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Sample records for stagonospora nodorum-wheat pathosystem

  1. Dissection of effector-induced host susceptibility pathways in Stagonospora nodorum blotch of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The necrotrophic Stagonospora nodorum-wheat interaction is characterized by several pathogen-derived proteinaceous host-selective toxins (SnToxA, SnTox1, SnTox2, SnTox3 and SnTox4) that induce diseases in the host carrying a corresponding dominant susceptibility gene (Tsn1, Snn1, Snn2, Snn3 and Snn4...

  2. SnTox5-Snn5: A novel Stagonospora nodorum effector-wheat gene interaction and its relationship with the SnToxA-Tsn1 and SnTox3-Snn3-B1 interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Stagonospora nodorum-wheat interaction consists of multiple pathogen - produced necrotrophic effectors that interact directly or indirectly with specific host gene products to induce the disease Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB). Here, we used a tetraploid wheat mapping population to identify an...

  3. Genetic Analysis of Disease Susceptibility Caused by Compatible Tsn1-SnToxA and Snn1-SnTox1 Interactions in the Wheat-Stagonospora Nodorum Pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagonospora nodorum is a foliar pathogen of wheat that produces several host-selective toxins (HSTs) and causes the disease Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB). The wheat genes Snn1 and Tsn1 confer sensitivity to the HSTs SnTox1 and SnToxA, respectively. The objectives of this study were to dissect, ...

  4. Development,Identification and Validation of Markers for Mmarker-Assisted Selection Against the Stagonospora nodorum Toxin Ssensitivity Genes Tsn1 and Snn2 in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat-Stagonospora nodorum pathosystem involves a number of pathogen-produced host-selective toxins that interact with host genes in an inverse gene-for-gene manner to cause disease. The wheat intervarietal recombinant inbred population derived from BR34 and Grandin (BG population) segregates f...

  5. Predicting pre-planting risk of Stagonospora nodorum blotch in winter wheat using machine learning models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pre-planting factors have been associated with the late-season severity of Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), caused by the fungal pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum, in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum). The relative importance of these factors in the risk of SNB has not been determined and this know...

  6. Characterising the role of GABA and its metabolism in the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum.

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    Oliver Mead

    Full Text Available A reverse genetics approach was used to investigate the role of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism in the wheat pathogenic fungus Stagonospora nodorum. The creation of mutants lacking Sdh1, the gene encoding succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, resulted in strains that grew poorly on γ-aminobutyric acid as a nitrogen source. The sdh1 mutants were more susceptible to reactive oxygen stress but were less affected by increased growth temperatures. Pathogenicity assays revealed that the metabolism of γ-aminobutyric acid is required for complete pathogenicity. Growth assays of the wild-type and mutant strains showed that the inclusion of γ-aminobutyric acid as a supplement in minimal media (i.e., not as a nitrogen or carbon source resulted in restricted growth but increased sporulation. The addition of glutamate, the precursor to GABA, had no effect on either growth or sporulation. The γ-aminobutyric acid effect on sporulation was found to be dose dependent and not restricted to Stagonospora nodorum with a similar effect observed in the dothideomycete Botryosphaeria sp. The positive effect on sporulation was assayed using isomers of γ-aminobutyric acid and other metabolites known to influence asexual development in Stagonospora nodorum but no effect was observed. These data demonstrate that γ-aminobutyric acid plays an important role in Stagonospora nodorum in responding to environmental stresses while also having a positive effect on asexual development.

  7. The cysteine rich necrotrophic effector SnTox1 produced by Stagonospora nodorum triggers susceptibility of wheat lines harboring Snn1.

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    Zhaohui Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple necrotrophic effectors (also called host-selective toxins that promote disease by interacting with corresponding host sensitivity gene products. SnTox1 was the first necrotrophic effector identified in S. nodorum, and was shown to induce necrosis on wheat lines carrying Snn1. Here, we report the molecular cloning and validation of SnTox1 as well as the preliminary characterization of the mechanism underlying the SnTox1-Snn1 interaction which leads to susceptibility. SnTox1 was identified using bioinformatics tools and verified by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. SnTox1 encodes a 117 amino acid protein with the first 17 amino acids predicted as a signal peptide, and strikingly, the mature protein contains 16 cysteine residues, a common feature for some avirulence effectors. The transformation of SnTox1 into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate was sufficient to make the strain pathogenic. Additionally, the deletion of SnTox1 in virulent isolates rendered the SnTox1 mutated strains avirulent on the Snn1 differential wheat line. SnTox1 was present in 85% of a global collection of S. nodorum isolates. We identified a total of 11 protein isoforms and found evidence for strong diversifying selection operating on SnTox1. The SnTox1-Snn1 interaction results in an oxidative burst, DNA laddering, and pathogenesis related (PR gene expression, all hallmarks of a defense response. In the absence of light, the development of SnTox1-induced necrosis and disease symptoms were completely blocked. By comparing the infection processes of a GFP-tagged avirulent isolate and the same isolate transformed with SnTox1, we conclude that SnTox1 may play a critical role during fungal penetration. This research further demonstrates that necrotrophic fungal pathogens utilize small effector proteins to exploit plant resistance pathways for their colonization, which provides important insights into the molecular

  8. Dothideomycete-plant interactions illuminated by genome sequencing and EST analysis of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hane, J.K.; Lowe, R.G.T.; Solomon, P.S.; Tan, K.C.; Schoch, C.L.; Spatafora, J.W.; Crous, P.W.; Kodira, C.; Birren, B.W.; Galagan, J.E.; Torriani, S.F.F.; McDonald, B.A.; Oliver, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Stagonospora nodorum is a major necrotrophic fungal pathogen of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and a member of the Dothideomycetes, a large fungal taxon that includes many important plant pathogens affecting all major crop plant families. Here, we report the acquisition and initial analysis of a draft

  9. Predicting Pre-planting Risk of Stagonospora nodorum blotch in Winter Wheat Using Machine Learning Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Lucky K; Cowger, Christina; Gross, Kevin; Ojiambo, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Pre-planting factors have been associated with the late-season severity of Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), caused by the fungal pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum, in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum). The relative importance of these factors in the risk of SNB has not been determined and this knowledge can facilitate disease management decisions prior to planting of the wheat crop. In this study, we examined the performance of multiple regression (MR) and three machine learning algorithms namely artificial neural networks, categorical and regression trees, and random forests (RF), in predicting the pre-planting risk of SNB in wheat. Pre-planting factors tested as potential predictor variables were cultivar resistance, latitude, longitude, previous crop, seeding rate, seed treatment, tillage type, and wheat residue. Disease severity assessed at the end of the growing season was used as the response variable. The models were developed using 431 disease cases (unique combinations of predictors) collected from 2012 to 2014 and these cases were randomly divided into training, validation, and test datasets. Models were evaluated based on the regression of observed against predicted severity values of SNB, sensitivity-specificity ROC analysis, and the Kappa statistic. A strong relationship was observed between late-season severity of SNB and specific pre-planting factors in which latitude, longitude, wheat residue, and cultivar resistance were the most important predictors. The MR model explained 33% of variability in the data, while machine learning models explained 47 to 79% of the total variability. Similarly, the MR model correctly classified 74% of the disease cases, while machine learning models correctly classified 81 to 83% of these cases. Results show that the RF algorithm, which explained 79% of the variability within the data, was the most accurate in predicting the risk of SNB, with an accuracy rate of 93%. The RF algorithm could allow early assessment of

  10. Re-Evaluation of a Tetraploid Wheat Population Indicates That the Tsn1-ToxA Interaction is the Only Factor Governing Stagonospora Nodorum Blotch Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat Tsn1 gene on chromosome 5B confers sensitivity to the host-selective toxin ToxA produced by the pathogens that cause tan spot and Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB). A compatible Tsn1-ToxA interaction is known to play a major role in conferring susceptibility of hexaploid (common) wheat to...

