crown classes based on the degree of "tufted", or "lion's tail" appearance of their branches, a potential symptom of black-stain root disease, then pushed over and their root systems examined for visual...

  17. Root cause of waterborne diseases in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashml, H.N.; Ghumman, A.R.; Malik, N.E.

    2005-01-01

    The waterborne diseases are increasing rapidly at an alarming rate in Pakistan due to poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water supplies. This study shows that about 25 percent of all the illnesses in Lahore are due to severe cases of waterborne diseases. Unhygienic sanitation system is the root cause for this scenario. Drinking water, samples were collected from different zones of the city to find out the root cause of waterborne diseases. The samples from the distribution system serving 'Kachi Abbadies' (Underdeveloped areas) were much more contaminated, may be due to non-chlorination as compared to the water which is regularly chlorinated in posh areas of the city. Contribution of soakage pits in groundwater contamination is more significant at shallow depths. From the laboratory results it is clear that water distribution in underdeveloped areas of the city is highly contaminated and ground water available at shallow depth is also infected by microbial activities. Data collected from the different hospitals to investigate the problem shows that waterborne diseases vary their trend seasonally. Here in Pakistan, rainy season (July-August) reveals maximum number of cases of waterborne diseases. Proper sanitation and water supply systems are more essential to control the influence of waterborne diseases within the country. It is strongly recommended that reputable ways of communications are urgently required to highlight the diseases related to unsafe drinking water. (author)

  18. Root rot diseases of sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Barry J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Root rot diseases of sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG 2-2 IIIB and AG 2-2 IV, R. crocorum, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Macrophomina phaeseolina, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-betae, Pythium aphanidermatum Phytophthora drechsleri, Rhizopus stolonifer, R. arrhizus and Sclerotium rolfsii cause significant losses wherever sugar beets are grown. However, not all these soil-borne pathogens have been reported in all sugar beet production areas. Losses include reduced harvestable tonnage and reduced white sugar recovery. Many of these pathogens also cause post harvest losses in storage piles. Control for diseases caused by these pathogens include disease resistant cultivars, avoidance of stresses, cultural practices such as water management and the use of fungicides.

  19. Tobacco-stained fingers: a clue for smoking-related disease or harmful alcohol use? A case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gregor; Pasche, Sephora; Rothen, Nicole; Charmoy, Alexia; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cécile; Genné, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tobacco stain on fingers is frequent. However, there is scarce description of this clinical sign. We aimed to explore tobacco stain on fingers as a marker of tobacco-related disease independent of cumulative tobacco exposure, and to find behavioural and environmental characteristics associated with those stains. Design Case–control study. Setting A Swiss community hospital of 180 beds. Participants 49 adults presenting tobacco-tars staining on fingers were matched to 49 control smokers by age, gender, height and pack-year (PY). Outcome measures Documented smoking-related carcinoma, ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also determined by lung function, were compared between groups. Association between harmful alcohol use, mental disorders or unemployment and tar-staining was adjusted for smoking behaviour through conditional logistic regression. Results Overall cigarette-related disease was high in the case group (84%), and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease was more frequent compared to controls (OR 3.5, CI 95% 1.1 to 14.6). Smoking-related carcinoma, ischaemic heart disease, stroke and COPD were not statistically different for control smokers. Harmful alcohol use was strongly associated with stains and this association persists after adjustment for smoking unfiltered cigarettes, smoking more than one pack of cigarettes in a day and age at smoking onset (adjusted OR 4.6, CI 95% 1.2 to 17.2). Mental disorders and unemployment were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patients with tobacco-tar-stained fingers frequently have cigarette-related disease, however statistically not more than control smokers matched for PY, except for symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. This study suggests a link between stained fingers and addictive behaviour or concomitant high alcohol consumption. PMID:24202054

  20. Estimating root lifespan of two grasses at contrasting elevation in a salt marsh by applying vitality staining on roots from in-growth cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Hengst, K.; Koutstaal, B.P.; Van Soelen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Contrasting soil conditions caused by different inundation frequencies require different root growth strategies along the elevational gradient of coastal salt marshes. The objective of this study was to examine (1) if root lifespan was shorter in Elymus pycnanthus, a relatively fast-growing

  1. Role of calretinin immunohistochemical stain in evaluation of Hirschsprung disease: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Rosenberg, Harvey; Tatevian, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The use of calretinin immunostain (IHC) in the evaluation of rectal suction biopsies for Hirschsprung disease (HD) has been reported by Kapur et al. and others. The first goal of this article is to report our institutional experience with the use of calretinin in specimens for evaluation of HD. The second goal is to describe the pattern of expression of calretinin in the junction of ganglionic-to-aganglionic segment of pull through specimens of patients with a previous diagnosis of HD on suction rectal biopsy. Three pathologists at University of Texas at Houston evaluated 28 rectal biopsy specimens from 2010-2011. The patients' age ranged from 15 days to 8 years. Twenty-three cases were suction biopsies, and five were rectal full thickness biopsies. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain was performed on at least 80 levels for the suction biopsy specimens. Calretinin immunohistochemical stain was performed on levels 40-42 in all cases, with adequate controls. The H&E slides of nine pull through specimens with a diagnosis of HD on a suction rectal biopsy that was evaluated in this study, were evaluated. Calretinin IHC was performed on the slide(s) showing the junction of aganglionic-to-normal rectum, along with adequate controls. The presence of ganglion cells consistently correlated with calretinin-positive thin nerve fibrils in the lamina propria, muscularis mucosae and superficial submucosa. These nerve fibrils were absent in the aganglionic segments of bowel and in the areas without ganglion cells from the junction of normal with diseased rectum. Calretinin was strongly expressed in the submucosal and subserosal nerve trunks in the ganglionic segment. It had faint expression in the thick nerve trunks from the areas without ganglion cells 1.6-2.5 cm proximal to the normal rectum. No calretinin expression was seen in the nerve trunks in the rest of the aganglionic segment. The pattern of expression of calretinin in rectal suction biopsies in HD and normal rectum coincide

  2. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI. Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+ was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2 rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies.

  3. Biology, diagnosis and management of Heterobasidion Root Disease of southern pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler J. Dreaden; Jason A.  Smith; Michelle M. Cram; David R   Coyle

    2016-01-01

    Heterobasidion root disease (previously called annosum, annosus, or Fomes root disease / root rot) is one of the most economically damaging forest diseases in the Northern Hemisphere. Heterobasidion root disease (HRD) in the southeastern U.S. is caused by the pathogen Heterobasidion irregulare, which infects loblolly, longleaf, pitch, shortleaf, slash, Virginia, and...

  4. Integrated approaches to root disease management in organic farming systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Termorshuizen, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional agriculture has had major environmental impacts, in particular with respect to soil degradation. Soil structure, fertility, microbial and faunal biodiversity have declined, and root diseases are common unless genetic resistance, soil fumigation and/or seed treatments are used. Primarily

  5. Evaluating paradox walnut rootstocks for resistance to Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common Juglans regia (English walnut) rootstock in California is Paradox, a hybrid between J. hindsii (Northern California black walnut) and J. regia. Unfortuntely, Paradox rootstock is highly susceptible to Armillaria root disease. The relative resistance of new clonal, Paradox rootstock...

  6. Pathological and rhizospherical studies on root-rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolations from diseased squash roots revealed the presence of Alternaria tenuis, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, F. solani and Rhizoctonia solani. The last two fungi were more frequent than any of the other fungi. Pathogenicity tests proved that squash plants were highly vulnerable to attack by Fusarium solani and ...

  7. Root surface characteristics of children teeth with periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimstein, E; Wignall, W; Cohen, D; Katz, J

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the root surfaces of teeth from children with or without periodontal diseases and with or without systemic diseases. Light microscopy revealed that when compared to control teeth: teeth with chronic periodontitis had similar radicular histology; teeth from children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, Down syndrome and aggressive periodontitis had narrower cementum areas; teeth from children with hypophosphatasia showed cementum aplasia. Cementum anomalies may facilitate the establishment and progress of periodontitis in children.

  8. Endocervical gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no symptoms. Alternative Names Gram stain of cervix; Gram stain of cervical secretions References Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  9. Gram staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  10. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Annosus Root Disease in the Intermountain Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Byler

    1989-01-01

    Stand patterns of annosus root disease include various degrees and patterns of tree mortality; tree crown, root collar, and root symptoms; and the condition and location of stumps. In the Intermountain states of Montana, Idaho, and Utah, annosus root disease is found in the ponderosa pine, mixed conifer and high-elevation fir forests. Stand patterns are of value in...

  11. Image Processing and Analysis of Mucosal Calretinin Staining to Define the Transition Zone in Hirschsprung Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Saleh; Ahn, Sangtae; Kasago, Israel; Zuo, Chunlai; Umrau, Kavita; Ainechi, Sanaz; Whyte, Christine; Sheehan, Christine E; Homan, Suzanne M; Lee, Hwajeong

    2018-01-05

     Quantification of calretinin-stained mucosal nerve fibers by image processing and analysis (IPA) may objectively define the transition zone (TZ) of Hirschsprung disease (HD). We tested the utility of IPA as an adjunctive tool in HD.  Calretinin immunostain was performed on 15 HD pull-through specimens, and multiple images were captured from the proximal aganglionic zone, TZ, and probable normal zone (NZ). Pixel count (PC), defined as the percentage of brown-stained pixels in the mucosa, was quantified and plotted against distance from the rectal distal end. To validate the method, PCs from 45 images were compared with three-tiered visual scoring by five pathologists. Results were correlated against pertinent variables, which were retrieved from the clinical record.  The PC gradually increased in the TZ toward the proximal resection margin in 10/13 (77%) cases. The PC variation in the probable NZ and around the circumference was substantial by the coefficient of variation. The mean PC of images with a visual score of 1 was less than scores of 2 and 3 by all five (100%) pathologists ( p  < 0.01). One patient had possible TZ pull-through that was clinically confirmed.  While the mucosal calretinin staining gradually increases in the TZ, for now, the boundaries of the TZ cannot be accurately defined by mucosal biopsies given the substantial variation of staining around the circumference at the same distance and in the NZ. However, the IPA technique does provide a continuous variable and warrants further utility in HD studies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Gram stain of urethral discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral discharge Gram stain; Urethritis - Gram stain ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . ...

  13. Comparative evaluation of modified canal staining and clearing technique, cone-beam computed tomography, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, spiral computed tomography, and plain and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiography in studying root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Prasanna; Subbarao, Chandana; Subbarao, Chandragiri V

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), spiral computed tomography (SCT), plain (plain digi), and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiographs (contrast digi) in studying root canal morphology. The root canal anatomy was analyzed in 95 teeth using CBCT, pQCT, SCT, plain digi, and contrast digi. After flushing out the radiopaque dye, access cavities were sealed, and the teeth were subject to the modified canal staining and clearing technique. The number of root canals (Vertucci classification and Gulabivala's additional classes) was calculated by three calibrated endodontists and two maxillofacial radiologists. Erroneous or unsuccessful identifications of root canals were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (p = 0.05). The modified canal staining and clearing technique identified an average of 1.8 root canals per mandibular central incisor, 2.3 per maxillary first premolar, 3.9 per maxillary first molar, 3.8 per maxillary and mandibular second molar, and 4.3 per mandibular first molar. CBCT and pQCT were erroneous in 0.29% and 2.05% cases, whereas SCT, contrast digi, and plain digi were unsuccessful in 15.58%, 14.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. There was a significant difference between all the methods (p technique where there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). CBCT and pQCT were as accurate as the modified canal staining and tooth clearing technique in identifying root canal systems. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Low Oxygen Stress on Phytophthora cinnamomi Infection and Disease of Cork Oak Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel A. Jacobs; James D. MacDonald; Alison M. Berry; Laurence R. Costello

    1997-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands root disease was quantified in cork oak (Quercus suber L.) roots subjected to low oxygen (hypoxia) stress. Seedling root tips were inoculated with mycelial plugs of the fungus and incubated in ≤1, 3-4, or 21 percent oxygen for 5 days. Ninety-four percent of roots...

  15. Sensitivity of PCR IS6110 in relation to culture and staining in Pott′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rapid diagnosis is essential to decrease the morbidity and mortality of Pott′s disease. The bacteriological methods are time-consuming or insensitive. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR provides a rapid diagnostic tool and hope for early diagnosis of this disease. The aim of this study was to compare and assess of a rapid and effective method among diagnostic battery (Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN microscopy, BACTEC culture and PCR of Pott′s disease. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five specimens from clinico-radiological suspected cases of Pott′s disease were included in this study. They were processed for ZN microscopy, BACTEC culture, and PCR IS6110. The tests tool′s efficiency, positive agreement Kc (Kappa coefficient, and significance level (P value were calculated for correlation between PCR and performed tests. Results: The PCR sensitivity reached to 96% and 46.3% among positive and negative specimens on ZN microscopy. Further, 94% and 36.4% sensitivity were found among positive and negative specimens by BACTEC culture. The total 38 (58.5% specimens were detected either ZN microscopy or by BACTEC culture. Thus, the overall sensitivity and specificity of PCR were 95% and 74.1%. The kappa coefficient and P value, calculated for PCR against BACTEC culture and combined results of performed bacteriological tests were (Kc=0.60, (P<0.001 and (Kc=0.70, (P<0.001, respectively. Above statistical relations showed a fair agreement with significant differences. Conclusion: The PCR IS6110 may be useful in rapid detection of clinico-radiological suspected cases of Pott′s disease and those that are negative with bacteriological methods.

  16. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Cytoplasmic Staining of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Saadah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unusual for the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody with cytoplasmic pattern (cANCA to present in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD without vasculitis. The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence and characteristics of pediatrics IBD with cANCA. Methods. A retrospective review of pediatric IBD associated with cANCA serology in patients from King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, between September 2002 and February 2012. Results. Out of 131 patients with IBD screened for cANCAs, cANCA was positive in 7 (5.3% patients of whom 4 had ulcerative colitis and 3 had Crohn's disease. The median age was 8.8 years (2–14.8 years. Six (86% were males. Of the 7 patients, 5 (71% were Saudi Arabians and 2 were of Indian ethnicity. The most common symptoms were diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and rectal bleeding. None had family history or clinical features suggestive of vasculitis involving renal and respiratory systems. No difference in the disease location or severity was observed between cANCA positive and cANCA negative patients apart from male preponderance in cANCA positive patients. Conclusion. The occurrence of cANCA in pediatric IBD is rare. Apart from male preponderance, there were no peculiar characteristics for the cANCA positive patients.

  17. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  18. Increased intestinal permeability correlates with sigmoid mucosa alpha-synuclein staining and endotoxin exposure markers in early Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Forsyth

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. The pathological hallmark of PD is neuronal inclusions termed Lewy bodies whose main component is alpha-synuclein protein. The finding of these Lewy bodies in the intestinal enteric nerves led to the hypothesis that the intestine might be an early site of PD disease in response to an environmental toxin or pathogen. One potential mechanism for environmental toxin(s and proinflammatory luminal products to gain access to mucosal neuronal tissue and promote oxidative stress is compromised intestinal barrier integrity. However, the role of intestinal permeability in PD has never been tested. We hypothesized that PD subjects might exhibit increased intestinal permeability to proinflammatory bacterial products in the intestine. To test our hypothesis we evaluated intestinal permeability in subjects newly diagnosed with PD and compared their values to healthy subjects. In addition, we obtained intestinal biopsies from both groups and used immunohistochemistry to assess bacterial translocation, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress, and alpha-synuclein. We also evaluated serum markers of endotoxin exposure including LPS binding protein (LBP. Our data show that our PD subjects exhibit significantly greater intestinal permeability (gut leakiness than controls. In addition, this intestinal hyperpermeability significantly correlated with increased intestinal mucosa staining for E. coli bacteria, nitrotyrosine, and alpha-synuclein as well as serum LBP levels in PD subjects. These data represent not only the first demonstration of abnormal intestinal permeability in PD subjects but also the first correlation of increased intestinal permeability in PD with intestinal alpha-synuclein (the hallmark of PD, as well as staining for gram negative bacteria and tissue oxidative stress. Our study may thus shed new light on PD pathogenesis as well as provide a new method for earlier

  19. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  20. Annosus Root Disease Hazard Rating, Detection, and Management Strategies in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. A. Alexander

    1989-01-01

    Annosus root disease (ARD), is the major root disease of pines in the southeastern United States where severely affected trees exhibit growth loss. Assessing the potential damage of ARD is essential for making effective disease control and management decisions. A soil hazard rating system developed to identify potential for tree mortality is described. The Annosus...

  1. Root Disease, Longleaf Pine Mortality, and Prescribed Burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otrosina, W.J; C.H. Walkinshaw; S.J. Zarnoch; S-J. Sung; B.T. Sullivan

    2001-01-01

    Study to determine factors involved in decline of longleaf pine associated with prescribed burning. Trees having symptoms were recorded by crown rating system based upon symptom severity-corresponded to tree physiological status-increased in hot burn plots. Root pathogenic fungi widespread throughout the study site. Histological studies show high fine root mortality rate in the hot burn treatment. Decline syndrome is complexed by root pathogens, soil factors, root damage and dysfunction.

  2. Indicators for root caries in Danish persons with recently diagnosed Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellefsen, Birita; Morse, Douglas E; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2012-01-01

    doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2011.00560.x Indicators for root caries in Danish persons with recently diagnosed Alzheimer's disease Objective:  To identify indicators of root caries among persons with newly diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD). Background:  Few studies have investigated dental caries...

  3. First report of Armillaria root disease caused by Armillaria tabescens on Araucaria araucana in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; P. Cannon; R. Medel; A. Lopez

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, bark samples were collected from the root collar of a single Araucaria araucana tree that had recently died and was suspected of being killed by Armillaria root disease. Disease symptoms and signs included a thinning crown and fruiting bodies at the tree base over a several-year period before tree death.

  4. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... mixing it with a violet stain (called a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to ... reveals an abnormal collection of pleural fluid. The Gram stain can help identify the bacteria that might ...

  5. Calcium effect on the content of DNA and NYS-stained nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins in cortex cells of pea (Pisum sativum L. roots treated with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Stecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using cytophotometric procedures, following Feulgen-NYS staining, the measurements of DNA and nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic protein contents in cortex cells of pea roots growing for 144 h in calcium and/or heavy metals (Cd2+, Cr3+, Pb2+ presence were made. All tested metals treatment reduced the number of nuclei in 4C DNA class and induced appearance of nuclei with DNA amount below 2C, that was expressed in diminished DNA content. The level of NYS proteins in cells underwent also reduction. In lead presence protein content diminished in nucleus. On the other hand, increased amount of nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins was observed in material treated with cadmium while only of nucleolar protein content in chromium presence. In root cells treated with tested metals protein content in nucleus was related with ploidy level, disturbances in this relation appeared in nucleolus and mostly in cytoplasm. Calcium added to chromium and mostly to lead solutions diminished the toxic effect of these metals that was demonstrated by an increase in DNA content, although calcium alone reduced DNA amount in nucleus due to lower number of 4C nuclei accompanied by appearance of 1C and 1-2C DNA classes. Calcium in different ways affected protein content changed by metal treatment. Present in cadmium solution it caused a further reduction in protein content in nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic protein when added to lead, and nucleolar proteins - in chromium solution. Moreover, calcium ions presence in metal solutions did not restore the relationship between ploidy level and nucleolar and cytoplasmic NYS stained proteins and it did not disturbe the relation existing in nucleus.

  6. Armillaria root disease affects oak coppice regeneration in upland Missouri Ozark forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. N. Bruhn; D. C. Dey; K. K. Kromroy; J. D. Mihail; J. M. Kabrick; J. J., Jr. Wetteroff

    2005-01-01

    Coppice regeneration is favored in North America for oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration. Although models of oak stump sprouting do not consider Armillaria root disease, many oak stumps in upland Ozark forest stands carry active Armillaria root crown infections. The spatial pattern of sprouting on oak stumps is...

  7. Western root disease model simulation versus plot remeasurement: 11 years of change in stand structure and density induced by Armillaria root disease in Central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helen M. Maffei; Gregory M. Filip; Kristen L. Chadwick; Lance David

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to use long term permanent plots to evaluate the short-term predictive capability of the Western Root Disease Model extension (WRDM) of the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) in central Oregon mixed-conifer forests in project planning situations. Measured (1991–2002) structure and density changes on a 100-acre unmanaged area in south-...

  8. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Survey of root rot diseases of sugar bett in Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive survey was conducted during the summer and autumn of 2004 in sugar beet fields in the area of Larissa, Thessaly region, with plants showing symptoms of root rot diseases. The aim of the monitoring was to identify the causal agents of root rot diseases. In total, 76 sugar beet fields were surveyed and 5-10 diseased roots were examined from each field. Isolations, carried out on PDA, showed that two main fungal pathogens causing root rot were Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora cryptogea. The former was isolated in 46% of the fields and the latter in 38% of the fields. In addition, Rhizopus stolonifer, Fusarium spp., Scerotium rolfsii and Rhizoctonia violacea were isolated in 14%, 7%, 4% and 1% of the fields respectively. In most of the surveyed fields only one pathogen species was isolated and only in a few of them more than one fungal species was identified.

  10. Port-Wine Stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Port-Wine Stains KidsHealth / For Parents / Port-Wine Stains What's ... Manchas de vino de oporto What Are Port-Wine Stains? A port-wine stain is a type ...

  11. Fusarium oxysporum protects Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings from root disease caused by Fusarium commune

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Mee-Sook Kim; Robert L. James

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium root disease can be a serious problem in forest and conservation nurseries in the western United States. Fusarium inoculum is commonly found in most container and bareroot nurseries on healthy and diseased seedlings, in nursery soils, and on conifer seeds. Fusarium spp. within the F. oxysporum species complex have been recognized as pathogens for more than a...

  12. Lectin staining shows no evidence of involvement of glycocalyx/mucous layer carbohydrate structures in development of celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nielsen, Christian; Biagini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The presence of unique carbohydrate structures in the glycocalyx/mucous layer of the intestine may be involved in a susceptibility to celiac disease (CD) by serving as attachment sites for bacteria. This host-microbiota interaction may influence the development of CD and possibly other diseases...... with autoimmune components. We examined duodenal biopsies from a total of 30 children, of which 10 had both celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D); 10 had CD alone; and 10 were suspected of having gastrointestinal disease, but had normal duodenal histology (non-CD controls). Patients with both CD and T1D...... showed no significant differences. Based on our material, we found no indication that the presence of Gal-β(1,3)-GalNAc or Fucα1-2Gal-R is involved in the susceptibility to CD, or that the disease process affects the expression of these carbohydrates....

  13. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  14. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  15. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  16. Occurrence of Root Rot and Vascular Wilt Diseases in Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Naglaa; Shimizu, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) family Malvaceae is an important crop used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutics industries. Roselle is cultivated mainly in Upper Egypt (Qena and Aswan governorates) producing 94% of total production. Root rot disease of roselle is one of the most important diseases that attack both seedlings and adult plants causing serious losses in crop productivity and quality. The main objective of the present study is to identify and characterize pathogens associated with root rot and wilt symptoms of roselle in Qena, Upper Egypt and evaluate their pathogenicity under greenhouse and field condition. Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium semitectum were isolated from the natural root rot diseases in roselle. All isolated fungi were morphologically characterized and varied in their pathogenic potentialities. They could attack roselle plants causing damping-off and root rot/wilt diseases in different pathogenicity tests. The highest pathogenicity was caused by F. oxysporum and M. phaseolina followed by F. solani. The least pathogenic fungi were F. equiseti followed by F. semitectum. It obviously noted that Baladi roselle cultivar was more susceptible to infection with all tested fungi than Sobhia 17 under greenhouse and field conditions. This is the first report of fungal pathogens causing root rot and vascular wilt in roselle in Upper Egypt. PMID:24808737

  17. Validation of Romanowsky staining as a novel screening test for the detection of faecal cryptosporidial oocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, A P S; Sood, N K; Singla, L D; Kaur, P; Gupta, K; Sandhu, B S

    2017-03-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an emerging waterborne protozoan disease and one of the major causes of neonatal diarrhea in humans and animals. But the disease remains under diagnosed due to lack of availability of special stains in majority of laboratories at primary health centers. Therefore, it requires a rapid screening test for routine diagnosis in conventional laboratory set up. In this pursuit, the present study was planned. During this study, fecal samples from 100 representative animals randomly selected from 17 out breaks of bovine calf diarrhea, were stained with modified Ziehl Neelsen staining (mZN) and Leishman's stain to demonstrate cryptosporidial oocysts and for routine fecal examination, respectively. By mZN staining, 25 cases confirmed the presence of cryptosporidial oocysts. However, examination of Leishman's stained fecal smears revealed round hollow unstained bodies resembling cryptosporidia in 20 cases. Therefore, a comparative morphometric analysis was made between the two techniques to determine their relative efficacy in demonstrating cryptosporidia in the feces of affected animals. The analyses showed that the Leishman's stain can be effective in making a presumptive diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis with a little experience. Confirmation of cryptosporidiosis was done by histopathological examination of intestinal sections of calves died during these out breaks. The findings appear to have great clinical value for routine laboratory screening of fecal samples for cryptosporidiosis as conventional Romanowsky stains are readily available and used for multipurpose examination in most of the laboratories at grass root level. Perusal of literature proved this to be the first attempt at easy diagnostics for cryptosporidiosis.

  18. Can metagenetic studies of soil microbial communities provide insights toward developing novel management approaches for Armillaria root disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Jane E. Stewart; John W. Hanna; Marcus V. Warwell; Paul J. Zambino; Christy Cleaver; Geral I. McDonald; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Bruce Moltzan; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2016-01-01

    Armillaria root diseases are among the most damaging and broadly distributed group of forest diseases in the world (Lockman et al. in press). Armillaria root disease is typically more severe in highly susceptible tree species and in trees that are maladapted due to rapidly changing climatic conditions (Ayres and Lombardero 2000, Kliejunas et al. 2009, Sturrock...

  19. Experimental minimum threshold for Phytophthora cinnamomi root disease expression on Quercus suber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Socorro SERRANO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercus suber seedlings were potted in soils infested with increasing concentrations of Phytophthora cinnamomi chlamydospores and submitted to weekly flooding for 3 months to favour root infections. Increasing quantities of chlamydospores led to an exponential increase in their ability to germinate. Root symptoms (necrosis and/or absence of feeder roots were significantly more severe than those recorded in uninfested soil only for plants potted in soils infested with 61 cfu g-1 or more. Although generated using potting mix, this minimum threshold represents a tool for checking the potential infectivity of infested soils or to assess the effectiveness of some control methods to reduce soil inoculum. However, a low level of root infection was recorded even at 3 cfu g-1. Therefore, long-term disease risk may be present whenever the pathogen is detectable in oak forest soils.

  20. Pathological and rhizospherical studies on root-rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-02-05

    Feb 5, 2007 ... Biology Department, Faculty of Science, King Abd El-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. E-mail: lnawar@kau.edu.sa. Accepted ... 1983; Abdel-el-Rehim et al., 1987). Biological control of plant diseases especially soilborne ...... Studies on the rhizosphere microflora of a desert plant. Folia Microbiol. 9: 1.

  1. Basal Root Rot, a new Disease of Teak (Tectona grandis in Malaysia caused by Phellinus noxius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farid, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal root rot of teak was first reported from Sabak Bernam, Selangor making this the first report of the disease on teak in Peninsular Malaysia. The fungus found associated with the disease was Phellinus noxious. The disease aggressively killed its host irrespective of the host health status. Bark depression at the root collar which was visible from a distance was the characteristic symptom and the main indicator in identifying the disease in the plantation since above ground symptoms of the canopy could not be differentiated from crowns of healthy trees. However, although above ground symptoms were not easily discernible, the disease was already advanced and the trees mostly beyond treatment; 3.4 % of the trees in the plantation were affected and the disease occurred both on solitary trees and in patches. Below ground, infected trees had rotted root systems, mainly below and around the collar region with brown discolored wood and irregular golden-brown honeycomb-like pockets of fungal hyphae in the wood. Pathogenicity tests showed that the fungus produced symptoms similar to those observed in the plantation and killed two year-old teak plants. The disease killed all the inoculated hosts within three months, irrespective of wounded or unwounded treatments.

  2. Observations on root disease of container whitebark pine seedlings treated with biological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese

    2008-01-01

    I observed that whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm. [Pinaceae]) germinants treated with biological controls, one commercially available (Trichoderma harzianum strain T-22), and the other being studied for potential efficacy (Fusarium oxysporum isolate Q12), experienced less seedling mortality caused by root disease than did a...

  3. Management Strategies for Annosus Root Disease in Pacific Northwest Coastal Western Hemlock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenelm W. Russell

    1989-01-01

    Actual loss from annosus root disease infections in hemlock stands is difficult to determine. As political trends move toward protecting old-growth timber, greater market demand will be placed on second growth western hemlock. These stands must be kept healthy for maximum productivity. The paper compares the following 70-year rotation timber management scenarios: The...

  4. Identification of tree-crop rootstocks with resistance to Armillaria root disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria root disease attacks a broad range of tree crops in California. Instead of re-tooling ineffective conventional controls, namely soil fumigation, we focused on identification of Armillaria-resistant Juglans rootstocks, as part of a collaborative project to identify rootstocks with resistan...

  5. Root Rot Disease of Five Fruit Tree Seedlings in the Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of root rot disease in the nursery of Chrysophyllum albidun Dacryodes edulis, persea Americana, Irvingia gabonensis and Annona muricala was assessed. Ten fungal pathogen were isolated using serial dilution and pathogenicity tests were carried out on the 5 fruit trees with the 10 isolated fungi. The 5 fruit ...

  6. Comparison between Rosellinia necatrix isolates from soil and diseased roots in terms of hypovirulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2005-10-01

    The white root rot fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, is a devastating soil-borne pathogen of many plant species. Biocontrol with the hypovirulence factor is promising, but disease symptoms, signs or culture morphology of the pathogen cannot be reliably used as markers for hypovirulence in this fungus. We attempted to obtain hypovirulent isolates from soil rather than from diseased roots, based on the hypothesis that hypovirulent isolates were more likely to persist in soil as saprobes. Sixteen isolates, belonging to eight mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs), were obtained from soil in two active and one abandoned Japanese pear orchards. Comparison of these isolates based on clonality revealed that six MCGs were commonly recovered from both diseased roots and soil and two MCGs exclusively from soil. No MCG was found in more than one orchard. With two exceptions, isolates within the same MCG were similar in virulence, competitive saprophytic ability (CSA) and mycelial growth rate whether or not they carried dsRNA. The two exceptional isolates recovered from soil had multiple dsRNA segments that caused hypovirulence, weakened CSA and restricted mycelial growth on nutrient-rich media. They belonged to different MCGs, each including dsRNA-free isolates. Isolates from soil contained various dsRNAs (44%), including the hypovirulence factor, more frequently than isolates from diseased roots in the same fields (25%), which is much higher than the proportion of isolates with dsRNA from diseased roots (19%) in a total of 424 isolates from Japan examined so far. These results suggest that isolation of R. necatrix from soil is an effective method to obtain isolates with dsRNAs, including the hypovirulence factor.

  7. Toward a west-wide model of Armillaria root disease: New surveys needed in western Oregon, western Washington, and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; M. -S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; A. C. Ramsey; D. W. Omdal; R. L. Mulvey; B. A. Goodrich; B. A. Ferguson; L. M. Winton; E. M. Goheen; J. J. Bronson; H. S. J. Kearns; K. L. Chadwick; M. Murray; D. C. Shaw; G. I. McDonald; E. W. I. Pitman; M. V. Warwell

    2017-01-01

    Currently, Armillaria root disease causes large growth/volume losses (e.g., 16-55%) in areas of western North America (Filip and Goheen 1984; Cruickshank 2011; Lockman and Kearns 2016). Armillaria root disease is typically more severe in trees that are maladapted to climate-induced stress (Ayres and Lombardero 2000; Kliejunas et al. 2009; Sturrock 2011). Thus, it is...

  8. Survey of Armillaria spp. in the Oregon East Cascades: Baseline data for predicting climatic influences on Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; A. L. Smith; H. M. Maffei; M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2008-01-01

    Root disease pathogens, such as Armillaria solidipes Peck (recently recognized older name for A. ostoyae), will likely have increasing impacts to forest ecosystems as trees undergo stress due to climate change. Before we can predict future impacts of root disease pathogens, we must first develop an ability to predict current distributions of the pathogens (and their...

  9. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 13: Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; Philip D. Tanimoto; Thomas M. Rice; David E. Hall; Jane E. Stewart; Paul J. Zambino; Jonalea R. Tonn; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim

    2005-01-01

    The Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART) is a Web-based tool that estimates Armillaria root disease risk in dry forests of the Western United States. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does and does not do, and tells the user how to obtain the model.

  10. RHIZOBACTERIA AS BIOCONTROL AGENTS OF ROOT ROT DISEASE ON SHALLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunik Iriyanti Ramadhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallot is a high-economic value commodity, but so far the supply is still lower than the demand. One of the production problem is “moler” disease of shallot (MDS caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae (FOCe. The aim of this research was to study the potentiality of shallot rhizobacteria (SRB from various soil ordo to inhibit (MDS. This research was held in the Laboratory of Biology and Soil Health and Greenhouse at UNS. This research was carried out by exploring rhizobacteria of shallot planted on Entisols, Andisols, and Vertisols. Rhizobacteria exploration results were tested for their ability to control Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.cepae (FOCe. Inhibitory ability test of SRB to FOCe was carried out in vitro and on shallot in the greenhouse. The green house research used a Completely Randomized Design (CDR with two factors. The first factor was rhizobacteria combination and the second factor was various soil ordo (Andisols, Entisols, and Vertisols. Each treatment was replicated three times. It was obtained three rhizobacteria isolates from Vertisols (B15: 70%, Andisols (B12:45,55%, and Entisols (B10:46,67% being the highest inhibition results to FOCe. The combination of rhizobacteria B12 and B10 provided the lowest intensity.

  11. Stabilized Romanowsky blood stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, J W; Dean, W W; Stastny, M; Lubrano, G J

    1979-05-01

    It has been shown that the degradation of thiazine dyes which normally occurs in methanolic solution, as in the case of Romanowsky blood stains, can be prevented by making the solution acidic. In a certain range of acidity, the stain precipitates in the form of monothiazine eosinate, but by making the solution sufficiently acidic, eosin is protonated and the precipitate cannot form. These observations have been used to develop a blood stain which is stable, even at elevated temperatures, for several months. For use the stain is neutralized by a specially formulated fixative solution.

  12. Control of Root-rot Diseases of Phaseolus vulgaris Using Gliotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaa, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the antifungal antibiotic gliotoxin on root-rot diseases caused by Fusarium solani and its influence on population of fungal flora in soil were investigated. Bean seeds were treated with different concentrations of gliotoxin before sowing. The results obtained from the green house application of bioagent indicated that soaking seeds in different concentrations of gliotoxin from 1µg/mL to 15µg/mL (for 60 minutes significantly reduced the percentage of damping off and root rot as compared with control (pathogen only. Also 10µg/mL of gliotoxin was significantly decreased the population of fungal flora as compared with control.

  13. Thickening of the cauda equina roots: a common finding in Krabbe disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Misun; Rodriguez, David; Zuccoli, Giulio; Panigrahy, Ashok; Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of Krabbe disease burden and eligibility for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are often based on neuroimaging findings using the modified Loes scoring system, which encompasses central but not peripheral nervous system changes. We show that quantitative evaluation of thickened cauda equina nerve roots may improve the evaluation of Krabbe disease and therapeutic guidance. Lumbar spine MRI scans of patients obtained between March 2013 and September 2013 were retrospectively evaluated and compared to those of controls. Quantitative evaluation of cauda equina roots was performed on the axial plane obtained approximately 5 mm below the conus medullaris. The largest nerves in the right and left anterior quadrants of the spinal canal were acquired. Fifteen symptomatic patients with Krabbe disease (5-44 months old) and eleven age-matched controls were evaluated. The average areas (mm 2 ) of anterior right and left nerves were 1.40 and 1.23, respectively, for patients and 0.61 and 0.60 for controls (differences: 0.79 and 0.63; p < 0.001). Cauda equina nerve root thickening is associated with Krabbe disease in both treated and untreated patients. Adding lumbar spine MRI to the current neurodiagnostic protocols, which fails to account for peripheral nerve abnormalities, will likely facilitate the diagnosis of Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  14. Thickening of the cauda equina roots: a common finding in Krabbe disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Misun; Rodriguez, David [Department of Radiology of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zuccoli, Giulio; Panigrahy, Ashok [Section of Neuroradiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L. [Department of Pediatrics at Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Evaluation of Krabbe disease burden and eligibility for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are often based on neuroimaging findings using the modified Loes scoring system, which encompasses central but not peripheral nervous system changes. We show that quantitative evaluation of thickened cauda equina nerve roots may improve the evaluation of Krabbe disease and therapeutic guidance. Lumbar spine MRI scans of patients obtained between March 2013 and September 2013 were retrospectively evaluated and compared to those of controls. Quantitative evaluation of cauda equina roots was performed on the axial plane obtained approximately 5 mm below the conus medullaris. The largest nerves in the right and left anterior quadrants of the spinal canal were acquired. Fifteen symptomatic patients with Krabbe disease (5-44 months old) and eleven age-matched controls were evaluated. The average areas (mm{sup 2}) of anterior right and left nerves were 1.40 and 1.23, respectively, for patients and 0.61 and 0.60 for controls (differences: 0.79 and 0.63; p < 0.001). Cauda equina nerve root thickening is associated with Krabbe disease in both treated and untreated patients. Adding lumbar spine MRI to the current neurodiagnostic protocols, which fails to account for peripheral nerve abnormalities, will likely facilitate the diagnosis of Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  15. Er:YAG laser scaling of diseased root surfaces: a histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Roberto; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of an erbium-doped:yttrium, aluminum, and garnet (Er:YAG) laser when used to treat periodontally involved root surfaces. Forty teeth affected by severe periodontal disease and scheduled for extraction were divided into two groups: in group A (control), 20 teeth were treated by hand instrumentation, and in group B (test), 20 teeth were treated by Er:YAG laser. In group A (teeth treated by curets), the root cementum layer was completely removed, but many deep scratches on the dentin layer were also observed. In group B, the laser-treated root surfaces, there was no cracking or carbonization, and the bacterial flora was completely eliminated, leaving a rough and uniform surface. Results of the present study showed that clinical use of an Er:YAG laser in vivo achieves plaque and calculus removal, providing a rough surface morphology.

  16. Inoculum reduction measures to manage Armillaria root disease in a severely infected stand of ponderosa pine in south-central Washington: 35-year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Shaw; D.W. Omdal; A. Ramsey-Kroll; L.F. Roth

    2012-01-01

    A stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) severely affected by Armillaria root disease was treated with five different levels of sanitation by root removal to reduce root disease losses in the regenerating stand. Treatments included the following: (1) all trees pushed over by machine, maximum removal of roots by machine ripping, and visible...

  17. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  18. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  19. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, J J M; Pepper, John

    2014-10-01

    Elective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh sleeve. TRR can be performed irrespective of aortic dimensions and a mechanical replacement valve is a secure and near certain means of correcting aortic valve regurgitation but has thromboembolic and bleeding risks. VSRR offers freedom from anticoagulation and attendant risks of bleeding but reoperation for aortic regurgitation runs at 1.3% per annum. A prospective multi-institutional study has found this to be an underestimate of the true rate of valve-related adverse events. PEARS conserves the aortic root anatomy and optimises the chance of maintaining valve function but average follow-up is under 5 years and so the long-term results are yet to be determined. Patients are on average in their 30s and so the cumulative lifetime need for reoperation, and of any valve-related complications, are consequently substantial. With lowering surgical risk of prophylactic root replacement, the threshold for intervention has reduced progressively over 30 years to 4.5 cm and so an increasing number of patients who are not destined to have a dissection are now having root replacement. In evaluation of these three forms of surgery, the number needed to treat to prevent dissection and the balance of net benefit and harm in future patients must be considered.

  20. Stool Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stool; Feces Gram stain References Allos BM. Campylobacter infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ... Bacterial Infections Read more Foodborne Illness Read more Gastroenteritis Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  1. Root disease in the IDF and ICH zones of the southern interior: A problem analysis. Research memo No. 212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Root diseases are endemic in nearly all biogeoclimatic zones of British Columbia. The reduction in harvestable volume that they bring about and the mortality that they cause make them a serious threat to efficient forest management and timber production. Two of the most damaging root diseases are caused by Armillaria ostoyae and Phellinus weirii. The objectives of this problem analysis are to summarize what is known about P. weirii and A. ostoyae in the southern interior; and to identify deficiencies in knowledge which limit our ability to manage root-diseased stands.

  2. Stock-Type Susceptibility and Delineation of Treatment Areas for a Cryptic Pinus radiata Root Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, I A; Kimberley, M O; Gardner, J F

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT Planting material with superior resistance to Armillaria root disease was identified in a field trial established to investigate variation in Armillaria infection among different Pinus radiata nursery stock types. At stand age 6.4 years, total infection incidence, mortality, and degree of root collar girdling by Armillaria spp. were all significantly lower among trees derived from both rooted stool bed cuttings (physiological age 1 to 3 years) and rooted field cuttings (physiological age 3 to 6 years) than among those grown from seedlings. Cutting types did not differ significantly from one another. No significant differences were found between stock types in stem diameter, but trees from stool bed cuttings were significantly taller than seedling trees. Whether these differences remain detectable later in the rotation, initial results suggest that it may be advantageous to plant robust stock, of either cuttings or seedlings, on Armillaria-infested sites. The incidence of infection in living, green-crowned trees was unevenly distributed across the trial site, and was greater nearer to trees killed by Armillaria spp. than further away (significant within a radius of 10 m). By mapping visible Armillaria-caused mortality prior to thinning, it may be possible to delineate areas with a higher incidence of concealed chronic infection, thus defining infested sites for postharvest treatment.

  3. Monitoring Spongospora subterranea Development in Potato Roots Reveals Distinct Infection Patterns and Enables Efficient Assessment of Disease Control Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamilarasan Thangavel

    Full Text Available Spongospora subterranea is responsible for significant potato root and tuber disease globally. Study of this obligate (non-culturable pathogen that infects below-ground plant parts is technically difficult. The capacity to measure the dynamics and patterns of root infections can greatly assist in determining the efficacy of control treatments on disease progression. This study used qPCR and histological analysis in time-course experiments to measure temporal patterns of pathogen multiplication and disease development in potato (and tomato roots and tubers. Effects of delayed initiation of infection and fungicidal seed tuber and soil treatments were assessed. This study found roots at all plant developmental ages were susceptible to infection but that delaying infection significantly reduced pathogen content and resultant disease at final harvest. The pathogen was first detected in roots 15-20 days after inoculation (DAI and the presence of zoosporangia noted 15-45 DAI. Following initial infection pathogen content in roots increased at a similar rate regardless of plant age at inoculation. All fungicide treatments (except soil-applied mancozeb which had a variable response suppressed pathogen multiplication and root and tuber disease. In contrast to delayed inoculation, the fungicide treatments slowed disease progress (rate rather than delaying onset of infection. Trials under suboptimal temperatures for disease expression provided valuable data on root infection rate, demonstrating the robustness of monitoring root infection. These results provide an early measure of the efficacy of control treatments and indicate two possible patterns of disease suppression by either delayed initiation of infection which then proceeds at a similar rate or diminished epidemic rate.

  4. Monitoring Spongospora subterranea Development in Potato Roots Reveals Distinct Infection Patterns and Enables Efficient Assessment of Disease Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Tamilarasan; Tegg, Robert S; Wilson, Calum R

    2015-01-01

    Spongospora subterranea is responsible for significant potato root and tuber disease globally. Study of this obligate (non-culturable) pathogen that infects below-ground plant parts is technically difficult. The capacity to measure the dynamics and patterns of root infections can greatly assist in determining the efficacy of control treatments on disease progression. This study used qPCR and histological analysis in time-course experiments to measure temporal patterns of pathogen multiplication and disease development in potato (and tomato) roots and tubers. Effects of delayed initiation of infection and fungicidal seed tuber and soil treatments were assessed. This study found roots at all plant developmental ages were susceptible to infection but that delaying infection significantly reduced pathogen content and resultant disease at final harvest. The pathogen was first detected in roots 15-20 days after inoculation (DAI) and the presence of zoosporangia noted 15-45 DAI. Following initial infection pathogen content in roots increased at a similar rate regardless of plant age at inoculation. All fungicide treatments (except soil-applied mancozeb which had a variable response) suppressed pathogen multiplication and root and tuber disease. In contrast to delayed inoculation, the fungicide treatments slowed disease progress (rate) rather than delaying onset of infection. Trials under suboptimal temperatures for disease expression provided valuable data on root infection rate, demonstrating the robustness of monitoring root infection. These results provide an early measure of the efficacy of control treatments and indicate two possible patterns of disease suppression by either delayed initiation of infection which then proceeds at a similar rate or diminished epidemic rate.