  11. The citrus leprosis pathosystem O patossistema leprose dos citros

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    Marinês Bastianel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis is considered the main viral disease for the Brazilian citrus production, particularly for the State of São Paulo, due to the high costs spent for the chemical control of its vector, the tenuipalpid mite Brevipalpus phoenicis. In addition, its global importance has significantly increased in the last years, with the dissemination of the virus to new countries in South and Central America. In Brazil, despite its economical importance and occurrence for more than seven decades, the most significant advances towards understanding the pathosystem interactions have been obtained only in the last ten years. This review focuses on various aspects of the disease, beginning with a historical view, its main characteristics, alternatives for its control, its increasing economical importance in Brazil and abroad, and the new data on the search for understanding the interactions amongst the mite vector, the virus, and the plant host.A leprose dos citros é considerada a principal virose na citricultura brasileira, com maior destaque no Estado de São Paulo, principalmente pelos altos custos demandados para o controle químico do vetor, o ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis. Além da relevância dessa virose para a citricultura local, sua importância mundial vem sendo ampliada consideravelmente nos últimos anos, principalmente com a disseminação do vírus em novos países da América do Sul e Central. No Brasil, apesar da sua importância econômica e ocorrência por mais de sete décadas, os mais importantes avanços no entendimento das interações do patossistema leprose têm sido obtidos apenas nos últimos dez anos. Essa revisão aborda os diferentes aspectos dessa doença, trazendo um breve histórico da doença, principais características da leprose, alternativas de controle, sua crescente importância econômica na cadeia citrícola nacional, os mais recentes relatos de sua ocorrência em outros países e os novos resultados obtidos

  12. Current and future molecular approaches to investigate the white pine blister rust pathosystem

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    B. A. Richardson; A. K. M. Ekramoddoulah; J.-J. Liu; M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetics is proving to be especially useful for addressing a wide variety of research and management questions on the white pine blister rust pathosystem. White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola, is an ideal model for studying biogeography, genetics, and evolution because: (1) it involves an introduced pathogen; (2) it includes multiple primary...

  13. Suppressiveness of 18 composts against 7 pathosystems: Variability in pathogen response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen, A.J.; Rijn, van E.; Gaag, van der D.J.; Alabouvette, C.; Chen, Y.; Lagerlöf, J.; Malandrakis, A.A.; Paplomatas, E.J.; Rämert, B.; Ryckeboer, J.; Steinberg, C.; Zmora-Nahum, S.

    2006-01-01

    Compost is often reported as a substrate that is able to suppress soilborne plant pathogens, but suppression varies according to the type of compost and pathosystem. Reports often deal with a single pathogen while in reality crops are attacked by multiple plant pathogens. The goal of the present

  14. Determining the order of resistance genes against Stagonospora nodorum blotch, Fusarium head blight and stem rust on wheat chromosome arm 3BS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Rima; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Ohm, Herbert W; Mateos-Hernandez, Maria; Wise, Kiersten A; Goodwin, Stephen B

    2016-02-02

    Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), Fusarium head blight (FHB) and stem rust (SR), caused by the fungi Parastagonospora (synonym Stagonospora) nodorum, Fusarium graminearum and Puccinia graminis, respectively, significantly reduce yield and quality of wheat. Three resistance factors, QSng.sfr-3BS, Fhb1 and Sr2, conferring resistance, respectively, to SNB, FHB and SR, each from a unique donor line, were mapped previously to the short arm of wheat chromosome 3B. Based on published reports, our hypothesis was that Sr2 is the most distal, Fhb1 the most proximal and QSng.sfr-3BS is in between Sr2 and Fhb1 on wheat chromosome arm 3BS. To test this hypothesis, 1600 F2 plants from crosses between parental lines Arina, Alsen and Ocoroni86, conferring resistance genes QSng.sfr-3BS, Fhb1 and Sr2, respectively, were genotyped and phenotyped for SNB along with the parental lines. Five closely linked single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used to make the genetic map and determine the gene order. The results indicate that QSng.sfr-3BS is located between the other two resistance genes on chromosome 3BS. Knowing the positional order of these resistance genes will aid in developing a wheat line with all three genes in coupling, which has the potential to provide broad-spectrum resistance preventing grain yield and quality losses.

  15. Genetics of Resistance and Pathogenicity in the Maize/Setosphaeria turcica Pathosystem and Implications for Breeding

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    Ana L. Galiano-Carneiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB, the most devastating leaf pathogen in maize (Zea mays L., is caused by the heterothallic ascomycete Setosphaeria turcica. The pathogen population shows an extremely high genetic diversity in tropical and subtropical regions. Varietal resistance is the most efficient technique to control NCLB. Host resistance can be qualitative based on race-specific Ht genes or quantitative controlled by many genes with small effects. Quantitative resistance is moderately to highly effective and should be more durable combatting all races of the pathogen. Quantitative resistance must, however, be analyzed in many environments (= location × year combinations to select stable resistances. In the tropical and subtropical environments, quantitative resistance is the preferred option to manage NCLB epidemics. Resistance level can be increased in practical breeding programs by several recurrent selection cycles based on disease severity rating and/or by genomic selection. This review aims to address two important aspects of the NCLB pathosystem: the genetics of the fungus S. turcica and the modes of inheritance of the host plant maize, including successful breeding strategies regarding NCLB resistance. Both drivers of this pathosystem, pathogen, and host, must be taken into account to result in more durable resistance.

  16. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora : a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, K.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for

  17. Co-evolutionary interactions between host resistance and pathogen avirulence genes in rice-Magnaporthe oryzae pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Ray, Soham; Thakur, Shallu; Rathour, Rajeev; Sharma, Vinay; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2018-04-06

    Rice and Magnaporthe oryzae constitutes an ideal pathosystem for studying host-pathogen interaction in cereals crops. There are two alternative hypotheses, viz. Arms race and Trench warfare, which explain the co-evolutionary dynamics of hosts and pathogens which are under continuous confrontation. Arms race proposes that both R- and Avr- genes of host and pathogen, respectively, undergo positive selection. Alternatively, trench warfare suggests that either R- or Avr- gene in the pathosystem is under balanced selection intending to stabilize the genetic advantage gained over the opposition. Here, we made an attempt to test the above-stated hypotheses in rice-M. oryzae pathosystem at loci of three R-Avr gene pairs, Piz-t-AvrPiz-t, Pi54-AvrPi54 and Pita-AvrPita using allele mining approach. Allele mining is an efficient way to capture allelic variants existing in the population and to study the selective forces imposed on the variants during evolution. Results of nucleotide diversity, neutrality statistics and phylogenetic analyses reveal that Piz-t, Pi54 and AvrPita are diversified and under positive selection at their corresponding loci, while their counterparts, AvrPiz-t, AvrPi54 and Pita are conserved and under balancing selection, in nature. These results imply that rice-M. oryzae populations are engaged in a trench warfare at least at the three R/Avr loci studied. It is a maiden attempt to study the co-evolution of three R-Avr gene pairs in this pathosystem. Knowledge gained from this study will help in understanding the evolutionary dynamics of host-pathogen interaction in a better way and will also aid in developing new durable blast resistant rice varieties in future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of Metabolic Changes in Plant Pathosystems by Imprint Imaging DESI-MS

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    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J.; Hamid, Tanam S.; Bayfield, Mark A.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2015-04-01

    The response of plants to microbial pathogens is based on the production of secondary metabolites. The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their understanding a challenging task for metabolomic studies requiring powerful analytical approaches. In this paper, the ability of ambient mass spectrometry to provide a snapshot of plant metabolic response to pathogen invasion was tested. The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). After 8 d from the inoculation, a decrease of the relative abundance of potato glycoalkaloids α-solanine ( m/z 706) and α-chaconine ( m/z 722) was observed, whereas the relative intensity of solanidine ( m/z 398), solasodenone ( m/z 412), solanaviol ( m/z 430), solasodiene ( m/z 396), solaspiralidine ( m/z 428), γ-solanine/γ-chaconine ( m/z 560) , β-solanine ( m/z 706), and β-chaconine ( m/z 722) increased. The progression of the disease, expressed by the development of brown necrotic lesions on the potato, led to the further decrease of all the glycoalkaloid metabolites. Therefore, the applicability of imprint imaging DESI-MS in studying the plant metabolic changes in a simple pathosystem was demonstrated with minimal sample preparation.