  5. Changes in nucleolar transcriptional activity in hepatitis B virus-associated chronic liver diseases. Preliminary results from a quantitative study of silver-stained nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, M; Robutti, F; Tallarida, F; Libener, R; Betta, P G

    1992-02-01

    Modifications of gene expression may occur in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related chronic liver diseases, possibly also involving ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes contained in the nucleolus. Changes in the level of transcriptional activity of rRNA genes are reflected by variations in the number and/or size of the nucleoli. Therefore a quantitative analysis of the silver-stained nucleoli (AgNus) was performed in a small series of liver needle biopsies from patients with HBV+ chronic persistent hepatitis (CPH) (n = 3), HBV+ chronic active hepatitis (CAH) (n = 3) and HBV+ cirrhosis (CIR) (n = 3). In each case, 100 hepatocytes were selected. The number of the nucleoli (AgNuN), their total area (tAgNuA), the average area of each nucleolus (xAgNuA), the nuclear area (NA) and the percentage ratio of tAgNuA related to NA (rAgNuA) were determined for each hepatocyte nucleus. The pooled mean values of all the features were significantly different (p less than 0.001) among the case groups. The results point towards a remarkable increase of nucleolar activity in CAH in comparison with CPH, whereas an additional increment of this activity is associated with the progress from CAH to CIR.

  6. Management of root rot and root knot disease of mungbean with the application of mycorrhizospheric fluorescent pseudomonas under field condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, S.S.; Tariq, S.; Ali, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The mycorrhizosphere is the region around a mycorrhizal fungus in which nutrients released from the hyphae increases microbial population and its activities. In this study five mycorrhizospheric fluorescent Pseudomonas (MRFP) were evaluated for biocontrol potential under field condition using mungbean (Vigna radiata) as test plant. MRFP-249 significantly reduced Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Whereas MRFP246 and MRFP-247 were also found effective against M. phaseolina. Mycorrhizospheric fluorescent Pseudomonas were also found effective against root knot nematode by reducing the galls on roots and nematode's penetration in roots. Highest fresh shoot weight and plant height was produced by MRFP-248. Plants grown in soil treated with Pseudomonas showed higher number of VAM spores around the mungbean roots than untreated control plants. The mycorrhizal symbiosis should not be considered merely as bipartite, plant-fungus interaction, but should instead include the associated microorganisms, particularly fluorescent Pseudomonas. (author)

  7. The Growth of Root Rot Disease on Pepper Seed Applied by Trichoderma Harzianum Inoculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Root rot disease on pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici is one of the most important diseases on pepper. The using of antagonistic fungus of Trichoderma harzianum as a biological control agent of the pathogen is one of the important alternatives in controlling P. capsici without causing negative effects on the environment. The objectives of the research were to study about the ability of T. harzianum inoculum application in inhibiting the development of root-rot disease, influenced the growth of pepper seed, to studythe effective length time application of T. harzianum inoculum in inhibiting the development of root rot disease, and increased the growth of pepper seedlings. This research was arranged in a completely randomized design, with five treatments of length time application of T. harzianum inoculum i.e. control treatment without applicationtime of T. harzianum inoculum (K, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 0 week (S0, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 1 week (S1, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for two weeks (S2, application time of T. harzianum inoculum for three weeks (S3, and application time of T. harzianum inoculum for 4 weeks (S4 before planting. Each treatment was repeated15 times. The observed parameterswere disease percentage, the inhibition of antagonistic fungus, disease infection rate, plant height, number of leaves, wet and dry weight of plant, stem and leaves on pepper seed, and P. capsici population density. The result showed that application time of T. harzianum inoculumfor 4 weeks (S4 before planting is the most effective time in inhibiting the development of root rot disease than the other treatment sand also had significant effect on increasing the growth of pepper seed. The antagonism test showed that T. harzianum could inhibit P. capsiciin vitro. This result proves that application time of T. harzianum inoculums

  8. Quantifying the Severity of Phytophthora Root Rot Disease in Avocado Trees Using Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arachchige Surantha Ashan Salgadoe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora root rot (PRR infects the roots of avocado trees, resulting in reduced uptake of water and nutrients, canopy decline, defoliation, and, eventually, tree mortality. Typically, the severity of PRR disease (proportion of canopy decline is assessed by visually comparing the canopy health of infected trees to a standardised set of photographs and a corresponding disease rating. Although this visual method provides some indication of the spatial variability of PRR disease across orchards, the accuracy and repeatability of the ranking is influenced by the experience of the assessor, the visibility of tree canopies, and the timing of the assessment. This study evaluates two image analysis methods that may serve as surrogates to the visual assessment of canopy decline in large avocado orchards. A smartphone camera was used to collect red, green, and blue (RGB colour images of individual trees with varying degrees of canopy decline, with the digital photographs then analysed to derive a canopy porosity percentage using a combination of ‘Canny edge detection’ and ‘Otsu’s’ methods. Coinciding with the on-ground measure of canopy porosity, the canopy reflectance characteristics of the sampled trees measured by high resolution Worldview-3 (WV-3 satellite imagery was also correlated against the observed disease severity rankings. Canopy porosity values (ranging from 20–70% derived from RGB images were found to be significantly different for most disease rankings (p < 0.05 and correlated well (R2 = 0.89 with the differentiation of three disease severity levels identified to be optimal. From the WV-3 imagery, a multivariate stepwise regression of 18 structural and pigment-based vegetation indices found the simplified ratio vegetation index (SRVI to be strongly correlated (R2 = 0.96 with the disease rankings of PRR disease severity, with the differentiation of four levels of severity found to be optimal.

  9. Republished review: Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, J J M; Pepper, John

    2016-02-01

    Elective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh sleeve. TRR can be performed irrespective of aortic dimensions and a mechanical replacement valve is a secure and near certain means of correcting aortic valve regurgitation but has thromboembolic and bleeding risks. VSRR offers freedom from anticoagulation and attendant risks of bleeding but reoperation for aortic regurgitation runs at 1.3% per annum. A prospective multi-institutional study has found this to be an underestimate of the true rate of valve-related adverse events. PEARS conserves the aortic root anatomy and optimises the chance of maintaining valve function but average follow-up is under 5 years and so the long-term results are yet to be determined. Patients are on average in their 30s and so the cumulative lifetime need for reoperation, and of any valve-related complications, are consequently substantial. With lowering surgical risk of prophylactic root replacement, the threshold for intervention has reduced progressively over 30 years to 4.5 cm and so an increasing number of patients who are not destined to have a dissection are now having root replacement. In evaluation of these three forms of surgery, the number needed to treat to prevent dissection and the balance of net benefit and harm in future patients must be considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Optimal fertilizer application for Panax notoginseng and effect of soil water on root rot disease and saponin contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengguo Xia

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that the amount of nitrogen fertilizer used in these fields is excessive and that of potassium fertilizer is deficient. Higher soil moisture is an important factor that increases the severity of the root rot disease.

  11. The Use of Antioxidants to Control Root Rot and Wilt Diseases of Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montaser Fawzy ABDEL-MONAIM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten isolates of Fusarium spp were isolated from pepper plants collected from different locations in New Valley Governorate, Egypt. Fusarium solani isolate FP2 and F. oxysporum isolate FP4 were highly pathogenic isolates but the other isolates moderate or less pathogenic to pepper plants (cv. Anaheim-M. The four antioxidant compounds (coumaric acid, citric acid, propylgalate and salicylic acid each at 100 and 200 ppm were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo agonist to Fusarium pathogenic isolates caused root rot and wilt diseases in pepper plants. All tested antioxidant compounds reduced damping-off, root rot/wilt and area under root rot/wilt progress curve when used as seed soaking, seedling soaking, and soil drench especially at 200 ppm under greenhouse and field conditions compared with untreated plants. All chemicals increased fresh and dry weight of seedling grown in soil drenching or seed treatment with any antioxidants. At the same time, all tested chemicals significantly increase plant growth parameters i.e plant length, plant branching, and total yield per plant in case of seedling soaking or soil drench. In general, propylgalate at 200 ppm was more efficient in reducing infection with damping-off, root rot and wilt diseases as well as increasing the seedling fresh weight, dry weight, plant length, plant branching, number of pod plant-1 and pod yield plant-1. On the other hand, all tested antioxidants had less or no effect on mycelial dry weight and mycelial leaner growth. On the contrary, all chemicals much reduced spore formation in both Fusarium species at 100 or 200 ppm and the inhibitory effect of antioxidants increased with increasing their concentrations.

  12. Investigation on the status of Johne's disease based on agar gel immunodiffusion, ziehl-neelsen staining and nested PCR approach in two cattle farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Mohan,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Methods: Paratuberculosis is a chronic disease of ruminant, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map, clinically infected animals produce high level of antibodies in blood and shed detectable amount of Map organisms in feces. Several serological and molecular tests are utilized for detection of antibodies or DNA of the organism in clinical samples. Present study indicates the status of paratuberculosis in two distinct cattle farms with different organizational set-ups viz. organized and unorganized. We used agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID assay for the detection of antibodies in blood. Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN staining of fecal smears was done to observe acid-fast bacilli and Nested PCR targeted to IS900 and f57 sequences, was performed to confirm the pathogen.Results: Sera samples of cattle, from organized farm, did not show any visible precipitating band with AGID assay. However, fecal smears of few cattle (3.57% were positive for acid-fast bacilli. When confirmed with nested PCR, only one fecal sample (0.71% was found positive for Map. In case of unorganized farm, a large number of cattle (38.75% showed precipitating antibodies with AGID assay and the percentage of fecal smears that showed acid-fast bacilli was 26.62%. Nevertheless, fecal samples containing Map DNA was confirmed in 14.37% of fecal sample by nested PCR.Conclusions: An organized farm, with better hygiene and management practices, showed lesser occurrence of paratuberculosis in cattle in comparison to unorganized farm. Not all AGID assays positive cattle might be an efficient shedder of Map and mare detection of acid-fast bacilli in fecal smears did not always indicate the presence of Map organism. Cattle infected with JD were mostly in the age group of six years and above.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of molecular responses in Malus domestica 'M26' roots affected by apple replant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Stefan; Bartsch, Melanie; Winkelmann, Traud

    2017-06-01

    Gene expression studies in roots of apple replant disease affected plants suggested defense reactions towards biotic stress to occur which did not lead to adequate responses to the biotic stressors. Apple replant disease (ARD) leads to growth inhibition and fruit yield reduction in replanted populations and results in economic losses for tree nurseries and fruit producers. The etiology is not well understood on a molecular level and causal agents show a great diversity indicating that no definitive cause, which applies to the majority of cases, has been found out yet. Hence, it is pivotal to gain a better understanding of the molecular and physiological reactions of the plant when affected by ARD and later to overcome the disease, for example by developing tolerant rootstocks. For the first time, gene expression was investigated in roots of ARD affected plants employing massive analysis of cDNA ends (MACE) and RT-qPCR. In reaction to ARD, genes in secondary metabolite production as well as plant defense, regulatory and signaling genes were upregulated whereas for several genes involved in primary metabolism lower expression was detected. For internal verification of MACE data, candidate genes were tested via RT-qPCR and a strong positive correlation between both datasets was observed. Comparison of apple 'M26' roots cultivated in ARD soil or γ-irradiated ARD soil suggests that typical defense reactions towards biotic stress take place in ARD affected plants but they did not allow responding to the biotic stressors attack adequately, leading to the observed growth depressions in ARD variants.

  14. Sustainable management of root-knot disease of tomato by neem cake and Glomus fasciculatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Rizvi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted during winter season of 2009–2010 in the department of Botany, AMU, Aligarh, India, to determine the nematicidal potential of organic matter, neem cake at third level of dose, and bioagent, Glomus fasciculatum in terms of various growth parameters of tomato, when inoculated individually as well as concomitantly with respect to root-knot development. Neem cake and G. fasciculatum showed potential for sustainable management while providing nutrient sources for proper plant growth. Disease intensity of root-knot nematode decreased while increasing the doses of neem cake along with the G. fasciculatum. Chlorophyll contents have been found to be increased in single and combined application as well. There is a progressive increase in growth parameters raised in soil amended with 10, 20, and 30 g neem cake/kg soil and inoculated with G. fasciculatum. Significant improvement in the plant growth was observed when G. fasciculatum and neem cake were inoculated simultaneously. Neem cake plus G. fasciculatum reduced the nematodes’ multiplication and root-galling, and increased the plant growth of tomato as compared to unamended and Meloidogyne incognita-inoculated plants. Mycorrhyzation and agronomic parameters were increased due to application of G. fasciculatum alone, but enhanced further when inoculated with neem cake.

  15. The evaluation of winter wheat roots and leaf sheath diseases diagnostic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Solarska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The maltose and mineral media for isolation of Gaeumannomyces graminis from roots were assessed. The differences in numbers of obtained isolates were found depending on the medium used and sampling date. Easier identification of pathogen was possible employing maltose medium. The fungi from genus Fusarium occurring on winter wheat leaf sheaths were identified by mycological analysis and PCR, while the fungus Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides was detected by PCR and ELISA methods. PCR and ELISA methods enabled to detect pathogens also in periods before the disease symptoms on plants occurred.

  16. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  17. Port-wine stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Port-wine stain URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ...

  18. A Root water uptake model to compensate disease stress in citrus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kambhammettu, B. P.; Lad, R. S.; Suradhaniwar, S.

    2017-12-01

    Plant root water uptake (RWU) controls a number of hydrologic fluxes in simulating unsaturated flow and transport processes. Variable saturated models that simulate soil-water-plant interactions within the rizhosphere do not account for the health of the tree. This makes them difficult to analyse RWU patterns for diseased trees. Improper irrigation management activities on diseased (Phytopthora spp. affected) citrus trees of central India has resulted in a significant reduction in crop yield accompanied by disease escalation. This research aims at developing a quantitative RWU model that accounts for the reduction in water stress as a function of plant disease level (hereafter called as disease stress). A total of four research plots with varying disease severity were considered for our field experimentation. A three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was performed to understand spatio-temporal distribution in soil moisture following irrigation. Evaporation and transpiration were monitored daily using micro lysimeter and sap flow meters respectively. Disease intensity was quantified (on 0 to 9 scale) using pathological analysis on soil samples. Pedo-physocal and pedo-electric relations were established under controlled laboratory conditions. A non-linear disease stress response function for citrus trees was derived considering phonological, hydrological, and pathological parameters. Results of numerical simulations conclude that the propagation of error in RWU estimates by ignoring the health condition of the tree is significant. The developed disease stress function was then validated in the presence of deficit water and nutrient stress conditions. Results of numerical analysis showed a good agreement with experimental data, corroborating the need for alternate management practices for disease citrus trees.

  19. Value of CT in the evaluation of nerve root compression in the lumbar herniated disc disease: comparative study with myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Il; Ku, Yong Woon; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Su [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a lumbar herniated disc disease, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. The purpose of this study is to estimate the valve of CT in athe evaluation of nerve root compression caused by herniated disc disease. We analyzed 52 roots of 26 patients of single level herniated disc disease with definite evidence of bilateral or unilateral neurologic deficit who had both CT and myelography at Pusan National University Hospital from May 1983 to March, 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Sensitivity and specificity of CT is 77% and 81%, respectively in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 2. Sensitivity and specificity of myelography is 77% and 81% respectively, in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 3. The results of this study indicate that high resolution CT was equivalent to myelography in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumar herniated disc disease.

  20. Nitric oxide induced by Indian ginseng root extract inhibits Infectious Bursal Disease virus in chicken embryo fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bhaskar; Umapathi, Vijaypillai; Rastogi, Sunil Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease is a severe viral disease of chicken responsible for serious economic losses to poultry farmers. The causative agent, Infectious Bursal Disease virus, is inhibited by nitric oxide. Root extract of the Indian ginseng, Withania somnifera , inhibits Infectious Bursal Disease virus in vitro. Also, Withania somnifera root extract is known to induce nitric oxide production in vitro. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine if the inhibitory activity of Withania somnifera against Infectious Bursal Disease virus was based on the production of nitric oxide. We show that besides other mechanisms, the inhibition of Infectious Bursal Disease virus by Withania somnifera involves the production of nitric oxide. Our results also highlight the paradoxical role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of Infectious Bursal Disease.

  1. Potential worldwide distribution of Fusarium dry root rot in common beans based on the optimal environment for disease occurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Macedo

    Full Text Available Root rots are a constraint for staple food crops and a long-lasting food security problem worldwide. In common beans, yield losses originating from root damage are frequently attributed to dry root rot, a disease caused by the Fusarium solani species complex. The aim of this study was to model the current potential distribution of common bean dry root rot on a global scale and to project changes based on future expectations of climate change. Our approach used a spatial proxy of the field disease occurrence, instead of solely the pathogen distribution. We modeled the pathogen environmental requirements in locations where in-situ inoculum density seems ideal for disease manifestation. A dataset of 2,311 soil samples from commercial farms assessed from 2002 to 2015 allowed us to evaluate the environmental conditions associated with the pathogen's optimum inoculum density for disease occurrence, using a lower threshold as a spatial proxy. We encompassed not only the optimal conditions for disease occurrence but also the optimal pathogen's density required for host infection. An intermediate inoculum density of the pathogen was the best disease proxy, suggesting density-dependent mechanisms on host infection. We found a strong convergence on the environmental requirements of both the host and the disease development in tropical areas, mostly in Brazil, Central America, and African countries. Precipitation and temperature variables were important for explaining the disease occurrence (from 17.63% to 43.84%. Climate change will probably move the disease toward cooler regions, which in Brazil are more representative of small-scale farming, although an overall shrink in total area (from 48% to 49% in 2050 and 26% to 41% in 2070 was also predicted. Understanding pathogen distribution and disease risks in an evolutionary context will therefore support breeding for resistance programs and strategies for dry root rot management in common beans.

  2. Potential worldwide distribution of Fusarium dry root rot in common beans based on the optimal environment for disease occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Renan; Sales, Lilian Patrícia; Yoshida, Fernanda; Silva-Abud, Lidianne Lemes; Lobo, Murillo

    2017-01-01

    Root rots are a constraint for staple food crops and a long-lasting food security problem worldwide. In common beans, yield losses originating from root damage are frequently attributed to dry root rot, a disease caused by the Fusarium solani species complex. The aim of this study was to model the current potential distribution of common bean dry root rot on a global scale and to project changes based on future expectations of climate change. Our approach used a spatial proxy of the field disease occurrence, instead of solely the pathogen distribution. We modeled the pathogen environmental requirements in locations where in-situ inoculum density seems ideal for disease manifestation. A dataset of 2,311 soil samples from commercial farms assessed from 2002 to 2015 allowed us to evaluate the environmental conditions associated with the pathogen's optimum inoculum density for disease occurrence, using a lower threshold as a spatial proxy. We encompassed not only the optimal conditions for disease occurrence but also the optimal pathogen's density required for host infection. An intermediate inoculum density of the pathogen was the best disease proxy, suggesting density-dependent mechanisms on host infection. We found a strong convergence on the environmental requirements of both the host and the disease development in tropical areas, mostly in Brazil, Central America, and African countries. Precipitation and temperature variables were important for explaining the disease occurrence (from 17.63% to 43.84%). Climate change will probably move the disease toward cooler regions, which in Brazil are more representative of small-scale farming, although an overall shrink in total area (from 48% to 49% in 2050 and 26% to 41% in 2070) was also predicted. Understanding pathogen distribution and disease risks in an evolutionary context will therefore support breeding for resistance programs and strategies for dry root rot management in common beans.

  3. Potential worldwide distribution of Fusarium dry root rot in common beans based on the optimal environment for disease occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Renan; Sales, Lilian Patrícia; Yoshida, Fernanda; Silva-Abud, Lidianne Lemes

    2017-01-01

    Root rots are a constraint for staple food crops and a long-lasting food security problem worldwide. In common beans, yield losses originating from root damage are frequently attributed to dry root rot, a disease caused by the Fusarium solani species complex. The aim of this study was to model the current potential distribution of common bean dry root rot on a global scale and to project changes based on future expectations of climate change. Our approach used a spatial proxy of the field disease occurrence, instead of solely the pathogen distribution. We modeled the pathogen environmental requirements in locations where in-situ inoculum density seems ideal for disease manifestation. A dataset of 2,311 soil samples from commercial farms assessed from 2002 to 2015 allowed us to evaluate the environmental conditions associated with the pathogen’s optimum inoculum density for disease occurrence, using a lower threshold as a spatial proxy. We encompassed not only the optimal conditions for disease occurrence but also the optimal pathogen’s density required for host infection. An intermediate inoculum density of the pathogen was the best disease proxy, suggesting density-dependent mechanisms on host infection. We found a strong convergence on the environmental requirements of both the host and the disease development in tropical areas, mostly in Brazil, Central America, and African countries. Precipitation and temperature variables were important for explaining the disease occurrence (from 17.63% to 43.84%). Climate change will probably move the disease toward cooler regions, which in Brazil are more representative of small-scale farming, although an overall shrink in total area (from 48% to 49% in 2050 and 26% to 41% in 2070) was also predicted. Understanding pathogen distribution and disease risks in an evolutionary context will therefore support breeding for resistance programs and strategies for dry root rot management in common beans. PMID:29107985

  4. The preventive Control of White Root Rot Disease in Small Holder Rubber Plantation Using Botanical, Biological and Chemical Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Prasetyo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The preventive control of white root rot disease in small holder plantation using botanical, biological, and chemical agents. A field and laboratory experiment were conducted from June 2008 to December 2009 in Panumangan, Tulang Bawang - Lampung. The  field experiment was intended to evaluate the effect of  botanical plants (Alpinia galanga, Sansiviera auranthii, and Marantha arundinacea, biological agents (organic matter and Trichoderma spp., and chemical agents (lime and natural sulphur on the incidence of white root rot disease and population of some soil microbes. The laboratory experiment was conducted  to observe the mechanism of botanical agents  in controlling white root rot disease. In the field experiment, the treatments were applied  in the experimental plot with cassava plant infection as the indicator. The variables  examined were the incidence of  white root rot and population of soil microbes. In the laboratory experiment, culture of R. microporus was grown in PDA containing root exudate of the antagonistic plant (botanical agent. The variable examined was colony diameter of R. microporus growing in the PDA plates. The results of the  field experiment  showed that planting of the botanical agents, and application of Trichoderma spp., as well as natural sulphur, decreased the incidence of white root rot disease. The effectiveness of M. arundinacea and Trichoderma spp. was comparable to natural  sulphur. The laboratory experiment showed only root exudate of  A. galanga and  S. auranthii that were significantly inhibit the growth of R. microporus.

  5. Tooth root growth impairment after mantle radiation in long-term survivors of Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Hopkins, K.P.; Thompson, E.I.; Hustu, H.O.

    1985-10-01

    The tooth root growth impairment that resulted from 35 to 37 Gy mantle port radiation in 47 long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's disease was quantified and related to specific age groups and categories of teeth. Root measurements of the mandibular permanent canines, first and second premolars, and first and second molars were made from sequential panoramic radiographs taken at the time of radiation therapy and after the closure of root apexes. The severity of root growth impairment was greatest in patients who received radiation during the early stages of odontogenesis. With later stages of odontogenesis, and as the age increased at the time of treatment, less impairment occurred. The potential difficulties of using repeated panoramic radiographs to assess tooth lengths in longitudinal studies also were discussed.

  6. Fusarium spp. and Pinus strobus seedlings: root disease pathogens and taxa associated with seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. M. Ocamb; J. Juzwik; F. B. Martin

    2002-01-01

    Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L .) seeds were sown in soil infested wlth Fusarium proliferatum, root necrosis developed on seedling roots, and F. proliferatum as reisolated from symptomatic roots; thus, demonstrating that F. proliferatum is pathogenic to eastern white pine seedling. Soils...

  7. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described. Images PMID:1688872

  8. Ghost mycobacteria on Gram stain.

    OpenAIRE

    Trifiro, S; Bourgault, A M; Lebel, F; René, P

    1990-01-01

    The Gram stain is a key tool in diagnostic microbiology. Its usefulness with respect to mycobacteria is undefined. The neutrality of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Gram staining of various clinical specimens is described.

  9. Potential of Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Cotton Roots for Biological Control against Verticillium Wilt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfei; Li, Zhifang; Shi, Yongqiang; Zhao, LiHong; Feng, Zili; Zhu, Heqin

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a soil-borne disease, and severely limits the development of cotton production. To investigate the role of endophytic fungi on Verticillium wilt, CEF-818 (Penicillium simplicissimum), CEF-714 (Leptosphaeria sp.), CEF-642 (Talaromyces flavus.) and CEF-193 (Acremonium sp.) isolated from cotton roots were used to assess their effects against cotton wilt disease caused by a defoliating V. dahliae strain Vd080. In the greenhouse, all treatments significantly reduced disease incidence and disease index, with the control efficacy ranging from 26% (CEF-642) to 67% (CEF-818) at 25 days (d) after inoculation. In the disease nursery, compared to controls (with disease incidence of 33.8% and disease index of 31), CEF-818, CEF-193, CEF-714 and CEF-642 provided a protection effect of 69.5%, 69.2%, 54.6% and 45.7%, respectively. Especially, CEF-818 and CEF-714 still provided well protection against Verticillium wilt with 46.9% and 56.6% or 14.3% and 33.7% at the first peak of the disease in heavily infected field, respectively (in early July). These results indicated that these endophytes not only delayed but also reduced wilt symptoms on cotton. In the harvest, the available cotton bolls of plant treated with CEF-818 and CEF-714 increased to 13.1, and 12.2, respectively. And the seed cotton yield significantly increased after seed bacterization with CEF-818 (3442.04 kg/ha) compared to untreated control (3207.51 kg/ha) by 7.3%. Furtherly, CEF-818 and CET-714 treatment increased transcript levels for PAL, PPO, POD, which leads to the increase of cotton defense reactions. Our results indicate that seed treatment of cotton plants with CEF-818 and CET-714 can help in the biocontrol of V. dahliae and improve seed cotton yield in cotton fields. This study provided a better understanding of cotton-endophyte interactions which will aid in developing effective biocontrol agents for Verticillium wilt of cotton in futhre. PMID:28107448

  10. Root interactions in a maize/soybean intercropping system control soybean soil-borne disease, red crown rot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum. The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices.

  11. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-08-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns sections are dewaxed, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, dried, covered with Sellotape, and the tissue cut out using a scalpel blade under direct visual control. The method is quick, eliminates problems of operator tremor, preserves the architecture of the micro-dissected tissue (for photographic documentation) and requires no special equipment. The presence of Sellotape and adhesive in the reaction mixture has no detrimental effect on the ability to extract DNA or to perform PCR.

  12. Incidence of root rot diseases of soybean in Multan Pakistan and its management by the use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, M.I.; Tahir, M.I.; Mahmood, S.

    2012-01-01

    Eight villages in Multan district were surveyed to record incidence of disease and losses of soybean (Glycine max L.) caused by root rot fungi. The root incidence ranged 10-17% and losses ranged 6.75-15.5%. The evaluation of four PGPR isolates was used in combination with organic amendment for the management of root-rot disease incidence and to reduce the population of root pathogenic fungi and to increase the yield in field. This study demonstrated effective biological control by the PGPR isolates tested, thereby indicating the possibility of application of rhizobacteria for control of soil bor ne diseases of soybean in Pakistan and other countries. (author)

  13. Incidence and phylogenetic analyses of Armillaria spp. associated with root disease in peach orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Elias-Roman; R. A. Guzman-Plazola; N. B. Klopfenstein; D. Alvarado-Rosales; G. Calderon-Zavala; J. A. Mora-Aguilera; M.-S. Kim; R. Garcia-Espinosa

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] tree mortality attributed to Armillaria root disease was assessed from 2009 to 2011 in 15 orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico. Incidence increased gradually every year of assessment, reaching average values of 9.7, 15.3 and 20.3% tree mortality and 23.2, 24.7 and 28.3% disease-impacted area of the orchards during 2009...

  14. Staining properties and stability of a standardised Romanowsky stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1978-03-01

    An evaluation of the standardised Romanowsky stain of Marshall et al. has been made in a routine haematology laboratory. It was noted that this stain had several advantages over the May-Grünwald Giemsa stain used in most British laboratories. These advantages include ease and speed of preparation, a shorter staining time, and reproducibility of results. These results are described in detail. The stability of the stock stain solution and of the 'working' stain (stock + buffer) has been studied by, respectively, thin-layer chromatography and visible spectroscopy. No change was detected in the composition of the stock solution at ambient temperature over a period of six months. Stability was unaffected by the composition of the container (polyethylene, PyrexTM, or soda-glass) or by daylight. The 'working' solution was stable for 3 hours. Thereafter a precipitate is formed, consisting of thiazine dyes and eosin in a molar ratio of approximately 2:1.

  15. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  16. Effects of combining CBCT technology with visual root canal recurrence in treatment of elderly patients with dental pulp disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J-J; Peng, B; Lin, W

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effects of combining cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology with visual root canal recurrence in the treatment of elderly patients with dental pulp disease. 56 cases of elderly patients with dental pulp disease were contiguously selected, and randomly divided into the control group (70 teeth from 27 patients) and the observation group (77 teeth from the rest 29 patients). We adopted CBCT technology combined with conventional root canal therapy in control group and CBCT technology combined with visual root canal recurrence in observation group to compare the clinical effects. It was found that there was no statistical difference in duration of operation between the two groups (p>0.05). The operation times and the VAS during and after operation of the observation group were significantly less than that of the control group (ptechnology combined with visual root canal recurrence can significantly improve the near and long-term treatment effects of elderly patients with dental pulp disease.

  17. Detection of White Root Disease (Rigidoporus Microporus) in Various Soil Types in the Rubber Plantations Based on The Serological Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriani Dalimunthe, Cici; Tistama, Radite; Wahyuni, Sri

    2017-12-01

    The Conventional detection of White Root Disease (Rigidoporus microporus, WRD) still uses the visual method based on an abnormal color of leaf or mycelium growth on the tap root neck. The method was less effective and less efficient. The serological technique uses yolk chicken antibodies induced by immunization with mycelium extract. The purpose of this research was to examine the consistency of selected antibodies in detecting root fungi at various soil types in the rubber plantations. This research used a Completely Randomized Design non-factorial with twelve (12) treatments and two (2) replications. The results showed that the antibodies could detect WRD in various soils types. The serological detection was higher precisely than visual observation. The development of WRD mycelium varies depending on the soil types and it was different in the each estate area. In addition, this research is expected to get a serology kit to detect early symptoms of WRD in the rubber plants.

  18. Root rot diseases of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L as affected by defloliation intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugar beet re-growth after water stress defoliation on root rots of three cultivars (Europa, Rival Corsica, which were spring sown in Thessaly, central Greece, for two growing seasons (2003-04. At the beginning of July, sugar beets were subjected to water deficit with irrigation withholding. A month later, three defoliation levels (control - C, moderate - MD, severe - SD and irrigation were applied. Thus, sugar beets were forced to re-grow and three harvests (15, 30 and 40 days after defoliation - DAD were conducted. Rotted roots per hectare were counted and pathogens were identified. Data were analyzed as a four-factor randomized complete block design with years, defoliation levels, sampling times and cultivars as main factors. The number of rotted roots was increased with the defoliation level and was significantly higher for SD sugar beets (3748 roots ha–1. No significant differences were found between C and MD treatments (1543 and 2116 roots ha–1, respectively. Rival was the most susceptible cultivar to root rots. Sugar beets were more susceptible to rotting 15 and 40 DAD (2778 and 2998 roots ha–1. The causal agents of root rots were the fungi, Fusarium spp., Rhizopus stolonifer, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani.

  19. Fabry's disease: biochemical and histochemical studies on hair roots for carrier detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorken, A J; Weterings, P J; Spierenburg, G T; vanBennekom, C A; Wirtz, P; deBruyn, C H; Oei, T L

    1978-02-01

    A method of assay alpha-galactosidase and acid phosphatase activities in single hair roots is described. Enzyme histochemical studies show that the distribution of acid phosphatase in the human hair root matches that of alpha-galactosidase. Histochemically, the main activity is located in the upper part of the sheath near the orifice of the duct of the sebaceous gland. This is confirmed by enzyme assays on different parts of the hair root after dissection. The variation in the values found in individual hair roots is improved by relating alpha-galactosidase to acid phosphatase activities. Storage experiments indicate a remarkable stability of both alpha-galactosidase and acid phosphatase in human hair roots.

  20. A new bacterial staining method involving Gram stain with theoretical considerations of the staining mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Y; Tôei, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Gram staining of bacteria, tests with anionic dyes followed by treatment with cationic octyltrimethylammonium (OTMA) were carried out. The study revealed that tetrabromophenolphthalein ethylester (TBPE) gave the most reliable staining of Gram-negative bacteria with negative staining of Gram-positive bacteria. Tests on many species of bacteria showed that TBPE positive bacteria were Gram-negative and vice versa, without exception.

  1. Efficacy of four plant extracts in the control of root rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garcinia cola) and neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts in the control of root rot of cowpea caused by Pythium aphanidermatum was carried out in vitro and in the field (in vivo). They were evaluated for their antifungal activity over P.

  2. An evaluation of some commerical Romanowsky stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1975-08-01

    The staining properties of 43 commerical Romanowsky-type stains have been studied. Considerable differences in the appearance of stained blood films were observed with different batches of these stains, the staining of red cells being particularly variable. Attempts have been made to correlate staining patterns with stain composition as revealed by thin-layer chromatography and sulphated ash analyses. In this way it has been possible to define some essential requirements for satisfactory staining.

  3. Enzymatic Activity of the Mycelium Compared with Oospore Development During Infection of Pea Roots by Aphanomyces euteiches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Rosendahl, Søren

    1998-01-01

    To describe the disease cycle of the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, enzymatic activity in the mycelium was compared with the development of oospores in pea roots. Plants were inoculated with two zoospore concentrations to achieve different disease levels. Hyphae were stained for fungal...... concentration, the enzymatic activity of the pathogen mycelium peaked 10 to 14 days after inoculation, when oospore formation was initiated. Oospore formation was associated with a gradual increase in disease symptoms. At the last harvest, plants inoculated with the higher zoospore concentration had died...... alkaline phosphatase activity in the roots. Additionally, enzyme activity was measured after electrophoresis of an A. euteiches-specific glucose-6-phosphate isozyme. Development of oospores in the roots was measured after staining the oospores with trypan blue. In plants inoculated with the higher zoospore...

  4. Native root-associated bacteria rescue a plant from a sudden-wilt disease that emerged during continuous cropping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Luu, Van Thi; Weinhold, Arne; Goldberg, Jay; Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants maintain microbial associations whose functions remain largely unknown. For the past 15 y, we have planted the annual postfire tobacco Nicotiana attenuata into an experimental field plot in the plant’s native habitat, and for the last 8 y the number of plants dying from a sudden wilt disease has increased, leading to crop failure. Inadvertently we had recapitulated the common agricultural dilemma of pathogen buildup associated with continuous cropping for this native plant. Plants suffered sudden tissue collapse and black roots, symptoms similar to a Fusarium–Alternaria disease complex, recently characterized in a nearby native population and developed into an in vitro pathosystem for N. attenuata. With this in vitro disease system, different protection strategies (fungicide and inoculations with native root-associated bacterial and fungal isolates), together with a biochar soil amendment, were tested further in the field. A field trial with more than 900 plants in two field plots revealed that inoculation with a mixture of native bacterial isolates significantly reduced disease incidence and mortality in the infected field plot without influencing growth, herbivore resistance, or 32 defense and signaling metabolites known to mediate resistance against native herbivores. Tests in a subsequent year revealed that a core consortium of five bacteria was essential for disease reduction. This consortium, but not individual members of the root-associated bacteria community which this plant normally recruits during germination from native seed banks, provides enduring resistance against fungal diseases, demonstrating that native plants develop opportunistic mutualisms with prokaryotes that solve context-dependent ecological problems. PMID:26305938

  5. BNYVV-derived dsRNA confers resistance to rhizomania disease of sugar beet as evidenced by a novel transgenic hairy root approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavli, R.; Panopoulos, N.J.; Goldbach, R.W.; Skaracis, G.N.

    2010-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed sugar beet hairy roots, expressing dsRNA from the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus replicase gene, were used as a novel approach to assess the efficacy of three intron-hairpin constructs at conferring resistance to rhizomania disease. Genetically engineered roots

  6. Investigation on the status of Johne's disease based on agar gel immunodiffusion, ziehl-neelsen staining and nested PCR approach in two cattle farm

    OpenAIRE

    Anand Mohan,; Pranabananda Das,; Neelam Kushwaha,; Kaliaperumal Karthik; Ankush Kiran Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methods: Paratuberculosis is a chronic disease of ruminant, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), clinically infected animals produce high level of antibodies in blood and shed detectable amount of Map organisms in feces. Several serological and molecular tests are utilized for detection of antibodies or DNA of the organism in clinical samples. Present study indicates the status of paratuberculosis in two distinct cattle farms with different organizationa...

  7. Image-based stained glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present a method of restyling an image so that it approximates the visual appearance of a work of stained glass. To this end, we develop a novel approach which involves image warping, segmentation, querying, and colorization along with texture synthesis. In our method, a given input image is first segmented. Each segment is subsequently transformed to match real segments of stained glass queried from a database of image exemplars. By using real sources of stained glass, our method produces high quality results in this nascent area of nonphotorealistic rendering. The generation of the stained glass requires only modest amounts of user interaction. This interaction is facilitated with a unique region-merging tool.

  8. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Umberto; Melina, Giovanni; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Roscitano, Antonino; Angeloni, Emiliano; Sinatra, Riccardo

    2011-06-01

    Surgical treatment of aortic root aneurysm in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients. To compare results of total root replacement versus valve-sparing aortic root replacement in MFS patients. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library were searched from January 1966 until February 2010 looking for papers reporting on aortic root operations in MFS patients. 530 studies were retrieved. Finally, 11 publications were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were observational studies reporting valve-related morbidity and mortality after total root replacement (TTR) and/or valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) in patients with MFS and study size n≥30, reflecting the centre's experience. Data obtained from papers reporting both TRR and VSRR cohorts were analysed separately. In case of multiple publications, the most recent and complete report was selected. If the total number of patient-years was not provided, we calculated it by multiplying the number of hospital survivors with the mean follow-up duration of that study. Overall, 1,385 patients were analysed (972 patients had TTR and 413 patients had VSRR). Reintervention rate was 0.3%/year (95% CI 0.1 to 0.5) versus 1.3%/year (95% CI 0.3 to 2.2) (p=0.02) and thromboembolic events rate was 0.7%/year (95% CI 0.5 to 0.9) versus 0.3%/year (95% CI 0.1 to 0.6) (p=0.01) after TRR and VSRR, respectively. When composite valve-related events were compared, no difference existed between the two surgical strategies (p=0.41). Among patients undergoing VSRR, reimplantation was associated with a reduced rate of reintervention compared with remodelling (0.7%/year vs 2.4%/year, p=0.02). VSRR may represent a valuable option for patients with MFS with aortic aneurysm. However, this technique should be used with caution in patients with valve characteristics at risk for decreased durability.

  9. Armillaria root rot of tea in Kenya : characterization of the pathogen and approaches to disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otieno, W.

    2002-01-01

    The rare occurrence of basidiomata and rhizomorphs constrains diagnosis of Armillaria root rot and identification of Armillaria species in Africa. This has had a negative impact on taxonomic research on the genus Armillaria in the continent, where the

  10. Prevention of root diseases in closed soilless growing systems by microbial optimisation and slow sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Postma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Closed hydroponic systems are good alternatives for soil grown crops using methyl bromide in protected cultivation. Root-infecting pathogens may be dispersed over the nursery by the circulating nutrient solution, which was reason to disinfect the nutrient solution. The natural microflora in the

  11. Genotype × Environment Interaction of Mosaic Disease, Root Yields and Total Carotene Concentration of Yellow-Fleshed Cassava in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert G. Maroya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one yellow-fleshed cassava genotypes were evaluated over two years in five major cassava growing agroecological zones in Nigeria. The trials were established in a randomized complete block design with four replications to assess genotype performance and Genotype × Environment interaction for cassava mosaic disease (CMD, fresh and dry root yield (FYLD; DYLD, root dry matter content (DMC, and total carotene concentration (TCC. Combined analysis of variance showed significant differences (P<0.001 among genotypes (G, environment (E, and Genotype × Environment interaction (GE for all the traits tested. For reaction to CMD, the best genotypes showing stable resistance were TMS 07/0539 and TMS 07/0628. For root yield, the best genotypes were TMS 01/1368 and TMS 07/0553. Genotype TMS 07/0593 was the best for DMC and TCC across the 10 environments. Variation among genotypes accounted for most of the Total Sum of Squares for CMD (72.1% and TCC (34.4%. Environmental variation accounted for most of the Total Sum of Squares for FYLD (42.8%, DYLD (39.6%, and DMC (29.2%. This study revealed that TMS 07/0593 has the highest and most stable TCC, DMC with the lowest CMD severity score and appeared to be the best genotype.

  12. Mitral valve disease in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkala, Meghana R; Schaff, Hartzell V; Li, Zhuo; Volguina, Irina; Dietz, Harry C; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Connolly, Heidi

    2013-09-10

    Cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome include aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Only scant data exist describing MVP in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement. We retrospectively analyzed data from 166 MFS patients with MVP who were enrolled in a prospective multicenter registry of patients who underwent aortic root aneurysm repair. Of these 166 patients, 9% had mitral regurgitation (MR) grade >2, and 10% had MR grade 2. The severity of MVP and MR was evaluated by echocardiography preoperatively and ≤ 3 years postoperatively. Forty-one patients (25%) underwent composite graft aortic valve replacement, and 125 patients (75%) underwent aortic valve-sparing procedures; both groups had similar prevalences of MR grade >2 (P=0.7). Thirty-three patients (20%) underwent concomitant mitral valve (MV) intervention (repair, n=29; replacement, n=4), including all 15 patients with MR grade >2. Only 1 patient required MV reintervention during follow-up (mean clinical follow-up, 31 ± 10 months). Echocardiography performed 21 ± 13 months postoperatively revealed MR >2 in only 3 patients (2%). One early death and 2 late deaths occurred. Although the majority of patients with Marfan syndrome who undergo elective aortic root replacement have MVP, only 20% have concomitant MV procedures. These concomitant procedures do not seem to increase operative risk. In patients with MR grade ≤ 2 who do not undergo a concomitant MV procedure, the short-term incidence of progressive MR is low; however, more follow-up is needed to determine whether patients with MVP and MR grade ≤ 2 would benefit from prophylactic MV intervention.

  13. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of

  14. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Beatrice Meyer

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  15. Spatial statistical analysis of basal stem root disease under natural field epidemic of oil palm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamu, Assis; Phin, Chong Khim; Seman, Idris Abu; Wan, Hoong Hak; Mun, Ho Chong

    2015-02-01

    Oil palm or scientifically known as Elaeis guineensis Jacq. is the most important commodity crop in Malaysia and has greatly contributed to the economy growth of the country. As far as disease is concerned in the industry, Basal Stem Rot (BSR) caused by Ganoderma boninence remains the most important disease. BSR disease is the most widely studied with information available for oil palm disease in Malaysia. However, there is still limited study on the spatial as well as temporal pattern or distribution of the disease especially under natural field epidemic condition in oil palm plantation. The objective of this study is to spatially identify the pattern of BSR disease under natural field epidemic using two geospatial analytical techniques, which are quadrat analysis for the first order properties of partial pattern analysis and nearest-neighbor analysis (NNA) for the second order properties of partial pattern analysis. Two study sites were selected with different age of tree. Both sites are located in Tawau, Sabah and managed by the same company. The results showed that at least one of the point pattern analysis used which is NNA (i.e. the second order properties of partial pattern analysis) has confirmed the disease is complete spatial randomness. This suggests the spread of the disease is not from tree to tree and the age of palm does not play a significance role in determining the spatial pattern of the disease. From the spatial pattern of the disease, it would help in the disease management program and for the industry in the future. The statistical modelling is expected to help in identifying the right model to estimate the yield loss of oil palm due to BSR disease in the future.

  16. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.).

  17. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi

    1994-01-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.)

  18. Etika Berbusana Mahasiswa Stain Samarinda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Suryani Wijaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethics is about behavior of human being, such as which one is right or wrong. The ethics is always affecting the human life. The ethics gives people orientation how he/she do manything every time every day. Islamic ethics consists of the way how someone interact each other; how someone should do or not to do, how to sit, how to walk, how to eat or drink, how to sleep, or how to get dressed. Al-Qur’an uses three terms to define about dressing, they are: libas, tsiyah, and sarahi. Dressing has a function as covering the body, as assessoris, as the way to do Islamic taqwa, and as an identiy. Dressing ethics of the female students of STAIN Samarinda has been regulated by the rector regulation No 19 of the year 2002 about relation and dressing ethics for the students of STAIN Samarinda.