  19. Laurel Wilt in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems: Understanding the Drivers and Scales of Complex Pathosystems

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    Randy C. Ploetz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laurel wilt kills members of the Lauraceae plant family in the southeastern United States. It is caused by Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harr., Fraedrich and Aghayeva, a nutritional fungal symbiont of an invasive Asian ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, which was detected in Port Wentworth, Georgia, in 2002. The beetle is the primary vector of R. lauricola in forests along the southeastern coastal plain of the United States, but other ambrosia beetle species that obtained the pathogen after the initial introduction may play a role in the avocado (Persea americana Miller pathosystem. Susceptible taxa are naïve (new-encounter hosts that originated outside Asia. In the southeastern United States, over 300 million trees of redbay (P. borbonia (L. Spreng. have been lost, and other North American endemics, non-Asian ornamentals and avocado—an important crop that originated in MesoAmerica—are also affected. However, there are no reports of laurel wilt on the significant number of lauraceous endemics that occur in the Asian homeland of R. lauricola and X. glabratus; coevolved resistance to the disease in the region has been hypothesized. The rapid spread of laurel wilt in the United States is due to an efficient vector, X. glabratus, and the movement of wood infested with the insect and pathogen. These factors, the absence of fully resistant genotypes, and the paucity of effective control measures severely constrain the disease’s management in forest ecosystems and avocado production areas.

  20. RNA-Seq analysis of the Sclerotinia homoeocarpa--creeping bentgrass pathosystem.

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    Angela M Orshinsky

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia homoeocarpa causes dollar spot disease, the predominate disease on highly-maintained turfgrass. Currently, there are major gaps in our understanding of the molecular interactions between S. homoeocarpa and creeping bentgrass. In this study, 454 sequencing technology was used in the de novo assembly of S. homoeocarpa and creeping bentgrass transcriptomes. Transcript sequence data obtained using Illumina's first generation sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS were mapped to the transcriptome assemblies to estimate transcript representation in different SBS libraries. SBS libraries included a S. homoeocarpa culture control, a creeping bentgrass uninoculated control, and a library for creeping bentgrass inoculated with S. homoeocarpa and incubated for 96 h. A Fisher's exact test was performed to determine transcripts that were significantly different during creeping bentgrass infection with S. homoeocarpa. Fungal transcripts of interest included glycosyl hydrolases, proteases, and ABC transporters. Of particular interest were the large number of glycosyl hydrolase transcripts that target a wide range of plant cell wall compounds, corroborating the suggested wide host range and saprophytic abilities of S. homoeocarpa. Several of the multidrug resistance ABC transporters may be important for resistance to both fungicides and plant defense compounds. Creeping bentgrass transcripts of interest included germins, ubiquitin transcripts involved in proteasome degradation, and cinnamoyl reductase, which is involved in lignin production. This analysis provides an extensive overview of the S. homoeocarpa-turfgrass pathosystem and provides a starting point for the characterization of potential virulence factors and host defense responses. In particular, determination of important host defense responses may assist in the development of highly resistant creeping bentgrass varieties.

  1. Characterization of a Francisella tularensis-Caenorhabditis elegans Pathosystem for the Evaluation of Therapeutic Compounds.

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    Jayamani, Elamparithi; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Coleman, Jeffrey J; Kim, Wooseong; Okoli, Ikechukwu; Hernandez, Ana M; Lee, Kiho; Nau, Gerard J; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-09-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia. Because of its potential as a bioterrorism agent, there is a need for new therapeutic agents. We therefore developed a whole-animal Caenorhabditis elegans - F. tularensis pathosystem for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize potential therapeutic compounds. We found that the C. elegans p38 mitogen-activate protein (MAP) kinase cascade is involved in the immune response to F. tularensis , and we developed a robust F. tularensis -mediated C. elegans killing assay with a Z' factor consistently of >0.5, which was then utilized to screen a library of FDA-approved compounds that included 1,760 small molecules. In addition to clinically used antibiotics, five FDA-approved drugs were also identified as potential hits, including the anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal that showed anti- F. tularensis activity in vitro Moreover, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diflunisal, at 4× MIC, blocked the replication of an F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) in primary human macrophages and nonphagocytic cells. Diflunisal was nontoxic to human erythrocytes and HepG2 human liver cells at concentrations of ≥32 μg/ml. Finally, diflunisal exhibited synergetic activity with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin in both a checkerboard assay and a macrophage infection assay. In conclusion, the liquid C. elegans - F. tularensis LVS assay described here allows screening for anti- F. tularensis compounds and suggests that diflunisal could potentially be repurposed for the management of tularemia. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. A novel Arabidopsis-oomycete pathosystem; differential interactions with Phytophthora capsici reveal a role for camalexin, indole glucosinolates and salicylic acid in defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Bouwmeester, K.; Mortel, van de J.E.; Shan, W.; Govers, F.

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes devastating diseases on a broad range of plant species. To better understand the interaction with its host plants, knowledge obtained from a model pathosystem can be instrumental. Here, we describe the interaction between P.¿capsici and Arabidopsis and the exploitation of

  4. Reference Gene Selection for qPCR Analysis in Tomato-Bipartite Begomovirus Interaction and Validation in Additional Tomato-Virus Pathosystems.

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    Ana L M Lacerda

    Full Text Available Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR is currently the most sensitive technique used for absolute and relative quantification of a target gene transcript, requiring the use of appropriated reference genes for data normalization. To accurately estimate the relative expression of target tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. genes responsive to several virus species in reverse transcription qPCR analysis, the identification of reliable reference genes is mandatory. In the present study, ten reference genes were analyzed across a set of eight samples: two tomato contrasting genotypes ('Santa Clara', susceptible, and its near-isogenic line 'LAM 157', resistant; subjected to two treatments (inoculation with Tomato chlorotic mottle virus (ToCMoV and its mock-inoculated control and in two distinct times after inoculation (early and late. Reference genes stability was estimated by three statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. To validate the results over broader experimental conditions, a set of ten samples, corresponding to additional three tomato-virus pathosystems that included tospovirus, crinivirus and tymovirus + tobamovirus, was analyzed together with the tomato-ToCMoV pathosystem dataset, using the same algorithms. Taking into account the combined analyses of the ranking order outputs from the three algorithms, TIP41 and EF1 were identified as the most stable genes for tomato-ToCMoV pathosystem, and TIP41 and EXP for the four pathosystems together, and selected to be used as reference in the forthcoming expression qPCR analysis of target genes in experimental conditions involving the aforementioned tomato-virus pathosystems.

  5. Standard Area Diagrams for Aiding Severity Estimation: Scientometrics, Pathosystems, and Methodological Trends in the Last 25 Years.

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    Del Ponte, Emerson M; Pethybridge, Sarah J; Bock, Clive H; Michereff, Sami J; Machado, Franklin J; Spolti, Piérri

    2017-10-01

    Standard area diagrams (SAD) have long been used as a tool to aid the estimation of plant disease severity, an essential variable in phytopathometry. Formal validation of SAD was not considered prior to the early 1990s, when considerable effort began to be invested developing SAD and assessing their value for improving accuracy of estimates of disease severity in many pathosystems. Peer-reviewed literature post-1990 was identified, selected, and cataloged in bibliographic software for further scrutiny and extraction of scientometric, pathosystem-related, and methodological-related data. In total, 105 studies (127 SAD) were found and authored by 327 researchers from 10 countries, mainly from Brazil. The six most prolific authors published at least seven studies. The scientific impact of a SAD article, based on annual citations after publication year, was affected by disease significance, the journal's impact factor, and methodological innovation. The reviewed SAD encompassed 48 crops and 103 unique diseases across a range of plant organs. Severity was quantified largely by image analysis software such as QUANT, APS-Assess, or a LI-COR leaf area meter. The most typical SAD comprised five to eight black-and-white drawings of leaf diagrams, with severity increasing nonlinearly. However, there was a trend toward using true-color photographs or stylized representations in a range of color combinations and more linear (equally spaced) increments of severity. A two-step SAD validation approach was used in 78 of 105 studies for which linear regression was the preferred method but a trend toward using Lin's correlation concordance analysis and hypothesis tests to detect the effect of SAD on accuracy was apparent. Reliability measures, when obtained, mainly considered variation among rather than within raters. The implications of the findings and knowledge gaps are discussed. A list of best practices for designing and implementing SAD and a website called SADBank for hosting

  6. A novel Arabidopsis-oomycete pathosystem: differential interactions with Phytophthora capsici reveal a role for camalexin, indole glucosinolates and salicylic acid in defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Bouwmeester, Klaas; van de Mortel, Judith E; Shan, Weixing; Govers, Francine

    2013-06-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes devastating diseases on a broad range of plant species. To better understand the interaction with its host plants, knowledge obtained from a model pathosystem can be instrumental. Here, we describe the interaction between P. capsici and Arabidopsis and the exploitation of this novel pathosystem to assign metabolic pathways involved in defence against P. capsici. Inoculation assays on Arabidopsis accessions with different P. capsici isolates revealed interaction specificity among accession-isolate combinations. In a compatible interaction, appressorium-mediated penetration was followed by the formation of invasive hyphae, haustoria and sporangia in leaves and roots. In contrast, in an incompatible interaction, P. capsici infection elicited callose deposition, accumulation of active oxygen species and cell death, resulting in early pathogen encasement in leaves. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants with defects in salicylic acid signalling, camalexin or indole glucosinolates biosynthesis pathways displayed severely compromised resistance to P. capsici. It is anticipated that this model pathosystem will facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits responsible for resistance against P. capsici. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of the Brassica napus-Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem identifies receptor, signaling and structural genes underlying plant resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael G; Zhang, Xuehua; Walker, Philip L; Wan, Joey C; Millar, Jenna L; Khan, Deirdre; Granger, Matthew J; Cavers, Jacob D; Chan, Ainsley C; Fernando, Dilantha W G; Belmonte, Mark F

    2017-05-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica napus (canola, oilseed rape) and causes significant loss of yield worldwide. While genetic resistance has been used to mitigate the disease by means of traditional breeding strategies, there is little knowledge about the genes that contribute to blackleg resistance. RNA sequencing and a streamlined bioinformatics pipeline identified unique genes and plant defense pathways specific to plant resistance in the B. napus-L. maculans LepR1-AvrLepR1 interaction over time. We complemented our temporal analyses by monitoring gene activity directly at the infection site using laser microdissection coupled to quantitative PCR. Finally, we characterized genes involved in plant resistance to blackleg in the Arabidopsis-L. maculans model pathosystem. Data reveal an accelerated activation of the plant transcriptome in resistant host cotyledons associated with transcripts coding for extracellular receptors and phytohormone signaling molecules. Functional characterization provides direct support for transcriptome data and positively identifies resistance regulators in the Brassicaceae. Spatial gradients of gene activity were identified in response to L. maculans proximal to the site of infection. This dataset provides unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the genes required for blackleg resistance and serves as a valuable resource for those interested in host-pathogen interactions. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Linnakoski

    2017-05-01

    to a limited body of empirical research on the effects of projected climate changes on forestry pathosystems, and is the first to investigate interactions between Norway spruce and E. polonica. The results indicate the potential for future climate changes to alter the impact of forest pathogens with implications for productivity, while highlighting the need for a strain-specific level of understanding of the disease agents.

  9. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnakoski, Riikka; Forbes, Kristian M; Wingfield, Michael J; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2017-01-01

    limited body of empirical research on the effects of projected climate changes on forestry pathosystems, and is the first to investigate interactions between Norway spruce and E. polonica . The results indicate the potential for future climate changes to alter the impact of forest pathogens with implications for productivity, while highlighting the need for a strain-specific level of understanding of the disease agents.

  10. Plastic Transcriptomes Stabilize Immunity to Pathogen Diversity: The Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Networks within the Arabidopsis/Botrytis Pathosystem[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Robert; Chen, Fang; Atwell, Susana

    2017-01-01

    To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two, which may play an important role in defense responses to specific pathogens or even genotypes. Here, we used the Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea pathosystem to test how the host’s defense system functions against genetic variation in a pathogen. We measured defense-related phenotypes and transcriptomic responses in Arabidopsis wild-type Col-0 and JA- and SA-signaling mutants, coi1-1 and npr1-1, individually challenged with 96 diverse B. cinerea isolates. Those data showed genetic variation in the pathogen influences on all components within the plant defense system at the transcriptional level. We identified four gene coexpression networks and two vectors of defense variation triggered by genetic variation in B. cinerea. This showed that the JA and SA signaling pathways functioned to constrain/canalize the range of virulence in the pathogen population, but the underlying transcriptomic response was highly plastic. These data showed that plants utilize major defense hormone pathways to buffer disease resistance, but not the metabolic or transcriptional responses to genetic variation within a pathogen. PMID:29042403

  11. SnTox3 acts in effector triggered susceptibility to induce disease on wheat carrying the Snn3 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The necrotrophic fungus Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple proteinaceous host-selective toxins (HSTs which act in effector triggered susceptibility. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of the SnTox3-encoding gene, designated SnTox3, as well as the initial characterization of the SnTox3 protein. SnTox3 is a 693 bp intron-free gene with little obvious homology to other known genes. The predicted immature SnTox3 protein is 25.8 kDa in size. A 20 amino acid signal sequence as well as a possible pro sequence are predicted. Six cysteine residues are predicted to form disulfide bonds and are shown to be important for SnTox3 activity. Using heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris and transformation into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate, we show that SnTox3 encodes the SnTox3 protein and that SnTox3 interacts with the wheat susceptibility gene Snn3. In addition, the avirulent S. nodorum isolate transformed with SnTox3 was virulent on host lines expressing the Snn3 gene. SnTox3-disrupted mutants were deficient in the production of SnTox3 and avirulent on the Snn3 differential wheat line BG220. An analysis of genetic diversity revealed that SnTox3 is present in 60.1% of a worldwide collection of 923 isolates and occurs as eleven nucleotide haplotypes resulting in four amino acid haplotypes. The cloning of SnTox3 provides a fundamental tool for the investigation of the S. nodorum-wheat interaction, as well as vital information for the general characterization of necrotroph-plant interactions.

  12. Secrets of the subterranean pathosystem of Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Coetzee, Martin P A; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    Armillaria root disease affects fruit and nut crops, timber trees and ornamentals in boreal, temperate and tropical regions of the world. The causal pathogens are members of the genus Armillaria (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae). This review summarizes the state of knowledge and highlights recent advances in Armillaria research. Armillaria includes more than 40 morphological species. However, the identification and delineation of species on the basis of morphological characters are problematic, resulting in many species being undetected. Implementation of the biological species' concept and DNA sequence comparisons in the contemporary taxonomy of Armillaria have led to the discovery of a number of new species that are not linked to described morphological species. Armillaria exhibits a range of symbioses with both plants and fungi. As plant pathogens, Armillaria species have broad host ranges, infecting mostly woody species. Armillaria can also colonize orchids Galeola and Gastrodia but, in this case, the fungus is the host and the plant is the parasite. Similar to its contrasting relationships with plants, Armillaria acts as either host or parasite in its interactions with other fungi. Disease control: Recent research on post-infection controls has revealed promising alternatives to the former pre-plant eradication attempts with soil fumigants, which are now being regulated more heavily or banned outright because of their negative effects on the environment. New study tools for genetic manipulation of the pathogen and characterization of the molecular basis of the host response will greatly advance the development of resistant rootstocks in a new stage of research. The depth of the research, regardless of whether traditional or genomic approaches are used, will depend on a clear understanding of where the different propagules of Armillaria attack a root system, which of the pathogen's diverse biolymer-degrading enzymes and secondary metabolites facilitate infection, and how the course of infection differs between resistant and susceptible hosts. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No Claim to Original US Government Works.