  19. Approaches to predicting potential impacts of climate change on forest disease: An example with Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; John W. Hanna; Bryce A. Richardson; John E. Lundquist

    2011-01-01

    Climate change will likely have dramatic impacts on forest health because many forest trees could become maladapted to climate. Furthermore, climate change will have additional impacts on forest health through changes in the distribution and severity of forest disease. Methods are needed to predict the influence of climate change on forest disease so that appropriate...

  20. Microwave-stimulated staining of plastic embedded bone marrow sections with the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain: improved staining patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M E; Kok, L P; Moorlag, H E; Gerrits, P O; Suurmeijer, A J

    1987-07-01

    Staining plastic sections with the Romanowsky-Giemsa method is both time-consuming and difficult. This paper reports how the staining time can be reduced to 25 min using microwave irradiation of the staining solution. It is shown that staining results depend on the fixative used, staining temperature, dye concentration and pH of the staining solution as well as on several parameters of the microwave irradiation technique. The staining patterns are improved when compared with those obtained by conventional staining of plastic sections. The colors are more brilliant and greater contrasts are observed. Basophilia, polychromasia, and orthochromasia accompanying red cell maturation are more pronounced. For white cell maturation the initial appearance of specific granules (neutrophil, basophil, and eosinophil) is more evident. Thus, cell classification is easily accomplished using the described technique. It is suggested that microwave-stimulated staining be considered for routine use.

  1. Bioagents and Commercial Algae Products as Integrated Biocide Treatments for Controlling Root Rot Diseases of Some Vegetables under Protected Cultivation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar M. Abdel-Kader

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated commercial blue-green algae extracts and bioagents treatments against vegetables root rot incidence when used as soil drench under greenhouse and plastic house conditions were evaluated. All applied treatments reduced significantly root rot incidence at both pre- and postemergence growth stages of cucumber, cantaloupe, tomato, and pepper plants compared with untreated check control. In pot experiment, the obtained results showed that treatments of Trichoderma harzianum or Bacillus subtilis either alone or combined with commercial algae extracts were significantly superior for reducing root rot disease for two tested vegetable plants compared with the other tested treatments as well as control. It is also observed that rising concentrations of either algae products, Oligo-X or Weed-Max, were reflected in more disease reduction. Promising treatments for controlling root rot disease incidence were applied under plastic houses conditions. As for field trails carried out under plastic houses conditions at different locations, the obtained results revealed that the applied combined treatments significantly reduced root rot incidence compared with fungicide and check control treatments. At all locations it was observed that Weed-Max (2 g/L + Bacillus subtilis significantly reduced disease incidence of grown vegetables compared with Oligo-X (2 mL/L + Trichoderma harzianum treatments. An obvious yield increase in all treatments was significantly higher than in the control. Also, the harvested yield in applied combined treatments at all locations was significantly higher than that in the fungicide and control treatments.

  2. Standardization of the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain: the influence of staining time on the RG-staining pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the influence of staining time on the staining pattern of Romanowsky-Giemsa (RG) type stains is investigated. Smears of rabbit bone marrow and of human venous blood were stained with azure B-eosin Y, azure A-eosin Y and with the cationic dyes alone under varying conditions of staining time and dye concentration. The stained smears were investigated by integrating microdensitometry. DNA-polyacrylamide (PAA) model films were stained with azure A-eosin Y, the extinction of the stained model films was determined by spectrophotometry. With increasing staining time the color of the cell nuclei changed from blue to an intense purple, the texture of the nuclear chromatin became more prominent. Prolonged staining resulted in over-staining of the cell nuclei with loss of a distinct chromatin texture. Besides such factors as dye concentration and pH of the staining solution standardization of staining time may be considered necessary for the reproducibility of the RG staining pattern.

  3. Detection, recognition and management of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases in the southern interior of British Columbia. FRDA report No. 179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.; Merler, H.; Norris, D.

    1992-01-01

    The root diseases caused by Armillaria ostoyae and Phellinus weirii reduce timber productivity and affect other resource values over a substantial area of the southern interior of B.C. This guide describes how to recognize and detect the diseases, the biology of the fungi, and management options for diseased sites. Information on the fungi comes from published work and the authors' observations and unpublished research. The management options presented are based on results from control trials, especially the Skimikin.

  4. Exotic ecosystems: where root disease is not a beneficial component of temperate conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Otrosina

    2003-01-01

    Forest tree species and ecosystems ahve evolved under climatic, geological, and biological forces over eons of time. The present flora represents the sum of these selective forces that have acted upon ancestral and modern species. Adaptations to climatic factors, soils, insects, diseases, and a host of disturbance events, operating at a variety of scales, ahve forged...

  5. Using a metagenomic approach to improve our understanding of Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Ross-Davis; Matt Settles; John W. Hanna; John D. Shaw; Andrew T. Hudak; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics has illuminated our understanding of how microbial communities influence health and disease. Researchers are beginning to characterize what constitutes healthy microbiota in terms of structure, function, and diversity in a variety of environments. Although investigation lags behind the more well-studied human microbiome, a growing body of research is using...

  6. Accelerated staining technique using kitchen microwave oven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Mukunda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Histopathological diagnosis of specimens is greatly dependent on good sample preparation and staining. Both of these processes is governed by diffusion of fluids and dyes in and out of the tissue, which is the key to staining. Diffusion of fluids can be accelerated by the application of heat that reduces the time of staining from hours to the minute. We modified an inexpensive model of kitchen microwave oven for staining. This study is an attempt to compare the reliability of this modified technique against the tested technique of routine staining so as to establish the kitchen microwave oven as a valuable diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: Sixty different tissue blocks were used to prepare 20 pairs of slides for 4 different stains namely hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson′s, 0.1% toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. From each tissue block, two bits of tissues were mounted on two different slides. One slide was stained routinely, and the other stained inside a microwave. A pathologist evaluated the stained slides and the results so obtained were analyzed statistically. Results: Microwave staining considerably cut down the staining time from hours to seconds. Microwave staining showed no loss of cellular and nuclear details, uniform-staining characteristics and was of excellent quality. Interpretation and Conclusion: The cellular details, nuclear details and staining characteristics of microwave stained tissues were better than or equal to the routine stained tissue. The overall quality of microwave-stained sections was found to be better than the routine stained tissue in majority of cases.

  7. Integrated Management of Damping-off, Root and/or Stem Rot Diseases of Chickpea and Efficacy of the Suggested Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montaser Fawzy ABDEL-MONAIM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleven fungal isolates were isolated from naturally infected chickpea roots collected from different locations in New Valley Governorate (Egypt. The isolated fungi were purified and identified as Rhizoctonia solani (5 isolates, Fusarium solani (4 isolates and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (2 isolates. The isolated fungi proved their pathogenicity on cv. Giza 3. Response of chickpea cvs. Giza 1, Giza 2, Giza 3, Giza 4, Giza 88, Giza 195, Giza 531 to infection by the tested fungi was significantly varied. Giza 1 was the most resistant one followed by Giza 531, while the other tested cvs. were highly susceptible. Seven biocontrol agents, namely Bacillus subtilis, B. megaterium, B. cereus, Trichoderma viride, T. harzianum, Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp. isolated from chickpea rhizosphere, were tested for their antagonistic action against the tested pathogens. B. subtilis isolate BSM1, B. megaterium isolate TVM5, T. viride isolate TVM2 and T. harzianum isolate THM4 were the most antagonistic ones to the tested fungi in vitro, while the other isolates were moderate or weak antagonists. The most antagonistic isolates as well as the commercial biocide Rhizo-N were applied as seed treatment for controlling damping-off, root and/or stem rot diseases caused by the tested fungi under greenhouse conditions. The obtained data showed that all tested antagonistic isolates were able to cause significant reduction of damping-off, root and/or stem rot diseases in chickpea plants. T. viride (isolate TVM2 and B. megaterium (isolate BMM5 proved to be the most effective isolates for controlling the diseases. Under field condition, the obtained data indicated that all the tested antagonistic isolates significantly reduced damping-off, root and/or stem rot. T. viride (isolate TVM2 and B. megaterium (isolate BMM5 recorded the highest reduction of damping-off, root and/or stem rot in all sowing dates. Sowing of treated seeds with bioagents in first of November gave the

  8. Biological control of wheat root diseases by the CLP-producing strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Ming; Wen, Shan-Shan; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Mavrodi, Olga V; von Wettstein, Diter; Thomashow, Linda S; Guo, Jian-Hua; Weller, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07, previously isolated from the phyllosphere of wheat grown in Hebei province, China, suppresses the soilborne disease of wheat take-all, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. We report here that strain HC1-07 also suppresses Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8. Strain HC1-07 produced a cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) with a molecular weight of 1,126.42 based on analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Extracted CLP inhibited the growth of G. graminis var. tritici and R. solani in vitro. To determine the role of this CLP in biological control, plasposon mutagenesis was used to generate two nonproducing mutants, HC1-07viscB and HC1-07prtR2. Analysis of regions flanking plasposon insertions in HC1-07prtR2 and HC1-07viscB revealed that the inactivated genes were similar to prtR and viscB, respectively, of the well-described biocontrol strain P. fluorescens SBW25 that produces the CLP viscosin. Both genes in HC1-07 were required for the production of the viscosin-like CLP. The two mutants were less inhibitory to G. graminis var. tritici and R. solani in vitro and reduced in ability to suppress take-all. HC1-07viscB but not HC-07prtR2 was reduced in ability to suppress Rhizoctonia root rot. In addition to CLP production, prtR also played a role in protease production.

  9. Control of spread of Augusta disease caused by tobacco necrosis virus in tulip by composting residual waste of small bulbs, tunics, roots and soil debris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asjes, C.J.; Barnhoorn, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this study the elimination of the infectious virus/fungus complex of tobacco necrosis virus (TNV; cause of Augusta disease in tulip) and Olpidium brassicae in different soil types and residual waste material of soil debris, small tulip bulbs, roots and tunics by temperature treatments of

  10. Transcriptome of an Armillaria root disease pathogen reveals candidate genes involved in host substrate utilization at the host­-pathogen interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. L. Ross-Davis; J. E. Stewart; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; B. J. Knaus; R. Cronn; H. Rai; B. A. Richardson; G. I. McDonald; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2013-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological roles ranging from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes (formerly A. ostoyae), a causal agent of Armillaria root disease, is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range of woody plants across the Northern Hemisphere. This white-rot pathogen grows between trees as rhizomorphs and attacks...

  11. Precommercial thinning in mixed-species conifer plantations affected by armillaria and heterobasidion root diseases in West-Central Oregon and Washington: 30-year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Filip; Joshua J. Bronson; Kristen L. Chadwick; Jeremy B. Filip; Susan J. Frankel; Donald J. Goheen; Ellen M. Goheen; Sylvia R. Mori; Angel L. Saavedra

    2015-01-01

    Four 10- to 20-year-old plantations were precommercially thinned to determine the effects on tree growth and mortality caused by armillaria and heterobasidion root diseases. The plantations represented different species compositions with one each of (1) coastal Douglas-fir and noble fir, (2) Douglas-fir and western hemlock, (3) pure Douglas-fir, and (4) Shasta red fir...

  12. Ethanol and acetone from Douglas-fir roots stressed by Phellinus sulphurascens infection: Implications for detecting diseased trees and for beetle host selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Gladwin Joseph; Doug Westlind; Walter G. Thies

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus sulphurascens (previously the Douglas-fir form of Phellinus weirii) is an important native pathogen causing laminated root rot in forests of western North America. Visual crown symptoms, or attacks by bark or ambrosia beetles appear only during advanced stages of the disease with extensive infection in the lower bole...

  13. The Palestinian-Israeli conflict: a disease for which root causes must be acknowledged and treated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelaish, Izzeldin; Arya, Neil

    2017-09-01

    Fourth of June 2017 marks a half century of the Six Day War, three decades post the first Intifada, seven decades post the Palestinian Nakba (catastrophe), the 70th anniversary of Israeli Independence, and one century post the Balfour Declaration. Both Palestinians and Israelis remain occupied. Five million Palestinians remain sick with hopelessness and despair rendered by years of subjugation. Israelis are stuck, occupied by their historical narrative and transcendental fears. Over two decades have passed since the Oslo accords, which both Israelis and Palestinians hoped might be a historic turning point. This was supposed to put an end to the chronic disease of protracted conflict, allowing Palestinians to enjoy freedom in an independent state side by side to Israel and Israelis to live within peaceful, secure borders with the respect of the international community. Palestinians were ready to give up 78% of their land. Free Palestine would be in the remaining 22%, with East Jerusalem as the capital and a satisfactory solution to the Right of Return. The patient's diagnosis and seeking therapy has been delayed by greed, ignorance, ideology, violence and fear. Accurate diagnosis is needed to successfully heal the wounds and cure this chronic disease.

  14. Comparison of immunohistochemical and modified Giemsa stains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2 cases immunostain could not demonstrate the bacteria but they were identified with modified Giemsa stain while in 5 cases the bacteria were identified by immunostain but not with modified Giemsa stain. The sensitivity of modified Giemsa stain was 85% (CI 66.5-98.8) while the specificity was 89% (CI 60.4 – 97.8).

  15. [Diagnostic stain of helminth eggs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L

    1976-12-01

    A description is given of a diagnostic method for the staining of eggs and larvae of intestinal helminth in smears of both fresh and fixed stool samples. The contents of the eggs and larvae stain red, the background various shades of blue. The most contrasting staining was obtained with thin-walled eggs.

  16. The environmental roots of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and the epigenetic impacts of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineis, Paolo; Stringhini, Silvia; Porta, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing worldwide. We hypothesize that environmental factors (including social adversity, diet, lack of physical activity and pollution) can become "embedded" in the biology of humans. We also hypothesize that the "embedding" partly occurs because of epigenetic changes, i.e., durable changes in gene expression patterns. Our concern is that once such factors have a foundation in human biology, they can affect human health (including NCDs) over a long period of time and across generations. To analyze how worldwide changes in movements of goods, persons and lifestyles (globalization) may affect the "epigenetic landscape" of populations and through this have an impact on NCDs. We provide examples of such changes and effects by discussing the potential epigenetic impact of socio-economic status, migration, and diet, as well as the impact of environmental factors influencing trends in age at puberty. The study of durable changes in epigenetic patterns has the potential to influence policy and practice; for example, by enabling stratification of populations into those who could particularly benefit from early interventions to prevent NCDs, or by demonstrating mechanisms through which environmental factors influence disease risk, thus providing compelling evidence for policy makers, companies and the civil society at large. The current debate on the '25 × 25 strategy', a goal of 25% reduction in relative mortality from NCDs by 2025, makes the proposed approach even more timely. Epigenetic modifications related to globalization may crucially contribute to explain current and future patterns of NCDs, and thus deserve attention from environmental researchers, public health experts, policy makers, and concerned citizens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Histological stain evaluation for machine learning applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy C Azar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A methodology for quantitative comparison of histological stains based on their classification and clustering performance, which may facilitate the choice of histological stains for automatic pattern and image analysis. Background: Machine learning and image analysis are becoming increasingly important in pathology applications for automatic analysis of histological tissue samples. Pathologists rely on multiple, contrasting stains to analyze tissue samples, but histological stains are developed for visual analysis and are not always ideal for automatic analysis. Materials and Methods: Thirteen different histological stains were used to stain adjacent prostate tissue sections from radical prostatectomies. We evaluate the stains for both supervised and unsupervised classification of stain/tissue combinations. For supervised classification we measure the error rate of nonlinear support vector machines, and for unsupervised classification we use the Rand index and the F-measure to assess the clustering results of a Gaussian mixture model based on expectation-maximization. Finally, we investigate class separability measures based on scatter criteria. Results: A methodology for quantitative evaluation of histological stains in terms of their classification and clustering efficacy that aims at improving segmentation and color decomposition. We demonstrate that for a specific tissue type, certain stains perform consistently better than others according to objective error criteria. Conclusions: The choice of histological stain for automatic analysis must be based on its classification and clustering performance, which are indicators of the performance of automatic segmentation of tissue into morphological components, which in turn may be the basis for diagnosis.

  19. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period.

  20. Standardization of Romanowsky stains. The relationship between stain composition and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1978-03-01

    A panel of 17 eminent haematologists has assessed the performance of 5 Romanowsky stains prepared from pure component dyes, comparing the suitability and acceptability of these stains for the preparation of routine blood and bone-marrow films. It was found that the results obtained using the stain described by Marshall et al (1975) were comparable to those obtained using a modification of the stain described by Wittekind et al (1976). The performance of the 3 other stains was less acceptable. Variations in stain formulation have been correlated with stain performance.

  1. Amazonian açai and food dyes for staining arbuscular- micorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lourdes Martins Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizae microscopy requires differential staining of typical structures. Dyes employed, such as trypan blue, pose risks to health and environment. Alternative dyes such as pen ink and aniline have variable coloring efficiency. In this work, Brachiaria decumbens roots, discolored with caustic soda (NaOH, were stained with açai, annatto, saffron, trypan blue and pen inks. There were significant differences among dyes regarding stained mycorrhizal structures and pictures quality. Acai was considered the best alternative dye, with similar results to trypan blue.

  2. Management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode and root wilt fungus on pigeonpea through soil organically enriched with Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza, karanj (Pongamia pinnata) oilseed cake and farmyard manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, B K; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Goswami, Jaideep; Tewari, D D

    2007-11-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare the percentage response of colonization and development of VA-Mycorrhiza (Glomus fasciculatum) on a number of pulse crops viz. cowpea, chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea and lentil under glasshouse conditions. Among the above-mentioned crops, pigeonpea exhibited the best performance and was selected for further studies. In this host the development and colonization percentage of G. fasciculatum was investigated under two separate substrates i. e. soil amended with FYM and karanj oilseed cake keeping a control treatment of field soil. A third treatment amended with karanj oilseed cake and farm yard manure (FYM) was also kept which responded best in terms of colonization percentage. This treatment showing improved plant health as well as integration with G. fasciculatum was selected as an ideal treatment for the management of disease complex caused by root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita and root wilt fungus, Fusarium udum on pigeonpea. Thus the treatment constituting FYM, karanj oilseed cake and VA-Mycorrhiza reduced the disease incidence caused by both maladies to a great extent with the most promising improvement in plant growth parameters as compared to all others. The present investigation, in addition to proposing an ideal eco-friendly treatment for the management of this disease complex also proposed an excellent medium for the proliferation of the obligate bio-protectant, G. fasciculatum.

  3. Effect of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal) root as a feed additive on immunological parameters and disease resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Labeo rohita (Hamilton) fingerlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Deo, Ashutosh D; Riteshkumar, S Tandel; Chanu, Thongam Ibemcha; Das, Arabinda

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of dietary doses of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) root powder on immunological parameters and disease resistance against the bacterial pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila infections in Indian major carp, Labeo rohita fingerlings. Fishes were fed with dry diet containing 0 gkg(-1) (control), 1 gkg(-1) (T(1)), 2 gkg(-1) (T(2)) and 3 gkg(-1) (T(3)) W. somnifera root powder for 42 days. Immunological (NBT level, Phagocytic activity, total immunoglobulin and lysozyme activity) parameters of fishes were examined at 0 days, 14 days, 28 days and 42 days of feeding. Fishes were challenged with A. hydrophila 42 days post feeding and mortalities (%) were recorded over 14 days post-infection. The results demonstrate that fishes fed with W. somnifera root showed enhanced NBT level, Phagocytic activity, total Immunoglobulin level and lysozyme activity (psomnifera at the level of 2 gkg(-1) showed significantly (Psomnifera root powder have a stimulatory effect on immunological parameters and increases disease resistance in L. rohita fingerlings against A. hydrophila infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Symptomology and etiology of a new disease, yellow stunt, and root rot of standing milkvetch caused by Embellisia sp. in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Zhong; Nan, Zhi Biao

    2007-06-01

    An Embellisia sp. has been established as the cause of a new disease of the herbaceous perennial forage legume, 'standing milkvetch' (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) in Northern China, which severely reduces plant density and degrades A. adsurgens stands. The disease was common at an experimental location in Gansu Province where it was recognized by the occurrence of stunted plants with reddish-brown stems and yellow and necrotic leaf blades. An Embellisia sp. was isolated from symptomatic stem, leaf blade, petiole, and root tissues at varying frequencies of up to 90%. Single-spore isolates grew very slowly on PCA, PDA, V-8 and, wheat hay decoction agar. Pathogenicity was confirmed by inoculation of seeds, dipping 2-day-old pre-germinated seedlings in inoculum and spraying inoculum on 6-month-old plants. Symptoms on test plants included yellow leaf lesions, brown lesions on stems and petioles, stunted side-shoots with yellow, small, distorted and necrotic leaves, shoot blight, bud death, crown rot, root rot, and plant death. The disease is named as 'yellow stunt and root rot' of A. adsurgens to distinguish it from diseases caused by other known pathogens. Embellisia sp. is also pathogenic to A. sinicus but not to 11 other tested plant species.

  5. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of cultured neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbierato, Massimo; Argentini, Carla; Skaper, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Immunofluorescence is a technique allowing the visualization of a specific protein or antigen in cells or tissue sections by binding a specific antibody chemically conjugated with a fluorescent dye such as fluorescein isothiocyanate. There are two major types of immunofluorescence staining methods: (1) direct immunofluorescence staining in which the primary antibody is labeled with fluorescence dye and (2) indirect immunofluorescence staining in which a secondary antibody labeled with fluorochrome is used to recognize a primary antibody. This chapter describes procedures for the application of indirect immunofluorescence staining to neural cells in culture.

  6. Direct gram stain and urease test to detect Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, K G; Dworkin, B M

    1990-01-01

    Antral biopsies were obtained by gastrointestinal endoscopy on 143 adult patients with dyspeptic symptoms of gastritis or peptic ulcer disease. A direct Gram stain and a direct urease test were performed on each biopsy in addition to culture. Forty-three biopsies (30%) were considered positive for Helicobacter pylori based on culture or histologic examination, or both. Thirty-one biopsies (72% sensitivity) were positive for both direct tests, whereas 95 of 100 negative cultures were negative for both tests. Thirty-eight of the 43 positive biopsies were Gram stain positive (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 100%). The direct urease test alone was positive at 4 hr for 29 biopsies (sensitivity, 67%; specificity, 100%) and at 24 hr for 38 biopsies (sensitivity, 74%; specificity, 95%). Rapid presumptive diagnosis of H. pylori in antral biopsies was obtained when at least one direct test, Gram stain or urease, was positive.

  7. Stain-free histopathology by programmable supercontinuum pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Marjanovic, Marina; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Chaney, Eric J.; Zhao, Youbo; You, Sixian; Wilson, William L.; Xu, Bingwei; Dantus, Marcos; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    The preparation, staining, visualization and interpretation of histological images of tissue is well accepted as the gold standard process for the diagnosis of disease. These methods have a long history of development, and are used ubiquitously in pathology, despite being highly time- and labour-intensive. Here, we introduce a unique optical imaging platform and methodology for label-free multimodal multiphoton microscopy that uses a novel photonic-crystal fibre source to generate tailored chemical contrast based on programmable supercontinuum pulses. We demonstrate the collection of optical signatures of the tumour microenvironment, including evidence of mesoscopic biological organization, tumour cell migration and (lymph-) angiogenesis collected directly from fresh ex vivo mammary tissue. Acquisition of these optical signatures and other cellular or extracellular features, which are largely absent from histologically processed and stained tissue, combined with an adaptable platform for optical alignment-free programmable-contrast imaging, offers the potential to translate stain-free molecular histopathology into routine clinical use.

  8. First report of Armillaria sinapina, a cause of armillaria root disease, associated with a variety of forest tree hosts on sites with diverse climates in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. E. Lundquist; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; G. I. McDonald

    2009-01-01

    In August of 2007, a preliminary survey was conducted in Alaska to evaluate potential impacts of climate change on forest trees. Armillaria sinapina, a root-disease pathogen, was isolated from conifer and hardwood hosts on climatically diverse sites spanning 675 km from the Kenai Peninsula to the Arctic Circle. Seven isolates (NKAK1, NKAK2, NKAK5, NKAK6, NKAK9F, NKAK13...

  9. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) root proteome and differentially expressed root proteins between hybrid and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao; Ni, Zhongfu; Yao, Yingyin; Xie, Chaojie; Li, Zhenxing; Wu, Haiyan; Zhang, Yinhong; Sun, Qixin

    2007-10-01

    To better understand the development of wheat roots, a reference map of the major soluble proteins of wheat roots was established using a combination of 2-DE and MALDI TOF MS and MS/MS, and a total of 450 protein spots were detected with silver staining in a pH ranges of 4-7, of which 282 spots corresponding to 240 proteins were identified. These identified proteins were grouped into diverse functional categories. In comparison with a wheat leave proteome, in root, proteins involved in metabolism and transport were over-represented, whereas proteins involved in energy, disease and defense, transcription, and signal transduction were under-represented. To further get an insight into the molecular basis of wheat heterosis, differential proteome analysis between hybrid and parents were performed. A total of 45 differentially expressed protein spots were detected, and both quantitative and qualitative differences could be observed. Moreover, 25 of the 45 differentially expressed protein spots were identified, which were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, energy, cell growth and division, disease and defense, secondary metabolism. These results indicated that hybridization between two parental lines can cause expression differences between wheat hybrid and its parents not only at mRNA levels but also at protein abundances.

  10. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  11. Evaluation of root-knot nematode disease control and plant growth promotion potential of biofertilizer Ning shield on Trichosanthes kirilowii in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Hao; Xie, Ping; Li, Ke; Xie, Yue-Sheng; Chen, Liu-Jun; Wang, Jin-Suo; Xu, Quan; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2017-11-11

    Biofertilizer Ning shield was composed of different strains of plant growth promotion bacteria. In this study, the plant growth promotion and root-knot nematode disease control potential on Trichosanthes kirilowii in the field were evaluated. The application of Ning shield significantly reduced the diseases severity caused by Meloidogyne incognita, the biocontrol efficacy could reached up to 51.08%. Ning shield could also promote the growth of T. kirilowii in the field by increasing seedling emergence, height and the root weight. The results showed that the Ning shield could enhance the production yield up to 36.26%. Ning shield could also promote the plant growth by increasing the contents of available nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and organic matter, and increasing the contents of leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment. Moreover, Ning shield could efficiently enhance the medicinal compositions of Trichosanthes, referring to the polysaccharides and trichosanthin. Therefore, Ning shield is a promising biofertilizer, which can offer beneficial effects to T. kirilowii growers, including the plant growth promotion, the biological control of root-knot disease and enhancement of the yield and the medicinal quality. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: Coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Dogruk Kacar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  13. Juvenile localized scleroderma with port wine stain: coincidental or possible common pathogenetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Seval Dogruk; Ozuguz, Pinar; Polat, Serap; Kacar, Emre; Polat, Onur; Tokyol, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    Port wine stain and juvenile localized scleroderma are two different dermatoses usually encountered in pediatric age group. Up to now, there are reports of morphea patients initially diagnosed and treated as port wine stain. Coexistence of both diseases is not found yet. We herein present a case of juvenile localized scleroderma on the left side of trunk, with congenital port wine stain located on the ipsilateral face at V1-V2 distribution.

  14. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-01-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns...

  15. Root Hairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  16. Standard specimens for stain calibration: application to Romanowsky-Giemsa staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J N; Weir, B; Collins, D N

    1990-01-01

    Standardized specimens with reproducible staining properties were fabricated from extracts of biological objects (bovine liver, nucleoprotamine and defatted muscle). The standard specimens were stained with two formulations of the Romanowsky-Giemsa stain (RG), using the same azure B and eosin Y. One formulation used methanol and Sorensen's buffer and the other DMSO and Hepes buffer as solvents. The standard specimens were stained either in the composite stain or in the individual dyes dissolved in the same solvents and at the same concentration as the composite stain. Solution spectroscopy demonstrated different spectra for the two formulations with some wavelength regions varying by more than an order of magnitude. The RG spectra were also very different from those of the individual dyes dissolved at the RG concentration in the respective solvents. The stained standard specimens were analyzed by microspectrophotometry and were found to have spectra similar to those of cell smears. Furthermore, the standard specimens were shown to be a repeatable substrate for stain uptake. The transmitted light intensity from random fields of the same standardized specimen varied +/- 5%. When specimens were stained at the same time, the specimen-to-specimen variation depended on preparation conditions and the measurement wavelength, but was as good as +/- 5% for some conditions. The quantitative stain performance of both formulations was studied and compared. The standardized specimens provide a tool for the quantitative study of staining processes and specimen preparation procedures and for stain calibration.

  17. Effect of (/sup 60/cobalt) gamma rays on growth and root rot diseases in mungbean (vigna radiata L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, N.; Dawar, S.; Zaki, M.J.; Abass, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Present investigation showed that gamma rays influences suppressive effect on root rot fungi such as Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn and Fusarium spp., and inducive effect on growth parameters of mung bean (Vigna radiata L.). Seeds of mung bean were treated with gamma rays (/sup 60/Cobalt) at time periods of 0 and 4 minutes and stored for 90 days at room temperature to determine its effect on growth parameters and infection of root infecting fungi. All treatments of gamma rays enhanced the growth parameters as compared to untreated plants. Infection of M. phaseolina, R. solani and Fusarium spp., were significantly decreased on mung bean seeds treated with gamma rays. Gamma rays significantly increased the growth parameters and controlled the root rot fungi up to 90 days of storage of seeds. (author)

  18. Transgenic sweet potato expressing thionin from barley gives resistance to black rot disease caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata in leaves and storage roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Tomoko; Shimamura, Takashi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Hori, Etsuko; Koda, Katsunori; Otani, Motoyasu; Hirai, Masana; Nakamura, Kenzo; Imaeda, Takao

    2012-06-01

    Black rot of sweet potato caused by pathogenic fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata severely deteriorates both growth of plants and post-harvest storage. Antimicrobial peptides from various organisms have broad range activities of killing bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungi. Plant thionin peptide exhibited anti-fungal activity against C. fimbriata. A gene for barley α-hordothionin (αHT) was placed downstream of a strong constitutive promoter of E12Ω or the promoter of a sweet potato gene for β-amylase of storage roots, and introduced into sweet potato commercial cultivar Kokei No. 14. Transgenic E12Ω:αHT plants showed high-level expression of αHT mRNA in both leaves and storage roots. Transgenic β-Amy:αHT plants showed sucrose-inducible expression of αHT mRNA in leaves, in addition to expression in storage roots. Leaves of E12Ω:αHT plants exhibited reduced yellowing upon infection by C. fimbriata compared to leaves of non-transgenic Kokei No. 14, although the level of resistance was weaker than resistance cultivar Tamayutaka. Storage roots of both E12Ω:αHT and β-Amy:αHT plants exhibited reduced lesion areas around the site inoculated with C. fimbriata spores compared to Kokei No. 14, and some of the transgenic lines showed resistance level similar to Tamayutaka. Growth of plants and production of storage roots of these transgenic plants were not significantly different from non-transgenic plants. These results highlight the usefulness of transgenic sweet potato expressing antimicrobial peptide to reduce damages of sweet potato from the black rot disease and to reduce the use of agricultural chemicals.

  19. Multicenter Assessment of Gram Stain Error Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Linoj P; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Harrington, Amanda; Cavagnolo, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Gram stains remain the cornerstone of diagnostic testing in the microbiology laboratory for the guidance of empirical treatment prior to availability of culture results. Incorrectly interpreted Gram stains may adversely impact patient care, and yet there are no comprehensive studies that have evaluated the reliability of the technique and there are no established standards for performance. In this study, clinical microbiology laboratories at four major tertiary medical care centers evaluated Gram stain error rates across all nonblood specimen types by using standardized criteria. The study focused on several factors that primarily contribute to errors in the process, including poor specimen quality, smear preparation, and interpretation of the smears. The number of specimens during the evaluation period ranged from 976 to 1,864 specimens per site, and there were a total of 6,115 specimens. Gram stain results were discrepant from culture for 5% of all specimens. Fifty-eight percent of discrepant results were specimens with no organisms reported on Gram stain but significant growth on culture, while 42% of discrepant results had reported organisms on Gram stain that were not recovered in culture. Upon review of available slides, 24% (63/263) of discrepant results were due to reader error, which varied significantly based on site (9% to 45%). The Gram stain error rate also varied between sites, ranging from 0.4% to 2.7%. The data demonstrate a significant variability between laboratories in Gram stain performance and affirm the need for ongoing quality assessment by laboratories. Standardized monitoring of Gram stains is an essential quality control tool for laboratories and is necessary for the establishment of a quality benchmark across laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Use of cross-flow membrane filtration in a recirculating hydroponic system to suppress root disease in pepper caused by Pythium myriotylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C; Hammer, William

    2009-05-01

    Zoosporic pathogens in the genera Pythium and Phytophthora cause extensive root disease epiphytotics in recirculating hydroponic vegetable-production greenhouses. Zoospore cysts of Pythium myriotylum Drechsler were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cross-flow membrane filters to control pythiaceous pathogens in recirculating hydroponic systems. Four membrane filter brands (Honeycomb, Polypure, Polymate, and Absolife) were tested alone or in combination to determine which filters would effectively remove infective propagules of P. myriotylum from solutions and reduce disease incidence and severity. Zoospore cysts of P. myriotylum generally measured 8 to 10 microm, and it was hypothesized that filters with pore-sizespepper plants from root infection. Single-filter assays with Honeycomb and Polypure brands removed 85 to 95% of zoospore cysts when pore sizes were rated at 1, 5, 10, 20, or 30 microm. Single-filter assays of Polymate and Absolife brands were more effective, exhibiting apparently 100% removal of zoospore cysts from nutrient solutions on filters rated at 1 to 10 microm. However, plant bioassays with Honeycomb and Polymate single filters failed to give long-term protection of pepper plants. Double-filter assays with 1- and 0.5-microm Polymate filters significantly increased the protection of pepper plants grown in nutrient film technique systems but, eventually, root disease and plant wilt could be observed. Insect transmissions by shore flies were not factors in disease development. Scanning electron microscopy images of zoospore cysts entrapped on Polymate filters revealed zoospore cysts that were either fully encysted, partially encysted, or of unusually small size (3 microm in diameter). It was concluded that either the atypically small or pliable pleomorphic zoospore cysts were able to penetrate filter membranes that theoretically should have captured them.

  1. Effects of Cichorium Intybus L. Root Extract on Secretory Activity of the Stomach in Health and Ulcer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylova, S G; Vymyatnina, Z K; Zueva, E P; Amosova, E N; Razina, T G; Litvinenko, V I

    2015-09-01

    Gastroprotective effect of Cichorium intybus L. root extract is demonstrated on H. Shay's model of experimental ulcer in rats. The effect is attributed to the antisecretory activity of the plant and stimulation of defense barrier function of the gastric mucosa. The regulatory effect of the phytocomplex on seasonal characteristics of the gastric secretory and defense functions in dogs with Basov's fistula is detected.

  2. Purified azure B as a reticulocyte stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Bentley, S A; Lewis, S M

    1976-01-01

    A comparison has been made between reticulocyte preparations stained with purified azure B and with several commerically available batches of brilliant cresyl blue and new methylene blue. Marked variations were observed in the composition and staining performances of the various batches of the two commerically available dyes. Although there were no significant differences in reticulocyte counts obtained with these two dyes, varying amounts of an extraneous, particulate dye deposit were present in these preparations, making accuracte counting both tedious and timeconsuming. Purified azure B, on the other hand, gave reproducibly stained, deposit-free preparations. Reticulocyte counts obtained from azure B preparations correlated almost exactly with those determined using new methylene blue. Purified azure B is therefore recommended as a convenient reticulocyte stain for routine use. Images PMID:64475

  3. Research on pre-staining gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Ruibo; Liu Yushuang; Zhang Ping; Liu Jingran; Zhao Guofen; Zhang Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gel electrophoresis is a powerful biochemical separation technique. Most biological molecules are completely transparent in the visible region of light, so it is necessary to use staining to show the results after gel electrophoresis, and the general steps of conventional staining methods are time-consuming. Purpose: We try to develop a novel approach to simplify the gel electrophoresis: Pre-Staining Gel Electrophoresis (PSGE), which can make the gel electrophoresis results monitored in real time. Methods: Pre-stain the protein samples with Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) for 30 min before loading the sample into the gel well. Results and Conclusion: PSGE can be successfully used to analyze the binding efficiency of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and amphiphilic polymer via chemical coupling and physical absorption, and the double PSGE also shows a great potential in bio-analytical chemistry. (authors)

  4. New Grocott Stain without Using Chromic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiogama, Kazuya; Kitazawa, Kayo; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Onouchi, Takanori; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We established a new “ecological” Grocott stain for demonstrating fungi, based upon a 4R principle of refusal, reduction, reuse, and recycle of waste management. Conventional Grocott stain employs environmentally harsh 5% chromic acid for oxidization. Initially, we succeeded in reducing the concentration of chromic acid from 5% to 1% by incubating the solution at 60°C and using five-fold diluted chromic acid solution at which point it was reusable. Eventually, we reached the refusal level where 1% periodic acid oxidization was efficient enough, when combined with preheating of sections in the electric jar, microwave oven, or pressure pan. For convenience sake, we recommend pressure pan heating in tap water for 10 min. Stainability of fungi in candidiasis and aspergillosis was comparable with conventional Grocott stain, while Mucor hyphae showed enhanced staining. The modified sequence was further applicable to detecting a variety of mycotic pathogens in paraffin sections. Our environmentally-friendly Grocott stain also has the advantage of avoiding risk of human exposure to hexavalent chromium solution in the histopathology laboratory. The simple stain sequence is can be easily applied worldwide

  5. Stain Removal Assessment of Two Manual Toothbrushes with an Interproximal Tooth Stain Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Svetlana; Grender, Julie M; Terézhalmy, Geza; Archila, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    To assess a newly developed index to measure interproximal stain and evaluate the stain removal efficacy of two commercially available manual toothbrushes. This was a randomized, examiner-blind, parallel-group, two-treatment clinical trial of two weeks' duration. Subjects qualified for the study if they had an average Modified Lobene Stain Index of ≥ 1.5 from two anterior teeth. At baseline, subjects brushed in front of a mirror for one minute under supervision. All subjects were provided with a standard 0.243% sodium fluoride dentifrice and were randomly assigned either an Oral-B Pulsar manual brush (OBP) or a Colgate Whitening manual brush (CW) to use for two weeks. Stain was reassessed after two weeks of product use. Stain measurements were conducted using the Modified Lobene Stain Index and the new Interproximal Modified Lobene Stain Index, which allows for assessment of stain in hard-to-reach areas using the same area and intensity scales as the Modified Lobene Stain Index. Use of the two manual brushes resulted in statistically significant reductions in surface stain relative to baseline after two weeks of use. Median stain reductions were 78% and 60% for the OBP and CW, respectively, as measured by the Modified Lobene Stain Index. The mean changes in the composite scores from baseline to week two were 1.85 and 1.57 for the two treatment groups, respectively. Statistically significant reductions from baseline were also found for the intensity and extent of stain measures (p brush and 83% reduction with the CW brush. For the gingival sites, the median stain removal percentages were 83% and 50%, respectively For the body region, a median stain removal of 100% was found for both treatment groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups for the mean composite scores for either index. Both manual brushes showed effective stain removal, including interproximal hard-to-reach sites. The Interproximal Modified Lobene Stain Index

  6. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar Purkayastha, Gargee; Mangar, Preeti; Saha, Aniruddha; Saha, Dipanwita

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC) and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1) in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens.

  7. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargee Dhar Purkayastha

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1 in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens.

  8. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Preeti; Saha, Aniruddha

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC) and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1) in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens. PMID:29466418

  9. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  10. Phytophthora cinnamon causing stem canker and root rot of nursery-grown Platanus × acerifolia: first report in the Northern emisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo PILOTTI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lethal stem and root cankers were observed in nursery-grown Platanus × acerifolia trees in Rome. Externally, canker lesions appeared as bluish or blackish areas starting from the stem base and extending upward. Inner bark was necrotised. In some cases an irregularly-shaped callus reaction attempted to heal the bark lesions. Black-stained necrosis affected the primary roots and the small branch roots to different degrees. The presence of Ceratocystis platani was excluded in the diseased trees. Phytophthora-like organisms were isolated from the altered tissue. Morphological and ITS-region-based analyses identified the isolates as Phytophthora cinnamomi. A pathogenicity test confirmed P. cinnamomi as the causal agent of the disease here defined as: stem canker and root rot of plane tree. This is the first report of P. cinnamomi in Platanus spp. in the Northern emisphere.

  11. Potential Value of YAP Staining in Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Atif A; Habeebu, Sultan S; Sherman, Ashley K; Ye, Shui Q; Wood, Nicole; Chastain, Katherine M; Tsokos, Maria G

    2018-03-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a common malignancy of soft tissue, subclassified as alveolar (ARMS), pleomorphic (PRMS), spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS), and embryonal (ERMS) types. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a member of the Hippo pathway and a transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of YAP in different RMSs, arranged in tissue microarray (TMA) and whole slide formats. Pertinent clinical data including patient age, gender, tumor location, and clinical stage were collected. Out of 96 TMA cases, 30 cases (31%) were pleomorphic, 27 (28%) were embryonal, 24 (25%) alveolar, and 15 (16%) spindle cell. Positive nuclear YAP staining was seen in the PRMS (17/30, 56.7%), SRMS (7/15, 46.7%), ERMS (19/27 or 70%), and less in ARMS (37.5%). YAP nuclear staining was significantly more prevalent in ERMS than ARMS ( p=0.02). Of the 41 whole slide cases, nuclear staining was detected in all ARMS but was restricted in distribution to 30% staining. These results highlight the role of YAP in RMS tumorigenesis, a fact that can be useful in engineering targeted therapy. Restricted nuclear YAP staining (<30% of cells) may be of value in the diagnosis of ARMS.

  12. Multicolored stain-free histopathology with coherent Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudiger, Christian W; Pfannl, Rolf; Orringer, Daniel A; Saar, Brian G; Ji, Minbiao; Zeng, Qing; Ottoboni, Linda; Wei, Ying; Ying, Wei; Waeber, Christian; Sims, John R; De Jager, Philip L; Sagher, Oren; Philbert, Martin A; Xu, Xiaoyin; Kesari, Santosh; Xie, X Sunney; Young, Geoffrey S

    2012-10-01

    Conventional histopathology with hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) has been the gold standard for histopathological diagnosis of a wide range of diseases. However, it is not performed in vivo and requires thin tissue sections obtained after tissue biopsy, which carries risk, particularly in the central nervous system. Here we describe the development of an alternative, multicolored way to visualize tissue in real-time through the use of coherent Raman imaging (CRI), without the use of dyes. CRI relies on intrinsic chemical contrast based on vibrational properties of molecules and intrinsic optical sectioning by nonlinear excitation. We demonstrate that multicolor images originating from CH(2) and CH(3) vibrations of lipids and protein, as well as two-photon absorption of hemoglobin, can be obtained with subcellular resolution from fresh tissue. These stain-free histopathological images show resolutions similar to those obtained by conventional techniques, but do not require tissue fixation, sectioning or staining of the tissue analyzed.

  13. Adversarial Stain Transfer for Histopathology Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentaieb, Aicha; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2018-03-01

    It is generally recognized that color information is central to the automatic and visual analysis of histopathology tissue slides. In practice, pathologists rely on color, which reflects the presence of specific tissue components, to establish a diagnosis. Similarly, automatic histopathology image analysis algorithms rely on color or intensity measures to extract tissue features. With the increasing access to digitized histopathology images, color variation and its implications have become a critical issue. These variations are the result of not only a variety of factors involved in the preparation of tissue slides but also in the digitization process itself. Consequently, different strategies have been proposed to alleviate stain-related tissue inconsistencies in automatic image analysis systems. Such techniques generally rely on collecting color statistics to perform color matching across images. In this work, we propose a different approach for stain normalization that we refer to as stain transfer. We design a discriminative image analysis model equipped with a stain normalization component that transfers stains across datasets. Our model comprises a generative network that learns data set-specific staining properties and image-specific color transformations as well as a task-specific network (e.g., classifier or segmentation network). The model is trained end-to-end using a multi-objective cost function. We evaluate the proposed approach in the context of automatic histopathology image analysis on three data sets and two different analysis tasks: tissue segmentation and classification. The proposed method achieves superior results in terms of accuracy and quality of normalized images compared to various baselines.

  14. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  15. News from the biological stain commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiernan, J.A.; Lyon, Hans Oluf

    2008-01-01

    In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems of the Internati......In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems...

  16. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper summarizes the different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots, exemplified by trauma and orthodontic treatment. The concept of the paper is to summarize and explain symptoms and signs of importance for avoiding resorption during...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost......-an ectodermal tissue layer (Malassez′s epithelium), a middle layer-composed by the collagen-mesodermal tissue layer, and an innermost root-close innervation layer. Abnormalities in one of these tissue layers are thought to cause inflammatory processes in the periodontal membrane comparable to inflammatory...

  17. Licorice Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Licorice Root Share: On This Page Background How Much Do ... This fact sheet provides basic information about licorice root—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources for ...