  13. Transcriptome Profiling of the Phaseolus vulgaris - Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padder, Bilal A; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Awale, Halima E; Kelly, James D

    2016-01-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) anthracnose caused by the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a major factor limiting production worldwide. Although sources of resistance have been identified and characterized, the early molecular events in the host-pathogen interface have not been investigated. In the current study, we conducted a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using Illumina sequencing of two near isogenic lines (NILs) differing for the presence of the Co-1 gene on chromosome Pv01 during a time course following infection with race 73 of C. lindemuthianum. From this, we identified 3,250 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) within and between the NILs over the time course of infection. During the biotrophic phase the majority of DEGs were up regulated in the susceptible NIL, whereas more DEGs were up-regulated in the resistant NIL during the necrotrophic phase. Various defense related genes, such as those encoding PR proteins, peroxidases, lipoxygenases were up regulated in the resistant NIL. Conversely, genes encoding sugar transporters were up-regulated in the susceptible NIL during the later stages of infection. Additionally, numerous transcription factors (TFs) and candidate genes within the vicinity of the Co-1 locus were differentially expressed, suggesting a global reprogramming of gene expression in and around the Co-1 locus. Through this analysis, we reduced the previous number of candidate genes reported at the Co-1 locus from eight to three. These results suggest the dynamic nature of P. vulgaris-C. lindemuthianum interaction at the transcriptomic level and reflect the role of both pathogen and effector triggered immunity on changes in plant gene expression.

  14. New resistance genes in the Zea mays: exserohilum turcicum pathosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bernardi Ogliari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of monogenic race-specific resistance is widespread for the control of maize (Zea mays L. helminthosporiosis caused by Exserohilum turcicum. Inoculation of 18 Brazilian isolates of E. turcicum onto elite maize lines containing previously identified resistance genes and onto differential near-isogenic lines allowed the identification of new qualitative resistance genes. The inoculation of one selected isolate on differential near-isogenic lines, F1 generations and a BC1F1 population from the referred elite lines enabled the characterization of the resistance spectrum of three new genes, one dominant (HtP, one recessive (rt and a third with non-identified genetic action. Three physiological races of the pathogen were also identified including two with new virulence factors capable of overcoming the resistance of one of the resistance genes identified here (rt.

  15. Establishment of compatibility in the Ustilago maydis/maize pathosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doehlemann, Gunther; Wahl, Ramon; Vranes, Miroslav; de Vries, Ronald P; Kämper, Jörg; Kahmann, Regine

    The fungus Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic pathogen parasitizing on maize. The most prominent symptoms of the disease are large tumors in which fungal proliferation and spore differentiation occur. In this study, we have analyzed early and late tumor stages by confocal microscopy. We show that

  16. The Venturia Apple Pathosystem: Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Plant Defense Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopaljee Jha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venturia inaequalis is the causal agent of apple scab, a devastating disease of apple. We outline several unique features of this pathogen which are useful for molecular genetics studies intended to understand plant-pathogen interactions. The pathogenicity mechanisms of the pathogen and overview of apple defense responses, monogenic and polygenic resistance, and their utilization in scab resistance breeding programs are also reviewed.

  17. Molecular analysis of the arabidopsis-Phytophthora pathosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Mauch, Felix; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Afin de mieux comprendre l´interaction Phytophthora-plante, nous avons développé un nouveau pathosystème: Arabidopsis thaliana-Phytophthora porri. Jusqu´à présent, Phytophthora infestans, qui a causé famine et désolation en Irlande voilà 150 ans, a été le mieux étudié. Etudier le pathosystème Pomme de terre-Phytophthora infestans a, sans aucun doute, des avantages surtout parce que la pomme de terre est très cultivée de par le monde. Toutefois, utiliser Arabidopsis comme plante modèle pour de...

  18. Genome-Wide Association Studies In Plant Pathosystems: Toward an Ecological Genomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bartoli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and re-emergence of plant pathogenic microorganisms are processes that imply perturbations in both host and pathogen ecological niches. Global change is largely assumed to drive the emergence of new etiological agents by altering the equilibrium of the ecological habitats which in turn places hosts more in contact with pathogen reservoirs. In this context, the number of epidemics is expected to increase dramatically in the next coming decades both in wild and crop plants. Under these considerations, the identification of the genetic variants underlying natural variation of resistance is a pre-requisite to estimate the adaptive potential of wild plant populations and to develop new breeding resistant cultivars. On the other hand, the prediction of pathogen's genetic determinants underlying disease emergence can help to identify plant resistance alleles. In the genomic era, whole genome sequencing combined with the development of statistical methods led to the emergence of Genome Wide Association (GWA mapping, a powerful tool for detecting genomic regions associated with natural variation of disease resistance in both wild and cultivated plants. However, GWA mapping has been less employed for the detection of genetic variants associated with pathogenicity in microbes. Here, we reviewed GWA studies performed either in plants or in pathogenic microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes. In addition, we highlighted the benefits and caveats of the emerging joint GWA mapping approach that allows for the simultaneous identification of genes interacting between genomes of both partners. Finally, based on co-evolutionary processes in wild populations, we highlighted a phenotyping-free joint GWA mapping approach as a promising tool for describing the molecular landscape underlying plant - microbe interactions.

  19. Unravelling and managing fusiform rust disease: a model approach for coevolved forest tree pathosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CD Nelson; TL Kubisiak; HV Amerson

    2010-01-01

    Fusiform rust disease remains the most destructive disease in pine plantations in the southern United States. Our ongoing research is designed to identify, map, and clone the interacting genes of the host and pathogen. Several resistance (R) genes have been identified and genetically mapped using informative pine families and single-spore isolate inoculations. In...

  20. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix E Enciso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site, CC (Coiled-Coil, TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor. We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI, eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%, biological process (85% and cellular component (79% using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  1. Evidence for resistance polymorphism in the Bromus tectorum/Ustilago bullata pathosystem: implications for biocontrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. E. Meyer; D. L. Nelson; S. Clement

    2001-01-01

    Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass or downy brome) is an important exotic weed in natural ecosystems as well as in winter cereal cropland in semiarid western North America. The systemic, seedling-infecting head smut pathogen Ustilago bullata Berk. commonly infects cheatgrass stands, often at epidemic levels. We examined factors...

  2. Calcium oxalate crystals: an integral component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals.

  3. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; López, Camilo E.; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry ( Physalis peruviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P . peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC–NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  4. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A; López, Camilo E; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance.

  5. The current status of the Soybean-Soybean mosaic virus (SMV Pathosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV is one of the most devastating pathogens that cost huge economic losses in soybean production worldwide. Due to the duplicated genome, clustered and highly homologous nature of R genes, as well as recalcitrant to transformation, soybean disease resistance studies is largely lagging compared with other diploid crops. In this review, we focus on the major advances that have been made in identifying both the virulence/avirulence factors of SMV and mapping of SMV resistant genes in soybean. In addition, we review the progress in dissecting the SMV resistant signaling pathways in soybean, with a special focus on the studies using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS. The soybean genome has been fully sequenced, and the increasingly saturated SNP markers have been identified. With these resources available together with newly developed genome editing tools, and more efficient soybean transformation system, cloning SMV resistant genes, and ultimately generating cultivars with a broader spectrum resistance to SMV are becoming more realistic than ever.

  6. RNA-Seq analysis reveals candidate genes for ontogenic resistance in Malus-Venturia pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Gusberti

    Full Text Available Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible and old (ontogenic resistant leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. IN THIS WORK, FIVE CANDIDATE GENES PUTATIVELY INVOLVED IN THE ONTOGENIC RESISTANCE OF APPLE WERE IDENTIFIED: a gene encoding an "enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein" was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3 were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result of the corresponding up- and down-regulation of these genes.

  7. Identification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Candidate Effectors with Virulence Activity in a Distantly Related Pathosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Kunjeti, Sridhara G.; Iyer, Geeta; Johnson, Ebony; Li, Eric; Broglie, Karen E.; Rauscher, Gilda; Rairdan, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, a disease that causes enormous economic losses, most markedly in South America. P. pachyrhizi is a biotrophic pathogen that utilizes specialized feeding structures called haustoria to colonize its hosts. In rusts and other filamentous plant pathogens, haustoria have been shown to secrete effector proteins into their hosts to permit successful completion of their life cycle. We have constructed a cDNA library from P. pachyrhizi h...