  18. Identification of Cyclospora cayetanensis in stool using different stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, A Y

    1998-08-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis, a newly emerging coccidian protozoa is world-wide in distribution. In the present study, different concentrations and staining techniques were used for identification of Cyclospora. Formol-ether sedimentation and Sheather's sugar flotation were used as concentration techniques and the different stains used were: the modified Ziehl-Neelsen, Giemsa, safranin-methylene blue, modifications of trichrome stain, calcoflour white and finally phenol-auramine. The safranin stain was the best, as it stained all the oocysts of Cyclospora uniformly, besides being rapid and easily applicable in the laboratories. Phenol-auramine stained the oocysts well, where both the wall and internal contents fluoresced brightly. With the calcoflour white stain, only the wall of oocysts took that fluorescent stain. The modified Ziehl-Neelsen stained some of the oocysts well, yet great variability in the staining pattern was noticed. Cyclospora oocysts were not efficiently stained with either trichrome modifications or Giemsa stains.

  19. Selective Root Retreatment: A Novel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudera, William J

    2015-08-01

    Root canal retreatment is traditionally considered an "all or none" treatment approach. It is typically recommended that all restorative and obturation materials be removed from all roots regardless of the presence or absence of periapical pathosis. In contrast, surgical endodontics is not viewed as an "all or none" treatment approach. Traditionally, only the diseased root(s) is addressed via root-end resection and root-end filling. The use of cone-beam computed tomographic imaging allows for a more accurate evaluation of the periapical status of individual roots associated with multirooted teeth. This information has introduced a novel and conservative treatment alternative for previously endodontically treated teeth with multiple roots presenting with post-treatment disease. This new approach is termed selective root retreatment. Advanced imaging allows the clinician to make predictable treatment decisions with respect to the presence or absence of periapical pathosis of individual roots as opposed to making assumptions about the tooth as a whole. Selective root retreatment combines the approach of nonsurgical retreatment with the selectivity of surgical root resection. In this manner, retreatment could be limited to a single root or roots clearly showing periapical pathosis while leaving the root(s) with no visible or perceived pathosis untouched. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antifungal activity of fabricated mesoporous alumina nanoparticles against root rot disease of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Mohamed; Derbalah, Aly; Hamza, Amany; Mohamed, Ahmed; El Safty, Sherif

    2017-06-01

    The present work involved the synthesis and characterisation of mesoporous alumina sphere (MAS) nanoparticles to evaluate their biological activity against tomato root rot caused by Fusarium oxysporium, as compared with the recommended fungicide, tolclofos-methyl, under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The effects of MAS nanoparticles on the growth of tomato plants were also evaluated and compared with those of tolclofos-methyl. The physical characteristics and structural features of MAS nanoparticles, such as their large surface-area-to-volume ratio, active surface sites and open channel pores, caused high antifungal efficacy against F. oxysporium. MAS nanoparticles presented an antifungal potential similar to that of tolclofos-methyl and much greater than that of the control under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The highest growth parameters were recorded in tomato plants treated with MAS nanoparticles, followed by those treated with tolclofos-methyl. Our study demonstrated the possible use of cylindrically cubic MAS nanoparticles as an effective alternative for the control of Fusarium root rot in tomato. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Fungal Root Microbiome from Healthy and Brittle Leaf Diseased Date Palm Trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Reveals a Hidden Untapped Arsenal of Antibacterial and Broad Spectrum Antifungal Secondary Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefteh, Fedia B.; Daoud, Amal; Chenari Bouket, Ali; Alenezi, Faizah N.; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Kadri, Adel; Gharsallah, Neji; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore and compare the composition, metabolic diversity and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi colonizing internal tissues of healthy and brittle leaf diseased (BLD) date palm trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) widely cultivated in arid zones of Tunisia. A total of 52 endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy and BLD roots of date palm trees, identified based on internal transcribed spacer-rDNA sequence analysis and shown to represent 13 species belonging to five genera. About 36.8% of isolates were shared between healthy and diseased root fungal microbiomes, whereas 18.4 and 44.7% of isolates were specific to healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes, respectively. All isolates were able to produce at least two of the screened enzymes including amylase, cellulase, chitinase, pectinase, protease, laccase and lipase. A preliminary screening of the isolates using disk diffusion method for antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria and antifungal activities against three phytopathogenic fungi indicated that healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes displayed interesting bioactivities against examined bacteria and broad spectrum bioactivity against fungal pathogens. Some of these endophytic fungi (17 isolates) were fermented and their extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial potential against bacterial and fungal isolates. Results revealed that fungal extracts exhibited antibacterial activities and were responsible for approximately half of antifungal activities against living fungi. These results suggest a strong link between fungal bioactivities and their secondary metabolite arsenal. EtOAc extracts of Geotrichum candidum and Thielaviopsis punctulata originating from BLD microbiome gave best results against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.78 mg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (6.25 mg/mL). G. candidum gave the best result against

  2. Staining of Platyhelminthes by herbal dyes: An eco-friendly technique for the taxonomist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An environment compatible technique to stain Platyhelminthes, Fasciola gigantica, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Taenia solium, and Moniezia expansa using aqueous and alcoholic extract of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris, China rose (Hibiscus rosasinensis, and red rose (Rosa hybrida were described to minimized the deleterious effects of the synthetic dyes. Materials and Methods: Aqueous/ethanolic extracts of roses were extracted from the flowers while red beet was extracted from the roots. Results: Stained helminthes acquired a comparable level of pigmentation with the distinction of their internal structure in these natural dyes. The flukes (liver and rumen internal structure, oral and ventral/posterior sucker, cirrus sac, gravid uterus, testes, ovary, and vitallaria were appeared pink color in aqueous and alcoholic extract of either China or red rose and yellow to brown color in sugar beet stain. The interior of the proglottid of T. solium and M. expansa took yellow to brown color with good contrast in sugar beet stain and of pink to pink-red in China and red rose stain. Conclusion: The extract of roses (red rose followed by China rose followed by red beet possess the potential to replace the conventional stains in the taxonomic study of Platyhelminthes parasites.

  3. Defining the Core Citrus Leaf- and Root-Associated Microbiota: Factors Associated with Community Structure and Implications for Managing Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Ryan A; Lorca, Graciela L; Meyer, Julie L; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Teplitski, Max

    2017-06-01

    Stable associations between plants and microbes are critical to promoting host health and productivity. The objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that restructuring of the core microbiota may be associated with the progression of huanglongbing (HLB), the devastating citrus disease caused by Liberibacter asiaticus , Liberibacter americanus , and Liberibacter africanus The microbial communities of leaves ( n = 94) and roots ( n = 79) from citrus trees that varied by HLB symptom severity, cultivar, location, and season/time were characterized with Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The taxonomically rich communities contained abundant core members (i.e., detected in at least 95% of the respective leaf or root samples), some overrepresented site-specific members, and a diverse community of low-abundance variable taxa. The composition and diversity of the leaf and root microbiota were strongly associated with HLB symptom severity and location; there was also an association with host cultivar. The relative abundance of Liberibacter spp. among leaf microbiota positively correlated with HLB symptom severity and negatively correlated with alpha diversity, suggesting that community diversity decreases as symptoms progress. Network analysis of the microbial community time series identified a mutually exclusive relationship between Liberibacter spp. and members of the Burkholderiaceae , Micromonosporaceae , and Xanthomonadaceae This work confirmed several previously described plant disease-associated bacteria, as well as identified new potential implications for biological control. Our findings advance the understanding of (i) plant microbiota selection across multiple variables and (ii) changes in (core) community structure that may be a precondition to disease establishment and/or may be associated with symptom progression. IMPORTANCE This study provides a comprehensive overview of the core microbial community within the microbiomes of plant hosts that vary

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of port-wine stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: PAI uses pulsed

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging of Port-Wine Stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Mulder, M.J.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. - Study Design/Materials and Methods: PAI uses

  6. A comparative assessment of commonly employed staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following an increase in the number of reports of Cryptosporidium infections and the problems encountered in detecting these organisms in faecal smears, a comparative assessment of a modification of the Sheather's flotation technique and other commonly employed staining procedures proved the modified Sheather's ...

  7. A comparative assessment of commonly employed staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-16

    Mar 16, 1991 ... methylene blue;8 fluorescence (auramine-phenoI9 and direct immunofluorescence1o. • ll. ); negative staining (periodic acid-. Schiff12. ); and flotation (Sheather's ..... using a direct immunofluorescence assay. Pediatr Infect Dis 1986; 5: 139-142. 12. Horen WP. Detection of Cryptosporidium in human faecal ...

  8. The Language of Stained-Glass Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Charl Anne

    2010-01-01

    The splendor and beauty of stained glass punctuates any room. In this article, the author describes a cross-curriculum project which incorporated the French classes' research and written study of France in the Middle Ages. For the project the author suggested Sainte-Chapelle which is considered a reliquary and was built by Louis IX to house the…

  9. Corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Slomovic, Allan R.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to report a case of corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline. METHODS: A patient with crystalline keratopathy caused by Streptococcus viridans after corneal transplantation was treated topically with tetracycline eye drops, based on results of

  10. Gram-stain-based antimicrobial selection reduces cost and overuse compared with Japanese guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsuha, Sanefumi; Shiiki, Soichi; Narita, Masashi

    2015-10-26

    The Gram stain has been used as an essential tool for antimicrobial stewardship in our hospital since the 1970s. The objective of this study was to clarify the difference in the targeted therapies selected based on the Gram stain and simulated empirical therapies based on the antimicrobial guidelines used in Japan. A referral-hospital-based prospective descriptive study was undertaken between May 2013 and April 2014 in Okinawa, Japan. All enrolled patients were adults who had been admitted to the Division of Infectious Diseases through the emergency room with suspected bacterial infection at one of three sites: respiratory system, urinary tract, or skin and soft tissues. The study outcomes were the types and effectiveness of the antibiotics initially selected, and their total costs. Two hundred eight patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 80 years. A significantly narrower spectrum of antibiotics was selected based on the Gram stain than was selected based on the Japanese guidelines. The treatments based on the Gram stain and on the guidelines were estimated to be equally highly effective. The total cost of antimicrobials after Gram-stain testing was less than half the cost after the guidelines were followed. Compared with the Japanese guidelines, the Gram stain dramatically reduced the overuse of broad-spectrum antimicrobials without affecting the effectiveness of the treatment. Drug costs were reduced by half when the Gram stain was used. The Gram stain should be included in all antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  11. Seasonal and spatial distribution of roots and arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (% of total roots length) was assessed after staining and observation under a compound microscope. Spores were extracted from soils by sucrose centrifugation and counted under the microscope. Root concentrations (cm per 100 g of dry soil) were greater on A. melliferathan on A. laeta ...

  12. Aluminium localization and toxicity symptoms related to root growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Morin staining showed the presence of Al3+ deep within the roots of the sensitive genotype, indicating that the metal was able to penetrate beyond the first few cell layers. In the tolerant genotype, Al3+ penetration was restricted to the first two cell layers. Ruptures in exodermis and epidermis layers by lateral root protrusions ...

  13. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures of...

  14. A More Accurate Approach to Amyloid Detection and Subtyping: Combining in situ Congo Red Staining and Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Thomas; Bachmann, Matthias; Grieshaber, Susanne; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the result of various, differently approachable diseases. It is vital to subtype the amyloid deposits in order to establish and finally treat the underlying disease properly. Besides the classical staining with Congo red, further procedures like immunohistochemical staining are needed for classification. Here, we present a more accurate approach using Congo red/immunohistochemical double staining easily applicable in routine diagnostics. Modifications of the Congo red staining technique and the immunohistochemical procedures were needed in order to combine both staining procedures on one slide. The evaluation was done using conventional light and fluorescence microscopy. By shortening the staining time for Congo red to 10 s and by modification regarding endogenous peroxidase blockage, accurate results could be obtained for evaluating the Congo red/immunohistochemistry double staining using a fluorescence microscope. Sections of 2 μm instead of 4 μm thickness were superior for evaluation, since they increased staining specificity. The combination of Congo red and immunohistochemistry as in situ double staining on one slide is a feasible approach in the diagnosis of amyloidosis. It allows focusing on the fluorescent Congo red-positive areas when evaluating immunohistochemistry, thus avoiding signing out false-positive results. Additionally, it increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the immunohistochemically stained sections on conventional microscopy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-C?cile

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic event...

  16. Laser Treatment of Port Wine Stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J. Stuart

    Port wine stain (PWS), also called nevus flammeus, is a congenital, cutaneous vascular malformation involving post-capillary venules which produce a light pink to red to dark-red-violet discoloration of human skin [1]. PWS occurs in an estimated 3 children per 1000 live births, affecting males and females and all racial groups equally [2]. There appears to be no hereditary predilection for PWS within families. There are no known risk factors or ways to prevent PWS.

  17. The syntaxin 31-induced gene, LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1), functions in Glycine max defense to the root parasite Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Shankar R; Krishnavajhala, Aparna; McNeece, Brant T; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2015-01-01

    Experiments show the membrane fusion genes α soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and syntaxin 31 (Gm-SYP38) contribute to the ability of Glycine max to defend itself from infection by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines. Accompanying their expression is the transcriptional activation of the defense genes ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and NONEXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) that function in salicylic acid (SA) signaling. These results implicate the added involvement of the antiapoptotic, environmental response gene LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) in defense. Roots engineered to overexpress the G. max defense genes Gm-α-SNAP, SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BOTRYTIS INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) and xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced Gm-LSD1 (Gm-LSD1-2) transcriptional activity. In reciprocal experiments, roots engineered to overexpress Gm-LSD1-2 in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced levels of SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BIK1 and XTH, but not α-SNAP prior to infection. In tests examining the role of Gm-LSD1-2 in defense, its overexpression results in ∼52 to 68% reduction in nematode parasitism. In contrast, RNA interference (RNAi) of Gm-LSD1-2 in the resistant genotype G. max[Peking/PI 548402] results in an 3.24-10.42 fold increased ability of H. glycines to parasitize. The results identify that Gm-LSD1-2 functions in the defense response of G. max to H. glycines parasitism. It is proposed that LSD1, as an antiapoptotic protein, may establish an environment whereby the protected, living plant cell could secrete materials in the vicinity of the parasitizing nematode to disarm it. After the targeted incapacitation of the nematode the parasitized cell succumbs to its targeted demise as the infected root region is becoming fortified.

  18. Diagnosis of Blastocystis hominis by different staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, A M

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and fifty stool samples were collected from diarrheic patients of different ages, and examined for Blastocystis hominis by direct smears and concentrated by Sheather's sugar flotation. Staining was done by: Giemsa, two modifications of trichrome stain, modified Ziehl-Neelsen, safranin-methylene blue and two-auramine stains. Out of the 150 cases nine were positive for blastocystosis. The best stains were safranin-methylene blue and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. They had the advantage of staining cysts and amoeboid forms besides being rapid and easy to perform. The modified trichrome stains identified 8 ie, less specific and were time consuming. The auramine dyes stained the cyst, both the wall and internal body fluoresced brightly. Giemsa stain was not an efficient stain. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) were performed to study the fine ultrastructure.

  19. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  20. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  1. Microspectrophotometric studies of Romanowsky stained blood cells. II. Comparison of the performance of two standardized stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P N; Galbraith, W; Navarro, E F; Bacus, J W

    1981-11-01

    This paper describes a comparison of the performance of two standardized Romanowsky blood stains, namely those of Marshall et al. and Wittekind et al., both containing azure B and eosin alone. Stain performance is assessed objectively by the use of three complementary techniques, all based on the visible absorbance spectra of stained cellular substrates. The first of these techniques is a simple comparison of the shapes and heights of the absorbance spectra. The second technique uses the CIE Colorimetric System, and thus permits the quantitation of colour in a manner that agrees with human observation. CIE co-ordinates (chromaticity points, luminance) are calculated directly from absorbance spectra. The third technique is that of spectral subtraction, which yields a set of factors which describe the quantities of component dyes which are bound by the object. This technique, unlike the other two, requires a priori knowledge of the dyes used in the stains, and their spectra when bound to cellular substrates. Although the differences between the two methods are subtle, and hard for the subjective observer to define, the objective methods described here do show statistically significant differences. Wittekind's stain produces less intense staining, except for lymphocyte and monocyte cytoplasms. To the human eye, the differential coloration of these two substrates is more pronounced, but the difference between all nuclei and cytoplasm is less marked. The major difference in the uptake of dye components is in the small quantities of eosin dimer that are bound in this technique.

  2. Comparison of methylene blue/gentian violet stain to Gram's stain for the rapid diagnosis of gonococcal urethritis in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie N; DiCarlo, Richard P; Martin, David H

    2011-11-01

    We compared a simple, one-step staining procedure using a mixture of methylene blue and gentian violet to Gram stain for the detection of gonococcal urethritis. The sensitivity and specificity of both Gram stain and methylene blue/gentian violet stain were 97.3% and 99.6%, respectively. There was a 100% correlation between the 2 methods.

  3. Effects of Root Debridement With Hand Curettes and Er:YAG Laser on Chemical Properties and Ultrastructure of Periodontally-Diseased Root Surfaces Using Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amid, Reza; Gholami, Gholam Ali; Mojahedi, Masoud; Aghalou, Maryam; Gholami, Mohsen; Mirakhori, Mahdieh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser for root debridement in comparison with curettes has been the subject of many recent investigations. Considering the possibility of chemical and ultra-structural changes in root surfaces following laser irradiation, this study sought to assess the effects of scaling and root planing (SRP) with curettes and Er:YAG laser on chemical properties and ultrastructure of root surfaces using spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, extracted sound human single-rooted teeth (n = 50) were randomly scaled using manual curettes alone or in conjunction with Er:YAG laser at 100 and 150 mJ/pulse output energies. The weight percentages of carbon, oxygen, phosphorous and calcium remaining on the root surfaces were calculated using spectroscopy and the surface morphology of specimens was assessed under SEM. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: No significant differences ( P > 0.05) were noted in the mean carbon, oxygen, phosphorous and calcium weight percentages on root surfaces following SRP using manual curettes with and without laser irradiation at both output energies. Laser irradiation after SRP with curettes yielded rougher surfaces compared to the use of curettes alone. Conclusion: Although laser irradiation yielded rougher surfaces, root surfaces were not significantly different in terms of chemical composition following SRP using manual curettes with and without Er:YAG laser irradiation. Er:YAG laser can be safely used as an adjunct to curettes for SRP.

  4. Effect of scaling and root planing on erythrocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in patients with chronic periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak; Kaur, Aaswin

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of chronic disease, a cytokine-mediated anemia, is a frequent complication of many chronic inflammatory conditions. The present clinical trial was aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic periodontal disease on erythrocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit and the changes produced in these parameters after the provision of periodontal therapy. 40 systemically healthy non-smoker male subjects in the age group of 25 to 50 years suffering with chronic periodontal disease were selected and categorized into 2 groups. Group A was categorized as chronic generalized gingivitis, and Group B was categorized as chronic generalized periodontitis on the basis of clinical findings. The clinical parameters Gingival Index (GI), Probing Pock et Depth (PPD) and Relative Attachment Level (RAL) and laboratory blood investigations viz erythrocyte count (EC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (HCT) and red cell indices (MCV, MCH, MCHC) were recorded at baseline. Complete oral prophylaxis was performed for all patients. Patients were recalled after 3 weeks and 3 months. The clinical and hematological parameters were re-evaluated to analyze the changes after provision of phase I therapy. The mean values of EC, Hb and HCT were significantly lower in Group B in comparison to Group A, and showed a significantly greater increase at 3 months of observation. However, the values of MCV, MCH and MCHC showed a non significant change during the same observation period in both the groups. Lower values of EC, Hb and HCT in Group B showed that mild anemia is associated with chronic generalized periodontitis, which tends to improve after provision of periodontal therapy. Minimal changes in MCV, MCH and MCHC indicated that the lower values are not due to any vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but secondary to the chronic inflammatory changes associated with chronic periodontal disease.

  5. A procedure for Alcian blue staining of mucins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2012-10-16

    The isolation and characterization of mucins are critically important for obtaining insight into the molecular pathology of various diseases, including cancers and cystic fibrosis. Recently, we developed a novel membrane electrophoretic method, supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), which separates mucins on a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane impregnated with a hydrophilic polymer. Alcian blue staining is widely used to visualize mucopolysaccharides and acidic mucins on both blotted membranes and SMME membranes; however, this method cannot be used to stain mucins with a low acidic glycan content. Meanwhile, periodic acid-Schiff staining can selectively visualize glycoproteins, including mucins, but is incompatible with glycan analysis, which is indispensable for mucin characterizations. Here we describe a novel staining method, designated succinylation-Alcian blue staining, for visualizing mucins on a PVDF membrane. This method can visualize mucins regardless of the acidic residue content and shows a sensitivity 2-fold higher than that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, a fluorescent periodate Schiff-base stain. Furthermore, we demonstrate the compatibility of this novel staining procedure with glycan analysis using porcine gastric mucin as a model mucin.

  6. [Detection and documentation of masked blood stains with infrared technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Chesne, A; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    1993-01-01

    On dark textiles the visualization of blood stains with the naked eye is either difficult or impossible. In experimental stains and in case work stains we have applied an infrared (IR) video camera in combination with a video printer. As an alternative, an IR goggle was used which could also be connected with a video printer. The results obtained on a variety of different stains and stain carriers are encouraging. Stains showing poor contrast usually become more contrasted. Stains which are partly masked can become complete. Masked stains can become visible. The system is not effective in all combinations of stains and carriers. But it solves a great proportion of formerly problematic cases. Documentation of results is quite easy if a videoprinter is used.

  7. Fetal Outcome in Meconium Stained Deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Agarwal, Manika

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the foetal outcome in Meconium Stained Amniotic Fluid (MSAF). Material and Methods: This prospective observational study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health And Medical Sciences, Shillong, India, over a period of eighteen months, from January 2010 to June 2011. A total of 355 pregnant women who had completed more than 37 weeks of gestation, with singleton pregnancies and cephalic presentations were included in this study. One hundred and sixty five cases with MSAF, were thus selected and they were compared with 190 randomly selected controls. Results: Among 165 cases, 27.88 % of the cases had regular visits to the Institute at least 3 times previously, 72.12% cases had no previous visit at all. Primigravidas accounted for a majority of cases and approximately 50% cases had gestational ages of more than 40 weeks Pregnancies complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension had statistically significant higher rates of meconium staining among cases (16.97%), as compared to those among controls (7.89%). 21.81% cases had foetal heart rate abnormalities, as were detected by electronic foetal monitoring and presence of foetal bradycardia was statistically higher in cases compared to that in controls. Casearean section rates were nearly double in cases (49.09%). Neonatal outcome was poor in terms of low Apgar score at birth, birth asphyxia, Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS) and increased neonatal admission among cases as compared to that among controls. Conclusion: Meconium stained amniotic fluid is really worrisome from both, obstetrician’s and paediatrician’s points of view, as it increases the caesarean rates, causes birth asphyxia, MAS and increases neonatal intensive care unit admissions. PMID:24551662

  8. Genetic analysis reveals efficient sexual spore dispersal at a fine spatial scale in Armillaria ostoyae, the causal agent of root-rot disease in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutech, Cyril; Labbé, Frédéric; Capdevielle, Xavier; Lung-Escarmant, Brigitte

    Armillaria ostoyae (sometimes named Armillaria solidipes) is a fungal species causing root diseases in numerous coniferous forests of the northern hemisphere. The importance of sexual spores for the establishment of new disease centres remains unclear, particularly in the large maritime pine plantations of southwestern France. An analysis of the genetic diversity of a local fungal population distributed over 500 ha in this French forest showed genetic recombination between genotypes to be frequent, consistent with regular sexual reproduction within the population. The estimated spatial genetic structure displayed a significant pattern of isolation by distance, consistent with the dispersal of sexual spores mostly at the spatial scale studied. Using these genetic data, we inferred an effective density of reproductive individuals of 0.1-0.3 individuals/ha, and a second moment of parent-progeny dispersal distance of 130-800 m, compatible with the main models of fungal spore dispersal. These results contrast with those obtained for studies of A. ostoyae over larger spatial scales, suggesting that inferences about mean spore dispersal may be best performed at fine spatial scales (i.e. a few kilometres) for most fungal species. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Cho

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN. This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support

  10. Robust fadeout profile of an evaporation stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, T. A.

    2009-06-01

    We propose an explanation for the commonly seen fading in the density of a stain remaining after a droplet has dried on a surface. The density decreases as a power p of the distance from the edge. For thin, dilute drops of general shape this power is determined by a flow stagnation point in the distant interior of the drop. The power p depends on the local evaporation rate J(0) at the stagnation point and the liquid depth h(0) there: p = 1 - 2~ (h(0)/\\bar h)(\\bar J/J(0)) , where \\bar h and \\bar J are averages over the drop surface.

  11. Single step modified ink staining for Tzanck test: quick detection of herpetic giant cells in Tzanck smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Hitoshi; Akeda, Tomoko; Yamanaka, Kei-Ichi; Isoda, Kenichi; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2012-02-01

    Tzanck test has been recently re-evaluated as a method for the diagnosis of herpes virus infection. Giemsa staining for the Tzanck test is time-consuming and laborious. There is a need to develop simple and quick staining methods for bedside diagnosis of this disease. We report a single step and quick method for staining herpes giant cells in Tzanck smears using routinely available inks and physiological saline. A keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) was cultured on a slide glass and stained with various commercially available blue, blue-black and black inks serially diluted with physiological saline. Clinical smear samples from herpes lesions were also stained with these solutions without specific pretreatment. The nuclei of HaCaT were clearly stained showing high contrast with the cytoplasm using 5% Parker-Quink blue-black ink saline solution. Concentration of ink solution higher or lower than 5% resulted in less contrast. Blue or black inks or other manufacturers' inks can also be used, but staining of the cultured keratinocytes was less clear. Smear of clinical samples from herpes lesions were also stained with 5% ink solution. The nuclei of the multinucleated giant cells were clearly stained, and the sample could be immediately used for microscopic examination. One step staining of Tzanck smear using this diluted ink solution is an inexpensive and a convenient bedside diagnostic tool for the dermatologist. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Romanowsky staining in cytopathology: history, advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafts, K P; Pambuccian, S E

    2011-04-01

    If the entire discipline of diagnostic cytopathology could be distilled into a single theme, it would be the Papanicolaou stain. Yet it was the Romanowsky stain upon which the discipline of cytopathology was founded. Both stains are used today in the cytopathology laboratory, each for a different and complementary purpose. We trace the history of cytopathological stains and discuss the advantages and limitations of Romanowsky-type stains for cytological evaluation. We also provide suggestions for the advantageous use of Romanowsky-type stains in cytopathology.

  13. Ex vivo model for studying polymicrobial biofilm formation in root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Díez Ortega

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic disease has mainly a microbial origin. It is caused by biofilms capable of attaching and surviving in the root canal. Therefore, it is important to study the conditions in which those biofilms grow, develop and colonize the root canal system. However, few studies have used natural teeth as models, which would take into account the root canal anatomical complexity and simulate the clinical reality. In this study, we used human premolar root canals to standardize in vitro biofilm optimal formation conditions for microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. 128 lower premolars underwent canal preparation using K-type files, and were treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and EDTA. Samples were inoculated with microorganisms and incubated for 15, 30, 45, and 60 days under anaerobiosis (CO2 atmosphere and aerobiosis. Microorganism presence was confirmed by Gram staining, cell culture, and electron microscopy. Exopolysaccharide matrix and microorganism aggregation were observed following 15 days of incubation. Bacterial growth towards the apical third of the root canal and biofilm maturation was detected after 30 days. CO2 atmosphere favored microbial growth the most. In vitro biofilm maturation was confirmed after 30 days of incubation under a CO2 atmosphere for both bacteria and yeast.

  14. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  15. Morphoanatomy and histochemistry analyses of cassava roots do not discriminate resistant from susceptible genotypes to soft root rot

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, Jonny Lucio Sousa; MOURA, Elisa Ferreira; ILKIU-BORGES, Fernanda; GALVÃO, Jessivaldo Rodrigues; FARIAS-NETO, João Tomé de; SILVA, Gisele Barata da; RÊGO, Marcela Cristiane Ferreira; CUNHA, Roberto Lisboa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cassava is an important culture in Brazil and in the North of the country, and soft root rot has affected root production. The aim of this work was to identify root morphoanatomic and histochemical characters associated with root rot resistance. In areas with no occurrence of the disease, nine cassava genotypes were tested, four of which were resistant, and five were susceptible to root rot. Root harvest was carried out twelve months after sowing, and thickness of suber, suber and co...

  16. Use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and soil organic amendments for the management of root diseases complex of uridbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Siddiqui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa-5 and IE-2 and Bacillus subtilis isolate alone or in conjunction with neem cake or Datura fastuosa was tested for the management of three soilbrne root-infecting fungi including Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani and the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica on uridbean. Biocontrol bacteria used in combination with either neem cake or D.fastuosa gave better control of the root-rot and root-knot infection with the enhancement of growth of uridbean compared to the use ofeither component alone. Neem cake l% w/w mixed with P.aeruginosa strain IE-2 caused greatest inhibition of the root-knot development due to M.javanica, P.aeruginosa and B.subtilis used with organic amendment also increased Bradyrhizobium-nodules in the root system.

  17. Laser therapy in plastic surgery: decolorization in port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Wolf, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    For the first time laserotherapy is described as a method of port wine stain decolorization in plastic surgery. The authors present their 20-year experience in the treatment of port wine stains with the argon laser and dye laser.

  18. Port wine stain on a child's face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port wine stains are always present at birth. In an infant, they are flat, pink, vascular lesions. Common locations ... may be present anywhere on the body. Port wine stains may appear in association with other syndromes.

  19. The degradation of Romanowsky-type blood stains in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W W; Stastny, M; Lubrano, G J

    1977-01-01

    The oxidative demethylation of Romanowsky-type stains in methanol has been examined quantitatively with respect to its effect upon the staining of blood smears. Spectral changes in bound dye, observed through two color filters, have been measured for the nuclei and cytoplasm of segmented neutrophils and monocytes utilizing the LARC automated differential analyzer. Stain decomposition in methanol results in a large loss in staining intensity with little change in color. The loss in intensity has been correlated with the observed spectral changes in the degraded stain. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of degraded stain samples has shown the products of methanolic degradation to be different from those obtained in aqueous polychroming reactions. To maintain a stain of defined thiazine dye composition and thus defined staining properties, refrigeration is recommended.

  20. Several staining techniques to enhance the visibility of Acanthamoeba cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Hikal, Wafaa Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebae. It is widespread in the environment and can infect humans causing keratitis. Delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis leads to extensive corneal inflammation and profound visual loss. Therefore, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is essential for successful treatment and good prognosis. This study was designed to use different staining techniques to facilitate the identification of Acanthamoeba cysts. Acanthamoeba cysts were isolated by cultivation of either corneal scraping specimens or tap water samples onto non-nutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. Subcultures were done from positive cultures until unique cysts were isolated. Acanthamoeba cysts were stained temporarily using iodine, eosin, methylene blue, and calcofluor white (CFW) stains and as permanent slides after processing for mounting using modified trichrome, Gimenez and Giemsa staining. These stains were compared on the basis of staining quality including clarity of morphological details, differentiation between cytoplasm and nuclei, color and contrast, and also other characteristics of the staining techniques, including ease of handling, time taken for the procedure, and cost effectiveness. The cysts of Acanthamoeba were recognized in the form of double-walled cysts: the outer wall (ectocyst) that was being differentiated from the variably stained surrounding background and the inner wall (endocyst) that was sometimes stellated, polygonal, round, or oval and visualized as separate from the spherical, sometimes irregular, outline of the ectocyst. Regarding the temporary stains, it was found that they were efficient for visualizing the morphological details of Acanthamoeba cysts. In CFW staining, Acanthamoeba cysts appeared as bluish-white or turquoise oval halos although the internal detail was not evident. On the other hand, the results of permanent-stained slides showed the most consistent stain for identification of

  1. Dye purity and dye standardization for biological staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2002-01-01

    for separating, identifying and assaying dye components. In the second part of the review, descriptions are given of the standardized staining method approach using standard staining methods for assessing stains, and practical responses to stain impurity including commercial quality control, third-party quality...... control and standardization of reagents, protocols and documentation. Finally, reference is made to the current state of affairs in the dye field....

  2. Symptom development in response to combined infection of in vitro grown Lilium longiflorum with the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans and soilborne fungi collected from diseased roots of field-grown lilies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eight fungal isolates (ELRF 1-8) were isolated from necrotic roots of Lilium longiflorum cv. Nellie White (Easter lily) grown in a field in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The eight fungal isolates were identified by sequencing and molecular phylogenetic analyses based on their ITS rDNA region. Five iso...

  3. Root growth during molar eruption in extant great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jay; Dean, Christopher; Ross, Sasha

    2009-01-01

    While there is gradually accumulating knowledge about molar crown formation and the timing of molar eruption in extant great apes, very little is known about root formation during the eruption process. We measured mandibular first and second molar root lengths in extant great ape osteological specimens that died while either the first or second molars were in the process of erupting. For most specimens, teeth were removed so that root lengths could be measured directly. When this was not possible, roots were measured radiographically. We were particularly interested in the variation in the lengths of first molar roots near the point of gingival emergence, so specimens were divided into early, middle and late phases of eruption based on the number of cusps that showed protein staining, with one or two cusps stained equated with immediate post-gingival emergence. For first molars at this stage, Gorilla has the longest roots, followed by Pongo and Pan. Variation in first molar mesial root lengths at this stage in Gorilla and Pan, which comprise the largest samples, is relatively low and represents no more than a few months of growth in both taxa. Knowledge of root length at first molar emergence permits an assessment of the contribution of root growth toward differences between great apes and humans in the age at first molar emergence. Root growth makes up a greater percentage of the time between birth and first molar emergence in humans than it does in any of the great apes. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Comparison between Giemsa and Van Geison stains in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trichrome stain (such as Van Geison) is usually used in histopathology laboratory for demonstration of collagenic fibers. Lack of selectivity and tendency of stain to fade makes van Gieson not ideal for collagen demonstration. This study was aimed to compare between Giemsa's and van Gieson's stains in collagen fibers ...

  5. Modified ultrafast Papanicolaou staining technique: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Moni; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrafast Papanicolaou stain (UFP) was introduced as a hybrid of Romanowsky and Papanicolaou (PAP) stain. It enhances the quality and reduces the time. In the present study, a modified staining technique was adapted where Gill's Hematoxylin was replaced by Harris Hematoxylin. Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the use of the modified ultrafast Papanicolaou (MUFP) stain for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of head and neck swellings in comparison with the routine PAP stain, hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), and Giemsa. Materials and Methods: Forty FNACs of head and neck swellings were collected. FNAC procedure was performed by standard method; two smears were fixed in 95% propanol and stained with PAP and H and E. Two smears were air dried, 1 was stained with Giemsa, and 1 was rehydrated with normal saline, fixed in alcoholic formalin, and stained with MUFP. Four parameters were considered and scored background, cell morphology, nuclear staining, and overall staining pattern). Results: The quality of MUFP smears were better when compared to routine PAP, H and E, and Giemsa, and was statistically significant by Wilcoxon matched pair test. Conclusions: MUFP stain in comparison to routine PAP, H and E, and Giemsa provides an excellent and suitable alterative in cytological staining for the study of various organs. PMID:28701828

  6. Modified ultrafast Papanicolaou staining technique: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moni Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultrafast Papanicolaou stain (UFP was introduced as a hybrid of Romanowsky and Papanicolaou (PAP stain. It enhances the quality and reduces the time. In the present study, a modified staining technique was adapted where Gill's Hematoxylin was replaced by Harris Hematoxylin. Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the use of the modified ultrafast Papanicolaou (MUFP stain for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of head and neck swellings in comparison with the routine PAP stain, hematoxylin and eosin (H and E, and Giemsa. Materials and Methods: Forty FNACs of head and neck swellings were collected. FNAC procedure was performed by standard method; two smears were fixed in 95% propanol and stained with PAP and H and E. Two smears were air dried, 1 was stained with Giemsa, and 1 was rehydrated with normal saline, fixed in alcoholic formalin, and stained with MUFP. Four parameters were considered and scored background, cell morphology, nuclear staining, and overall staining pattern. Results: The quality of MUFP smears were better when compared to routine PAP, H and E, and Giemsa, and was statistically significant by Wilcoxon matched pair test. Conclusions: MUFP stain in comparison to routine PAP, H and E, and Giemsa provides an excellent and suitable alterative in cytological staining for the study of various organs.

  7. Comparison between Giemsa and Van Geison stains in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rukevwe S. Abraka

    2016-09-14

    Sep 14, 2016 ... Trichrome stain (such as Van Geison) is usually used in histopathology laboratory for demonstration of collagenic fibers. Lack of selectivity and tendency of stain to fade makes van Gieson not ideal for collagen demonstration. This study was aimed to compare between Giemsa's and van Gieson's stains.

  8. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442... Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is deeper than Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] below color grade cotton ...

  9. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper than that of Strict Middling Tinged Color. [57 FR 34498, Aug. 5, 1992] ...

  10. Root-Securing and Brain-Fortifying Liquid Upregulates Caveolin-1 in Cell Model with Alzheimer’s Disease through Inhibiting Tau Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depei Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the effect of root-securing and brain-fortifying Liquid- (RSBFL- mediated caveolin-1 (CAV-1 on phosphorylation of Tau protein and to uncover underlying mechanisms of RSBFL for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, hippocampal neurons isolated from neonatal SD rats and cultured in DMEM-F12 medium were induced by exogenous Aβ1–42 to establish a cell model with AD. Meanwhile, pEGFP-C1-CAV1 and CAV1-shRNA plasmids were transfected into hippocampal neurons for CAV-1 overexpression and silence, respectively. The serum containing RSBFL was prepared for the intervention of AD model cells. The expression of CAV-1, GSK-3β, and p-Tau in normal hippocampal neurons and AD model cells in the presence of serum containing RSBFL was evaluated. The model hippocampal neurons with AD induced by Aβ1–42 revealed an obvious CAV-1 inhibition, enhanced GSK-3β activity, and abnormal Tau phosphorylation. In contrast, the treatment with serum containing RSBFL could upregulate CAV-1 in AD hippocampal neurons (P<0.05 with improved p-GSK-3βSer9 and reduced p-GSK-3βTyr216 (P<0.01, as well as suppressed abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein. Therefore, RSBFL has an excellent protective effect on hippocampal neurons through increasing CAV-1 expression, inhibiting GSK-3β activity, and reducing excessive abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein.

  11. Panax ginseng C.A Meyer root extract for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD impairs quality of life and leads to premature mortality. COPD sufferers experience progressive deterioration of lung function and decreased ability to undertake day-to-day activities. Ginseng has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine for respiratory symptoms. Several controlled clinical trials using ginseng for COPD have shown promising clinical effect, however these studies were generally small and with some potential bias, prompting the need for rigorously designed studies. Aim The objective of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic value and safety profile of a standardised root extract of Panax ginseng C.A Meyer (ginseng for symptomatic relief, with a focus on quality of life (QoL improvements in individuals with moderate (Stage II COPD FEV1/FVC 1 50% - 80% predicted. Methods This paper describes the design of a randomised, multi-centre, double-blind, placebo controlled, two-armed parallel clinical trial. Two trial sites in Melbourne Australia will proportionately randomise a total of 168 participants to receive either ginseng capsule (100 mg or matching placebo twice daily for 24 weeks. The primary outcomes will be based on three validated QoL questionnaires, St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT. Secondary outcomes are based on lung function testing, relief medication usage and exacerbation frequency and severity. Safety endpoints include blood tests and adverse event reporting. Intention-to-treat will be applied to all data analyses. Discussion Findings from this study may lead to new therapeutic development for chronic respiratory diseases, particularly COPD. This protocol may also guide other investigators to develop quality herbal medicine clinical trials in the future. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000768099

  12. Effects of dietary supplementations with the fibrous root of Rhizoma Coptidis and its main alkaloids on non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yaozong; Li, Ling; He, Kai; Huang, Tao; Mou, Shaoxia; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Ye, Xiaoli; Li, Xuegang

    2016-05-01

    The effects of fibrous root of Rhizoma Coptidis (FRC) and its main alkaloids on non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp were investigated. The fish were randomly assigned to seven groups: normal control group (NC), groups treated with 12.5 g/kg FRC (FRC-L), 25 g/kg FRC (FRC-M), 50 g/kg FRC (FRC-H), 0.78 g/kg total alkaloids (TA), 0.78 g/kg berberine (BBR), and 0.78 g/kg coptisine (Cop), respectively. Results showed that the activities of myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and respiratory burst were significantly elevated after treated with FRC-M, FRC-H, TA, BBR and Cop, and the complement C3 level and phagocytic activity were significantly increased in FRC-M, TA and BBR treated groups compared with NC group. The real-time PCR analysis indicated that FRC, TA, BBR and Cop could up-regulate the mRNA expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, lysozyme-c and C3, but down-regulate that of IL-10 in the head kidney of common carp. Besides, FRC-M, FRC-H, TA, BBR and Cop significantly enhanced the survival rate of common carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, when compared to NC group. It was concluded that the FRC could enhance the non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp and the main alkaloids might contribute to these effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fat tissue staining and photodynamic/photothermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Yanina, Irina Yu.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.

    2010-02-01

    Cellulite is considered as a disease of the subcutaneous fat layer that appears mostly in women and consists of changes in fat cell accumulation together with disturbed lymphatic drainage, affecting the external appearance of the skin. The photodynamic and selective photothermal treatments may provide reduction the volume of regional or sitespecific accumulations of subcutaneous adipose tissue on the cellular level. We hypothesize that light irradiation of stained fat tissue at selected temperature leads to fat cell lypolytic activity (the enhancement of lipolysis of cell triglycerides due to expression of lipase activity and cell release of free fat acids (FFAs) due to temporal cell membrane porosity), and cell killing due to apoptosis caused by the induced fat cell stress and/or limited cell necrosis.

  14. Myeloperoxidase staining in the diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Acharya, Anirudh B; Kumar, S C Veerendra

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining procedure as a reliable, affordable and easily available diagnostic assay for aggressive periodontitis. Fifteen subjects were recruited in the study wherein five each were diagnosed as aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis respectively, and five were periodontally healthy. Three millilitres (ml) of venous blood was collected using Vacutainers containing ethylene diamine tetra acetate (EDTA) and was subjected to MPO staining procedure. Histological picture was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). MPO stained specimen of all the patients showed positive MPO staining of the neutrophils. The intensity of the stain of MPO granules was more in aggressive periodontitis specimen as compared to the chronic periodontitis patient specimen and healthy subject specimen. The staining characteristics were comparable for chronic periodontitis patients and healthy subject. This study shows that there is a potential and probable place for MPO staining as an economical, relatively convenient and easily available assay in the diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis.

  15. Composite Cucurbita pepo plants with transgenic roots as a tool to study root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Elena L; Logachov, Anton A; Laplaze, Laurent; Demchenko, Nikolay P; Pawlowski, Katharina; Demchenko, Kirill N

    2012-07-01

    In most plant species, initiation of lateral root primordia occurs above the elongation zone. However, in cucurbits and some other species, lateral root primordia initiation and development takes place in the apical meristem of the parental root. Composite transgenic plants obtained by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation are known as a suitable model to study root development. The aim of the present study was to establish this transformation technique for squash. The auxin-responsive promoter DR5 was cloned into the binary vectors pKGW-RR-MGW and pMDC162-GFP. Incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) was used to evaluate the presence of DNA-synthesizing cells in the hypocotyl of squash seedlings to find out whether they were suitable for infection. Two A. rhizogenes strains, R1000 and MSU440, were used. Roots containing the respective constructs were selected based on DsRED1 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence, and DR5::Egfp-gusA or DR5::gusA insertion, respectively, was verified by PCR. Distribution of the response to auxin was visualized by GFP fluorescence or β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity staining and confirmed by immunolocalization of GFP and GUS proteins, respectively. Based on the distribution of EdU-labelled cells, it was determined that 6-day-old squash seedlings were suited for inoculation by A. rhizogenes since their root pericycle and the adjacent layers contain enough proliferating cells. Agrobacterium rhizogenes R1000 proved to be the most virulent strain on squash seedlings. Squash roots containing the respective constructs did not exhibit the hairy root phenotype and were morphologically and structurally similar to wild-type roots. The auxin response pattern in the root apex of squash resembled that in arabidopsis roots. Composite squash plants obtained by A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation are a good tool for the investigation of root apical meristem development and root branching.

  16. Refractile mycobacteria in Romanowsky-stained bone marrow smears. A comparison of acid-fast-stained tissue sections and Romanowsky-stained smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakovic, E; Clayton, F; Ames, E D

    1992-03-01

    The appearance of mycobacteria was studied in Wright-stained bone marrow preparations of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and compared with acid-fast-stained trephine biopsy sections and culture results. Mycobacterium avium complex in Romanowsky-stained preparations may be seen as extracellular and intracellular clear or red refractile beaded rods and nonrefractile "negative images." Refractile mycobacteria were seen in 17 of 20 culture-positive cases. Acid-fast stain of the trephine biopsy demonstrated organisms in only 11 of the 20 cases. Thus, six cases were culture positive and contained refractile rods but had no acid-fast organisms on the trephine biopsy. No false-positive results were seen with Romanowsky stain; the three false-negative results for refractility also were negative with acid-fast stain. Examination of Romanowsky-stained smears or imprints for refractile mycobacteria provides a reliable and sensitive method to identify mycobacteria in this population. Romanowsky-stained bone marrow aspirate and imprint smears should be examined for refractile bacilli when mycobacterial infection is suspected.

  17. Erbium doped stain etched porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, B.; Diaz-Herrera, B.; Guerrero-Lemus, R.; Mendez-Ramos, J.; Rodriguez, V.D.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, C.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work a simple erbium doping process applied to stain etched porous silicon layers (PSLs) is proposed. This doping process has been developed for application in porous silicon solar cells, where conventional erbium doping processes are not affordable because of the high processing cost and technical difficulties. The PSLs were formed by immersion in a HF/HNO 3 solution to properly adjust the porosity and pore thickness to an optimal doping of the porous structure. After the formation of the porous structure, the PSLs were analyzed by means of nitrogen BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) area measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the PSLs were immersed in a saturated erbium nitrate solution in order to cover the porous surface. Then, the samples were subjected to a thermal process to activate the Er 3+ ions. Different temperatures and annealing times were used in this process. The photoluminescence of the PSLs was evaluated before and after the doping processes and the composition was analyzed by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy

  18. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  19. Autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid stain skin lacking laminin 5 and type VII collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillikens, D; Ishiko, A; Jonkman, MF; Chimanovitch, [No Value; Shimizu, H; Hashimoto, T; Brocker, EB

    2000-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a widespread bullous skin disease and linear deposits of IgG and C3 at the dermal-epidermal junction using direct immunofluorescence microscopy. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated circulating IgG autoantibodies that stained, like autoantibodies to

  20. Neuroglial Roots of Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2011), s. 87-96 ISSN 0893-7648 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696; GA ČR GA305/08/1384; GA ČR GA309/08/1381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Astrocytes * Oligodendrocytes * Microglia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.735, year: 2011

  1. Survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in modified Romanowsky staining solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Richard; Wong, Hui-San; Trott, Darren J; Hill, Peter B

    2015-08-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that rapid staining solutions can become contaminated with micro-organisms, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To determine whether inoculation of rapid Romanowsky-type stains with P. aeruginosa results in viable bacterial contamination, which could lead to cross-contamination of slides during cytological staining. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was inoculated into clean and organically contaminated staining solutions (fixative, eosin and methylene blue) and positive (broth) and negative (bleach) control solutions. Subsequent viability and survival were detected by measuring colony-forming units per millilitre at various time points up to 2 weeks. Each sample was stained and microscopically examined to determine whether bacteria were visible. No bacteria could be cultured at any time point from the bleach or fixative solution. In clean eosin and methylene blue staining solutions, viable bacteria were recovered for up to 1 h, but by 24 h all bacteria were dead. In staining solutions contaminated with hair and dead skin cells, bacteria survived in methylene blue for up to 1 h, and viable bacteria persisted in the eosin stain for 2 weeks. In solutions containing viable organisms, the bacteria could be observed by microscopic examination; no bacteria were visible when the solutions contained no viable organisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive in commonly used staining solutions for variable periods of time, but is unable to proliferate. Although theoretically this might complicate cytological interpretation and subsequent diagnosis, the likelihood of this in clinical practice appears remote when the correct staining technique is used. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. Rectal gel application of Withania somnifera root extract expounds anti-inflammatory and muco-restorative activity in TNBS-induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagtap Suresh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is marked with chronic inflammation of intestinal epithelium driven by oxidative stress. Traditional treatments with plant extracts gained renewed interest due to their ability to ameliorate the multi factorial conditions like inflammation. We investigated the beneficial effects of Withania somnifera in Trinitro Benzyl Sulfonic Acid (TNBS induced experimental IBD through a rectally applicable formulation. Methods The study included (i preparation of gel formulation from aqueous Withania somnifera root extract (WSRE, (ii biochemical assays to determine its performance potential, (iii testing of formulation efficacy in TNBS-induced IBD rat model, and (iv histo-patholgical studies to assess its healing and muco-regenerative effect in IBD-induced rats. For this purpose, concentration dependant antioxidant activity of the extracts were evaluated using biochemical assays like (a inhibition of lipid peroxidation, (b NO scavenging, (c H2O2 scavenging, and (d ferric reducing power assay. Results The extract, at 500 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, showed 95.6% inhibition of lipid peroxidation, 14.8% NO scavenging, 81.79% H2O2 scavenging and a reducing capacity of 0.80. The results were comparable with standard antioxidants, ascorbic acid and curcumin. WSRE treatment positively scored on histopathological parameters like necrosis, edema, neutrophil infiltration. The post treatment intestinal features showed restoration at par with the healthy intestine. In view of these results, gel formulation containing an aqueous extract of W. somnifera, prepared for rectal application was tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in TNBS-induced rat models for IBD. Commercially available anti-inflammatory drug Mesalamine was used as the standard in this assay. Conclusions Dose of the rectal gel applied at 1000 mg of WSRE per kg rat weight showed significant muco-restorative efficacy in the IBD-induced rats

  3. Rectal gel application of Withania somnifera root extract expounds anti-inflammatory and muco-restorative activity in TNBS-induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is marked with chronic inflammation of intestinal epithelium driven by oxidative stress. Traditional treatments with plant extracts gained renewed interest due to their ability to ameliorate the multi factorial conditions like inflammation. We investigated the beneficial effects of Withania somnifera in Trinitro Benzyl Sulfonic Acid (TNBS) induced experimental IBD through a rectally applicable formulation. Methods The study included (i) preparation of gel formulation from aqueous Withania somnifera root extract (WSRE), (ii) biochemical assays to determine its performance potential, (iii) testing of formulation efficacy in TNBS-induced IBD rat model, and (iv) histo-patholgical studies to assess its healing and muco-regenerative effect in IBD-induced rats. For this purpose, concentration dependant antioxidant activity of the extracts were evaluated using biochemical assays like (a) inhibition of lipid peroxidation, (b) NO scavenging, (c) H2O2 scavenging, and (d) ferric reducing power assay. Results The extract, at 500 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, showed 95.6% inhibition of lipid peroxidation, 14.8% NO scavenging, 81.79% H2O2 scavenging and a reducing capacity of 0.80. The results were comparable with standard antioxidants, ascorbic acid and curcumin. WSRE treatment positively scored on histopathological parameters like necrosis, edema, neutrophil infiltration. The post treatment intestinal features showed restoration at par with the healthy intestine. In view of these results, gel formulation containing an aqueous extract of W. somnifera, prepared for rectal application was tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in TNBS-induced rat models for IBD. Commercially available anti-inflammatory drug Mesalamine was used as the standard in this assay. Conclusions Dose of the rectal gel applied at 1000 mg of WSRE per kg rat weight showed significant muco-restorative efficacy in the IBD-induced rats, validated by histo

  4. Endophytic fungi harbored in Panax notoginseng: diversity and potential as biological control agents against host plant pathogens of root-rot disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Kun Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggested that P. notoginseng harbors diversified endophytic fungi that would provide a basis for the identification of new bioactive compounds, and for effective biocontrol of notoginseng root rot.

  5. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables.

  6. A useful single-solution polychrome stain for plant material...Brook Cyte-Chrome I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley L Krugman; Julia F. Littlefield

    1968-01-01

    Fresh and chemically fixed sectioned plant material can be quickly stained by applying a Brook Cyte Chrome I polychrome stain. Staining time averaged only about 10 minutes. And exact timing of staining and de-staining is not as critical as with most of the commonly used stains. The overall quality is comparable to that of the traditional stains.

  7. Hoffman's violet and dahlia as specific stains for animal chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, M K

    1979-03-01

    The paper deals with staining of the chromosomes of animal testicular materials with two basic dyes, Hoffman's violet and dahlia of the triphenylmethane group, following iodine-dye procedure. The important finding, as presented herein, is that iodinated alcohol after staining can be substituted with various acids, both organic as well as inorganic, all of which act as trapping agent preventing leaching of the dye that binds with the chromosomal DNA. It is clear from this study that RNA is not involved by this process of staining, since treatment of stained sections with cold phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20--25 min and then stained also reveals perfect colouration of the chromosomes without any cytoplasmic staining. The in vitro absorption properties of Hoffman's violet have also been presented herein. The probable mechanism of action of these dyes has been suggested.

  8. Efficacy test of a toothpaste in reducing extrinsic dental stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustanti, A.; Ramadhani, S. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Callea, M.; Yavuz, I.; Maharani, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    This clinical trial compared the external dental stain reduction achieved by tested toothpaste versus placebo in adult patients. In this double-blind, parallel, randomised clinical trial, 45 female volunteers with a mean age of 20 years old were included. All study subjects front teeth were topically applicated with Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) to create external dental stains. Subjects were randomized into test (n=22) and control (n=23) groups. Toothpastes were used for two days to analyse the effects of removing external stains on the labial surfaces of all anterior teeth. VITA Easyshade Advance 4.0 was used to measure dental extrinsic stains changes. The analysis showed statistically significant efficacy of the tested toothpaste in reducing external dental stain caused by SDF, comparing to the placebo toothpaste, after one and two days of usage. The tested toothpaste was effective in reducing dental stain.

  9. Techniques for controlling variability in gram staining of obligate anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M J; Thatcher, E; Cox, M E

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobes recovered from clinical samples is complicated by the fact that certain gram-positive anaerobes routinely stain gram negative; Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Eubacterium plautii, Clostridium ramosum, Clostridium symbiosum, and Clostridium clostridiiforme are among the nonconformists with regard to conventional Gram-staining procedures. Accurate Gram staining of American Type Culture Collection strains of these anaerobic bacteria is possible by implementing fixing and staining techniques within a gloveless anaerobic chamber. Under anaerobic conditions, gram-positive staining occurred in all test organisms with "quick" fixing techniques with both absolute methanol and formalin. The results support the hypothesis that, when anaerobic bacteria are exposed to oxygen, a breakdown of the physical integrity of the cell wall occurs, introducing Gram stain variability in gram-positive anaerobes. PMID:7538512

  10. Factors influencing extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa staining of rat testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassey, R B; Bakare, A A; Peter, A I; Oremosu, A A; Osinubi, A A

    2012-08-01

    Some plant extracts can be used in biology and medicine to reveal or identify cellular components and tissues. We investigated the effects of time and concentration on staining of histological sections of rat testes by an acidified extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa. An ethanolic extract of H. sabdariffa was diluted using 1% acetic acid in 70% ethanol to stain histological sections of testes at concentrations of 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 g/ml for 5, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min. The sections of testes were stained deep red. The staining efficiency of H. sabdariffa was greater at a high concentration and required less time to achieve optimal staining. H. sabdariffa is a strongly basic dye that can be used for various diagnostic purposes. Staining time and concentration must be considered to achieve optimal results.

  11. Diagnosing periprosthetic infection: false-positive intraoperative Gram stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oethinger, Margret; Warner, Debra K; Schindler, Susan A; Kobayashi, Hideo; Bauer, Thomas W

    2011-04-01

    Intraoperative Gram stains have a reported low sensitivity but high specificity when used to help diagnose periprosthetic infections. In early 2008, we recognized an unexpectedly high frequency of apparent false-positive Gram stains from revision arthroplasties. The purpose of this report is to describe the cause of these false-positive test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of all intraoperative Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasty cases during a 3-month interval using microbiologic cultures of the same samples as the gold standard. Methods of specimen harvesting, handling, transport, distribution, specimen processing including tissue grinding/macerating, Gram staining, and interpretation were studied. After a test modification, results of specimens were prospectively collected for a second 3-month interval, and the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative Gram stains were calculated. The retrospective review of 269 Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasties indicated historic sensitivity and specificity values of 23% and 92%, respectively. Systematic analysis of all steps of the procedure identified Gram-stained but nonviable bacteria in commercial broth reagents used as diluents for maceration of periprosthetic membranes before Gram staining and culture. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing showed mixed bacterial DNA. Evaluation of 390 specimens after initiating standardized Millipore filtering of diluent fluid revealed a reduced number of positive Gram stains, yielding 9% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Clusters of false-positive Gram stains have been reported in other clinical conditions. They are apparently rare related to diagnosing periprosthetic infections but have severe consequences if used to guide treatment. Even occasional false-positive Gram stains should prompt review of laboratory methods. Our observations implicate dead bacteria in microbiologic reagents as potential sources of false-positive Gram

  12. TREATMENTS TO MINIMIZE EXTRACTIVES STAIN IN WESTERN RED CEDAR

    OpenAIRE

    Rod Stirling,; Paul I. Morris

    2012-01-01

    Under certain conditions involving uneven exposure to weather, stains related to the extractives can reduce the aesthetic appeal of western red cedar in exterior applications such as fence boards, siding, and sidewall shingles. Selected chemical treatments were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of extractives stain. DDACarbonate, alkyl amine oxide, and combinations thereof delayed extractives stain formation in an accelerated field test, with higher loadings having greater ...

  13. Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, J E; Seka, W; Featherstone, J D B; Rechmann, P

    2012-04-01

    The selective ablation of extrinsic dental enamel stains using a 400-nm laser is evaluated at several fluences for completely removing stains with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser (400-nm wavelength, 60-nanosecond pulse duration, 10-Hz repetition rate) was used to treat 10 extracted human teeth with extrinsic enamel staining. Each tooth was irradiated perpendicular to the surface in a back-and-forth motion over a 1-mm length using an ∼300-µm-diam 10th-order super-Gaussian beam with fluences ranging from 0.8 to 6.4 J/cm(2) . Laser triangulation determined stain depth and volume removed by measuring 3D surface images before and after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy evaluated the surface roughness of enamel following stain removal. Fluorescence spectroscopy measured spectra of unbleached and photobleached stains in the spectral range of 600-800 nm. Extrinsic enamel stains are removed with laser fluences between 0.8 and 6.4 J/cm(2) . Stains removed on sound enamel leave behind a smooth enamel surface. Stain removal in areas with signs of earlier cariogenic acid attacks resulted in isolated and randomly located laser-induced, 50-µm-diam enamel pits. These pits contain 0.5-µm diam, smooth craters indicative of heat transfer from the stain to the enamel and subsequent melting and water droplet ejection. Ablation stalling of enamel stains is typically observed at low fluences (<3 J/cm(2) ) and is accompanied by a drastic reduction in porphyrin fluorescence from the Soret band. Laser ablation of extrinsic enamel stains at 400 nm is observed to be most efficient above 3 J/cm(2) with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. Unsound underlying enamel is also observed to be selectively removed after irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Studies on the blue-staining fungi of pine wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strzelczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this was were to examine associations of bule-staining fungi which occur on pine wood to determine the interactions between fungi and to check the suscebility of these fungi to commonly used fungieides. The stron antagonism of members of the Trichoderma genus against the blue-staining fungi was demonstrated, Members of genera Pullularia, Hormiscium and Hormodendrum were strongy inhibited by stains of Trichoderma Ophiostoma strains were less susceptible to inhibition by this antagonist.

  15. Gram and acridine orange staining for diagnosis of septic arthritis in different patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Gregory; Seghrouchni, Khalid; Ruffieux, Etienne; Vaudaux, Pierre; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Godinho, Eduardo; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2014-06-01

    The sensitivity of Gram staining is known to be suboptimal for the diagnosis of native joint septic arthritis. We lack information about the accuracy of Gram compared to other microscopic staining techniques for predicting infection in different patient populations. This was a cohort study with cost evaluations at the Orthopaedic Service of Geneva University Hospitals (January 1996-October 2012). Among 500 episodes of arthritis (196 with immunosuppression, 227 with underlying arthroplasties and 69 with gout or other crystals in synovial fluid), Gram staining revealed pathogens in 146 episodes (146/500, 29 %) or in 146 of the 400 culture-positive episodes (37 %). Correlation between the Gram and acridine staining of the same sample was good (Spearman 0.85). Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain for rapid diagnosis of septic arthritis was 0.37, 0.99, 0.99 and 0.28, respectively, compared to microbiological cultures. Quite similar values were recorded across the different patient subpopulations, in particular for sensitivity values that were 0.33 for patients with prosthetic joint infections, 0.40 for immunosuppressed patients, 0.36 for patients under antibiotic administration and 0.52 for patients with concomitant crystalline disease. The sensitivity of Gram or acridine orange staining for a rapid diagnosis of episodes of septic arthritis is suboptimal compared to microbiological culture, regardless of underlying conditions, immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy. The sensitivity in the presence of synovial fluid crystals is moderate. Acridine orange and Gram stains are equivalent.

  16. [Histochemical stains for minerals by hematoxylin-lake method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish the experimental animal model by histological staining methods for minerals. After intraperitoneal injections of minerals, precipitates deposited on the surface of the liver. Liver tissues were fixed in paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin and cut into thin sections which were used as minerals containing standard section. Several reagents for histological stains and spectrophotometry for minerals were applied in both test-tube experiments and stainings of tissue sections to test for minerals. Hematoxylin-lake was found of capable of staining minerals in tissue. A simple technique used was described for light microscopic detection of minerals.

  17. Histopathological evaluation of ocular microsporidiosis by different stains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Savitri

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited data on comparing stains in the detection of microsporidia in corneal biopsies. Hence we wanted to evaluate various stains for their ability to detect microsporidia in corneal tissue sections. Methods Four cases diagnosed with microsporidiosis on Hematoxylin and Eosin and Periodic Acid Schiff's stained sections of the corneal button between January 2002 and December 2004, were included. Further sections were prospectively stained with calcofluor white, Gram, Giemsa, Masson's trichrome, acridine orange, Gomori's methenamine silver, Gram's chromotrope and modified acid fast stain. The stained sections were analyzed for the spore characteristics in terms of size, shape, color contrast, cell wall morphology, waist band in cytoplasm and ease of detection. Results All sections showed microsporidial spores as 3 – 5 μm, oval bodies. 1% acid fast, Gram's chromotrope and GMS stains provided a reliable diagnosis of microsporidia as diagnostic waist band could be identified and good contrast helped distinguish the spores from inflammatory debris. Conclusion Considering the ease of performance, cost effectiveness and rapidity of the technique, 1% acid fast stain and Gram's chromotrope stain are ideal for the detection of microsporidia.

  18. Reliability of a rapid hematology stain for sputum cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Jéssica; Pizzichini, Emilio; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Rocha, Cristiane Cinara; Ferreira, Samira Cardoso; Zimmermann, Célia Tânia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability of a rapid hematology stain for the cytological analysis of induced sputum samples. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comparing the standard technique (May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain) with a rapid hematology stain (Diff-Quik). Of the 50 subjects included in the study, 21 had asthma, 19 had COPD, and 10 were healthy (controls). From the induced sputum samples collected, we prepared four slides: two were stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, and two w...

  19. Black stain and dental caries in Filipino schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Monse, Bella; van Palenstein Helderman, Wim

    2009-04-01

    Black stain is defined as dark pigmented exogenous substance in lines or dots parallel to the gingival margin and firmly adherent to the enamel at the cervical third of the tooth crowns in the primary and permanent dentition. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of black stain on teeth of Filipino children and to determine a possible association between black stain and caries levels. The study was designed to test the following hypotheses: (i) the prevalence of black stain does not differ between children from schools with oral health intervention programs and those from schools without an intervention program, (ii) the prevalence of black stain does not differ in children attending easily accessible and remote schools, (iii) caries prevalence and caries experience do not differ in children with and without black stain and (iv) the caries distribution at the surface level does not differ in children with and without black stain. In total, 32 elementary schools were included. 19 schools with a comprehensive school-based preventive oral health program, seven schools with a basic preventive program and six control schools. All sixth graders of these schools (n=1748) aged 11.7+/-1.1 years were clinically examined for black stain. DMFT was assessed in 1121 children by seven calibrated dentists using WHO criteria. DMFS was scored in 627 children by two calibrated dentists. Black stain was found in 16% of this population. The prevalence of black stain did not differ significantly between children attending schools with different oral health intervention programs. Thus, hypothesis 1 was accepted. The prevalence of black stain was significantly higher (Pcaries prevalence and caries experience than children without black stain. Thus, hypothesis 3 was rejected. No difference was found in the DMFS pattern of occlusal, smooth and proximal surfaces between children with and without black stain. Thus hypothesis 4 was accepted. The presence of black stain is

  20. Periapical repair after root canal filling with different root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Tanomaru, Juliane Maria Guerreiro; Leonardo, Mario Roberto; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate periapical repair after root canal filling with different endodontic sealers. Sixty-four root canals from dog s teeth were filled, divided into 4 groups (n=16). Root canals were instrumented with K-type files and irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Root canals were filled in the same session by active lateral condensation of the cones and sealers: Intrafill, AH Plus, Roeko Seal and Resilon/Epiphany System. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized and the tissues to be evaluated were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. For histopathological analysis, the following parameters were evaluated: inflammatory process, mineralized tissue resorption, and apical mineralized tissue deposition. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that Intrafill had less favorable results in terms of apical and periapical repair, compared to the other sealers (p0.05). In conclusion, AH Plus and the materials Roeko Seal and Epiphany are good options for clinical use in Endodontics.

  1. Ki67/KIT double immunohistochemical staining in cutaneous mast cell tumors from Boxer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Alves, Carlos Eduardo; Bento, Daniel Diola; Torres-Neto, Rafael; Werner, Juliana; Kitchell, Barbara; Laufer-Amorim, Renée

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) are among the most frequent malignant tumors in dogs and Boxer breed dogs have a higher incidence of this disease. Ki67 staining and KIT staining are widely used to predict natural behavior in canine MCT but no previous study has evaluated double staining of these proteins as a prognostic factor. Based on biological behavior predictors in canine MCT, the purpose of this study was to determine the Ki67 proliferative index in KIT positive cells using double stain immunohistochemistry technique. Sixty-nine MCTs from Boxer dogs were selected and a tissue microarray was constructed for the double stained immunohistochemistry. Double positivity (Ki67(+)/KIT(+)) was observed in 20/69 (29%) MCT, with a mean of 9.06 double positive cells per tissue core (range 0.48%-43.97%) and Ki67(-)/KIT(+) animals had a longer survival time than Ki67(+)/KIT(+) animals (p=0.03). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant root-microbe communication in shaping root microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareen, Andrew; Burton, Frances; Schäfer, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of research is highlighting the impacts root-associated microbial communities can have on plant health and development. These impacts can include changes in yield quantity and quality, timing of key developmental stages and tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. With such a range of effects it is clear that understanding the factors that contribute to a plant-beneficial root microbiome may prove advantageous. Increasing demands for food by a growing human population increases the importance and urgency of understanding how microbiomes may be exploited to increase crop yields and reduce losses caused by disease. In addition, climate change effects may require novel approaches to overcoming abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity as well as new emerging diseases. This review discusses current knowledge on the formation and maintenance of root-associated microbial communities and plant-microbe interactions with a particular emphasis on the effect of microbe-microbe interactions on the shape of microbial communities at the root surface. Further, we discuss the potential for root microbiome modification to benefit agriculture and food production.

  3. Endophytic fungi harbored inPanax notoginseng: diversity and potential as biological control agents against host plant pathogens of root-rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Kun; Miao, Cui-Ping; Chen, Hua-Hong; Huang, Fang-Fang; Xia, Yu-Mei; Chen, You-Wei; Zhao, Li-Xing

    2017-07-01

    Endophytic fungi play an important role in balancing the ecosystem and boosting host growth. In the present study, we investigated the endophytic fungal diversity of healthy Panax notoginseng and evaluated its potential antimicrobial activity against five major phytopathogens causing root-rot of P. notoginseng . A culture-dependent technique, combining morphological and molecular methods, was used to analyze endophytic fungal diversity. A double-layer agar technique was used to challenge the phytopathogens of P. notoginseng . A total of 89 fungi were obtained from the roots, stems, leaves, and seeds of P. notoginseng , and 41 isolates representing different morphotypes were selected for taxonomic characterization. The fungal isolates belonged to Ascomycota (96.6%) and Zygomycota (3.4%). All isolates were classified to 23 genera and an unknown taxon belonging to Sordariomycetes. The number of isolates obtained from different tissues ranged from 12 to 42 for leaves and roots, respectively. The selected endophytic fungal isolates were challenged by the root-rot pathogens Alternaria panax , Fusarium oxysporum , Fusarium solani , Phoma herbarum , and Mycocentrospora acerina. Twenty-six of the 41 isolates (63.4%) exhibited activity against at least one of the pathogens tested. Our results suggested that P. notoginseng harbors diversified endophytic fungi that would provide a basis for the identification of new bioactive compounds, and for effective biocontrol of notoginseng root rot.

  4. Direct immunofluorescence of the outer root sheath in anagen and telogen hair in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasilovic, Srdjan; Medenica, Ljiljana; Popadic, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Direct immunofluorescence of peri-lesional skin is the gold standard in the diagnosis of pemphigus. A specific immunofluorescence pattern may also be demonstrated in the outer root sheath of anagen and telogen hair. We demonstrated an intercellular reticular deposition of immunoglobulin G in the outer root sheath of plucked anagen and telogen hair in all pemphigus vulgaris patients with active disease and for the first time in all patients with active pemphigus foliaceus. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that plucked hair samples may be kept at -20°C for at least 2 weeks before immunofluorescent staining and analysis. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  5. Confusion over live/dead stainings for the detection of vital microorganisms in oral biofilms--which stain is suitable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netuschil, Lutz; Auschill, Thorsten M; Sculean, Anton; Arweiler, Nicole B

    2014-01-11

    There is confusion over the definition of the term "viability state(s)" of microorganisms. "Viability staining" or "vital staining techniques" are used to distinguish live from dead bacteria. These stainings, first established on planctonic bacteria, may have serious shortcomings when applied to multispecies biofilms. Results of staining techniques should be compared with appropriate microbiological data. Many terms describe "vitality states" of microorganisms, however, several of them are misleading. Authors define "viable" as "capable to grow". Accordingly, staining methods are substitutes, since no staining can prove viability.The reliability of a commercial "viability" staining assay (Molecular Probes) is discussed based on the corresponding product information sheet: (I) Staining principle; (II) Concentrations of bacteria; (III) Calculation of live/dead proportions in vitro. Results of the "viability" kit are dependent on the stains' concentration and on their relation to the number of bacteria in the test. Generally this staining system is not suitable for multispecies biofilms, thus incorrect statements have been published by users of this technique.To compare the results of the staining with bacterial parameters appropriate techniques should be selected. The assessment of Colony Forming Units is insufficient, rather the calculation of Plating Efficiency is necessary. Vital fluorescence staining with Fluorescein Diacetate and Ethidium Bromide seems to be the best proven and suitable method in biofilm research.Regarding the mutagenicity of staining components users should be aware that not only Ethidium Bromide might be harmful, but also a variety of other substances of which the toxicity and mutagenicity is not reported. - The nomenclature regarding "viability" and "vitality" should be used carefully.- The manual of the commercial "viability" kit itself points out that the kit is not suitable for natural multispecies biofilm research, as supported by an

  6. Astroculture™ Root Metabolism and Cytochemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Barta, D. J.; Ming, D. W.; Morrow, R. C.; Musgrave, M. E.

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture™ plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the root tissue. ADH activity is a sensitive biochemical indicator of hypoxic conditions in plants and was measured in both spaceflight and control roots. In addition to the biochemical enzyme assays, localization of ADH in the root tissue was examined cytochemically. The results of these analyses showed that ADH activity increased significantly as a result of spaceflight exposure. Enzyme activity increased 248% to 304% in dwarf wheat when compared with the ground controls and Brassica showed increases between 334% and 579% when compared with day zero controls. Cytochemical staining revealed no differences in ADH tissue localization in any of the dwarf wheat treatments. These results show the importance of considering root system oxygenation in designing and building nutrient delivery hardware for spaceflight plant cultivation and confirm previous reports of an ADH response associated with spaceflight exposure

  7. ASTROCULTURE (TM) root metabolism and cytochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Barta, D. J.; Ming, D. W.; Morrow, R. C.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture (TM) plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the root tissue. ADH activity is a sensitive biochemical indicator of hypoxic conditions in plants and was measured in both spaceflight and control roots. In addition to the biochemical enzyme assays, localization of ADH in the root tissue was examined cytochemically. The results of these analyses showed that ADH activity increased significantly as a result of spaceflight exposure. Enzyme activity increased 248% to 304% in dwarf wheat when compared with the ground controls and Brassica showed increases between 334% and 579% when compared with day zero controls. Cytochemical staining revealed no differences in ADH tissue localization in any of the dwarf wheat treatments. These results show the importance of considering root system oxygenation in designing and building nutrient delivery hardware for spaceflight plant cultivation and confirm previous reports of an ADH response associated with spaceflight exposure.

  8. Endophytic bacteria from Piper tuberculatum Jacq.: isolation, molecular characterization, and in vitro screening for the control of Fusarium solani f. sp piperis, the causal agent of root rot disease in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, S B; Lima, A M; Borges, B N; de Souza, C R B

    2015-07-06

    Endophytic bacteria have been found to colonize internal tissues in many different plants, where they can have several beneficial effects, including defense against pathogens. In this study, we aimed to identify endophytic bacteria associated with roots of the tropical piperaceae Piper tuberculatum, which is known for its resistance to infection by Fusarium solani f. sp piperis, the causal agent of black pepper (Piper nigrum) root rot disease in the Amazon region. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we isolated endophytes belonging to 13 genera: Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Agrobacterium, Ralstonia, Serratia, Cupriavidus, Mitsuaria, Pantoea, and Staphylococcus. The results showed that 56.52% of isolates were associated with the phylum Proteobacteria, which comprised α, β, and γ classes. Other bacteria were related to the phylum Firmicutes, including Bacillus, which was the most abundant genus among all isolates. Antagonistic assays revealed that Pt12 and Pt13 isolates, identified as Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp, respectively, were able to inhibit F. solani f. sp piperis growth in vitro. We describe, for the first time, the molecular identification of 23 endophytic bacteria from P. tuberculatum, among which two Pseudomonas species have the potential to control the pathogen responsible for root rot disease in black pepper in the Amazon region.

  9. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    equation are the same as the poles of the close loop system. Ideally, a desired performance can be achieved a control system by adjusting the location of roots in the s-plane by varying one or mo system parameters. Root-locus Method is a line. 8023278605. AIDED ROOT. AIDED ROOT-LOCUS NUMERICAL TECHNIQUE.

  10. ROOT Reference Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuakye, Eric Gyabeng

    2017-01-01

    A ROOT Reference Documentation has been implemented to generate all the lists of libraries needed for each ROOT class. Doxygen has no option to generate or add the lists of libraries for each ROOT class. Therefore shell scripting and a basic C++ program was employed to import the lists of libraries needed by each ROOT class.

  11. A contribution to the histological study of hypercementosis using metal staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lia, R C; Lauand, F; Marcantonio, E; Neto, C B

    1978-01-01

    After studying hypercementosis, in detail using metallic staining procedures, the authors reached the following conclusions: (1) The histology of hypercementosis, observed by metallic staining reveals remarkable and characteristic microscopical alterations. (2) The Rio Hortega12 procedures, the mitochondria technique of Polak,10 and the method of Achucarro-Hortega13 are of great value for the study of the morphology of cementum. (3) Among the technical procedures used, we consider the 1916 method of Achucarro-Hortega as affording the best view of cementocytes. (4) The Sharpey fibers, revealing great irregularity in course, shape and size, and frequent interruptions could be clearly observed; heavily stained lacunae were frequently observed along the cementum-dentin border; a direct deposit of cellular cementum on the dentin in the middle third of the root was frequently observed. Curiously, an acellular cementum deposit next to a cellular cementum layer could be observed; we also noted numerous cementocytes of different shapes and sizes, at times exhibiting alterations of a degenerative type, particularly fragmentation of protoplasmic prolongations. (5) The techniques used also showed the frequency of blood vessels in the texture of hyperplastic cementum and the presence of capillaries near cementum-dentin junction.

  12. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Tomiichi [Fukushima Medical Coll., Matsuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L{sub 5} radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author).

  13. Anolyte as an alternative bleach for stained cotton fabrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as the two- and three-factor interactions. The results from the study indicated that Anolyte was less effective than sodium hypochlorite as a stain remover for blood, tea, soot/mineral oil and blackcurrant juice. It was noted that the temperature of bleach liquids had an influence on the removal of stains by both bleach liquids.

  14. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2011-01-01

    In the 10th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meeting of ISO/TC 212/WG 1 held in London, UK, on 16-17 November 2009. Furthermore...

  15. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2012-01-01

    In this 12(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meetings of ISO/TC 212/WG 1 Quality and competence in the medical laboratory and ISO...

  16. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2013-01-01

    In the 13(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the first plenary meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical lab...... laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on 17-19 October 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada....

  17. Alcian blue-stained particles in a eutrophic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, J.; Søndergaard, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We used a neutral solution of Alcian Blue to stain transparent particles in eutrophic Lake Frederiksborg Slotss0, Denmark. Alcian Blue-stained particles (ABSP) appeared to be similar to the so-called transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) identified with an acidic solution of Alcian Blue. Our...

  18. Lawsonia inermis And Hibiscus sabdariffa : Posible Histological Stains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of various concentrations of aqueous extracts of Lawsonia inermis and Hibiscus sabdariffa to stain histological tissues was demonstrated. The results with sections of tongue and kidney of the laboratory rat, cut at 6microns thickness showed that only the cellular cytoplasm was stained. However, combinations of ...

  19. The use of special stains in liver biopsy interpretation: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The formalin fixed paraffin embedded blocks of liver biopsies reported in two histopathology laboratories between 2008 and 2013 were retrieved. These were stained with H and E and the following standard special stains for liver tissue histology – Perl's Prussian blue, reticulin, Sirius red, Shikata ...

  20. anolyte as an alternative bleach for stained cotton fabrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Serowe College of Education. Private Bag 009. Serowe. Botswana ... and cons that may affect the environment as well as the quality of the final ..... improved as the pH became higher. Effects of anolyte, sodium hypochlorite and distilled water on the removal of tea stain on cotton. Leverette (2013:1) describes a tea stain as a.

  1. Lasers or light sources for treating port-wine stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Olesen, Anne Braae; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Port-wine stains are birthmarks caused by malformations of blood vessels in the skin. Port-wine stains manifest themselves in infancy as a flat, red mark and do not regress spontaneously but may, if untreated, become darker and thicker in adult life. The profusion of various lasers and light...

  2. Proteome analysis of soybean roots under waterlogging stress at an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Supplementary figure. 2-DE analysis of soybean root proteins under waterlogging stress. A total of 350 μg protein was separated by 2-D as described in Materials and Methods, and visualized with Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. (A) and (B) represent the. 2-DE patterns of control and 3-day waterlogging-treated ...

  3. Decreased mortality associated with prompt Gram staining of blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenfanger, Joan; Graham, Donald R; Kolluri, Lavanya; Sangwan, Gaurav; Lawhorn, Jerry; Drake, Cheryl A; Verhulst, Steven J; Peterson, Ryan; Moja, Lauren B; Ertmoed, Matthew M; Moja, Ashley B; Shevlin, Douglas W; Vautrain, Robert; Callahan, Charles D

    2008-12-01

    Gram stains of positive blood cultures are the most important factor influencing appropriate therapy. The sooner appropriate therapy is initiated, the better. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the sooner Gram stains are performed, the better. To determine the value of timely Gram stains and whether improvement in Gram stain turnaround time (TAT) is feasible, we compared data for matched pairs of patients with cultures processed promptly ( or =1 hour TAT) and then monitored TAT by control charting.In 99 matched pairs, average difference in time to detection of positive blood cultures within a pair of patients was less than 0.1 hour. For the less than 1 hour TAT group, the average TAT and crude mortality were 0.1 hour and 10.1%, respectively; for the 1 hour or longer TAT group, they were 3.3 hours and 19.2%, respectively (P Gram stains.

  4. Study of sideroblasts and iron stores in bone marrow aspirates using Perls′ stain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpana Dharwadkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A bone marrow examination is a critical part of the evaluation of patients with a variety of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic diseases. A Perls′ or Prussian blue stain demonstrates hemosiderin in bone marrow macrophages and iron within sideroblasts. Examination of iron stain allows detection not only of an increased or decreased proportion of sideroblasts but also of abnormal sideroblasts. We undertook this study to evaluate the iron stores in bone marrow as judged by Perls′ stain. Materials and Methods: A Prospective analysis of 55 bone marrow aspirates in a tertiary care center. Results: Sideroblasts were present in all the cases. They were decreased in iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and few other chronic diseases whereas normal to increase in megaloblastic anemia. According to Gale′s method, cases of IDA had absent or decreased iron stores while those of megaloblastic anemia or normoblastic marrows showed normal to increased stores. Grading by the recent intensive method showed combined functional and iron stores deficiency. Conclusion: Perls′ stain on bone marrow aspirates is an important tool not only for assessing the iron stores, increased or decreased but also to study abnormal sideroblasts.

  5. Cadmium translocation by contractile roots differs from that in regular, non-contractile roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Alexander; Lackovič, Andrej; Van Staden, Johannes; Lišková, Desana; Kohanová, Jana; Martinka, Michal

    2015-06-01

    Contractile roots are known and studied mainly in connection with the process of shrinkage of their basal parts, which acts to pull the shoot of the plant deeper into the ground. Previous studies have shown that the specific structure of these roots results in more intensive water uptake at the base, which is in contrast to regular root types. The purpose of this study was to find out whether the basal parts of contractile roots are also more active in translocation of cadmium to the shoot. Plants of the South African ornamental species Tritonia gladiolaris were cultivated in vitro for 2 months, at which point they possessed well-developed contractile roots. They were then transferred to Petri dishes with horizontally separated compartments of agar containing 50 µmol Cd(NO3)2 in the region of the root base or the root apex. Seedlings of 4-d-old maize (Zea mays) plants, which do not possess contractile roots, were also transferred to similar Petri dishes. The concentrations of Cd in the leaves of the plants were compared after 10 d of cultivation. Anatomical analyses of Tritonia roots were performed using appropriately stained freehand cross-sections. The process of contraction required specific anatomical adaptation of the root base in Tritonia, with less lignified and less suberized tissues in comparison with the subapical part of the root. These unusual developmental characteristics were accompanied by more intensive translocation of Cd ions from the basal part of contractile roots to the leaves than from the apical-subapical root parts. The opposite effects were seen in the non-contractile roots of maize, with higher uptake and transport by the apical parts of the root and lower uptake and transport by the basal part. The specific characteristics of contractile roots may have a significant impact on the uptake of ions, including toxic metals from the soil surface layers. This may be important for plant nutrition, for example in the uptake of nutrients from

  6. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  7. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. A sensitive cytochemical staining method for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in individual erythrocytes. I. Optimalization of the staining procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Vogels, I. M.; James, J.; Tas, J.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive cytochemical staining method for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in individual human erythrocytes is described. This staining method can be used for the rapid routine discrimination of patients with a deficiency of the enzyme in its homozygote or heterozygote form, but also

  9. Novel Process for Laser Stain Removal from Archaeological Oil Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nadi, Lotfia; El-Feky, Osama; Abdellatif, Galila; Darwish, Sawsan

    2013-03-01

    Some samples of oil paintings (5 × 5 cm) were prepared on wooden panel with four types of fungi commonly encountered on oil paintings were selected for this study. Each of the fungi is associated with different colored stains. Fungus Alternaria tenuis is associated by a dense black stain, Chetomium globosum by a brownish gray stain, Aspergillus flavus by a yellowish stain, and Fusaruim oxysporum by a pinkish stain. Fungi growing on oil paintings affect the surface characteristics by forming a variety of colored patches typically composed of many complex chemical substances that are produced during metabolic processes. These colored stains may be encrusted in spores, present in mycelium or secreted to a substance such as oil paintings surfaces. While the fungal stains can sometimes be extracted with appropriate solvents, there are some stains that resist solvent extraction entirely. Developing new solvent system that might attack the paint structure, and is time consuming and requires a great deal of trial and error. Mechanical stain removal is also problematic in that it often produces abrasion of the surface, markedly deteriorating the artwork, and is extra ordinarily fine and tedious. For these reasons, we decided to examine an alternative physical technique as a new approach to deal with stain removal. Since the stains are due to the existence of fungi, we thought it a good idea to remove them by singlet oxygen. We applied the photo dynamic process through which the fungi stains were covered with organic dye derivatives in solution under controlled illumination in the lab. The samples were then irradiated by low power Laser light from a He-Ne laser, the dye will be photodecomposed and produce singlet oxygen. We report in this work the results obtained as a function of: - The concentration and types of the organic dye in solution, - The presence of certain amounts of liquids added to the solution, - The scanning speed of the laser beam on the sample surface

  10. Root exudates from grafted-root watermelon showed a certain contribution in inhibiting Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ling

    Full Text Available Grafting watermelon onto bottle gourd rootstock is commonly used method to generate resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON, but knowledge of the effect of the root exudates of grafted watermelon on this soil-borne pathogen in rhizosphere remains limited. To investigate the root exudate profiles of the own-root bottle gourd, grafted-root watermelon and own-root watermelon, recirculating hydroponic culture system was developed to continuously trap these root exudates. Both conidial germination and growth of FON were significantly decreased in the presence of root exudates from the grafted-root watermelon compared with the own-root watermelon. HPLC analysis revealed that the composition of the root exudates released by the grafted-root watermelon differed not only from the own-root watermelon but also from the bottle gourd rootstock plants. We identified salicylic acid in all 3 root exudates, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in root exudates from own-root bottle gourd and grafted-root watermelon but not own-root watermelon, and abundant cinnamic acid only in own-root watermelon root exudates. The chlorogenic and caffeic acid were candidates for potentiating the enhanced resistance of the grafted watermelon to FON, therefore we tested the effects of the two compounds on the conidial germination and growth of FON. Both phenolic acids inhibited FON conidial germination and growth in a dose-dependent manner, and FON was much more susceptible to chlorogenic acid than to caffeic acid. In conclusion, the key factor in attaining the resistance to Fusarium wilt is grafting on the non-host root stock, however, the root exudates profile also showed some contribution in inhibiting FON. These results will help to better clarify the disease resistance mechanisms of grafted-root watermelon based on plant-microbe communication and will guide the improvement of strategies against Fusarium-mediated wilt of watermelon plants.

  11. Sensitivity of Gram stain in the diagnosis of urethritis in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, M Angeles; Gómez-Lus, M Luisa; Lora, David

    2012-06-01

    Acute urethritis is among the most common types of sexually transmitted diseases in men. The diagnosis usually requires microscopic evidence of urethritis, but sometimes urethral pathogens are detected in asymptomatic men without such evidence. The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of Gram stain in men with urethral symptoms and to relate it to the microorganisms isolated. Between January 2006 and December 2007, 491 urethral samples were analysed. The authors assessed the presence of leukocytes by Gram stain and tested specifically for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis and Trichomonas vaginalis, as well as analysing the results of conventional culture. The percentages of positive samples as a function of Gram category were two or less polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs)/high-power field (HPF) 25% (92/364), three to four PMNLs/HPF 32% (18/57) and five or more PMNLs/HPF 54% (38/70). Classing samples with more than two PMNLs/HPF as positive, the sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratio for Gram stain were 38% (95% CI 30 to 46), 79% (95% CI 75 to 84) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.4 to 2.4), respectively. On the other hand, taking as positive five or more PMNLs/HPF, the sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratio for Gram stain were 26% (95% CI 18 to 33), 91% (95% CI 87 to 94) and 2.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 4.2), respectively. The sensitivity of Gram stain to Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were 80% (95% CI 64 to 96), 23% (95% CI 8 to 39) and 11% (95% CI 2 to 20), respectively. The low sensitivity of Gram stain means that negative results do not exclude the presence of urethritis in symptomatic patients.

  12. Rapid staining techniques in cytopathology: a review and comparison of modified protocols for hematoxylin and eosin, Papanicolaou and Romanowsky stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörundsson, Einar; Lumsden, John H.; Jacobs, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review and compare rapid protocols for fixation and staining of cytologic smears. We used fresh surgical specimens from dogs and horses to evaluate and modify, if necessary, previously described rapid staining protocols. Slides were wet-fixed, rehydrated or air-dried. Rapid Papanicolaou, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), and Romanowsky stains were applied, including modification of Diff-Quick stain. The modified rapid staining protocols were simple to use and gave results within 5 minutes that were comparable to those obtained with traditional methods. Advantages of rehydrated vs wet-fixed smears included consistent preparations, a clean background, and equally good or superior nuclear detail.