  8. Reference Genes in the Pathosystem Phakopsora pachyrhizi/ Soybean Suitable for Normalization in Transcript Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hirschburger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating pathogen on soybean, endangering soybean production worldwide. Use of Host Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS and the study of effector proteins could provide novel strategies for pathogen control. For both approaches quantification of transcript abundance by RT-qPCR is essential. Suitable stable reference genes for normalization are indispensable to obtain accurate RT-qPCR results. According to the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE guidelines and using algorithms geNorm and NormFinder we tested candidate reference genes from P. pachyrhizi and Glycine max for their suitability in normalization of transcript levels throughout the infection process. For P. pachyrhizi we recommend a combination of CytB and PDK or GAPDH for in planta experiments. Gene expression during in vitro stages and over the whole infection process was found to be highly unstable. Here, RPS14 and UbcE2 are ranked best by geNorm and NormFinder. Alternatively CytB that has the smallest Cq range (Cq: quantification cycle could be used. We recommend specification of gene expression relative to the germ tube stage rather than to the resting urediospore stage. For studies omitting the resting spore and the appressorium stages a combination of Elf3 and RPS9, or PKD and GAPDH should be used. For normalization of soybean genes during rust infection Ukn2 and cons7 are recommended.

  9. Reference Genes in the Pathosystem Phakopsora pachyrhizi/ Soybean Suitable for Normalization in Transcript Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschburger, Daniela; Müller, Manuel; Voegele, Ralf T; Link, Tobias

    2015-09-23

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating pathogen on soybean, endangering soybean production worldwide. Use of Host Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS) and the study of effector proteins could provide novel strategies for pathogen control. For both approaches quantification of transcript abundance by RT-qPCR is essential. Suitable stable reference genes for normalization are indispensable to obtain accurate RT-qPCR results. According to the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines and using algorithms geNorm and NormFinder we tested candidate reference genes from P. pachyrhizi and Glycine max for their suitability in normalization of transcript levels throughout the infection process. For P. pachyrhizi we recommend a combination of CytB and PDK or GAPDH for in planta experiments. Gene expression during in vitro stages and over the whole infection process was found to be highly unstable. Here, RPS14 and UbcE2 are ranked best by geNorm and NormFinder. Alternatively CytB that has the smallest Cq range (Cq: quantification cycle) could be used. We recommend specification of gene expression relative to the germ tube stage rather than to the resting urediospore stage. For studies omitting the resting spore and the appressorium stages a combination of Elf3 and RPS9, or PKD and GAPDH should be used. For normalization of soybean genes during rust infection Ukn2 and cons7 are recommended.

  10. Identification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi candidate effectors with virulence activity in a distantly related pathosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhara eKunjeti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, a disease that causes enormous economic losses, most markedly in South America. P. pachyrhizi is a biotrophic pathogen that utilizes specialized feeding structures called haustoria to colonize its hosts. In rusts and other filamentous plant pathogens, haustoria have been shown to secrete effector proteins into their hosts to permit successful completion of their life cycle. We have constructed a cDNA library from Phakopsora pachyrhizi haustoria using paramagnetic bead-based methodology and have identified 35 P. pachyrhizi candidate effector (CE genes from this library which are described here. In addition, we quantified the transcript expression pattern of six of these genes and show that two of these CEs are able to greatly increase the susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Phytophthora infestans. This strongly suggests that these genes play an important role in P. pachyrhizi virulence on its hosts.

  11. Identification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Candidate Effectors with Virulence Activity in a Distantly Related Pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjeti, Sridhara G; Iyer, Geeta; Johnson, Ebony; Li, Eric; Broglie, Karen E; Rauscher, Gilda; Rairdan, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, a disease that causes enormous economic losses, most markedly in South America. P. pachyrhizi is a biotrophic pathogen that utilizes specialized feeding structures called haustoria to colonize its hosts. In rusts and other filamentous plant pathogens, haustoria have been shown to secrete effector proteins into their hosts to permit successful completion of their life cycle. We have constructed a cDNA library from P. pachyrhizi haustoria using paramagnetic bead-based methodology and have identified 35 P. pachyrhizi candidate effector (CE) genes from this library which are described here. In addition, we quantified the transcript expression pattern of six of these genes and show that two of these CEs are able to greatly increase the susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Phytophthora infestans. This strongly suggests that these genes play an important role in P. pachyrhizi virulence on its hosts.

  12. Attack modes and defence reactions in pathosystems involving Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Brassica carinata, B. juncea and B. napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) is a damaging disease of oilseed brassicas world-wide. Host resistance is urgently needed to achieve control, yet the factors that contribute to stem resistance are not well understood. This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance to SSR. Stems of 5-week-old Brassica carinata, B. juncea and B. napus of known resistance were infected via filter paper discs impregnated with S. sclerotiorum mycelium under controlled conditions. Transverse sections of the stem and portions of the stem surface were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The association of anatomical features with the severity of disease (measured by mean lesion length) was determined. Several distinct resistance mechanisms were recorded for the first time in these Brassica-pathogen interactions, including hypersensitive reactions and lignification within the stem cortex, endodermis and in tissues surrounding the lesions. Genotypes showing a strong lignification response 72 h post-infection (hpi) tended to have smaller lesions. Extensive vascular invasion by S. sclerotiorum was observed only in susceptible genotypes, especially in the vascular fibres and xylem. Mean lesion length was negatively correlated with the number of cell layers in the cortex, suggesting progress of S. sclerotiorum is impeded by more cell layers. Hyphae in the centre of lesions became highly vacuolate 72 hpi, reflecting an ageing process in S. sclerotiorum hyphal networks that was independent of host resistance. The infection process of S. sclerotiorum was analogous in B. carinata and B. napus. Infection cushions of the highly virulent isolate of S. sclerotiorum MBRS-1 were grouped together in dense parallel bundles, while hyphae in the infection cushions of a less aggressive isolate WW-3 were more diffuse, and this was unaffected by host genotype. A variety of mechanisms contribute to host resistance against S. sclerotiorum across the three Brassica species. These complex interactions between pathogen and host help to explain variable expressions of resistance often observed in the field. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Study of the pathosystem: Begomovirus Bemisia tabaci I tomato on the South West islands of the Indian Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delatte, H.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) belongs to the genus Begomovirus within the Geminiviridae family, and is exclusively transmitted by the whitefly species Bemisia labaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) (Gennadius). It is an emerging virus which since the 1980's has globally spread over many tropical,

  14. The FonSIX6 gene acts as an avirulence effector in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum - watermelon pathosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are three generally accepted Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon) physiological races (0, 1, and 2) that infect watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Among them, race 1 is the most prevalent on watermelon throughout the world, while race 2 is highly aggressive to all commercial watermelon cultivar...

  15. Derivation of host and pathogen genotypes in the fusiform rust pathosystem on slash pine using a complimentary genetics model and diallel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E. Stelzel; Robert L. Doudrick; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    1997-01-01

    Seedlings from 20, full-sib families five-parent slash pine diallel were inoculated using two, single urediniospore-derived cultures of the fusiform rust fungus on two different dates during the 1994 growing season. Presence or absence of fusiform rust galls was recorded for each inoculated seedling at nine months post-inoculation and percent infection levels for each...

  16. Phytohormone Involvement in the Ustilago maydis- Zea mays Pathosystem: Relationships between Abscisic Acid and Cytokinin Levels and Strain Virulence in Infected Cob Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin N Morrison

    Full Text Available Ustilago maydis is the causative agent of common smut of corn. Early studies noted its ability to synthesize phytohormones and, more recently these growth promoting substances were confirmed as cytokinins (CKs. Cytokinins comprise a group of phytohormones commonly associated with actively dividing tissues. Lab analyses identified variation in virulence between U. maydis dikaryon and solopathogen infections of corn cob tissue. Samples from infected cob tissue were taken at sequential time points post infection and biochemical profiling was performed using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI MS/MS. This hormone profiling revealed that there were altered levels of ABA and major CKs, with a marked reduction in CK glucosides, increases in methylthiol CKs and a particularly dramatic increase in cisZ CK forms, in U. maydis infected tissue. These changes were more pronounced in the more virulent dikaryon relative to the solopathogenic strain suggesting a role for cytokinins in moderating virulence during biotrophic infection. These findings highlight the fact that U. maydis does not simply mimic a fertilized seed but instead reprograms the host tissue. Results underscore the suitability of the Ustilago maydis- Zea mays model as a basis for investigating the control of phytohormone dynamics during biotrophic infection of plants.