  13. Novel methods of cytokine detection: Real-time PCR, ELISPOT, and intracellular cytokine staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Turlej

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are small hormone-like proteins that play important roles in immune system control. Cytokines regulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells and hematopoiesis and act as mediators in the inflammatory reaction. Changes in cytokine levels are found in many diseases, such as sepsis, bowel inflammatory disease, autoimmune diseases, as well as graft-versus-host disease. Cytokines levels can be detected using in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo techniques. The level of cytokine produced can be measured by immunoenzymatic test (ELISA in supernatant after cell culture with the addition of stimulant and in plasma by techniques that measure the level of cytokine secretion in cells (e.g. immunohistochemical staining, ELISPOT, and intracellular cytokine staining, and by molecular biological methods (RPA, real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and Northern blot. Detection of cytokine mRNA in tissues is useful in the direct determination of heterogenic populations of cytokine-producing cells. Nowadays the most frequently used methods for measuring cytokine level are ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining with flow cytometry detection, and real-time PCR. These methods have an important clinical role in vaccine efficacy, in viral, bacterial, and verminous diagnostics, and in determining the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  14. Effect of Melamine Sponge on Tooth Stain Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takero; Kawata, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stain removal ability of melamine sponge before aesthetic tooth whitening in extracted teeth. Melamine sponge of thickness 40 mm was compressed and the destruction of the partition wall structure during the compression process was examined under a stereoscopic microscope. An extracted human tooth was cleaned by normal polishing or with melamine sponge for 90 s. To evaluate the stain level, the tooth surfaces were photographed under a stereoscopic microscope at 0, 30, 60 and 90 s. The residual stained region was traced in a high-magnification photograph, and the stain intensity was presented as a change, relative to the intensity before the experiment (0 s). Mechanical cleaning by toothbrushing produced polishing scratches on the tooth surface, whereas use of the melamine sponge resulted in only minimal scratches. As the compression level increased, the stain-removing effect tended to become stronger. Melamine sponge can remove stains from the tooth surface more effectively and less invasively compared to a conventional toothbrush. As no new scratches are made on the tooth surface when using a melamine sponge brush, the risk of re-staining is reduced. Cleaning using a melamine sponge brush can be easily and effectively performed at home and in a dental office.

  15. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. van den Berg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI Stations is limited.

  16. Are there metallic traces in black extrinsic dental stain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Limor; Chevion, Mordechai; Berenshtein, Eduard; Faibis, Sarit; Moskovitz, Moti

    2013-05-01

    The detection of ferric ions in samples of black extrinsic dental stain led to the idea that it is comprised of insoluble ferric compounds. The present study examined the chemical composition of black extrinsic dental stain. Plaque was collected from 17 children with black extrinsic dental stain (study group A) and from 15 children without black extrinsic stain (control group), using sterile graphite curettes; and from 4 children with black extrinsic stain (study group B), using a standard sterile metal curette. Samples were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and subjected to quantitative chemical analysis (energy dispersive spectrometry). Except for calcium and phosphorus levels, no significant differences were found between the chemical composition of black extrinsic dental stain and dental plaque. Metallic ions were not detected in samples collected with a graphite curette (study group A), but were detected in samples collected with a metal curette (study group B). Metallic ions do not seem to be the origin of black extrinsic dental stain. Previous reports of the presence of metallic ions are probably due to contamination of the samples by the collection method.

  17. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan Osipov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977. The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine.

  18. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Vinokurov, Alexei; Smetanina, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977). The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity) compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine. PMID:24727376

  19. A novel washing algorithm for underarm stain removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikgoz Tufan, H.; Gocek, I.; Sahin, U. K.; Erdem, I.

    2017-10-01

    After contacting with human sweat which comprise around 27% sebum, anti-perspirants comprising aluminium chloride or its compounds form a jel-like structure whose solubility in water is very poor. In daily use, this jel-like structure closes sweat pores and hinders wetting of skin by sweat. However, when in contact with garments, they form yellowish stains at the underarm of the garments. These stains are very hard to remove with regular machine washing. In this study, first of all, we focused on understanding and simulating such stain formation on the garments. Two alternative procedures are offered to form jel-like structures. On both procedures, commercially available spray or deo-stick type anti-perspirants, standard acidic and basic sweat solutions and artificial sebum are used to form jel-like structures, and they are applied on fabric in order to get hard stains. Secondly, after simulation of the stain on the fabric, we put our efforts on developing a washing algorithm specifically designed for removal of underarm stains. Eight alternative washing algorithms are offered with varying washing temperature, amounts of detergent, and pre-stain removal procedures. Better algorithm is selected by comparison of Tristimulus Y values after washing.

  20. LANTHANUM STAINING OF THE SURFACE COAT OF CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Stephen M.

    1971-01-01

    Among the techniques which have been reported to stain the surface coat of cells, for electron microscopy, is lanthanum staining en bloc. Similarly, the presence of the cationic dye, Alcian blue 8GX, in a primary glutaraldehyde fixative has been reported to improve the preservation of the surface coat of cells of many types; however, the preserved coat is not very electron opaque unless thin sections are counterstained. The present paper shows that for several rat tissues lanthanum staining en bloc is an effective electron stain for the cell surface, giving excellent contrast, if combined sequentially with prefixation in an aldehyde fixative containing Alcian blue. The cationic substance cetylpyridinium chloride was found to have a similar effect to that of Alcian blue in enhancing the lanthanum staining of the surface coat material of the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. The patterns of lanthanum staining obtained for the tissues studied strikingly resemble those reported in the literature where tissues are stained by several standard methods for demonstrating mucosubstances at the ultrastructural level. This fact and the reproduction of the effect of Alcian blue by cetylpyridinium chloride constitute a persuasive empirical argument that the material visualized is a mucopolysaccharide or mucopolysaccharide-protein complex. PMID:4108476

  1. Western Blot of Stained Proteins from Dried Polyacrylamide Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Claudia; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1996-01-01

    Western blotting of proteins is customarily performed following their separation on polyacrylamide gels, either prior to staining (1) or, as recently reported, following staining (2). We describe here Western blotting with stained gels, which had been dried and some of which had been stored for years. This procedure permits immunological analysis of proteins, to which antisera may have become available only later, or where the application of newly developed sensitive detection methods is desired. Once rehydration of the gels is achieved, proteins can be-transferred to blotting membranes by any appropriate protocol. Proteins stained with Coomassie Blue have to be detected with a non-chromogenic method, such as the film-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL)2) procedure (3). Silver stained proteins, which transfer in the colorless form, may be visualized by any detection method, although, because of the usually very low amounts of proteins, detection by ECL is preferable. Blotting of stained proteins from rehydrated gels is as rapid and as quantitative as from freshly prepared gels, in contrast to blotting from wet stained gels, which requires extensive washing and results in low transfer efficiency (2). Together with a photographic record of the gel pattern, unambiguous identification of immunoreactive proteins from complex mixtures is possible. Some further applications of this work are discussed.

  2. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weizhong; Zhou, Huafu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA), (dC), (dG) and (dT) to silver staining could be ranged as (dA) > (dG) > (dC) > (dT) from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT) was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt). The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  3. Comparing root architectural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  4. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2012-01-01

    The 11th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) provides our first impressions of the REACH and ECHA programs. We intend to give a more thorough account of what these important programs actually mean in later editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission. Under the heading...... of Regulatory Affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the opening session of the meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on 2-4 June 2010 in Seoul, Republic...

  5. Establishment of a transgenic hairy root system in wild and domesticated watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) for studying root vigor under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Morikawa, Kaoru; Abe, Yosuke; Yokota, Akiho; Akashi, Kinya

    2010-07-01

    Root vigor is an important trait for the growth of terrestrial plants, especially in water-deficit environments. Although deserts plants are known for their highly developed root architecture, the molecular mechanism responsible for this trait has not been determined. Here we established an efficient protocol for the genetic manipulation of two varieties of watermelon plants: a desert-grown wild watermelon that shows vigorous root growth under drought, and a domesticated cultivar showing retardation of root growth under drought stress. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transgenic hairy roots were efficiently induced and selected from the hypocotyls of these plants. Transgenic GUS expression was detected in the roots by RT-PCR and histochemical GUS staining. Moreover, a liquid culture system for evaluating their root growth was also established. Interestingly, growth of the hairy roots derived from domesticated variety of watermelon strongly inhibited under high osmotic condition, whereas the hairy roots derived from wild variety of watermelon retained substantial growth rates under the stress condition. The new protocol presented here offers a powerful tool for the comparative study of the molecular mechanism underlying drought-induced root growth in desert plants.

  6. Potential of Epicoccum purpurascens Strain 5615 AUMC as a Biocontrol Agent of Pythium irregulare Root Rot in Three Leguminous Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutb, Mostafa; Ali, Esam H

    2010-12-01

    Epicoccum purpurascens stain 5615 AUMC was investigated for its biocontrol activity against root rot disease caused by Pythium irregulare. E. purpurascens greenhouse pathogenicity tests using three leguminous plants indicated that the fungus was nonpathogenic under the test conditions. The germination rate of the three species of legume seeds treated with a E. purpurascens homogenate increased significantly compared with the seeds infested with P. irregulare. No root rot symptoms were observed on seeds treated with E. purpurascens, and seedlings appeared more vigorous when compared with the non-treated control. A significant increase in seedling growth parameters (seedling length and fresh and dry weights) was observed in seedlings treated with E. purpurascens compared to pathogen-treated seedlings. Pre-treating the seeds with the bioagent fungus was more efficient for protecting seeds against the root rot disease caused by P. irregulare than waiting for disease dispersal before intervention. To determine whether E. purpurascens produced known anti-fungal compounds, an acetone extract of the fungus was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The extract revealed a high percentage of the cinnamic acid derivative (trimethylsiloxy) cinnamic acid methyl ester. The E. purpurascens isolate grew more rapidly than the P. irregulare pathogen in a dual culture on potato dextrose agar nutrient medium, although the two fungi grew similarly when cultured separately. This result may indicate antagonism via antibiosis or competition.

  7. Real-time histological imaging of kidneys stained with food dyes using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yasuaki; Kimura, Kazushi; Wang, Shujie; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a real-time imaging technique for diagnosis of kidney diseases which is composed of two steps, staining renal cells safely with food dyes and optical sectioning of living renal tissue to obtain histological images by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Here, we demonstrated that the MPM imaging with food dyes, including erythrosine and indigo carmine, could be used as fluorescent agents to visualize renal functions and structures such as glomerular bloodstreams, glomerular filtration, and morphology of glomeruli and renal tubules. We also showed that the kidneys of IgA nephropathy model-mice stained with the food dyes presented histopathological characteristics different from those observed in normal kidneys. The use of the food dyes enhances the quality of tissue images obtained by MPM and offers the potential to contribute to a clinical real-time diagnosis of kidney diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Screening for resistance to purple seed stain Cercospora kikuchii by seed inoculation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.H.; Oh, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt was made to establish a mass-screening technique for resistance to purple seed stain disease in soybean. Seeds sterilized in 1 : 10,000 mercuric chloride for 1 minute and transferred to Petridishes containing 20ml water agar plus 50 ppM of the sodium salt of 2,4-D were inoculated by placing a small agar cube containing fungal mycelium on the seed coat of each seed. A positive correlation betweeen natural infection of purple seed stain and purple discoloration by seed inoculation technique was highly significant and by this technique, some native soybean collections and introduced varieties were tested for resistance to the disease. Most of the soybean varieties tested were susceptible except for the varieties Hill, Harosoy and Sac, resistant comparatively.

  9. Construction of 2 intraspecific linkage maps and identification of resistance QTLs for Phytophthora capsici root-rot and foliar-blight diseases of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A; Berke, Terry F; Massoudi, Mark; Black, Lowell L; Huestis, Gordon; Choi, Doil; Lee, Sanghyeob; Prince, James P

    2005-08-01

    Two linkage maps of pepper were constructed and used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring resistance to Phytophthora capsici. Inoculations were done with 7 isolates: 3 from Taiwan, 3 from California, and 1 from New Mexico. The first map was constructed from a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the PSP-11 (susceptible) x PI201234 (resistant) cross; and the second map was from a set of F(2) lines of the Joe E. Parker' (susceptible) x 'Criollo de Morelos 334' (resistant) cross. The RIL map covered 1466.1 cM of the pepper genome, and it consisted of 144 markers -- 91 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 34 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs), 15 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 1 sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR), and 3 morphological markers -- distributed over 17 linkage groups. The morphological markers mapped on this population were erect fruit habit (up), elongated fruit shape (fs(e)), and fasciculate fruit clusters (fa). The F(2) map consisted of 113 markers (51 AFLPs, 45 RAPDs, 14 SSRs, and 3 SCARs) distributed in 16 linkage groups, covering a total of 1089.2 cM of the pepper genome. Resistance to both root rot and foliar blight were evaluated in the RIL population using the 3 Taiwan isolates; the remaining isolates were used for the root-rot test only. Sixteen chromosomal regions of the RIL map contained single QTLs or clusters of resistance QTLs that had an effect on root rot and (or) foliar blight, revealing a complex set of genetics involved in resistance to P. capsici. Five QTLs were detected in the F(2) map that had an effect on resistance to root rot.

  10. Evaluation of polycross sweetpotato seedlings for root yield potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed at determining the root yield potential of the sweetpotato seedlings, the variation in storage root flesh colour and response of the storage roots to major pests and diseases attacking sweetpotato in the field .The experiment was carried out in the screen house and at the Eastern experimental field of National ...

  11. The Gram stain after more than a century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, A; Doyle, R J

    1996-05-01

    The Gram stain, the most important stain in microbiology, was described more than a century ago. Only within the past decade, however, has an understanding of its mechanism emerged. It now seems clear that the cell wall of Gram-positive microorganisms is responsible for retention of a crystal violet:iodine complex. In Gram-negative cells, the staining procedures damage the cell surface resulting in loss of dye complexes. Gram-positive microorganisms require a relatively thick cell wall, irrespective of composition, to retain the dye. Therefore, Gram-stainability is a function of the cell wall and is not related to chemistry of cell constituents. This review provides a chronology of the Gram stain and discusses its recently discovered mechanism.

  12. Standardization of the Romanowsky staining procedure: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, S A; Marshall, P N; Trobaugh, F E

    1980-01-01

    Commerically available Romanowsky blood stains are variable mixtures of thiazein dyes and brominated fluorescein derivatives with varying degrees of metallic salt contamination in a number of different solvent systems. There is a need for standardized Romanowsky stains of constant composition, which, when used in conjunction with a carefully controlled specimen preparation technique, should give consistent performance. Such a preparation system would be of great value to hematologists in general and would be essential to the validity of data obtained by the digital processing of blood cell images. It is possible to prepare standardized Romanowsky stains as mixtures of two or three dye components, namely, eosin Y, azure B and methylene blue, although azure B has only recently become commercially available at an acceptable degree of purity. The logistic problems of stain standardization are discussed.

  13. The effect of decalcifying solutions on hemosiderin staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; Bellis, Maria

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether routine decalcification may reduce the amount of stainable iron that is visible on tissue sections, samples of liver and lung tissue with excessive iron stores were placed in three standard decalcifying solutions (i) formic acid [33%], formaldehyde [4%], and NaCl [0.85%]; (ii) formic acid [30%], formaldehyde [4%], and water; and (iii) nitric acid [5%] for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. After exposure to the decalcifying solutions, the tissues were stained with Perls stain. The slides were examined blind and the intensity of iron staining was scored semiquantitatively from 0 to 3+. The trend in all samples over the course of the experiment (96 h) was for reduction in the intensity of hemosiderin staining. As the amount of stainable hemosiderin in tissues may be significantly altered by decalcification, the absence of hemosiderin in tissues adjacent to a fracture site does not necessarily indicate that the injury was acute. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. The value of intraoperative Gram stain in revision spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifflett, Grant D; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Bjerke-Kroll, Benjamin T; Kueper, Janina; Koltsov, Jayme B; Sama, Andrew A; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative cultures and Gram stains are often obtained in cases of revision spine surgery even when clinical signs of infection are not present. The clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of this behavior remain unproven. The aim was to evaluate the clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of routine intraoperative Gram stains in revision spine surgery. This was a retrospective clinical review performed at an academic center in an urban setting. One hundred twenty-nine consecutive adult revision spine surgeries were performed. The outcome measures included intraoperative Gram stains. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 594 consecutive revision spine surgeries performed by four senior surgeons between 2008 and 2013 to identify patients who had operative cultures and Gram stains performed. All revision cases including cervical, thoracic, and lumbar fusion and non-fusion, with and without instrumentation were reviewed. One hundred twenty-nine (21.7%) patients had operative cultures obtained and were included in the study. The most common primary diagnosis code at the time of revision surgery was pseudarthrosis, which was present in 41.9% of cases (54 of 129). Infection was the primary diagnosis in 10.1% (13 of 129) of cases. Operative cultures were obtained in 129 of 595 (21.7%) cases, and 47.3% (61 of 129) were positive. Gram stains were performed in 98 of 129 (76.0%) cases and were positive in 5 of 98 (5.1%) cases. Overall, there was no correlation between revision diagnosis and whether or not a Gram stain was obtained (p=.697). Patients with a history of prior instrumentation were more likely to have a positive Gram stain (pGram staining was found to have a sensitivity of 10.9% (confidence interval [CI] 3.9%-23.6%) and specificity of 100% (CI 93.1%-100%). The positive and negative predictive values were 100% (CI 48.0%-100%) and 57.3% (CI 45.2%-66.2%), respectively. Kappa coefficient was calculated to be 0.1172 (CI 0.0194-0.2151). The cost per discrepant

  15. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of calcium (Ca) in caps of vertically- and horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays was monitored to determine its possible role in root graviresponsiveness. A modification of the antimonate precipitation procedure was used to localize Ca in situ. In vertically-oriented roots, the presumed graviperceptive (i.e., columella) cells were characterized by minimal and symmetric staining of the plasmalemma and mitochondria. No precipitate was present in plasmodesmata or cell walls. Within 5 min after horizontal reorientation, staining was associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell. This asymmetric staining persisted throughout the onset of gravicurvature. No staining of lateral cell walls of columella cells was observed at any stage of gravicurvature, suggesting that a lateral flow of Ca through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots does not occur. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like structures in their cell walls. These results are discussed relative to proposed roles of root-cap Ca in root gravicurvature.

  16. Relationships between root diameter, root length and root branching along lateral roots in adult, field-grown maize

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qian; Pag?s, Lo?c; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Root diameter, especially apical diameter, plays an important role in root development and function. The variation in diameter between roots, and along roots, affects root structure and thus the root system?s overall foraging performance. However, the effect of diameter variation on root elongation, branching and topological connections has not been examined systematically in a population of high-order roots, nor along the roots, especially for mature plants grown in the f...

  17. NEONATAL OUTCOME IN MECONIUM STAINED DELIVERIES — A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    RAMAN, TS RAGHU; JAYAPRAKASH, DG

    1997-01-01

    This prospective study analyzes the neonatal outcome in deliveries complicated by meconium stained amniotic fluid. In a study of 1000 live born deliveries, meconium staining of amniotic fluid was seen in 50 (5%) deliveries. Out of these, 20 newborns (40%) developed classical signs of meconium aspiration syndrome and were managed according to a predetermined protocol. Multiparity, term deliveries, use of sedatives in mother, intrauterine growth retardation and prolonged labour were some of the...

  18. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2014-01-01

    In the 15(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the plenary meetings of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical laborat...... laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on August 22-24, 2012 in Berlin, Germany. An additional discussion of the use of food dyes in India also is included....

  19. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  20. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2007-06-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we compared the colony staining efficiencies of the widely used methylene blue, and Ethidium bromide (ETeB) stains. Results show that the ETeB protocol works well on plastic and is extremely effective for staining colonies on collagen when compared to methylene blue. The key features and advantages of ETeB technique are; (a) reduction in background for colonies grown on collagen and possibly other substrates, (b) the whole procedure takes less than a minute, (c) no post-stain washing step is required which eliminates colony losses for cell lines that are loosely adherent, (d) colony visualization and counting can be done immediately following the staining procedure using a standard UV illuminator and software, and (e) the method works across a wide variety of cell lines. The simplicity and robustness of this procedure should warrant its usage in both small and large-scale clonogenic experiments.

  1. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the diffic...

  2. Root production method system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Lovelace

    2002-01-01

    The RPM system (Root Production Method) is a multistep production system of container tree production that places primary emphasis on the root system because the root system ultimately determines the tree's survival and performance in its outplanted environment. This particular container production system has been developed to facilitate volume production, in a...

  3. Armillaria root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  4. Root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Chávez de Paz, L.E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root

  5. The Root Canal Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, Michel; Chávez de Paz, E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root

  6. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile

    2017-04-20

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic events in a given experiment. The protocol also allows the visualization of more than one fluorescent protein or dye simultaneously, using multiple channel acquisition. We particularly focus on imaging of cytokinesis in Arabidopsis root tip meristem, but this protocol is also suitable to follow root hair growth, pollen tube growth, and other regions of root over time, in various plant species. It may as well be amendable to automatically track non-plant structures with an apical growth.

  7. External root resorption: Different etiologies explained from the composition of the human root-close periodontal membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper summarizes different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots. It also highlights factors important for individual susceptibility to root resorption. Furthermore, the paper focuses on idiopathic root resorption where the provoking factor is not known. The Hypothesis: The several different disturbances causing root resorption can be either orthodontically provoked or acquired by trauma, virus or congenital diseases. It is presumed that all these conditions lead to inflammatory processes in the three main tissue layers, comprising the peri-root sheet. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: This paper explains how different etiologies behind root resorption and how different phenotypic traits in root resorption can be understood from immunohistochemical studies of the human periodontal membrane close to the root and thus, gain a new understanding of the phenomenon of root resorption.

  8. Resprouting from roots in four Brazilian tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Adriana Hissae; Appezzato-da-Glória, Beatriz

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies pointed out that species richness and high density values within the Leguminosae in Brazilian forest fragments affected by fire could be due, at least partially, to the high incidence of root sprouting in this family. However, there are few studies of the factors that induce root sprouting in woody plants after disturbance. We investigated the bud formation on root cuttings, and considered a man-made disturbance that isolates the root from the shoot apical dominance of three Leguminosae (Bauhinia forficata Link., Centrolobium tomentosum Guill. ex Benth, and Inga laurina (Sw.) Willd) and one Rutaceae (Esenbeckia febrifuga (St. Hil.) Juss. ex Mart.). All these species resprout frequently after fire. We also attempted to induce bud formation on root systems by removing the main trunk, girdling or sectioning the shallow lateral roots from forest tree species Esenbeckia febrifuga and Hymenaea courbaril L. We identified the origin of shoot primordia and their early development by fixing the samples in Karnovsky solution, dehydrating in ethyl alcohol series and embedding in plastic resin. Serial sections were cut on a rotary microtome and stained with toluidine blue O. Permanent slides were mounted in synthetic resin. We observed different modes of bud origin on root cuttings: close to the vascular cambium (C. tomentosum), from the callus (B. forficata and E. febrifuga) and from the phloematic parenchyma proliferation (I. laurina). Fragments of B. forficata root bark were also capable of forming reparative buds from healing phellogen formed in callus in the bark's inner side. In the attempt of bud induction on root systems, Hymenaea courbaril did not respond to any of the induction tests, probably because of plant age. However, Esenbeckia febrifuga roots formed suckers when the main trunk was removed or their roots were sectioned and isolated from the original plant. We experimentally demonstrated the ability of four tree species to resprout from roots

  9. Antibacterial Activities of Glycyrrhiza gabra Linn. (Licorice Root Extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis rand Its Inhibitory Effects on Cysteine Proteases and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttipalin Suwannakul

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the antibacterial activity of licorice root extract. Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial and anti-proteolytic activities of root extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis in both planktonics and bioflm cells. Methods: Glycyrrhiza glabra (G. glabra roots were extracted by 95% ethanol freeze dried and kept at -20˚C prior experiments. P.gingvalis (ATCC 33277 were cultured and used for experiments. Determination of antibacterial activities of G.glabra extracts (lico rice against P.gingvalis planktonic the MIC and MBC were evaluated by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-killing methods. The crystal violet assay was used to assess the bioflm growth inhibition and the disruption of established bioflm. The Arg - specifc proteolytic activities were analyzed using the chromogenic substrates assays using N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride and N-(p-tosyl-Gly Pro-Lys 4-nitroanilide acetate salt to assess the enzymatic inhibition effects of the extracts compared with the controls. Results: The licorice root extract had antimicrobial activities on P.gingivalis with MIC and MBC of 62.5µg/ml and 25 µg/ml respectively. The assay showed that Licorice root extronidazole. Licorice root extract also had effect on P.gingivalis bioflms. Quantifcation by crystal violate staining showed the reduction of bioflm mass in the presence of Licorice root extract. The Arg-and Kgp- proteases activities were also inhibited by the extract in dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results suggested that licorice root extract may has potential therapeutics values as a candidate for periodontal disease

  10. Novel methylene blue staining technique for localizing small esophageal leiomyomas during thoracoscopic enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Ai, B; Liao, Y; Liu, L; Liu, M

    2016-11-01

    The treatment of choice for leiomyoma, the most common benign esophageal tumor, is thoracoscopic enucleation. One of the most difficult aspects of thoracoscopic enucleation is the precise localization of small tumors (≤1.5 cm) and tumors without external protrusion. No simple, feasible solutions to this problem are available. We developed a novel methylene blue staining technique to localize small esophageal leiomyomas and evaluated the feasibility of our technique. Between January 2013 and July 2014, eight patients with small esophageal leiomyomas (≤1.5 cm) underwent thoracoscopic enucleation in Tongji Hospital. Preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography was performed in all patients. The leiomyomas were located in the middle (n = 5) and lower (n = 3) thirds of the esophagus. We preoperatively injected 0.5-1.0 mL methylene blue in the submucosa adjacent to the tumors under standard gastroscope guidance. The entire staining process took about 10 minutes. Staining was successful in all patients. The unstained tumor was exposed after the blue-stained mediastinal pleura, and overlying muscle were incised longitudinally. All procedures were successfully completed without conversion to open surgery. No abnormalities were detected in the esophageal mucosa. The median operating time was 60 minutes (range, 40-90 minutes). Postoperative histopathology confirmed leiomyoma in all patients. The median postoperative hospital stay was 6 days (range, 5-7 days). No major complications, such as esophageal leakage or esophageal diverticulum, occurred. Endoscopic methylene blue staining is safe and feasible for localizing small esophageal leiomyomas during thoracoscopic enucleation. This method will enable precise and easy enucleation. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. A quantitative analysis of stem cell homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Zhang, Chen; Ghosh, Dipanjana; Gong, Ximing; Xu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The Lugol's staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late 1990s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labeling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol's staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol's staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behavior that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Stem Cell Homeostasis in the Arabidopsis Columella Root Cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han eHong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lugol’s staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late ‘90s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labelling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU, the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol’s staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol’s staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behaviour that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  13. The influence of Romanowsky-Giemsa type stains on nuclear and cytoplasmic features of cytological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E; Wittekind, D

    1989-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the staining pattern of the standard azure B-eosin Y stain with commercial May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stains on cytological specimens by means of high resolution image analysis. Several cytological specimens (blood smears, abdominal serous effusions, bronchial scrape material) were air dried, methanol fixed and stained with the standard azure B-eosin Y stain and with commercial May-Grünwald-Giemsa stains. Integrated optical density (IOD) and colour intensities of cell nuclei and cytoplasm were measured with the IBAS 2000 image analyser. Commercial MGG stains gave much higher coefficients of variation for all parameters than the standard stain. Reproducibility of cell nuclei segmentation versus cytoplasm was significantly better for the standard stain. Contamination of the standard stain with methylene blue partly copied the staining pattern of commercial stains. The standard azure B-eosin Y stain is recommended for high resolution image analysis (HRIA) of cytological samples.

  14. Leishman-Giemsa Cocktail - Is it an Effective Stain for Air Dried Cytology Smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddagowda, Shilpa Manigatta; Shashidhar, Hemalatha Anantharamaiah; Prasad, Chinaiah Subramanyam Babu Rajendra

    2017-03-01

    Air dried cytology smears are stained routinely with Romanowsky stains so that the relative cell size, nuclear size, cytoplasmic details, smear background elements and intercellular matrix components are better appreciated. A variety of modified Romanowsky stains are used in cytology. Leishman-Giemsa (LG) cocktail is one of the new staining techniques which can be used for staining the air dried cytology smears. To evaluate the quality of staining of LG cocktail on air dried smears and to compare the quality of staining of LG cocktail with May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) which is the most commonly used stain in cytology. The present prospective comparative study was carried out with 100 cases and two extra smears were prepared for each case and stained with MGG and LG cocktail stains. The stained slides were blinded and were evaluated for the staining characteristics of the nucleus, cytoplasm and background staining. Based on this, scoring was done by two pathologists independently. Quality Index (QI) was calculated by dividing the scores obtained with the total score possible. LG cocktail stained slides were excellent in cytoplasmic staining, granularity, nuclear morphology, background material staining and overall staining characteristics. QI of LG cocktail was 0.8 while that of MGG was 0.59. Staining of air dried smears by LG cocktail has a good QI. It is also cheaper, requires short duration for staining as compared to MGG. Hence, LG cocktail can be an effective replacement for MGG for staining the air dried cytology smears.

  15. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W [San Francisco, CA; Pinkel, Daniel [Lafayette, CA; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka [Turku, FI; Kallioniemi, Anne [Tampere, FI; Sakamoto, Masaru [Tokyo, JP

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. The standard Romanowsky-Giemsa stain in histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekind, D; Schulte, E; Schmidt, G; Frank, G

    1991-01-01

    A new and technically simple Romanowsky-Giemsa (RG) stain is proposed as a standardized technique for use in histology. An RG stock solution (pure azure B 7.5 g/l, eosin Y as eosinic acid 1.2 g/l in dimethylsulfoxide) is diluted to form the working solution with HEPES-buffer, pH 6. Staining time is 30-90 min after formol-calcium solution (or 2-4 hr after formaldehyde-organic acid mixtures). The resulting overstained sections are to be differentiated. A tannic acid-acetic acid combination in an isopropanol-water mixture was found to give optimum results within 100 sec. Subsequent dehydration is in isopropanol only. The staining pattern obtained is polychrome. The distribution of colors in detail is influenced by the modes of pre- and posttreatment. Of practical interest is the development of green and greenish blue colors on collagen fibrils which contrast strongly against the pink of sarcoplasm. For this and other reasons, this RG stain version seems suitable to replace the trichrome Gomori-type trichrome stains under appropriate processing conditions.

  17. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A staining protocol for identifying secondary compounds in Myrtaceae1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamales, Hernan A.; Scharaschkin, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Here we propose a staining protocol using toluidine blue (TBO) and ruthenium red to reliably identify secondary compounds in the leaves of some species of Myrtaceae. • Methods and Results: Leaves of 10 species representing 10 different genera of Myrtaceae were processed and stained using five different combinations of ruthenium red and TBO. Optimal staining conditions were determined as 1 min of ruthenium red (0.05% aqueous) and 45 s of TBO (0.1% aqueous). Secondary compounds clearly identified under this treatment include mucilage in the mesophyll, polyphenols in the cuticle, lignin in fibers and xylem, tannins and carboxylated polysaccharides in the epidermis, and pectic substances in the primary cell walls. • Conclusions: Potential applications of this protocol include systematic, phytochemical, and ecological investigations in Myrtaceae. It might be applicable to other plant families rich in secondary compounds and could be used as a preliminary screening method for extraction of these elements. PMID:25309840

  19. A staining protocol for identifying secondary compounds in Myrtaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamales, Hernan A; Scharaschkin, Tanya

    2014-10-01

    Here we propose a staining protocol using toluidine blue (TBO) and ruthenium red to reliably identify secondary compounds in the leaves of some species of Myrtaceae. • Leaves of 10 species representing 10 different genera of Myrtaceae were processed and stained using five different combinations of ruthenium red and TBO. Optimal staining conditions were determined as 1 min of ruthenium red (0.05% aqueous) and 45 s of TBO (0.1% aqueous). Secondary compounds clearly identified under this treatment include mucilage in the mesophyll, polyphenols in the cuticle, lignin in fibers and xylem, tannins and carboxylated polysaccharides in the epidermis, and pectic substances in the primary cell walls. • Potential applications of this protocol include systematic, phytochemical, and ecological investigations in Myrtaceae. It might be applicable to other plant families rich in secondary compounds and could be used as a preliminary screening method for extraction of these elements.

  20. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced...... a number of interesting results, it has some potential pitfalls that have rarely been discussed. In the present paper, I review the major findings of ecology and evolution studies employing sperm viability staining and outline the method's principle limitations. The key problem is that the viability assay...... may itself kill sperm, which is likely to confound many common experimental designs in addition to producing artificially low estimates of sperm viability. I further suggest that sperm number should be routinely measured in sperm viability studies, as it may be an important but overlooked source...

  1. Vital staining of coronal dentin in monkey teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronstad, L

    1978-04-01

    Vital staining of monkey incisor teeth with the incisal dentin exposed to the oral environment by attrition was carried out, with the use of a number of dyes (pH and redox indicators). There was a distinct staining of the coronal dentin, regardless of which dye was introduced into the pulpal cavity. The exposed dentin was stained like the unaffected dentin, with the exception of a narrow centrally located zone that extended from the tip of the original pulp horn to the incisal edge of the tooth. The suggestion is that this zone is not unstained because of exposure of the dentin to the oral environment, but because it coincides with an area of the tissue where the pulpal ends of the dentinal tubules are blocked by atubular hard tissue normally laid down in the pulp horn of incisor teeth.

  2. Identification of loci Associated with Resistance to Root-Rot Diseases in Autotetraploid Alfalfa using Genome-Wide Sequencing and Association Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the world-wide forage crop. Changing trends to multipurpose uses increases demand for alfalfa. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by endemic and emerging diseases. Identification of genes/loci controlling disease resistance will facilitate breeding for i...

  3. Intrapartum amnioinfusion for meconium-stained liquor in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, J; Matchaba, P; Payne, A J

    1998-01-01

    Intrapartum amnioinfusion (AI) has been reported to decrease perinatal mortality and morbidity in women with meconium-stained liquor. Such work has not previously been performed at King Edward VIII Hospital (KEH), in a developing country, where the incidence of meconium-stained liquor is said to be extremely high. To establish whether AI during the intrapartum period for meconium-stained liquor decreases Caesarean section rates for fetal distress and decreases perinatal morbidity. Informed consent was obtained from patients in labour who were 3-8 cm dilated, with meconium-staining of the liquor, grades I to III inclusive, and who had a normal cardiotocograph on presentation at term. Sixty patients were included in the trial; 30 had AI. The control group was managed by standard methods. The study group had an amnioinfusion of 0.9% normal saline at 15 ml/min under continuous cardiotocographic monitoring, until a volume of 11 was completed. This was repeated if delivery did not occur within 4 h. The mean pH of umbilical arterial blood was significantly higher in the AI group (7.30 versus 7.23; P = 0.0029). In addition fewer patients in this group developed hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (0 versus 2 controls) or meconium aspiration syndrome (1 versus 4 controls). This was not statistically significant. Caesarean section for fetal distress was performed on fewer patients in the AI group (3 versus 7 controls), although this was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that amnioinfusion is an effective technique for improving the perinatal outcome of pregnancies complicated by meconium-stained liquor in labour. The decrease in Caesarean sections for fetal distress, though not statistically significant in this study, has clinical relevance. Furthermore, this study suggests that amnioinfusion is cost effective in a busy, high-risk labour ward unit and consequently should become standard practice in the management of meconium-stained liquor in labour.

  4. Optical Monte Carlo modeling of a true portwine stain anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.; Smithies, Derek J.; Nelson, Jerry; van Gemert, Martin J.

    1998-04-01

    A unique Monte Carlo program capable of accommodating an arbitrarily complex geometry was used to determine the energy deposition in a true port wine stain anatomy. Serial histologic sections taken from a biopsy of a dark red, laser therapy resistant stain were digitized and used to create the program input for simulation at wavelengths of 532 and 585 nm. At both wavelengths, the greatest energy deposition occurred in the superficial blood vessels, and subsequently decreased with depth as the laser beam was attenuated. However, more energy was deposited in the epidermis and superficial blood vessels at 532 nm than at 585 nm.

  5. DETECTION OF TISSUE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS BY DIFFERENTIATING IMMUNOPEROXIDASE STAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Lysenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staining impression smears from organ and tissues with peroxidase conjugated antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex antigens, followed by visualization with diaminobenzidine and Kinyoun stains, ensured the painting of acid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms to rubin red, acid-susceptible ones to brown, and tissue cells and microorganisms of other species to blue. Typical bacilli were absent in the lymph nodes of patients and animals with latent infection, but acid-resistant (rubin-red granular forms were encountered in the granulomatous masses. Brown fat cells containing mycobacterial antigens, as well as acid-susceptible granular, reticular, fungoid, and rod-like forms were also found in considerable quantities.

  6. Evaluation Method of Accumulated Cooking Oil Stains in Room

    OpenAIRE

    五十嵐, 由利子; 中村, 和吉; 萬羽, 郁子; Igarashi, Yuriko; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Banba, Ikuko

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion of the oil mist while cooking affects the entire room, leaving stains on the ceiling and walls. The validity of measuring the color difference of stains was examined by installing teflon plates in the kitchen and the adjacent space with a view to assessing the oil diffusion. Four houses were designated for the examination. In each house, four teflon plates (20×40mm) were installed on the ceiling and walls of the kitchen and the space adjacent to it. Then, one plate was removed a...

  7. Improvement of adventitious root formation in flax using hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takáč, Tomáš; Obert, Bohuš; Rolčík, Jakub; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-09-25

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important crop for the production of oil and fiber. In vitro manipulations of flax are used for genetic improvement and breeding while improvements in adventitious root formation are important for biotechnological programs focused on regeneration and vegetative propagation of genetically valuable plant material. Additionally, flax hypocotyl segments possess outstanding morphogenetic capacity, thus providing a useful model for the investigation of flax developmental processes. Here, we investigated the crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and auxin with respect to reprogramming flax hypocotyl cells for root morphogenetic development. Exogenous auxin induced the robust formation of adventitious roots from flax hypocotyl segments while the addition of hydrogen peroxide further enhanced this process. The levels of endogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) were positively correlated with increased root formation in response to exogenous auxin (1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA). Histochemical staining of the hypocotyl segments revealed that hydrogen peroxide and peroxidase, but not superoxide, were positively correlated with root formation. Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that endogenous levels of hydrogen peroxide were controlled by peroxidases during root formation from hypocotyl segments. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide positively affected flax adventitious root formation by regulating the endogenous auxin levels. Consequently, this agent can be applied to increase flax regeneration capacity for biotechnological purposes such as improved plant rooting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement of resistance to Fusarium root rot through gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium root rot (FRR), caused by Fusarium solani f.sp. , is one of the most serious root rot diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) throughout the world. Yield losses of up to 84% have been attributed to the disease. Development and deployment of resistant materials is the most feasible approach to managing ...

  9. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ramesh R.; Reddy Anjaneya Prasanna L.; Subbaiah Chinna J.; Kumar Niranjana A.; Prasad Nagendra H.N.; Bhukya Balakishan

    2011-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes) and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant) and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and ...

  10. Tooth eruption without roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-P

    2013-03-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future.

  11. EFFECTS OF THE GRAM STAIN ON MICROSPHERES FROM THERMAL POLYAMINO ACIDS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Sidney W.; Yuyama, Shuhei

    1963-01-01

    Fox, Sidney W. (The Florida State University, Tallahassee) and Shuhei Yuyama. Effects of the Gram stain on microspheres from thermal polyamino acids. J. Bacteriol. 85:279–283. 1963.—Microspheres produced from acid proteinoid accept the Gram stain. The stain is negative, but microspheres produced from mixtures containing a sufficient proportion of lysine proteinoid stain positive. Microspheres produced from mixtures containing the appropriate proportions contain individuals which stain positive and others which stain negative. Images PMID:13959050

  12. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  13. RUNTIME DICTIONARIES FOR ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wind, David Kofoed

    2013-01-01

    ROOT is the LHC physicists' common tool for data analysis; almost all data is stored using ROOT's I/O system. This system benefits from a custom description of types (a so-called dictionary) that is optimised for the I/O. Until now, the dictionary cannot be provided at run-time; it needs to be prepared in a separate prerequisite step. This project will move the generation of the dictionary to run-time, making use of ROOT 6's new just-in-time compiler. It allows a more dynamic and natural access to ROOT's I/O features especially for user code.

  14. Root rot of sugarbeet in the Vojvodina Province

    OpenAIRE

    Stojšin Vera B.; Marić Adam A.; Jasnić Stevan M.; Bagi Ferenc F.; Marinković Branko J.

    2006-01-01

    Large changes introduced in the sugar beet production technology in the Vojvodina Province over last 40 years resulted in changes in the etiology and harmfulness of different agents of sugar beet root diseases. Improvements in cultivation practices reduced the harmfulness of some diseases while increased the harmfulness of others. Some disease agents became obsolete, but others gained importance. New agents of root diseases were found. The most frequent damages, persisting over long periods o...

  15. Role of mungbean root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas and rhizobia in suppressing the root rotting fungi and root knot nematodes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noreen, R.; Shafique, A.; Haque, S.E.; Ali, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Three isolates each of fluorescent Pseudomonas (NAFP-19, NAFP-31 and NAFP-32) and rhizobia (NFB- 103, NFB-107 and NFB-109) which were originally isolated from root nodules of mungbean (Vigna radiata) showed significant biocontrol activity in the screen house and under field condition, against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani evaluated on chickpea. Biocontrol potential of these isolates was also evaluated against Meloidogyne incognita, the root knot nematode. Application of Pseudomonas and rhizobial isolates as a soil drench, separately or mixed significantly reduced root rot disease under screen house and field conditions. Nematode penetration in roots was also found significantly less in rhizobia or Pseudomonas treatments used separately or mixed as compared to control. Fluorescent Pseudomonas treated plants produced greater number of nodules per plant than control plants and about equal to rhizobia treated plants, indicating that root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas enhance root nodulation. (author)

  16. Comparative assessment of seller's staining test (SST) and direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion:The relatively low sensitivity of the SST observed in this study calls for its replacement with the dFAT for accurate ... seller's staining test (SST) and direct fluorescent antibody test for rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of rabies. Afri Health Sci. 2016 ... lack of laboratory equipment and reliable reagents16,17.

  17. Interlaboratory variability of Ki67 staining in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Cornelia M; Bürger, Horst; van Diest, Paul J; Finsterbusch, Kai; Gläser, Doreen; Korsching, Eberhard; Decker, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Postanalytic issues of Ki67 assessment in breast cancers like counting method standardisation and interrater bias have been subject of various studies, but little is known about analytic variability of Ki67 staining between pathology labs. Our aim was to study interlaboratory variability of Ki67 staining in breast cancer using tissue microarrays (TMAs) and central assessment to minimise preanalytic and postanalytic influences. Thirty European pathology labs stained serial slides of a TMA set of breast cancer tissues with Ki67 according to their routine in-house protocol. The Ki67-labelling index (Ki67-LI) of 70 matched samples was centrally assessed by one observer who counted all cancer cells per sample. We then tested for differences between the labs in Ki67-LI medians by analysing variance on ranks and in proportions of tumours classified as luminal A after dichotomising oestrogen receptor-positive cancers into cancers showing low (Ki67-LI using Cochran's Q. Substantial differences between the 30 labs were indicated for median Ki67-LI (0.65%-33.0%, p cancers classified as luminal A (17%-57%, p Ki67 staining of breast cancer tissue was found between 30 routine pathology labs. Clinical use of the Ki67-LI for therapeutic decisions should be considered only fully aware of lab-specific reference values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative assessment of seller's staining test (SST) and direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rabies causes 55, 000 annual human deaths globally and about 10,000 people are exposed annually in Nigeria. Diagnosis of animal rabies in most African countries has been by direct microscopic examination. In Nigeria, the Seller's stain test (SST) was employed until 2009. Before then, both SST and dFAT ...

  19. The gram stain smear: A screening test for genital mycoplasmas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result of 168 vaginal specimens from women examined for genital mycoplasmas showed that more of these organisms were isolated from specimens whose Gram stain smears were devoid of Gram positive bacilli (GPB) (43%) as against those whose smears contain GPB (22.1%). This result was found to be statistically ...

  20. Gram's Stain Does Not Cross the Bacterial Cytoplasmic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Michael J; Sheffield, Joel B; Sharifian Gh, Mohammad; Wu, Yajing; Spahr, Christian; Gonella, Grazia; Xu, Bolei; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2015-07-17

    For well over a century, Hans Christian Gram's famous staining protocol has been the standard go-to diagnostic for characterizing unknown bacteria. Despite continuous and ubiquitous use, we now demonstrate that the current understanding of the molecular mechanism for this differential stain is largely incorrect. Using the fully complementary time-resolved methods: second-harmonic light-scattering and bright-field transmission microscopy, we present a real-time and membrane specific quantitative characterization of the bacterial uptake of crystal-violet (CV), the dye used in Gram's protocol. Our observations contradict the currently accepted mechanism which depicts that, for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, CV readily traverses the peptidoglycan mesh (PM) and cytoplasmic membrane (CM) before equilibrating within the cytosol. We find that not only is CV unable to traverse the CM but, on the time-scale of the Gram-stain procedure, CV is kinetically trapped within the PM. Our results indicate that CV, rather than dyes which rapidly traverse the PM, is uniquely suited as the Gram stain.