  17. A Network Approach of Gene Co-expression in the Zea mays/Aspergillus flavus Pathosystem to Map Host/Pathogen Interaction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musungu, Bryan M.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L.; Payne, Gary A.; OBrian, Greg; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Geisler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    A gene co-expression network (GEN) was generated using a dual RNA-seq study with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and its plant host Zea mays during the initial 3 days of infection. The analysis deciphered novel pathways and mapped genes of interest in both organisms during the infection. This network revealed a high degree of connectivity in many of the previously recognized pathways in Z. mays such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). For the pathogen A. flavus, a link between aflatoxin production and vesicular transport was identified within the network. There was significant interspecies correlation of expression between Z. mays and A. flavus for a subset of 104 Z. mays, and 1942 A. flavus genes. This resulted in an interspecies subnetwork enriched in multiple Z. mays genes involved in the production of ROS. In addition to the ROS from Z. mays, there was enrichment in the vesicular transport pathways and the aflatoxin pathway for A. flavus. Included in these genes, a key aflatoxin cluster regulator, AflS, was found to be co-regulated with multiple Z. mays ROS producing genes within the network, suggesting AflS may be monitoring host ROS levels. The entire GEN for both host and pathogen, and the subset of interspecies correlations, is presented as a tool for hypothesis generation and discovery for events in the early stages of fungal infection of Z. mays by A. flavus. PMID:27917194

  18. RNAi-mediated Control of Aflatoxins in Peanut: Method to Analyze Mycotoxin Production and Transgene Expression in the Peanut/Aspergillus Pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Renée S; Dang, Phat M; Sobolev, Victor S

    2015-12-21

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 25% of the food crops in the world are contaminated with aflatoxins. That represents 100 million tons of food being destroyed or diverted to non-human consumption each year. Aflatoxins are powerful carcinogens normally accumulated by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in cereals, nuts, root crops and other agricultural products. Silencing of five aflatoxin-synthesis genes by RNA interference (RNAi) in peanut plants was used to control aflatoxin accumulation following inoculation with A. flavus. Previously, no method existed to analyze the effectiveness of RNAi in individual peanut transgenic events, as these usually produce few seeds, and traditional methods of large field experiments under aflatoxin-conducive conditions were not an option. In the field, the probability of finding naturally contaminated seeds is often 1/100 to 1/1,000. In addition, aflatoxin contamination is not uniformly distributed. Our method uses few seeds per transgenic event, with small pieces processed for real-time PCR (RT-PCR) or small RNA sequencing, and for analysis of aflatoxin accumulation by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). RNAi-expressing peanut lines 288-72 and 288-74, showed up to 100% reduction (p ≤ 0.01) in aflatoxin B1 and B2 compared to the control that accumulated up to 14,000 ng · g(-1) of aflatoxin B1 when inoculated with aflatoxigenic A. flavus. As reference, the maximum total of aflatoxins allowable for human consumption in the United States is 20 ng · g(-1). This protocol describes the application of RNAi-mediated control of aflatoxins in transgenic peanut seeds and methods for its evaluation. We believe that its application in breeding of peanut and other crops will bring rapid advancement in this important area of science, medicine and human nutrition, and will significantly contribute to the international effort to control aflatoxins, and potentially other mycotoxins in major food crops.

  19. Characterisation of an Arabidopsis-Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem: resistance partially requires camalexin biosynthesis and is independent of salicylic acid, ethylene and jasmonic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Svante; Staal, Jens; Thomma, Bart P H J; Wang, Maolin; Dixelius, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Out of 168 Arabidopsis accessions screened with isolates of Leptosphaeria maculans, one (An-1) showed clear disease symptoms. In order to identify additional components involved in containment of L. maculans in Arabidopsis, a screen for L. maculans-susceptible (lms) mutants was performed. Eleven lms mutants were isolated, which displayed differential susceptibility responses to L. maculans. lms1 was crossed with Columbia (Col-0) and Ws-0, and mapping data for both populations showed the highest linkage to a region on chromosome 2. Reduced levels of PR-1 and PDF1.2 expression were found in lms1 compared to wild-type plants 48 h after pathogen inoculation. In contrast, the lms1 mutant displayed upregulation of either marker gene upon chemical treatment, possibly as an effect of an altered ethylene (ET) response. To assess the contribution of different defence pathways, genotypes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) signalling plants expressing the bacterial salicylate hydroxylase (nahG) gene, non-expressor of PR1 (npr1)-1 and phytoalexin-deficient (pad4-1), jasmonic acid (JA) signalling (coronatine insensitive (coi)1-16, enhanced disease susceptibility (eds)8-1 and jasmonic acid resistant (jar)1-1) and ET signalling (eds4-1, ethylene insensitive (ein)2, ein3-1 and ethylene resistant (etr)1-1) were screened. All the genotypes screened were as resistant as wild-type plants, demonstrating the dispensability of the pathways in L. maculans resistance. When mutants implicated in cell death responses were assayed, responsive to antagonist 1 (ran1)-1 exhibited a weak susceptible phenotype, whereas accelerated cell death (acd)1-20 showed a rapid lesion development. Camalexin is only partially responsible for L. maculans containment in Arabidopsis, as pad3-1 and enhanced susceptibility to Alternaria (esa)1 clearly showed a susceptible response while wild-type levels of camalexin were present in An-1 and lms1. The data presented point to the existence of multiple defence mechanisms controlling the containment of L. maculans in Arabidopsis.

  20. Characterisation of an Arabidopsis-Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem: resistance partially requires camalexin biosynthesis and is independent of salicylic acid, ethylene and jasmonic acid signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohman, S.; Staal, J.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Wang, M.; Dixelius, C.

    2004-01-01

    Out of 168 Arabidopsis accessions screened with isolates of Leptosphaeria maculans, one (An-1) showed clear disease symptoms. In order to identify additional components involved in containment of L. maculans in Arabidopsis, a screen for L. maculans-susceptible (lms) mutants was performed. Eleven lms

  1. RNAi-mediated Control of Aflatoxins in Peanut: Method to Analyze Mycotoxin Production and Transgene Expression in the Peanut/Aspergillus Pathosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Arias, Ren?e S.; Dang, Phat M.; Sobolev, Victor S.

    2015-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 25% of the food crops in the world are contaminated with aflatoxins. That represents 100 million tons of food being destroyed or diverted to non-human consumption each year. Aflatoxins are powerful carcinogens normally accumulated by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in cereals, nuts, root crops and other agricultural products. Silencing of five aflatoxin-synthesis genes by RNA interference (RNAi) in pean...

  2. A Network Approach of Gene Co-expression in theZea mays/Aspergillus flavusPathosystem to Map Host/Pathogen Interaction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musungu, Bryan M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Brown, Robert L; Payne, Gary A; OBrian, Greg; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Geisler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    A gene co-expression network (GEN) was generated using a dual RNA-seq study with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and its plant host Zea mays during the initial 3 days of infection. The analysis deciphered novel pathways and mapped genes of interest in both organisms during the infection. This network revealed a high degree of connectivity in many of the previously recognized pathways in Z. mays such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). For the pathogen A. flavus , a link between aflatoxin production and vesicular transport was identified within the network. There was significant interspecies correlation of expression between Z. mays and A. flavus for a subset of 104 Z. mays , and 1942 A. flavus genes. This resulted in an interspecies subnetwork enriched in multiple Z. mays genes involved in the production of ROS. In addition to the ROS from Z. mays , there was enrichment in the vesicular transport pathways and the aflatoxin pathway for A. flavus . Included in these genes, a key aflatoxin cluster regulator, AflS, was found to be co-regulated with multiple Z. mays ROS producing genes within the network, suggesting AflS may be monitoring host ROS levels. The entire GEN for both host and pathogen, and the subset of interspecies correlations, is presented as a tool for hypothesis generation and discovery for events in the early stages of fungal infection of Z. mays by A. flavus .