  1. A comparision of modified and standard papanicolaou staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare modified and standard Papanicolaou (Pap) staining methods in the assessment of the cervical smears. Design: A descriptive cross sectional study. setting: Kenyatta National Hospital. Subjects: One hundred and sixty two women who were eligible for a pap smear and met the inclusion criteria.

  2. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, Hans O

    2013-01-01

    In the 14(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) the BSC's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meetings of ISO/TC 212/WG 3, In vitro diagnostic products, and from the final plenary meeting of ISO/TC 212, Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro...

  3. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Dapson, R W

    2009-01-01

    In this fifth issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory Affairs, the BSC's International Affairs Committee provides more information from the meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Committee that took place on June 2-4, 2008...

  4. Comparison of Giemsa Staining, Intraperitoneal Injection and Oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Rashidi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common protozoan parasites in humans and animals in all countries of the world. The aim of this study was to detect Toxoplasma parasite in the brain of wild rats in Tehran using smear preparation, Giemsa staining, Intraperitoneal injection and oral administration to Souri mice. Materials and Methods: Forty rats were collected from different areas of Tehran. Smears were prepared from rat brains on glass slides and stained using Giemsa. In the second method, a cell suspension was prepared from rat brain and was given orally and injected intraperitoneally into Souri mice. In peritoneal method, peritoneum of the mice was examined for parasites. In oral method, the titer of Toxoplasma antibody in sera of Souri mice was determined using Toxoplasma IgG antibody kit and anti-mouse conjugate of Sigma company. Results: All results were negative in Giemsa staining method. In the second method, the results were negative and no parasites were observed in peritoneum of Souri mice. In oral administration method, after ingestion of suspensions by Souri mice and measuring the IgG titer, 50% of them showed a positive titer after one month. Conclusion: In detection of Toxoplasma gondii, the method of smear preparation on glass slides followed by Giemsa staining, and intraperitoneal injection of brain suspensions to Souri mice are of less value in comparison with oral administration of suspensions and determining the titer of IgG in sera of Souri mice.

  5. a comparison of modified and standard papanicolaou staining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-07

    Jul 7, 2011 ... Corporation, Hollywood, Florida Gynecologic. Seminars in Surgical Oncology 1999; 16: 217–221. Gupta, S., Chachra, K. L., Bhadola, P. 7. et al. Modified. Papanicolaou staining protocol with minimum alcohol use: a cost-cutting measure for resource limited. Division of Cytopathology, Institute of Cytology ...

  6. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    2015-06-08

    Jun 8, 2015 ... Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells. B.M. van den Berg*. Barex Biochemical Products, Seb. Centenweg 45, 1602ML Enkhuizen, The Netherlands. Abstract. The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric.

  7. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  8. The Stained Glass Paintings of Nigeria's Prime Artists, YCA Grillo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    Abstract. Many lamps same Light' investigates the place of agency in the transmutation of indigenous imageries in the art works of the pictorial turn. Through an investigation that entailed an empirical analysis of the works of two Nigerian prime stained glass artists, Yusuf Grillo and David Dale, this study established that in ...

  9. Borax methylene blue: a spectroscopic and staining study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P T; Russo, A; Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-07-01

    Borax methylene blue is quite stable at room temperatures of 22-25 C. At 30 C polychroming is slow; during 50 days in a water bath at this temperature the absorption peak moves from 665 to 656 nm. At 35 C, the absorption peak reaches 660 nm in 7 days, 654 nm in 14. At 60 C polychroming is rapid, the absorption peak reaching 640-620 nm in 3 days. When the pH of the borax methylene blue solutions, normally about 9.0, is adjusted to pH 6.5, the absorption peak remains at 665 nm even when incubated at 60 C for extended periods. When used as a blood stain 0.4 ml borax methylene blue (1% methylene blue in 1% borax), 4 ml acetone, 2 ml borax-acid phosphate buffer to bring the solution to pH 6.5, and distilled water to make 40 ml, with 0.2 ml 1% eosin added just before using, an excellent Nocht-Giemsa type stain is achieved after 30 minutes staining. The material plasmodia P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei stain moderate blue with dark red chromatin and green to black pigment granules. The study confirms Malachowski's 1891 results and explains Gautier's 1896-98 failure to duplicate it.

  10. Christendom's Narratives and the Stained Glass Designs of Yusuf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts a recast of Christendom's narratives in the stained glass designs of Yusuf Cameron Adebayo Grillo as the distinctive overarching mechanism of the evangelisation paradigm of the post Vatican II Church. It, therefore, draws attention to the delimitation of time frames in the history of the art form. Using the ...

  11. A generally applicable sequential alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemical double staining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loos, Chris M.; Teeling, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A universal type of sequential double alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemical staining is described that can be used for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and cryostat tissue sections from human and mouse origin. It consists of two alkaline phosphatase detection systems including enzymatic

  12. Color and dichroism of silver-stained glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Gloria; Murcia, Sonia; Molera, Judit; Roldan, Clodoaldo; Crespo, Daniel; Pradell, Trinitat

    2013-01-01

    Yellow decorations in glasses have been produced since the beginning of the fourteenth century by incorporating metallic silver nanoparticles into the glass (from a few to some tens of nanometers). The optical response of the glass-particles composite is determined by the surface plasmon resonance absorption and scattering of the nanometric metallic particles. Generally, the same color is perceived in reflection and in transmission although dichroic effects are occasionally observed. As silver-stained glasses were designed to be observed in transmission, tuning the transmission color from yellow to red was of technological interest. The relationship between the color observed both in transmission and reflection and the composition and nanostructure of regular (yellow) and dichroic (yellow and red) silver stains from the Renaissance (late fifteenth and sixteenth century, respectively) is related to the presence of a layer (of about 10–20 μm thick) of metallic silver nanoparticles (from few to 100 nm in size). The correlation between the colors observed and the silver stain nanostructure is studied with particular emphasis on the origin of the dichroic behavior. The optical response is computed and compared to the experimental data. Differences in the synthesis parameters responsible for the colors and for the dichroic behavior of the silver stain glasses are proposed. This is essential for the replication of the glass pieces which are required as replacements in the restoration/conservation of the windows but is also of broader interest

  13. [Pnemocystis jiroveci pneumonia: Comparison between conventional PCR and staining techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaouech, E; Kallel, K; Anane, S; Belhadj, S; Abdellatif, S; Mnif, K; Ben Othmane, T; Ben Lakhal, S; Kilani, B; Ben Châabane, T; Chaker, E

    2009-07-01

    Diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia is usually based on clinical features and X-rays photography and confirmed in the laboratory by visualisation of Pneumocystis organisms in stained preparations of respiratory specimens using several techniques (Gomori-Grocott, May-Grünwald Giemsa, bleu de toluidine O). Actually, PCR has considerably increased sensitivity of detection of Pneumocystis. The aim of this study is to compare conventional PCR results to those of staining techniques (Gomori-Grocott, May-Grünwald Giemsa) in addition to the X-ray and clinical findings in order to evaluate the contribution of each method. Sixty-four respiratory specimens were collected from 54 immuno-compromised patients with clinical symptoms of pulmonary infection. We diagnosed pneumocystis pneumonia in 16 patients according to staining techniques and/or typical clinical and radiological findings and/or response to treatment. Of the 15 patients, 14 were positive by PCR and only five were positive by direct examination, yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 93.3 and 87.1% for PCR and 33.3 and 100% for staining techniques. Conventional PCR provides a sensitive and objective method for the detection Pneumocystis jiroveci from less invasive sample.

  14. Black stain and dental caries in Filipino schoolchildren.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrich-Weltzien, R.; Monse, B.; Palenstein Helderman, W.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Black stain is defined as dark pigmented exogenous substance in lines or dots parallel to the gingival margin and firmly adherent to the enamel at the cervical third of the tooth crowns in the primary and permanent dentition. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of black

  15. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid – what is the evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opinions regarding the significance of meconium-stained liquor detected during labour have varied although there is consensus that meconium aspirated into the lungs of the neonate may lead to meconium aspiration syndrome. The efficacy of various interventions designed to prevent meconium aspiration syndrome are ...

  16. Image analysis of dye stained patterns in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Christina; Trancón y Widemann, Baltasar; Lange, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Quality of surface water and groundwater is directly affected by flow processes in the unsaturated zone. In general, it is difficult to measure or model water flow. Indeed, parametrization of hydrological models is problematic and often no unique solution exists. To visualise flow patterns in soils directly dye tracer studies can be done. These experiments provide images of stained soil profiles and their evaluation demands knowledge in hydrology as well as in image analysis and statistics. First, these photographs are converted to binary images classifying the pixels in dye stained and non-stained ones. Then, some feature extraction is necessary to discern relevant hydrological information. In our study we propose to use several index functions to extract different (ideally complementary) features. We associate each image row with a feature vector (i.e. a certain number of image function values) and use these features to cluster the image rows to identify similar image areas. Because images of stained profiles might have different reasonable clusterings, we calculate multiple consensus clusterings. An expert can explore these different solutions and base his/her interpretation of predominant flow mechanisms on quantitative (objective) criteria. The complete workflow from reading-in binary images to final clusterings has been implemented in the free R system, a language and environment for statistical computing. The calculation of image indices is part of our own package Indigo, manipulation of binary images, clustering and visualization of results are done using either build-in facilities in R, additional R packages or the LATEX system.

  17. Comparison of various staining techniques in the diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant moderate level of agreement between the staining methods though trichrome showed a stronger agreement than auramine when compared with Modified ZN in test (κ value 0.569 and 0.553 respectively), and a significant, fair level of agreement between the methods with Auramine showing a ...

  18. Comparism of Various Staining Techniques in the Diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    value of 69.9%, negative predictive value of 85.2% in test subjects. There was a significant moderate level of agreement between the staining methods though. Trichrome showed a stronger agreement than Auramine when compared with Modified ZN in test (к value 0.569 and 0.553 respectively), and a significant, fair level ...

  19. Standardization in biological staining. The influence of dye manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of biological staining is to obtain specimens of biological material that can be assessed in the microscope. These specimens are influenced by all processes from removal from the intact organism to mounting on the microscopic slide. To achieve comparable results with various techniques...

  20. Interlaboratory variability of Ki67 staining in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Focke, Cornelia M.; Bürger, Horst; van Diest, Paul J.; Finsterbusch, Kai; Gläser, Doreen; Korsching, Eberhard; Decker, Thomas; Anders, M.; Bollmann, R.; Eiting, Fr; Friedrich, K.; Habeck, J. O.; Haroske, G.; Hinrichs, B.; Behrens, A.; Krause, Lars Udo; Braun-Lang, U.; Lorenzen, J.; Minew, N.; Mlynek-Kersjes, M.; Nenning, H.; Packeisen, J.; Poche-de Vos, F.; Reyher-Klein, S.; Rothacker, D.; Schultz, M.; Sturm, U.; Tawfik, M.; Berghäuser, K. H.; Böcker, W; Cserni, G.; Habedank, S.; Lax, S.; Moinfar, F.; Regitnig, P.; Reiner-Concin, A.; Rüschoff, J.; Varga, Z.; Woziwodski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Postanalytic issues of Ki67 assessment in breast cancers like counting method standardisation and interrater bias have been subject of various studies, but little is known about analytic variability of Ki67 staining between pathology labs. Our aim was to study interlaboratory variability

  1. Potential causes of black-stained peritoneal dialysis tubing: an analysis from nurse practitioner's prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongpirul, Krit; Pongpirul, Wannarat Amornnimit; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak

    2014-07-06

    Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) has been promoted to be the main method of treatment for Thai End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients; however, a national survey of dialysis centers reported an annual incidence of black-stained particle of 57.6 per 1,000 CAPD cases. The objective of this study was to identify potential causes of the stain in the nurse practitioners' prospect. This study applied three-round Delphi technique. In the first round, the questionnaire was sent to 127 nurses in all dialysis centers. Their responses were analyzed to come up with an anonymous summary, which was presented in the second and third round of the survey among 80 and 200 nurses. The response rates of the three rounds of Delphi were 57.5%, 81.3%, and 75.0%, respectively. Nurses consistently believed that the contamination was caused by spilled-out povidone-iodine solution during transfer set change. Other potential causes were previous peritonitis, inadequate dialysis, low serum albumin, transfer set soaking with antiseptics, patient history of diabetes, dressing technique, and existence of dry abdomen period. Black-stained particle is a common contamination of dialysis tube in CAPD patients. This study proposed some potential determinants, most of which were relevant to care process.

  2. Automated epidermis segmentation in histopathological images of human skin stained with hematoxylin and eosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłeczek, Paweł; Dyduch, Grzegorz; Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard

    2017-03-01

    Background: Epidermis area is an important observation area for the diagnosis of inflammatory skin diseases and skin cancers. Therefore, in order to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system, segmentation of the epidermis area is usually an essential, initial step. This study presents an automated and robust method for epidermis segmentation in whole slide histopathological images of human skin, stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Methods: The proposed method performs epidermis segmentation based on the information about shape and distribution of transparent regions in a slide image and information about distribution and concentration of hematoxylin and eosin stains. It utilizes domain-specific knowledge of morphometric and biochemical properties of skin tissue elements to segment the relevant histopathological structures in human skin. Results: Experimental results on 88 skin histopathological images from three different sources show that the proposed method segments the epidermis with a mean sensitivity of 87 %, a mean specificity of 95% and a mean precision of 57%. It is robust to inter- and intra-image variations in both staining and illumination, and makes no assumptions about the type of skin disorder. The proposed method provides a superior performance compared to the existing techniques.

  3. A Glycine max homolog of NON-RACE SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1 (NDR1) alters defense gene expression while functioning during a resistance response to different root pathogens in different genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Brant T; Pant, Shankar R; Sharma, Keshav; Niruala, Prakash; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2017-05-01

    A Glycine max homolog of the Arabidopsis thaliana NON-RACE SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1 (NDR1) coiled-coil nucleotide binding leucine rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) defense signaling gene (Gm-NDR1-1) is expressed in root cells undergoing a defense response to the root pathogenic nematode, Heterodera glycines. Gm-NDR1-1 overexpression in the H. glycines-susceptible genotype G. max [Williams 82/PI 518671] impairs parasitism. In contrast, Gm-NDR1-1 RNA interference (RNAi) in the H. glycines-resistant genotype G. max [Peking/PI 548402] facilitates parasitism. The broad effectiveness of Gm-NDR1-1 in impairing parasitism has then been examined by engineering its heterologous expression in Gossypium hirsutum which is susceptible to the root pathogenic nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The heterologous expression of Gm-NDR1-1 in G. hirsutum effectively impairs M. incognita parasitism, reducing gall, egg mass, egg and juvenile numbers. In contrast to our prior experiments examining the effectiveness of the heterologous expression of a G. max homolog of the A. thaliana salicyclic acid signaling (SA) gene NONEXPRESSOR OF PR1 (Gm-NPR1-2), no cumulative negative effect on M. incognita parasitism has been observed in G. hirsutum expressing Gm-NDR1-1. The results indicate a common genetic basis exists for plant resistance to parasitic nematodes that involves Gm-NDR1. However, the Gm-NDR1-1 functions in ways that are measurably dissimilar to Gm-NPR1-2. Notably, Gm-NDR1-1 overexpression leads to increased relative transcript levels of its homologs of A. thaliana genes functioning in SA signaling, including NPR1-2, TGA2-1 and LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1-2) that is lost in Gm-NDR1-1 RNAi lines. Similar observations have been made regarding the expression of other defense genes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  4. The roots of nodulins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, J.P.H.; Bisseling, T.

    1990-01-01

    Nodulin gene expression is an integral and highly specific part of the formation of nitrogenfixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Dependent on the time of expression during root nodule development, nodulin genes can be divided into early and late nodulin genes. A brief overview of the

  5. Irrational Square Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  6. Biofilm detection in chronic rhinosinusitis by combined application of hematoxylin-eosin and gram staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, László; Csomor, Péter; Sziklai, István; Karosi, Tamás

    2011-10-01

    The pathomechanism of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRS/NP) seems to be unclear. Bacterial-, fungal- and combined biofilms might play a potential role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases and recently in CRS/NP. A prospective, blinded observational study was performed to confirm that the combination of conventional hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Gram staining protocols could be used to detect bacterial and fungal biofilms in patients with CRS/NP. A total of 50 patients with CRS/NP undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) were analyzed. The negative control group consisted of 12 patients undergoing septoplasty for nasal obstruction without CRS/NP. The nasal polyps and inferior turbinate mucosa specimens applied as negative controls were processed to HE and Gram staining. Biofilm was detected in 44 of 50 patients with CRS/NP and in none of 12 negative controls. In our series, HE method showed an obvious correlation with the results of Gram staining and was allocated to be a good predictor of biofilm existence. It was found that the microscopic structure and thickness of biofilms were strongly associated with the integrity of nasal mucosa and with the characteristics of subepithelial cellular infiltration. This study confirmed the presence of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the surface of NPs obtained from patients with CRS. Since biofilms may affect the severity and recurrence rate of CRS treated by ESS they should be detected histologically. In conclusion, HE staining combined with Gram protocol is a robust and reliable method for the detection of bacterial and fungal biofilms in CRS/NP.

  7. Development of a preparation and staining method for fetal erythroblasts in maternal blood : Simultaneous immunocytochemical staining and FISH analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Mesker, WE; Ouwerkerk-van Velzen, MCM; Knepfle, CFHM; Wiesmeijer, KC; van den Burg, MJM; Beverstock, GC; Bernini, LF; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Kanhai, HHH; Tanke, HJ

    1998-01-01

    In order to detect fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in maternal blood, a protocol was developed which aimed at producing a reliable staining method for combined immunocytochemical and FISH analysis. The technique had to be suitable for eventual automated screening of slides. Chorionic villi

  8. Increases in snap bean and soybean seedling diseases associated with a chloride salt and changes in the micro-partitioning of tap root calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a series of field experiments from 1995 through 2010, the incidence of seedling diseases of snap bean and soybean caused by Rhizoctonia solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium spp., and Fusarium spp. was greater with an application of KCl than with K2SO4 applied at 93 kg K/ha. To determine if th...

  9. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    To Identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode and fungal disease resistance traits, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) chromosome substitution (CS) lines were used in this study. The CS lines were developed in ...

  10. Histopathological periodic acid-schiff stains of nail clippings as a second-line diagnostic tool in onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Eliza; Izhak, Ofer Ben; Bergman, Reuven

    2012-05-01

    The diagnosis of onychomycosis, using direct microscopy and fungal cultures, is often negative despite the presence of disease. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining of nail clippings, using histopathological processing, may be positive in these cases. It is not always clear, however, whether the fungal elements detected by PAS staining are pathogenic fungi or some are saprophytes. We aimed to study the efficacy of histopathological PAS staining of nail clippings as a second-line diagnostic tool in onychomycosis. The study included 100 consecutive cases in which direct microscopy and fungal cultures from suspected onychomycosis were negative on one occasion or more. The obtained nail clippings were processed for routine histology, stained with hematoxylin and eosin and PAS, and examined microscopically. Of the 100 cases, 38 (38%) showed positive fungal elements. As a result, 9 patients had sought and received oral antifungal therapy and all achieved complete clinical cure. The histological examination also revealed parakeratosis and globules of plasma, which were statistically significantly more common in the fungal infected nail samples. This may indicate an ongoing inflammatory process associated with onychomycosis. Neutrophils and bacteria were not statistically and significantly more common in the fungal infected nails. We conclude that as a second-line diagnostic tool, PAS stain of nail clippings increases markedly the diagnostic yield of onychomycosis and, consequently, the outcome of therapy.

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Chlorhexidine in Combination with Sodium Perborate on Gingivitis, Plaque and Tooth Surface Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Torkzaban

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The present study evaluated staining as a result of the chlorhexidine use and the role of sodium perborate in removing stains; in addition, the amount of decreases in plaque and gingival inflammation and the role of sodium perborate in chlorhexidine efficacy in removing plaque and decreasing gingival inflammation were evaluated. Materials & Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial 40 patients (20-30 years old referring to the Department of Periodontics, who had mild-to-moderate gingivitis were randomly divided into two groups with a parallel study design and were evaluated in a double-blind scheme. At baseline the patients underwent scaling, root planning and polishing procedures and brushed their teeth daily for two weeks. After two weeks, plaque indexes (PI, gingival indexes (GI and bleeding indexes (BI were determined and recorded. In the control group 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash and in the experimental group 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash containing 0.2% sodium perborate were used for 30 seconds. The subjects refrained from tooth brushing during this period. After 14 days the above-mentioned indexes were again determined and recorded, along with staining indexes.Also staining potential of mouthwash and chlorhexidine mouthwash containing sodium perborate was analysed with spectrophotometric devices. Data was analyzed by t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in PI, BI and GI between the control and experimental groups, although there were more decreases in PI, GI and BI in the experimental group compared to the control group. Regarding the intensity of staining, there was a significant decrease in the intensity and extent of staining on tooth surfaces and gingivitis in the experimental group compared to the control group (P=0.001. Conclusion: The use of chlorhexidine mouthwash containing sodium perborate significantly decreases the amount and extent of stains

  12. A simple method suitable to study de novo root organogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available De novo root organogenesis is the process in which adventitious roots regenerate from detached or wounded plant tissues or organs. In tissue culture, appropriate types and concentrations of plant hormones in the medium are critical for inducing adventitious roots. However, in natural conditions, regeneration from detached organs is likely to rely on endogenous hormones. To investigate the actions of endogenous hormones and the molecular mechanisms guiding de novo root organogenesis, we developed a simple method to imitate natural conditions for adventitious root formation by culturing Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants on B5 medium without additive hormones. Here we show that the ability of the leaf explants to regenerate roots depends on the age of the leaf and on certain nutrients in the medium. Based on these observations, we provide examples of how this method can be used in different situations, and how it can be optimized. This simple method could be used to investigate the effects of various physiological and molecular changes on the regeneration of adventitious roots. It is also useful for tracing cell lineage during the regeneration process by differential interference contrast observation of -glucuronidase staining, and by live imaging of proteins labeled with fluorescent tags.

  13. In vitro Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Leaf and Root Extracts of Taraxacum Officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Belén; Fernandez-Dacosta, Raquel; Dávalos, Alberto; Ordovás, José M; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa

    2015-06-11

    Adipose tissue dysfunction constitutes a primary defect in obesity and might link this disease to severe chronic health problems. We aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of three extracts from Taraxacum officinale (dandelion) as well as their effects on mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes concerning intracellular lipid accumulation and cytotoxicity, this would give indications regarding therapeutic interest of dandelion as potential anti-obesity candidate. Antioxidant activities of extracts from dandelion roots and leaves were evaluated in vitro using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhyorazyl (DPPH) and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) methods at the concentration range used in cellular assays (300-600 µg/mL). The influence of the extracts on mature 3T3-L1 adipocyte viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Lipid content was determined by Oil-red-O staining. The extracts showed effective antioxidant activity correlating with total flavonoid and polyphenol contents. However, the functionality level was weakly associated with the antioxidant activity. Further, our data demonstrated that mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes reduced in size and number when incubated with the extracts, which suggests a significant increase in lipolysis activity. Particularly, leaf extract and crude powdered root of dandelion reduced triglyceride accumulation in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes to a greater extent that the extract from the root. Our study shows anti-lipogenic effects of dandelion extracts on adipocytes as well as radical scavenging and reducing activity. Importantly, along with previous results indicating that cell populations cultivated in the presence of the dandelion extracts decrease in 3T3-L1 adipogenesis capacity, these results suggests that these extracts might represent a treatment option for obesity-related diseases by affecting different processes during the adipocyte life cycle.

  14. In vitro Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Leaf and Root Extracts of Taraxacum Officinale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén García-Carrasco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue dysfunction constitutes a primary defect in obesity and might link this disease to severe chronic health problems. We aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of three extracts from Taraxacum officinale (dandelion as well as their effects on mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes concerning intracellular lipid accumulation and cytotoxicity, this would give indications regarding therapeutic interest of dandelion as potential anti-obesity candidate. Antioxidant activities of extracts from dandelion roots and leaves were evaluated in vitro using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhyorazyl (DPPH and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP methods at the concentration range used in cellular assays (300–600 µg/mL. The influence of the extracts on mature 3T3-L1 adipocyte viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Lipid content was determined by Oil-red-O staining. The extracts showed effective antioxidant activity correlating with total flavonoid and polyphenol contents. However, the functionality level was weakly associated with the antioxidant activity. Further, our data demonstrated that mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes reduced in size and number when incubated with the extracts, which suggests a significant increase in lipolysis activity. Particularly, leaf extract and crude powdered root of dandelion reduced triglyceride accumulation in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes to a greater extent that the extract from the root. Our study shows anti-lipogenic effects of dandelion extracts on adipocytes as well as radical scavenging and reducing activity. Importantly, along with previous results indicating that cell populations cultivated in the presence of the dandelion extracts decrease in 3T3-L1 adipogenesis capacity, these results suggests that these extracts might represent a treatment option for obesity-related diseases by affecting different processes during the adipocyte life cycle.

  15. In vitro Hypolipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of Leaf and Root Extracts of Taraxacum Officinale

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Belén; Fernandez-Dacosta, Raquel; Dávalos, Alberto; Ordovás, José M.; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction constitutes a primary defect in obesity and might link this disease to severe chronic health problems. We aimed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of three extracts from Taraxacum officinale (dandelion) as well as their effects on mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes concerning intracellular lipid accumulation and cytotoxicity, this would give indications regarding therapeutic interest of dandelion as potential anti-obesity candidate. Antioxidant activities of extracts from dandelion roots and leaves were evaluated in vitro using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhyorazyl (DPPH) and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) methods at the concentration range used in cellular assays (300–600 µg/mL). The influence of the extracts on mature 3T3-L1 adipocyte viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Lipid content was determined by Oil-red-O staining. The extracts showed effective antioxidant activity correlating with total flavonoid and polyphenol contents. However, the functionality level was weakly associated with the antioxidant activity. Further, our data demonstrated that mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes reduced in size and number when incubated with the extracts, which suggests a significant increase in lipolysis activity. Particularly, leaf extract and crude powdered root of dandelion reduced triglyceride accumulation in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes to a greater extent that the extract from the root. Our study shows anti-lipogenic effects of dandelion extracts on adipocytes as well as radical scavenging and reducing activity. Importantly, along with previous results indicating that cell populations cultivated in the presence of the dandelion extracts decrease in 3T3-L1 adipogenesis capacity, these results suggests that these extracts might represent a treatment option for obesity-related diseases by affecting different processes during the adipocyte life cycle. PMID:29083390

  16. Effects of fixation protocol and gravistimulation on cytoskeletal organization in Brassica rapa roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Andrea; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2012-07-01

    In preparation for a flight experiment we have studied the optimization of the staining protocols for microtubules and actin filaments in Brassica rapa seedlings. Microtubules (MT) were stained with monoclonal antibody (mAb) YOL 1/34. F-actin (FA) staining was achieved with C4 mAb antibody. Fixative prepared more than three weeks before use produces specimens that stained poorly. Storage in fixative for more than four weeks resulted in noticeably poorer staining. Staining was best in cortical cells but more difficult and less consistent in cap cells, especially for FA. In addition, the quality of staining of root cap cells was dependent on the age of the formaldehyde. The organization of the MTs corresponded with previously published descriptions; FA was prominent in the stele with thick and numerous parallel bundles; cortical cells showed less dense and less directional organization of mostly thinner filaments. FA organization was determined by tissue rather than by differential elongation. The organization of MTs in cortical cells of curving roots was uniformly circular and perpendicular to the long cell axis despite different cell length. The effect of clinorotation around the horizontal axis and centrifugation on the cytoskeletal organization was inconsistent. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  17. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashri Kolte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients.

  18. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients.

  19. PENGARUH SPIRITUALITAS, INTELEKTUALITAS, DAN PROFESIONALISME TERHADAP KINERJA DOSEN STAIN SALATIGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Nugraha Pratama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of each variable spirituality, intellect, and professionalism of the lecturers performance STAIN Salatiga. The population of this study are all tenured State Institute of Islamic Studies (STAIN Salatiga as many as 107 people. The sampling technique used in this study using simple random sampling and 65 were taken as respondents. With quantitative methods and analysis techniques that use moderated regression analysis (MRA, it can be concluded that (1 spirituality is partially not significantly affect the performance of the faculty; (2 the partial intellect does not significantly affect the performance of the faculty; (3 professionalism partially positive and significant effect on the performance of the lecturer. (4 spirituality, intellect and professionalism of lecturers jointly affect the performance of the lecturer. The study also found that the majority of respondents aged very productive, but they are staying at very far away from the campus.

  20. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia developing within a port wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Robert N; Itinteang, Tinte; de Jong, Sophie; Brasch, Helen D; Tan, Swee T

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male with a port wine stain on the base of his neck presented with a 5-month history of gradual thickening of the involved skin which interfered with clothing and caused repeated bleeding. The lesion was excised and histopathologic examination revealed angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) arising from the pre-existing port wine stain - a rare finding with only one previously reported case. Additionally the lesion was associated with elevated serum renin levels which virtually normalized following excision of the lesion. We further demonstrated the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptors 1 and 2 by the lesion and discuss the possible role of the renin-angiotensin system in this condition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Selection of Ovine Oocytes by Brilliant Cresyl Blue Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheep oocytes derived from the ovaries collected from the slaughterhouse are often used for research on in vitro embryo production, animal cloning, transgenesis, embryonic stem cells, and other embryo biotechnology aspects. Improving the in vitro culture efficiency of oocytes can provide more materials for similar studies. Generally, determination of oocyte quality is mostly based on the layers of cumulus cells and cytoplasm or cytoplasm uniformity and colors. This requires considerable experience to better identify oocyte quality because of the intense subjectivity involved (Gordon (2003, Madison et al. (1992 and De Loos et al. (1992. BCB staining is a function of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity, an enzyme synthesized in developing oocytes, which decreases in activity with maturation. Therefore, unstained oocytes (BCB− are high in G6PD activity, while the less mature oocytes stains are deep blue (BCB+ due to insuffcient G6PD activity to decolorize the BCB dye.

  2. Selection of Ovine Oocytes by Brilliant Cresyl Blue Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqin; Lin, Jiapeng; Huang, Juncheng; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yuncheng; Chen, Tong

    2012-01-01

    Sheep oocytes derived from the ovaries collected from the slaughterhouse are often used for research on in vitro embryo production, animal cloning, transgenesis, embryonic stem cells, and other embryo biotechnology aspects. Improving the in vitro culture efficiency of oocytes can provide more materials for similar studies. Generally, determination of oocyte quality is mostly based on the layers of cumulus cells and cytoplasm or cytoplasm uniformity and colors. This requires considerable experience to better identify oocyte quality because of the intense subjectivity involved (Gordon (2003), Madison et al. (1992) and De Loos et al. (1992)). BCB staining is a function of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, an enzyme synthesized in developing oocytes, which decreases in activity with maturation. Therefore, unstained oocytes (BCB−) are high in G6PD activity, while the less mature oocytes stains are deep blue (BCB+) due to insuffcient G6PD activity to decolorize the BCB dye. PMID:22675245

  3. Dietary licorice root supplementation improves diet-induced weight gain, lipid deposition and hepatic steatosis in ovariectomized mice without stimulating reproductive tissues and mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Zeynep Madak; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Xu, Liwen; Wrobel, Kinga U.; Hartman, James A.; Wang, Michelle; Cam, Anthony; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Helferich, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Scope We studied the impact of dietary supplementation with licorice root components on diet-induced obesity, fat accumulation and hepatic steatosis in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice as a menopause model. Materials and Methods We evaluated the molecular and physiological effects of dietary licorice root administered to ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice as root powder (LRP), extracts (LRE) or isolated isoliquiritegenin (ILQ) on reproductive (uterus and mammary gland) and non-reproductive tissues important in regulating metabolism (liver, perigonadal, perirenal, mesenteric and subcutaneous fat). Quantitative outcome measures including body weight, fat distribution (MRI), food consumption, bone density and weight (DXA) and gene expression were assessed by the degree of restoration to the premenopausal health state. We characterized histological (H&E and oil red O staining) and molecular properties (expression of certain disease markers) of these tissues, and correlated these with metabolic phenotype as well as blood levels of bioactives. Conclusions Although LRE and ILQ provided some benefit, LRP was the most effective in reducing body weight gain, overall fat deposition, liver steatosis, and expression of hepatic lipid synthesis genes following ovariectomy. Our data demonstrate that licorice root provided improvement of multiple metabolic parameters under conditions of menopausal low estrogen and high-fat diets without stimulating reproductive tissues. PMID:26555669

  4. Dietary licorice root supplementation reduces diet-induced weight gain, lipid deposition, and hepatic steatosis in ovariectomized mice without stimulating reproductive tissues and mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Xu, Liwen; Wrobel, Kinga U; Hartman, James A; Wang, Michelle; Cam, Anthony; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Twaddle, Nathan C; Doerge, Daniel R; Khan, Ikhlas A; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Helferich, William G

    2016-02-01

    We studied the impact of dietary supplementation with licorice root components on diet-induced obesity, fat accumulation, and hepatic steatosis in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice as a menopause model. We evaluated the molecular and physiological effects of dietary licorice root administered to ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice as root powder (LRP), extracts (LRE), or isolated isoliquiritigenin (ILQ) on reproductive (uterus and mammary gland) and nonreproductive tissues important in regulating metabolism (liver, perigonadal, perirenal, mesenteric, and subcutaneous fat). Quantitative outcome measures including body weight, fat distribution (magnetic resonance imaging), food consumption, bone density and weight (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and gene expression were assessed by the degree of restoration to the preovariectomized health state. We characterized histological (H&E and oil red O staining) and molecular properties (expression of certain disease markers) of these tissues, and correlated these with metabolic phenotype as well as blood levels of bioactives. Although LRE and ILQ provided some benefit, LRP was the most effective in reducing body weight gain, overall fat deposition, liver steatosis, and expression of hepatic lipid synthesis genes following ovariectomy. Our data demonstrate that licorice root provided improvement of multiple metabolic parameters under conditions of low estrogen and high-fat diets without stimulating reproductive tissues. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Technique and Feasibility of a Dual Staining Method for Estrogen Receptors and AgNORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Günther

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A new staining method for dual demonstration of Estrogen receptors (ER and argyrophilc Nucleolus‐Organizer Regions (AgNORs was developed. To rule out possible reciprocal effects, serial slides of 10 invasive ductale breast cancers were stained with either the single staining method or the simultaneous ER/AgNOR‐staining method and investigated comparatively. By measuring the slides with the image analysis system AMBA, reciprocal effects could be excluded. It was proven that dual staining of both markers results in a reproducible and specific staining result. We concluded that it is justified to measure AgNORs in immunohistochemically stained cells.

  6. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays

    OpenAIRE

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2007-01-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we ...

  7. Solid-Color Stains on Western Redcedar and Redwood Siding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    You have decided to put wood siding on your new house. Several questions are probably going through your mind: “What’s the best type of wood?” “Should I use paint or stain?” “Should I apply the finish before or after I install the siding?”

  8. Myeloperoxidase staining in the diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Acharya, Anirudh B.; Kumar, S. C. Veerendra

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining procedure as a reliable, affordable and easily available diagnostic assay for aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Fifteen subjects were recruited in the study wherein five each were diagnosed as aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis respectively, and five were periodontally healthy. Three millilitres (ml) of venous blood was collected using Vacutainers containing ethylene diamine tetra acetate (EDTA) and was...

  9. Autometallographic (AMG) technique used for enhancement of the Golgi-Cox staining gives good contrast andhigh resolution of dendrites and spines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, Dariusz

    flexible than conventional enhancement proceduresperformed with commercial photographic developers. The staining procedure is thoroughly described and wedemonstrate with qualitative and quantitative data, how Golgi-Cox immersion time and different AMGenhancement length may influence the staining...... of dendrites and spines in the rat hippocampus. The describedmethod will be of value for future behavioural-anatomical studies, examining changes in dendrite branching andspine density caused by brain diseases and their subsequent treatment....

  10. Mercury content of sprouts and harvested roots from treated sweet potato mother roots. [Ipomoea batatas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisingh, D.; Nielsen, L.W.

    1972-01-01

    Mercury containing fungicides have been used extensively for seed and root disease control, but data on the fate of the mercury (Hg) are scarce. Experiments were designed to see if Hg applied to propagative sweet potato roots increased the Hg-content of edible roots. Roots were treated with Semesan Bel(hydroxymercurinitrophenol + hydroxymercurichlorophenol), Mertect (Thiabendazole: 2-(4-Thiazolyl)-benzimidazole), or Botran (2,6-Dichloro-4-nitroanaline) at recommended rates or with water. Treated roots were bedded into sandy loam soil, and the plants were harvested at 2 and 3 months after bedding. Some sprouts transplanted at 2 months were grown to maturity, and the harvested roots were analyzed. Hg analyses were performed by flameless atomic absorption. Roots treated prior to planting with Semesan Bel, Mertect, Botran, and water contained 23.0, 0.05, 0.03 and 0.03 ..mu..g/g dry wt, respectively. At the 2-month harvest, the leaves and stems of the Semesan Bel-treated plants contained 5 times more Hg than those of the other treatments. By the 3-month harvest, the amount of Hg in plant leaves and stems from Hg-treated roots was 2 to 3 times that of the others. Fall harvested fleshy roots contained 0.03, 0.02, 0.03, and 0.03 ..mu..g/g dry wt Hg for the Semesan Bel, Mertect, Botran, and water treatments, respectively. This demonstrates that the Hg applied to the mother root was translocated to the new plant, but little if any was translocated to the new fleshy roots.

  11. Meibomian orifices and Marx's line. Studied by triple vital staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1985-12-01

    The ciliary margins of the lower lids have been vital stained by the lipid-specific Sudan III powder, fluorescein 0.1% and the bottom of the lacrimal river (Marx's line) by lissamine green 1% in 100 cases. The Meibomian orifices are situated in a straight row just in front of the Marx's line in the lipid phase. With increasing age (greater than 50 years) the orifices are more often displaced and also discharge their lipid in the depth of the aqueous phase. The number averaged 21.5 in the lipid phase and 1.7 in the aqueous phase. Active orifices staining with lipid were found in 45% of all orifices in normals, independent of age, and were increased in conjunctivitis in the lipid phase. Lissamine green-stained orifices were independent of age, phase and diagnosis. The anterior edge of Marx's line may run an irregular course in elderly normals (greater than 50 years), significantly more often in conjunctivitis and blepharitis.

  12. Survival of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in modified Romanowsky staining solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misan, Angus; Chan, Wei Yee; Trott, Darren; Hill, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    Stains that are used regularly for patient-side diagnosis to rapidly identify bacterial and fungal infections could become contaminated by common pathogens, such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, during slide immersion. To determine whether the inoculation of S. pseudintermedius into modified Romanowsky type stains (Quick Dip ® ) results in viable bacterial contamination and whether this is influenced by the addition of organic debris (canine hair and skin). A clinical isolate of S. pseudintermedius was inoculated into clean and organically contaminated Quick Dip ® solutions (methanol fixative, eosin, methylene blue), and positive (broth) and negative (bleach) controls. Each solution was tested for the presence of viable bacteria by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU/mL) at various time points. Solutions also were examined under high power microscopy to count the number of visible bacteria at each time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was able to survive in the clean and contaminated Quick Dip ® stains for at least one hour, but by 24 h no viable bacteria remained. Survival of the bacteria was not supported in the fixative at any time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius remained visible under high power microscopy for up to 2 weeks in all organically contaminated solutions of the Quick Dip ® set. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius only remains viable in eosin and methylene blue for short periods of time, but the prolonged visibility of dead organisms could theoretically lead to the misdiagnosis of cytology samples. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Hancornia speciosa latex in Allium cepa root model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, T P; Sousa, T R; Arruda, A S; Peixoto, N; Gonçalves, P J; Almeida, L M

    2016-02-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Mangabeira tree) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including diarrhea, ulcer, gastritis, tuberculosis, acne and warts. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of H. speciosa latex on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa were examined. Onion bulbs were exposed to different concentrations of latex and then submitted to microscopic analysis using Giemsa stain. Water was used as a negative control and sodium azide as a positive control. The results showed that, under the testing conditions, the mitotic index (MI) of the onion roots submitted to latex treatment did not differ significantly from the negative control, which suggests that the latex is not cytotoxic. Low incidence of chromosome aberrations in the cells treated with H. speciosa latex was also observed, indicating that the latex does not have genotoxic effect either. The MI and the chromosome aberration frequency responded to the latex concentration, requiring more studies to evaluate the dosage effect on genotoxicity. The results indicate that in tested concentrations H. speciosa latex is probably not harmful to human health and may be potentially used in medicine.

  14. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ramesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and showed significant positive genotypic correlation with yield. Starch-fiber ratio (SFR, determinant of brittle root texture showed strong negative association with root yield. The total alkaloid content had positive genotypic correlation with root yield. So genetic upgradation should aim at optimum balance between two divergent groups of traits i.e. root yield traits (root morphometric traits and crude fiber content and root textural quality traits (starch content and SFR to develop superior genotypes with better yield and quality.

  15. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  16. Roots and routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte; Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    2011-01-01

    This article is about transnational migrants, how they construct belonging to ‘new’ places where they have arrived, and how the feelings of belonging to their places of origin change when they go back. The theoretical part of the article outlines the relationship between migration and belonging...... arguing that there is a dynamic interplay between roots and routes in people's lives. The empirical point of departure is narratives about roots and routes by ethnic minorities settled in Aalborg East, an underprivileged neighbourhood in northern Denmark. One of the main findings is a gap between....... A somewhat paradoxical finding is that it appears to be more difficult for transnational migrants to maintain their roots in the country of origin when they go back than it was to establish new roots in the host country...

  17. Comparative study of the efficacy of Wright-Giemsa stain and Liu's stain in the detection of Auer rods in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qing Fang; Xiong, Bei; Chen, Wan Xin; Liu, Xin Yue

    2014-07-01

    In view of the importance of Auer rods in the rapid diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we compared the results of Wright-Giemsa stain and Liu's stain (a rapid and simple stain, which is also a kind of modified Romanowsky stain) in the detection of Auer rods. This study was based on 53 cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Two staining methods were respectively performed on the bone marrow smears of these cases, and presence of Auer rods as well as nuclear features, cytoplasmic features and the degree of granularity of the cytoplasm were compared in each case. Our results showed that the occurrence of Auer rods as well as faggots in leukemic promyelocytes were significantly higher under Liu's stain than under Wright-Giemsa stain. Significant differences also existed in the occurrence of hypergranular cells and cytoplasmic protrusions between smears stained with Liu's stain and Wright-Giemsa stain. Liu's stain is important for the rapid diagnosis of suspicious APL, especially in recognizing Auer rods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A COMPARATIVE STUDY TO SEE THE UTILITY OF MODIFIED ULTRAFAST PAPANICOLAOU (MUFP STAIN OVER STANDARD PAP STAIN IN ROUTINE FNA SMEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Khajuria

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pap stain is an excellent method to review the cytological specimen; however, it is time consuming and costly. Various modifications have been developed in Pap stain of which latest is Modified Ultrafast Pap (MUFP stain which is hybrid of the technique by Romanowsky and conventional Pap stain to reduce the staining time to 90 seconds. AIM Aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and applicability of MUFP stain in fine needle aspiration smears of various organs. MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective study was carried out in the cytopathology laboratory of GMC, Jammu for a period of 6 months from December 2015 to May 2016. A total no of 200 specimens were collected. The samples included 80 lymph node aspiration samples, 40 thyroid FNA samples, 50 breast FNA samples, 25 soft tissue aspirations and 5 salivary gland aspirations. Two smears were kept for fixation in 95% ethanol for staining with standard Pap stain and 2 were air dried for MUFP staining. RESULTS A correct diagnosis was achieved in all the cases. Background was similar in both staining methods. However, well-preserved cell morphology, crisp nuclear outline, good overall staining were well seen with MUFP method when compared with the standard Pap method. CONCLUSION The findings of this study support the use of MUFP method in cytology laboratory over standard Pap method.

  19. Cold storage of rooted and non-rooted carnation cuttings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... The specific objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of storage duration on the survival rate of rooted cuttings and to determine the rooting and survival rates of non-rooted cuttings for two standard carnation cultivars (that is., Dianora and Vittorio). The survival rates of rooted cuttings showed ...

  20. Relationships between root diameter, root length and root branching along lateral roots in adult, field-grown maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Pagès, Loïc; Wu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Root diameter, especially apical diameter, plays an important role in root development and function. The variation in diameter between roots, and along roots, affects root structure and thus the root system's overall foraging performance. However, the effect of diameter variation on root elongation, branching and topological connections has not been examined systematically in a population of high-order roots, nor along the roots, especially for mature plants grown in the field. A method combining both excavation and analysis was applied to extract and quantify root architectural traits of adult, field-grown maize plants. The relationships between root diameter and other root architectural characteristics are analysed for two maize cultivars. The basal diameter of the lateral roots (orders 1-3) was highly variable. Basal diameter was partly determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. Basal diameter defined a potential root length, but the lengths of most roots fell far short of this. This was explained partly by differences in the pattern of diameter change along roots. Diameter tended to decrease along most roots, with the steepness of the gradient of decrease depending on basal diameter. The longest roots were those that maintained (or sometimes increased) their diameters during elongation. The branching density (cm(-1)) of laterals was also determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. However, the location of this bearing segment along the mother root was also involved - intermediate positions were associated with higher densities of laterals. The method used here allows us to obtain very detailed records of the geometry and topology of a complex root system. Basal diameter and the pattern of diameter change along a root were associated with its final length. These relationships are especially useful in simulations of root elongation and branching in source-sink models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals

  1. Laminated Root Rot of Western Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.E. Nelson; N.E. Martin; R.E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Laminated root rot is caused by the native fungus Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb. It occurs throughout the Northwestern United States and in southern British Columbia, Canada. The disease has also been reported in Japan and Manchuria. In the United States, the pathogen is most destructive in pure Douglas-fir stands west of the crest of the Cascade Range in Washington...

  2. Biochar for horticultural rooting media improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Chris; Salm, van der Caroline; Hofland-Zijlstra, Jantineke; Streminska, Marta; Eveleens-Clark, Barbara; Regelink, Inge; Fryda, Lydia; Visser, Rianne

    2017-01-01

    Peat is used as rooting medium in greenhouse horticulture. Biochar is a sustainable alternative for the use of peat, which will reduce peat derived carbon dioxide emissions. Biochar in potting soil mixtures allegedly increases water storage, nutrient supply, microbial life and disease suppression

  3. Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Hokken (Raymond)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAortic valve disease in the pediatric age group is usually a consequence of congenital aortic stenosis, which may be isolated or may be a part of an anomaly of the left ventricular outflow tract or the aortic root. Management of these patients is difficult. Neonates and infants

  4. Root canal morphology of South asian Indian mandibular premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian mandibular premolars using a tooth clearing technique. Two hundred mandibular premolar teeth were collected from different dental schools and clinics in India. After pulp tissue removal and root canal staining with Indian ink, the specimens were decalcified with 5% nitric acid, dehydrated in ethyl alcohol, and subsequently cleared in methyl salicylate. Of the 200 mandibular premolars, 100 were first premolars and 100 were second premolars. Of the first premolars, 94% had a single root, whereas 6% were 2 rooted. Seventy-six percent had a single canal, 22% had 2 canals, and 2% had 3 canals. Eighty-two percent had a single apical foramen, 16% had 2 foramens, and 2% teeth had 3 apical foramens. Eighty percent of teeth had type I, 6% had type II, 10% had type IV, 2% had type V, and 2% teeth had type IX root canal anatomy. Of the 100 second premolars, 92% had a single root, whereas 8% teeth were 2 rooted and fused. Fifty-eight percent of teeth had a single canal, and 42% had two canals. Eighty-eight percent had a single apical foramen, and 12% had 2 foramens. Sixty-six percent had type I, 30% had type II, and 4% had type V root canal anatomy. A high prevalence of 2 canals was noted in the first and second premolars. Also, 20% of first premolars and 34% of second premolars had a root canal anatomy other than type I. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantification of polysaccharides fixed to Gram stained slides using lactophenol cotton blue and digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Dark blue rings and circles emerged when the non-specific polysaccharide stain lactophenol cotton blue was added to Gram stained slides. The dark blue staining is attributable to the presence of capsular polysaccharides and bacterial slime associated with clumps of Gram-negative bacteria.  Since all bacterial cells are glycosylated and concentrate polysaccharides from the media, the majority of cells stain light blue. The contrast between dark and light staining is sufficient to enable a digital image processing thresholding technique to be quantitative with little background noise. Prior to the addition of lactophenol cotton blue, the Gram-stained slides appeared unremarkable, lacking ubiquitous clumps or stained polysaccharides.  Adding lactophenol cotton blue to Gram stained slides is a quick and inexpensive way to screen cell cultures for bacterial slime, clumps and biofilms that are invisible using the Gram stain alone.

  6. Appearance of granulated cells in blood films stained by automated aqueous versus methanolic Romanowsky methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robin W; Velguth, Karen E

    2010-03-01

    Romanowsky stains are used routinely by veterinary clinical pathology laboratories for cytologic and blood film evaluations. Automated stainers are available for both aqueous and methanolic Romanowsky stains. Mast cell granules and canine distemper virus inclusions are known to stain differently by these 2 methods, but we have noticed differences in the staining characteristics of other granulated cells. The aim of this study was to investigate and document the variable appearance of basophils and large granular lymphocytes in blood films stained using aqueous and methanolic Romanowsky methods. Cytologic preparations from 1 canine mast cell tumor and blood films from 8 dogs, 1 cat, 1 rabbit, and 1 ostrich were stained using an automated aqueous stain (Aerospray 7120, with and without a predip fixative) and an automated methanolic stain (Hematek). Staining quality and intensity of the cytoplasmic granules in mast cells, basophils, and large granular lymphocytes was evaluated subjectively. Cytoplasmic granules of mast cells, basophils, and large granular lymphocytes stained poorly or not at all with the automated aqueous stain but stained prominently and were readily identified with the automated methanolic stain. Use of the predip fixative with the Aerospray method improved the visibility of basophil granules but not mast cell granules, and had a variable affect on the visibility of granules in large granular lymphocytes. Clinical pathologists should be aware of the staining methodology used on the slides they evaluate to avoid incorrect interpretation of granulated cell populations.

  7. Polyphenols from Root, Tubercles and Grains Cropped in Brazil: Chemical and Nutritional Characterization and Their Effects on Human Health and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego dos Santos Baião

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout evolution, plants have developed the ability to produce secondary phenolic metabolites, which are important for their interactions with the environment, reproductive strategies and defense mechanisms. These (polyphenolic compounds are a heterogeneous group of natural antioxidants found in vegetables, cereals and leguminous that exert beneficial and protective actions on human health, playing roles such as enzymatic reaction inhibitors and cofactors, toxic chemicals scavengers and biochemical reaction substrates, increasing the absorption of essential nutrients and selectively inhibiting deleterious intestinal bacteria. Polyphenols present in some commodity grains, such as soy and cocoa beans, as well as in other vegetables considered security foods for developing countries, including cassava, taro and beetroot, all of them cropped in Brazil, have been identified and quantified in order to point out their bioavailability and the adequate dietary intake to promote health. The effects of the flavonoid and non-flavonoid compounds present in these vegetables, their metabolism and their effects on preventing chronic and degenerative disorders like cancers, diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular and neurological diseases are herein discussed based on recent epidemiological studies.

  8. Polyphenols from Root, Tubercles and Grains Cropped in Brazil: Chemical and Nutritional Characterization and Their Effects on Human Health and Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Baião, Diego; Silva de Freitas, Cyntia; da Silva, Davi; Ribeiro Pereira, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Throughout evolution, plants have developed the ability to produce secondary phenolic metabolites, which are important for their interactions with the environment, reproductive strategies and defense mechanisms. These (poly)phenolic compounds are a heterogeneous group of natural antioxidants found in vegetables, cereals and leguminous that exert beneficial and protective actions on human health, playing roles such as enzymatic reaction inhibitors and cofactors, toxic chemicals scavengers and biochemical reaction substrates, increasing the absorption of essential nutrients and selectively inhibiting deleterious intestinal bacteria. Polyphenols present in some commodity grains, such as soy and cocoa beans, as well as in other vegetables considered security foods for developing countries, including cassava, taro and beetroot, all of them cropped in Brazil, have been identified and quantified in order to point out their bioavailability and the adequate dietary intake to promote health. The effects of the flavonoid and non-flavonoid compounds present in these vegetables, their metabolism and their effects on preventing chronic and degenerative disorders like cancers, diabetes, osteoporosis, cardiovascular and neurological diseases are herein discussed based on recent epidemiological studies. PMID:28930173

  9. Color stability and staining of silorane after prolonged chemical challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jesus, Vivian CBR; Martinelli, Nata Luiz; Poli-Frederico, Regina Célia

    methacrylate (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE; Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE; Master Fill, Biodinâmica) or silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE) composite materials. Initial color was registered in a spectrophotometer. Specimens were divided in four groups and individually stored at 37°C in 0.02N citric acid, 0.02N phosphoric...... perceptible after immersion in water, citric acid, phosphoric acid or ethanol up to 21 days (¿E... of the immersion medium (pacid or citric acid did not influence the color stability or staining susceptibility of the investigated...

  10. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  11. Al behavior in tobacco cells by NAA and staining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, H.; Tanoi, K.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    To study aluminum toxicity for plant, it is important to analyze the behavior of Al in cells. The way how Al is taken up by tobacco cells through lumogallion staining method developed is presented. The fluorescence intensity from the cell was increased rapidly between 4 and 8 hours of 1 mM Al treatment. To calibrate the fluorescence intensity from Al-lumogallion complex, Al amount in the cell was determined by NAA. When the same sample was analyzed by ICP-AES, Al amounts in all the samples were 13% lower than those measured by NAA. (author)

  12. Examination of seminal stain by HPLC assay of phenolphthalein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Manabu; Akane, Atsushi; Mitani, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Okii, Yutaka

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect semen was investigated in this study. Briefly, 1cm of a gauze thread with a seminal stain was soaked in the reaction mixture (phenolphthalein diphosphate tetrasodium dissolved in acetate buffer) for 5-10 min, and the supernatant was analyzed by HPLC with a spectrophotometric detector. Phenolphthalein was liberated from the reagent in the presence of acid phosphatase, and the liberated phenolphthalein was detected objectively and was unaffected by blood contamination. Since liberation of phenolphthalein from the reagent occurred slightly in control negative samples, the cut-off value of the examination should be set at 1.0 microg/ml.

  13. Buffered Romanowsky-Giemsa method for formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections: taming a traditional stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, D; Samardžija, G; Redžek, A; Arnaut, M; Nikin, Z; Stefanović, M

    2017-01-01

    Romanowsky-Giemsa (RG) stains were devised during the 19th century for identifying plasmodia parasites in blood smears. Later, RG stains became standard procedures for hematology and cytology. Numerous attempts have been made to apply RG staining to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections, with varied success. Most published work on this topic described RG staining methods in which sections were overstained, then subjected to acid differentiation; unfortunately, the differentiation step often caused inconsistent staining outcomes. If staining is performed under optimal conditions with control of dye concentration, pH, solution temperature and staining time, no differentiation is required. We used RG and 0.002 M buffer, pH 42, for staining and washing sections. All steps were performed at room temperature. After staining and air drying, sections were washed in 96-100% ethanol to remove extraneous stain. Finally, sections were washed in xylene and mounted using DPX. Staining results were similar to routine hemalum and eosin (H & E) staining. Nuclei were blue; intensity depended largely on chromatin density. RNA-rich sites were purple. Collagen fibers, keratin, muscle cells, erythrocytes and white matter of the central nervous system were stained pinkish and reddish hues. Cartilage matrix, mast cell granules and areas of myxomatous degeneration were purple. Sulfate-rich mucins were stained pale blue, while those lacking sulfate groups were unstained. Deposits of hemosiderin, lipofuscin and melanin were greenish, and calcium deposits were blue. Helicobacter pylori bacteria were violet to purple. The advantages of the method are its close similarity to H & E staining and technical simplicity. Hemosiderin, H. pylori, mast cell granules, melanin and specific granules of different hematopoietic cells, which are invisible or barely distinguishable by H & E staining, are visualized. Other advantages over previous RG stains include shorter staining time and avoidance

  14. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  15. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide reversibly inhibits root gravitropism and induces horizontal curvature of primary root during grass pea germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinglong; Su, Miao; Wang, Liyan; Jiao, Chengjin; Sun, Zhengxi; Cheng, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Wang, Chongying

    2012-04-01

    During germination in distilled water (dH(2)O) on a horizontally positioned Petri dish, emerging primary roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) grew perpendicular to the bottom of the Petri dish, due to gravitropism. However, when germinated in exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the primary roots grew parallel to the bottom of the Petri dish and asymmetrically, forming a horizontal curvature. Time-course experiments showed that the effect was strongest when H(2)O(2) was applied prior to the emergence of the primary root. H(2)O(2) failed to induce root curvature when applied post-germination. Dosage studies revealed that the frequency of primary root curvature was significantly enhanced with increased H(2)O(2) concentrations. This curvature could be directly counteracted by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of H(2)O(2), but not by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and pyridine, inhibitors of H(2)O(2) production. Exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment caused both an increase in the activities of H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzymes [including ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POD: EC 1.11.1.7)] and a reduction in endogenous H(2)O(2) levels and root vitality. Although grass pea seeds absorbed exogenous H(2)O(2) during seed germination, DAB staining of paraffin sections revealed that exogenous H(2)O(2) only entered the root epidermis and not inner tissues. These data indicated that exogenously applied H(2)O(2) could lead to a reversible loss of the root gravitropic response and a horizontal curvature in primary roots during radicle emergence of the seedling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Aggressiveness of Fusarium species and impact of root infection on growth and yield of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María M Díaz; Leandro, Leonor F; Munkvold, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium spp. are commonly isolated from soybean roots but the pathogenic activity of most species is poorly documented. Aggressiveness and yield impact of nine species of Fusarium were determined on soybean in greenhouse (50 isolates) and field microplot (19 isolates) experiments. Root rot severity and shoot and root dry weights were compared at growth stages V3 or R1. Root systems were scanned and digital image analysis was conducted; yield was measured in microplots. Disease severity and root morphology impacts varied among and within species. Fusarium graminearum was highly aggressive (root rot severity >90%), followed by F. proliferatum and F. virguliforme. Significant variation in damping-off (20 to 75%) and root rot severity (60%) was observed among F. oxysporum isolates. In artificially-infested microplots, root rot severity was low (soybean at different plant stages and introduces root image analysis to assess the impact of root pathogens on soybean.

  17. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  18. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Coser Guignone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions.METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18 according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva. The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA, Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA, Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA. Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0, 24 hours (T1, 72 hours (T2, as well as 7 days (T3 and 14 days (T4 of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%.RESULTS: The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations.CONCLUSIONS: Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions.

  19. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-24

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14 th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19 th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  20. Coproduction of detergent compatible bacterial enzymes and stain removal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2015-10-01

    Most of the detergents that are presently produced contain the detergent compatible enzymes to improve and accelerate the washing performance by removing tough stains. The process is environment friendly as the use of enzymes in the detergent formulation reduces the utilization of toxic detergent constituents. The current trend is to use the detergent compatible enzymes that are active at low and ambient temperature in order to save energy and maintain fabric quality. As the detergent compatible bacterial enzymes are used together in the detergent formulation, it is important to co-produce the detergent enzymes in a single fermentation medium as the enzyme stability is assured, and production cost gets reduced enormously. The review reports on the production, purification, characterization and application of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases are available. However, there is no specific review or minireview on the concomitant production of detergent compatible amylases, lipases, and proteases. In this minireview, the coproduction of detergent compatible enzymes by bacterial species, enzyme stability towards detergents and detergent components, and stain release analysis were discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Visualizing peripheral nerve regeneration by whole mount staining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-peng Dun

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve trauma triggers a well characterised sequence of events both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Axons distal to the injury degenerate, Schwann cells convert to a repair supportive phenotype and macrophages enter the nerve to clear myelin and axonal debris. Following these events, axons must regrow through the distal part of the nerve, re-innervate and finally are re-myelinated by Schwann cells. For nerve crush injuries (axonotmesis, in which the integrity of the nerve is maintained, repair may be relatively effective whereas for nerve transection (neurotmesis repair will likely be very poor as few axons may be able to cross between the two parts of the severed nerve, across the newly generated nerve bridge, to enter the distal stump and regenerate. Analysing axon growth and the cell-cell interactions that occur following both nerve crush and cut injuries has largely been carried out by staining sections of nerve tissue, but this has the obvious disadvantage that it is not possible to follow the paths of regenerating axons in three dimensions within the nerve trunk or nerve bridge. To try and solve this problem, we describe the development and use of a novel whole mount staining protocol that allows the analysis of axonal regeneration, Schwann cell-axon interaction and re-vascularisation of the repairing nerve following nerve cut and crush injuries.

  2. Stained glasses under the nuclear microprobe: A window into history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarigues, M. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: mgv@fct.unl.pt; Fernandes, P. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro and R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da [Dep. Fisica, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    Stained glass fragments from the 15th, 16th and 20th centuries, belonging to Mosteiro de Santa Maria da Vitoria, Batalha (Portugal), were characterised non-destructively in a nuclear microprobe. The work aimed at finding the composition of the glasses and glass paintings and relating these with the corresponding production periods. The elemental compositions of the glass fragments were obtained by means of scanning micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) spectrometry in selected cross-sections. These were complemented by micro X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Characterisation of colour was performed by optical absorption spectroscopy in the UV-vis range, while the corrosion products were identified by optical microscopy and {mu}-FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) spectroscopy in combination with the data generated by {mu}-PIXE. Nuclear microprobe analysis allowed unveiling the compositions and structures, in particular of glass paintings and corrosion products. While it is not surprising that Fe, Cu and Pb were the main elements identified in the grisaille paintings of all studied periods, as well as Ag and Cu found in the glasses decorated with yellow silver painting, their distribution gave important clues on the materials and techniques used to manufacture these stained glasses. Furthermore, it allowed establishing a definite relation between the compositions found and the periods of production, with the added bonus of correctly reassigning the manufacturing period of some samples.

  3. The rapid inhibition of root respiration after exposure of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, G.; Ali, A.; Wukasch, R. T.; Fletcher, R. A.

    The metabolic activity of the roots was very sensitive to the changes induced in the leaves by O 3. Respiratory activity began to decrease well before visible injury appeared on the leaves, and the per cent reduction of respiration was much greater than the per cent leaf injury. The triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining technique revealed changes in root tips very quickly, was generally more sensitive to changes in respiratory activity and was a convenient technique for handling large numbers of samples. Reducing foliar injury from O 3 with low levels of SO 2 reduced the effects on the roots indicating the effect of O 3 is on processes in the leaf.

  4. Infection of hairy roots of strawberry (Fragaria x Ananassa Duch.) with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutila, A M; Vestberg, M; Kauppinen, V

    1995-05-01

    Hairy root cultures of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) were induced with the Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4. Cultures were maintained on B50 medium but could also grow on a minimal medium, which did not inhibit the growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The growth and nutrient uptake were characterized in shake flasks and in a bioreactor. Spores of the native Finnish arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus fistulosum V128 were used to infect strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. 'Senga Sengana') hairy roots in vitro. During cultivation, vegetative spore formation was observed. At the end of the cultivation, hyphae and arbuscules were observed in the stained roots.

  5. Clinical evaluation of Lugol's iodine staining in the treatment of stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, M; Shigeta, T; Takahashi, H; Minamikawa, T; Komatsubara, H; Oguni, A; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2011-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often surrounded by epithelial dysplasia; leaving it unresected can result in local recurrence. Staining with Lugol's iodine solution detects epithelial dysplasia in oral mucosa, but whether it decreases local recurrence after OSCC surgery is unknown. This study investigated local recurrence rates in patients with early tongue cancer who underwent surgery using Lugol's staining. 93 patients with T1-2N0 tongue SCC underwent partial glossectomy using Lugol's staining during surgery. Resection was performed at least 5mm from the margin of the unstained area. Patients were investigated retrospectively for local recurrence status. Postoperative histology revealed negative surgical margins for SCC or epithelial dysplasia in 81 patients, close margins for SCC in 5, positive margins for mild epithelial dysplasia in 6, and a positive margin for SCC in one. Those with a positive or a close margin for SCC underwent additional resection 2-4 weeks after surgery; one was proved histologically to have residual SCC. No patients developed local recurrence, but 2 died of neck metastasis and 2 of distant metastasis. The 5-year disease specific survival rate was 93.8%. Lugol's staining during surgery can reduce local recurrence and improve survival in patients with early tongue SCC. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Root canal adhesive filling in dogs' teeth with or without coronal restoration: a histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Mario Roberto; Barnett, Frederick; Debelian, Gilberto J; de Pontes Lima, Regina Karla; Bezerra da Silva, Léa Assed

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo the response of the periradicular tissues after endodontic treatment and root filling with Epiphany/Resilon (Penntron Clinical Technologies, LLC, Wallingford, CT) or gutta percha and new Sealapex (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA) in dogs' teeth with or without coronal restoration. Teeth without coronal restorations were used to assess the influence of continuous exposure to the oral environment on the periradicular tissues. Sixty root canals with vital pulps in three dogs were instrumented and obturated in a single session and randomly assigned to one of four groups as follows. group 1: root canal filling with Epiphany/Resilon with coronal restoration, group 2: root canal filling with Sealapex sealer and gutta percha with restoration, group 3: root canal filling with Epiphany/Resilon without restoration, and group 4: root canal filling with Sealapex sealer and gutta percha without coronal restoration. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized, and the maxillas and mandibles were removed and submitted for histologic processing. Longitudinal sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Mallory's trichrome, and Brown and Brenn stains and examined under light microscopy. There were significant differences found between the four groups (p < 0.05). The results showed that roots canals filled with Epiphany/Resilon, with coronal restoration, had significantly less periradicular inflammation than roots canals filled with gutta percha and Sealapex, with coronal restoration (p = 0.021). No significant difference was observed in the intensity of inflammation between roots canals filled with Epiphany/Resilon with no restoration and roots filled with gutta percha and Sealapex with restoration (p = 0.269). Roots canals filled with gutta percha and Sealapex sealer without coronal restoration showed the greatest degree of periradicular inflammation.

  7. Contributions of roots and rootstocks to sustainable, intensified crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter J; Atkinson, Christopher J; Bengough, A Glyn; Else, Mark A; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Harrison, Richard J; Schmidt, Sonja

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable intensification is seen as the main route for meeting the world's increasing demands for food and fibre. As demands mount for greater efficiency in the use of resources to achieve this goal, so the focus on roots and rootstocks and their role in acquiring water and nutrients, and overcoming pests and pathogens, is increasing. The purpose of this review is to explore some of the ways in which understanding root systems and their interactions with soils could contribute to the development of more sustainable systems of intensive production. Physical interactions with soil particles limit root growth if soils are dense, but root-soil contact is essential for optimal growth and uptake of water and nutrients. X-ray microtomography demonstrated that maize roots elongated more rapidly with increasing root-soil contact, as long as mechanical impedance was not limiting root elongation, while lupin was less sensitive to changes in root-soil contact. In addition to selecting for root architecture and rhizosphere properties, the growth of many plants in cultivated systems is profoundly affected by selection of an appropriate rootstock. Several mechanisms for scion control by rootstocks have been suggested, but the causal signals are still uncertain and may differ between crop species. Linkage map locations for quantitative trait loci for disease resistance and other traits of interest in rootstock breeding are becoming available. Designing root systems and rootstocks for specific environments is becoming a feasible target.

  8. STAINING SECTIONS OF WATER-MISCIBLE RESINS .1. EFFECTS OF THE MOLECULAR-SIZE OF THE STAIN, AND OF RESIN CROSS-LINKING, ON THE STAINING OF GLYCOL METHACRYLATE EMBEDDED TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERRITS, PO; HOROBIN, RW; WRIGHT, DJ

    1990-01-01

    Penetration of hydrophilic acid and basic dyes into sections cut from glycol methacrylate (GMA)-embedded tissues was studied; as were the effects on such staining of superficial coatings of thin layers of GMA. Dye size was a major factor in controlling penetration of resin and staining of tissues.

  9. Phenylpropanoid pathway is potentiated by silicon in the roots of banana plants during the infection process of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Alessandro Antônio; da Silva, Washington Luís; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, is a disease that causes large reductions in banana yield worldwide. Considering the importance of silicon (Si) to potentiate the resistance of several plant species to pathogen infection, this study aimed to investigate, at the histochemical level, whether this element could enhance the production of phenolics on the roots of banana plants in response to F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection. Plants of cultivar Maçã, which is susceptible to F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense, were grown in plastic pots amended with 0 (-Si) or 0.39 g of Si (+Si) per kilogram of soil and inoculated with race 1 of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. The root Si concentration was increased by 35.6% for +Si plants in comparison to the -Si plants, which contributed to a 27% reduction in the symptoms of Fusarium wilt on roots. There was an absence of fluorescence for the root sections of the -Si plants treated with the Neu and Wilson's reagents. By contrast, for the root sections obtained from the +Si plants treated with Neu's reagent, strong yellow-orange fluorescence was observed in the phloem, and lemon-yellow fluorescence was observed in the sclerenchyma and metaxylem vessels, indicating the presence of flavonoids. For the root sections of the +Si plants treated with Wilson's reagent, orange-yellowish autofluorescence was more pronounced around the phloem vessels, and yellow fluorescence was more pronounced around the metaxylem vessels, also indicating the presence of flavonoids. Lignin was more densely deposited in the cortex of the roots of the +Si plants than for the -Si plants. Dopamine was barely detected in the roots of the -Si plants after using the lactic and glyoxylic acid stain, but was strongly suspected to occur on the phloem and metaxylem vessels of the roots of the +Si plants as confirmed by the intense orange-yellow fluorescence. The present study provides new evidence of the pivotal role of the phenylpropanoid pathway in

  10. Effectiveness of clean-up procedures on stain susceptibility of different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Pundlik Mane

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Chemical-cure adhesive showed higher stain susceptibility than light-cure adhesive in all clean-up procedures. Both adhesives would show less stain susceptibility with polishing step with rubber cup and pumice.

  11. Development of Pathological Diagnostics of Human Kidney Cancer by Multiple Staining Using New Fluorescent Fluolid Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilibaier Wuxiuer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New fluorescent Fluolid dyes have advantages over others such as stability against heat, dryness, and excess light. Here, we performed simultaneous immunostaining of renal tumors, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, papillary RCC, chromophobe RCC, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC (ACD-RCC, and renal angiomyolipoma (AML, with primary antibodies against Kank1, cytokeratin 7 (CK7, and CD10, which were detected with secondary antibodies labeled with Fluolid-Orange, Fluolid-Green, and Alexa Fluor 647, respectively. Kank1 was stained in normal renal tubules, papillary RCC, and ACD-RCC, and weakly or negatively in all other tumors. CK7 was positive in normal renal tubules, papillary RCC, and ACD-RCC. In contrast, CD10 was expressed in renal tubules and clear cell RCC, papillary RCC, AML, and AC-RCC, and weakly in chromophobe RCC. These results may contribute to differentiating renal tumors and subtypes of RCCs. We also examined the stability of fluorescence and found that fluorescent images of Fluolid dyes were identical between a tissue section and the same section after it was stored for almost three years at room temperature. This indicates that tissue sections can be stored at room temperature for a relatively long time after they are stained with multiple fluorescent markers, which could open a door for pathological diagnostics.

  12. India Ink Staining, a Rapid and Affordable Test for Diagnosis of Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masfiyah Masfiyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis incidence has increased along with an increase in incidence of HIV-AIDS. This infection causes increased morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV-AIDS. A rapid diagnosis plays an important role to ensure a prompt therapy of the disease. The cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen test for diagnosis of meningitis is rapid but relatively expensive while culture is time consuming. A 47-year man was admitted to hospital with a headache, fever, nausea, and vomiting and a HIV history for the last 6 months. On physical examination, he was compos mentis, meningeal’s stimuli signs (+, where as on examination of craniales nerves, motor and sensibility was in a normal range. Routine blood was normal, 60 CD4 cells/mm3. Laboratory finding included a clowdy/turbid Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, low glucose level (CSF glucose 43 mg / dl vs. blood glucose 293 mg / dl, elevated protein concentration (137.1 mg / dl, and polymorphonuclear pleocytosis. India ink stain showed encapsulated yeasts. Cryptococcus sp is the only encapsulated yeast, while C. neoformans is the most common cause of Cryptococcosis in patients with HIV-AIDS. The patient was diagnosed with Cryptococcal meningitis by indian ink staining, and immediately given anti-fungal theraphy.

  13. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal and fetal characteristics associated with meconium-stained amniotic fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balchin, Imelda; Whittaker, John C; Lamont, Ronald F

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (AF) and adverse outcome in relation to gestational age and racial group, and to investigate the predictors of meconium-stained AF.......To estimate the rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (AF) and adverse outcome in relation to gestational age and racial group, and to investigate the predictors of meconium-stained AF....

  15. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in microculture plates with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, M; Chernesky, M; Mahony, J

    1984-06-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IF) staining, using a monoclonal antibody, detected two- to fourfold more inclusions than did iodine staining. Of 274 clinical specimens, 53 (19.3%) were positive by IF on passage 1 as compared with 33 (12%) by iodine staining (P less than 0.005). IF-stained inclusions in McCoy cells in the bottom of microculture wells were readily viewed with a long-focal-length objective at a magnification of 250 X.

  16. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in microculture plates with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, M; Chernesky, M; Mahony, J

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IF) staining, using a monoclonal antibody, detected two- to fourfold more inclusions than did iodine staining. Of 274 clinical specimens, 53 (19.3%) were positive by IF on passage 1 as compared with 33 (12%) by iodine staining (P less than 0.005). IF-stained inclusions in McCoy cells in the bottom of microculture wells were readily viewed with a long-focal-length objective at a magnification of 250 X.

  17. Development and Evaluation of Semiautomated Quantification of Lissamine Green Staining of the Bulbar Conjunctiva From Digital Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunya, Vatinee Y; Chen, Min; Zheng, Yuanjie; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Gee, James; Daniel, Ebenezer; O'Sullivan, Ryan; Smith, Eli; Stone, Richard A; Maguire, Maureen G

    2017-10-01

    Lissamine green (LG) staining of the conjunctiva is a key biomarker in evaluating ocular surface disease. The disease currently is assessed using relatively coarse subjective scales. Objective assessment would standardize comparisons over time and between clinicians. To develop a semiautomated, quantitative system to assess lissamine green staining of the bulbar conjunctiva on digital images. Using a standard photography protocol, 35 digital images of the conjunctiva of 11 patients with a diagnosis of dry eye disease based on characteristic signs and symptoms were obtained after topical administration of preservative-free LG, 1%, solution. Images were scored independently by 2 masked ophthalmologists in an academic medical center using the van Bijsterveld and National Eye Institute (NEI) scales. The region of interest was identified by manually marking 7 anatomic landmarks on the images. An objective measure was developed by segmenting the images, forming a vector of key attributes, and then performing a random forest regression. Subjective scores were correlated with the output from a computer algorithm using a cross-validation technique. The ranking of images from least to most staining was compared between the algorithm and the ophthalmologists. The study was conducted from April 26, 2012, through June 2, 2016. Correlation and level of agreement among computerized algorithm scores, van Bijsterveld scale clinical scores, and NEI scale clinical scores. The scores from the automated algorithm correlated well with the mean scores obtained from the gradings of 2 ophthalmologists for the 35 images using the van Bijsterveld scale (Spearman correlation coefficient, rs = 0.79), and moderately with the NEI scale (rs = 0.61) scores. For qualitative ranking of staining, the correlation between the automated algorithm and the 2 ophthalmologists was rs = 0.78 and rs = 0.83. The algorithm performed well when evaluating LG staining of the conjunctiva, as

  18. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  19. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Metagenomics at Grass Roots. Sudeshna ... benefit human health, agriculture, and ecosystemfunctions. This article provides a brief history of technicaladvances in metagenomics, including DNA sequencing methods,and some case studies.

  20. (Lamiaceae) root extracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal effects of 10 solvent extracts of Mentha spicata root. Methods: Ten solvent extracts were investigated for their total flavonoid and phenolic content and screened for larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal activities. The total phenolic ...

  1. Vegetable cells in Papanicolaou-stained cervical smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivasi, Francesco; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara; Curatola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Vegetable cells are unusual findings in Papanicolaou-stained cervical smears; these structures could be wrongly mistaken for abnormal human cells, worm eggs, or spores by a cytologist encountering the possibility of meeting those elements in cytological analysis. Five cervicovaginal smears showing similar vegetable cells have been detected over a 3-yr period (2002-2004) in the course of a population screening program for cancer of the uterine cervix in Modena (Italy) involving 32,500 women. According to the clinical histories of the patients, the vaginal pharmaceutical drugs or appliances used were of different types: vaginal lavages, pessaries, and vaginal creams. Following a careful investigation, the only substance that can lead to vegetal elements has been identified as polysaccharide galactomannan, which is one of the excipient present in the drugs used. The authors have identified the origin of these contaminants and the means of pollution, using cytological and pharmaceutical investigation.

  2. Homogeneously staining regions (HSR) in a human malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieux de Salum, S; Slavutsky, I; Besuschio, S; Pavlovsky, A A

    1984-01-01

    A case of nodular malignant melanoma (level V of Clark's classification) with homogeneously staining regions (HSR) on the long arm of one chromosome #2 is described. Ultrastructural observation of melanosomic and promelanosomic granules near Golgi's vesicles confirmed the histologic diagnosis. Chromosome analysis was performed on nine metaphases from a bone marrow sample and 76 metaphases from culture of the malignant skin tumor. G-banding revealed the presence of a clone with trisomy #8 and another cell line with the HSR marker. This is the first report of HSR in human melanoma cells. As HSR has been found only in malignant cells, we believe that among the many factors that influence the patients' clinical evolution and poor response to treatment, the genic imbalance is of the utmost importance.

  3. Age estimation of blood stains by hemoglobin derivative determination using reflectance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, Rolf H.; Nadort, Annemarie; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Blood stains can be crucial in reconstructing crime events. However, no reliable methods are currently available to establish the age of a blood stain on the crime scene. We show that determining the fractions of three hemoglobin derivatives in a blood stain at various ages enables relating these

  4. A Comparison of Heat versus Methanol Fixation for Gram Staining Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerath, Jeanne M.; Roland, Jenna M.; Rossi, Lucas C.; Weishalla, Steven R.; Wolf, Melissa M.

    2009-01-01

    Gram staining bacteria is a fundamental technique introduced in general biology and microbiology laboratory courses. Two common problems students encounter when Gram staining bacteria are (1) having a difficult time locating bacterial cells on the microscope slide and (2) over-decolorizing bacterial cells during the staining procedure such that…

  5. Combined beta-galactosidase and immunogold/silver staining for immunohistochemistry and DNA in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, W.; van der Loos, C.; Volkers, H.; Lauwen, R.; van den Berg, F.; Houthoff, H. J.; Das, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    A combination of beta-galactosidase enzyme and the immunogold/silver staining method was studied for evaluation of double-staining experiments. Applications are shown for immunohistochemical double staining using two monoclonal antibodies and for combined immunohistochemistry and DNA in situ

  6. Digital simulation of staining in histopathology multispectral images: enhancement and linear transformation of spectral transmittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-05-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is currently the most popular for routine histopathology staining. Special and/or immuno-histochemical (IHC) staining is often requested to further corroborate the initial diagnosis on H&E stained tissue sections. Digital simulation of staining (or digital staining) can be a very valuable tool to produce the desired stained images from the H&E stained tissue sections instantaneously. We present an approach to digital staining of histopathology multispectral images by combining the effects of spectral enhancement and spectral transformation. Spectral enhancement is accomplished by shifting the N-band original spectrum of the multispectral pixel with the weighted difference between the pixel's original and estimated spectrum; the spectrum is estimated using M transformed to the spectral configuration associated to its reaction to a specific stain by utilizing an N × N transformation matrix, which is derived through application of least mean squares method to the enhanced and target spectral transmittance samples of the different tissue components found in the image. Results of our experiments on the digital conversion of an H&E stained multispectral image to its Masson's trichrome stained equivalent show the viability of the method.

  7. 19 CFR 10.52 - Painted, colored or stained glass windows for religious institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Painted, colored or stained glass windows for.... General Provisions Works of Art § 10.52 Painted, colored or stained glass windows for religious institutions. When painted, colored, or stained glass windows or parts thereof, are claimed free of duty under...

  8. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L*a*b* system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab*) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested. PMID:23559921

  9. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  10. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  11. Evaluating Corneal Fluorescein Staining Using a Novel Automated Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, Francisco; Wang, Haobing; Yin, Jia; Marmalidou, Anna; Dana, Reza

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate interobserver concordance in measured corneal fluorescein staining (CFS) using the National Eye Institute/Industry (NEI) grading scale and the Corneal Fluorescein Staining Index (CFSi), a computer-assisted, objective, centesimal scoring system. We conducted a study to evaluate CFS in clinical photographs of patients with corneal epitheliopathy. One group of clinicians graded CFS in the images using the NEI while a second group applied the CFSi. We evaluated the level of interobserver agreement and differences among CFS scores with each method, level of correlation between the two methods, and distribution of cases based on the CFS severity assigned by each method. The level of interobserver agreement was 0.65 (P < 0.001) with the NEI, and 0.99 (P < 0.001) with the CFSi. There were statistically significant differences among clinicians' measurements obtained with the NEI (P < 0.001), but not with the CFSi (P = 0.78). There was a statistically significant correlation between the CFS scores obtained with the two methods (R = 0.72; P < 0.001). The NEI scale allocated the majority of cases (65%) within the higher quartile in the scale's severity (12-15/15). In contrast, the CFSi allocated the majority of cases (61%) within the lower quartile in the scale's severity (0-25/100). The CFSi is easy to implement, provides higher interobserver consistency, and due to its continuous score can discriminate smaller differences in CFS. Reproducibility of the computer-based system is higher and, interestingly, the system allocates cases of epitheliopathy in different severity categories than clinicians do. The CFSi can be an alternative for objective CFS evaluation in the clinic and in clinical trials.

  12. A mouse model of inflammatory root resorption induced by pulpal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balto, Khaled; White, Robert; Mueller, Ralph; Stashenko, Philip

    2002-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the frequency and extent of apical root resorption associated with induced periradicular lesions in mice. Bone and root resorption was quantified by using two- and three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (mu-CT) in the lower first molars of mice subjected to pulp exposure and infection. mu-CT measurements showed significant apical resorption in exposed and infected teeth, resulting in an average distal root shortening of 12.7% (P staining showed the presence of bacteria in dentinal tubules adjacent to resorbed cementum. Apical root resorption is a prominent and consistent finding associated with periradicular infection in the mouse. This species represents a convenient model for studying the pathogenesis of inflammatory root resorption in vivo.

  13. The use of special stains in liver biopsy interpretation: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... liver disease are mainly chronic hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma with varying proportions from hospital to hospital.[2] Alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are quite rarely reported in the studies.[2]. Liver biopsies are useful in diagnosing ...

  14. Roles of Woody Root-Associated Fungi in Forest Ecosystem Processes: Recent Advances in Fungal Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill A. Hoff; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Jonalea R. Tonn; Geral I. McDonald; Paul J. Zambino; Jack D. Rogers; Tobin L. Peever; Lori M. Carris

    2004-01-01

    Interactions between fungi and woody roots may be critical factors that influence diverse forest ecosystems processes, such as wood decay (nutrient recycling); root diseases and their biological control; and endophytic, epiphytic, and mycorrhizal symbioses. However, few studies have characterized the diversity and the spatial and temporal distribution of woody root-...

  15. [Application of Immunohistochemistry and Immunofluorescence Staining in Detection of Phospholipase A2 Receptor on Paraffin Section of Renal Biopsy Tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-rui; Wang, Yan-yan; Wang, Guo-qin; Sun, Li-jun; Cheng, Hong; Chen, Yi-pu

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the application of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence staining method in the detection of phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) on paraffin section of renal biopsy tissue,and to find an accurate and fast method for the detection of PLA2R in renal tissue. The PLA2R of 193 cases were detected by immunohistochemical staining,and the antigen was repaired by the method of high pressure cooker (HPC) hot repair plus trypsin repair. The 193 samples including 139 cases of idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN), 15 cases of membranous lupus nephritis, 8 cases of hepatitis B virus associated membranous nephropathy, 18 cases of IgA nephropathy, and 13 cases of minimal change diseases. To compare the dyeing effects, 22 paraffin sections of renal biopsy tissue of IMN cases with positive PLA2R were stained by using 4 different. of antigen repairing,which included HPC hot repair, HPC hot repair plus trypsin repair, water bath heat repair, and water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair. To compare the dyeing effects, 15 paraffin sections of renal biopsy tissue of IMN cases with positive PLA2R were stained by using 3 different. of antigen repairing,which included water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair, protease K digestion repair, and pepsin digestion repair. In 193 cases, the positive rate of PLA2R in IMN cases was 90.6% (126/139), and the other 54 patients without IMN were negative. Twenty-two IMN patients were positive for PLA2R by using the HPC heat repair plus trypsin repaire or the water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair;while only a few cases of 22 IMN cases were positive by using the HPC hot repair alone or water bath heat repair alone. Fifteen IMN patients were positive for PLA2R by using water bath heat repair plus trypsin repair,protease K digestion repair,and pepsin digestion repair, but the distribution of positive deposits and the background were different. PLA2R immunohistochemical staining can effectively identify IMN and secondary MN. For

  16. Cadmium induces hypodermal periderm formation in the roots of the monocotyledonous medicinal plant Merwilla plumbea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Alexander; Vaculík, Marek; Martinka, Michal; Lisková, Desana; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2011-02-01

    Merwilla plumbea is an important African medicinal plant. As the plants grow in soils contaminated with metals from mining activities, the danger of human intoxication exists. An experiment with plants exposed to cadmium (Cd) was performed to investigate the response of M. plumbea to this heavy metal, its uptake and translocation to plant organs and reaction of root tissues. Plants grown from seeds were cultivated in controlled conditions. Hydroponic cultivation is not suitable for this species as roots do not tolerate aquatic conditions, and additional stress by Cd treatment results in total root growth inhibition and death. After cultivation in perlite the plants exposed to 1 and 5 mg Cd L(-1) in half-strength Hoagland's solution were compared with control plants. Growth parameters were evaluated, Cd content was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and root structure was investigated using various staining procedures, including the fluorescent stain Fluorol yellow 088 to detect suberin deposition in cell walls. The plants exposed to Cd were significantly reduced in growth. Most of the Cd taken up by plants after 4 weeks cultivation was retained in roots, and only a small amount was translocated to bulbs and leaves. In reaction to higher Cd concentrations, roots developed a hypodermal periderm close to the root tip. Cells produced by cork cambium impregnate their cell walls by suberin. It is suggested that the hypodermal periderm is developed in young root parts in reaction to Cd toxicity to protect the root from radial uptake of Cd ions. Secondary meristems are usually not present in monocotyledonous species. Another interpretation explaining formation of protective suberized layers as a result of periclinal divisions of the hypodermis is discussed. This process may represent an as yet unknown defence reaction of roots when exposed to elemental stress.

  17. Methyl green-pyronin Y staining of nucleic acids: studies on the effects of staining time, dye composition and diffusion rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, P; Lyon, H O

    2003-01-01

    of hypotheses have been put forward concerning kinetics and binding mechanisms. Using both filter paper models containing DNA, RNA or heparin and histological sections, we have attempted to evaluate the kinetics of staining and the role of staining time for methyl green and pyronin Y by applying the dyes...

  18. Linking fungal communities in roots, rhizosphere, and soil to the health status of Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Lihui; Ravnskov, Sabine; Larsen, John

    2012-01-01

    in richness were observed between samples associated with diseased and healthy roots. Health status and field both had significant effects on fungal community structures in roots, whereas only field had significant effects on communities in rhizosphere and bulk soils. Indicator species analysis across......Changes in fungal communities associated with healthy and diseased pea roots were investigated using deep amplicon pyrosequencing in three spatial compartments: roots, rhizosphere, and surrounding soil. Thirty root systems were collected from three fields, half of which showing clear symptoms...... of root rot. In total, 500 461 internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences were obtained that were clustered into 123 (roots), 271 (rhizosphere), and 440 (bulk soil) nonsingleton operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Species richness was highest in bulk soils and lowest in roots; however, no notable differences...

  19. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  20. Recognition of Pneumocystis carinii by gram stain in impression smears of lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felegie, T P; Pasculle, A W; Dekker, A

    1984-01-01

    In 12 of 20 (60%) biopsy-proven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the diagnosis was first suggested by examination of routine Gram stains of impression smears made from infected lung tissue and later confirmed by methenamine-silver staining. The cysts appeared as 5- to 7-microns unstained spheres, each containing six to eight intracystic gram-negative bodies (sporozoites). Although the Gram stain does not appear to be as sensitive as more traditional staining techniques for the detection of P. carinii, clinical microbiologists should be aware of the morphology of this organism in gram-stained specimens because this relatively simple procedure gives quick results. Images PMID:6084017