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of the Melon-Fusarium oxysporumf. sp.melonisRace 1.2 Pathosystem in Susceptible and Resistant Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia Sebastiani, M; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Sestili, Sara; Biselli, Chiara; Zechini, Antonella; Orrù, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Ficcadenti, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Snyd. & Hans race 1.2 (FOM1.2) is the most virulent and yield-limiting pathogen of melon ( Cucumis melo L.) worldwide. Current information suggest that the resistance to race 1.2 is controlled by multiple recessive genes and strongly affected by the environment. RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify candidate resistance genes and to dissect the early molecular processes deployed during melon-FOM1.2 interaction in the resistant doubled haploid line NAD and in the susceptible genotype Charentais-T (CHT) at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation (hpi). The transcriptome analysis of the NAD-FOM1.2 interaction identified 2,461 and 821 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 24 hpi and at 48 hpi, respectively, while in susceptible combination CHT-FOM1.2, 882 and 2,237 DEGs were recovered at 24 hpi and at 48 hpi, respectively. The overall expression profile suggests a prompt activation of the defense responses in NAD due to its basal defense-related machinery that allows an early pathogen recognition. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses revealed a total of 57 GO terms shared by both genotypes and consistent with response to fungal infection. GO classes named "chitinase activity," "cellulase activity," "defense response, incompatible interaction," "auxin polar transport" emerged as major factors of resistance to FOM1.2. The data indicated that NAD reacts to FOM1.2 with a fine regulation of Ca 2+ -mediated signaling pathways, cell wall reorganization, and hormone crosstalk (jasmonate and ethylene, auxin and abscissic acid). Several unannotated transcripts were recovered providing a basis for a further exploration of the melon resistance genes. DEGs belonging to the FOM1.2 genome were also detected in planta as a resource for the identification of potential pathogenicity factors. This work provides a broader view of the dynamic changes of the melon transcriptome triggered by FOM1.2 and highlights that the resistance response of NAD is mainly signaled by jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways mediated by ABA and auxin. The role of candidate plant and fungal responsive genes involved in the resistance is discussed.

  4. Application of molecular genetic tools for forest pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; John Hanna; Amy Ross-Davis; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular genetics have provided powerful tools to address critical issues in forest pathology to help promote resilient forests. Although molecular genetic tools are initially applied to understand individual components of forest pathosystems, forest pathosystems involve dynamic interactions among biotic and abiotic components of the...

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a ToxA-like gene from the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxA, the first discovered fungal proteinaceous host-selective toxin, was originally identified from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr). Homologues of the PtrToxA gene have not been identified from any other ascomycetes except the leaf/glume blotch fungus Stagonospora nodorum, w...

  6. Map-Based Cloning of the Fungal Toxin Sensitivity Gene Tsn1 in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat Tsn1 gene on wheat chromosome arm 5BL confers sensitivity to the host-selective proteinaceous toxins Ptr ToxA and SnToxA produced by the pathogenic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Stagonospora nodorum, respectively. Compatible Tsn1-ToxA interactions lead to extensive cell death and...

  7. A modelling framework to simulate foliar fungal epidemics using functional-structural plant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Guillaume; Fournier, Christian; Andrieu, Bruno; Houlès, Vianney; Robert, Corinne; Pradal, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Sustainable agriculture requires the identification of new, environmentally responsible strategies of crop protection. Modelling of pathosystems can allow a better understanding of the major interactions inside these dynamic systems and may lead to innovative protection strategies. In particular, functional-structural plant models (FSPMs) have been identified as a means to optimize the use of architecture-related traits. A current limitation lies in the inherent complexity of this type of modelling, and thus the purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to both extend and simplify the modelling of pathosystems using FSPMs. Different entities and interactions occurring in pathosystems were formalized in a conceptual model. A framework based on these concepts was then implemented within the open-source OpenAlea modelling platform, using the platform's general strategy of modelling plant-environment interactions and extending it to handle plant interactions with pathogens. New developments include a generic data structure for representing lesions and dispersal units, and a series of generic protocols to communicate with objects representing the canopy and its microenvironment in the OpenAlea platform. Another development is the addition of a library of elementary models involved in pathosystem modelling. Several plant and physical models are already available in OpenAlea and can be combined in models of pathosystems using this framework approach. Two contrasting pathosystems are implemented using the framework and illustrate its generic utility. Simulations demonstrate the framework's ability to simulate multiscaled interactions within pathosystems, and also show that models are modular components within the framework and can be extended. This is illustrated by testing the impact of canopy architectural traits on fungal dispersal. This study provides a framework for modelling a large number of pathosystems using FSPMs. This structure can accommodate both

  8. Insights into Tan Spot and Stem Rust Resistance and Susceptibility by Studying the Pre-Green Revolution Global Collection of Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Sidrat; Sehgal, Sunish Kumar; Jin, Yue; Turnipseed, Brent; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-01-01

    Tan spot (TS), caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died) Drechs, is an important foliar disease of wheat and has become a threat to world wheat production since the 1970s. In this study a globally diverse pre-1940s collection of 247 wheat genotypes was evaluated against Ptr ToxA, P. tritici-repentis race 1, and stem rust to determine if; (i) acquisition of Ptr ToxA by the P. tritici-repentis from Stagonospora nodorum led to increased pathogen virulence or (ii) incorporation of ...

  9. Ecological genetics of the Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) - Ustilago Bullata (Ustilaginaceae): A role for frequency dependent selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer; David L. Nelson; Suzette Clement; Alisa Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary processes that maintain genetic diversity in plants are likely to include selection imposed by pathogens. Negative frequency-dependent selection is a mechanism for maintenance of resistance polymorphism in plant - pathogen interactions. We explored whether such selection operates in the Bromus tectorum - Ustilago bullata pathosystem. Gene-for-gene...

  10. Elms and Dutch elm disease: a quick overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael. Marcotrigiano

    2017-01-01

    In the 1930s Dutch elm disease (DED) was accidentally introduced from Europe into the United States. It had a devastating impact on American elm (Ulmus americana) and its relatives in urban and riparian environments. In the United States, the three-part pathosystem for DED is unique in that the affected elm species are North American, the pathogen originated in Asia,...

  11. Bemisia tabaci : the whitefly vector of cassava mosaic geminiviruses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ecology of the Bemisia tabaci/cassava/African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) pathosystem is reviewed briefly with special attention given to the parameters affecting the pattern of population development of B. tabaci. Significant gaps in our understanding of this system remain, particularly concerning the importance of ...

  12. Limitations of Cassava Bacterial Blight: New Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo López

    2006-07-01

    genomics. The acquired knowledge in the last years for this pathosystem will help to establish better disease control strategies and generate, in a short term, resistant cassava varieties contributing to solve one of the main problems of poor cassava farmers and this effort will open a new horizon to the cassava crop in the world.

  13. Comments Regarding the Binary Power Law for Heterogeneity of Disease Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The binary power law (BPL) has been successfully used to characterize heterogeneity (over dispersion or small-scale aggregation) of disease incidence for many plant pathosystems. With the BPL, the log of the observed variance is a linear function of the log of the theoretical variance for a binomial...

  14. A Greenhouse Bioassay for the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense x ‘Grand Naine’ (Musa, AAA, Cavendish Subgroup) Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dita Rodriguez, M.A.; Waalwijk, C.; Paiva, L.V.; Souza, M.T.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Several disease resistance screening protocols for Fusarium wilt of banana (causal agent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense - Foc) under greenhouse conditions have been reported. Here, we report a standardised rapid and reliable greenhouse bioassay for this pathosystem. This is indispensable for

  15. Advancing our understanding of charcoal rot in soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid ) of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], is an important but commonly misidentified disease, and very few summary articles exist on this pathosystem. Research conducted over the last 10 years has improved our understanding of the environment conducive...

  16. Toward the molecular cloning of the Septoria nodorum blotch susceptibility gene Snn2 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septoria nodorum blotch is a disease of wheat caused by the necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum. In the wheat-P. nodorum pathosystem, recognition of pathogen-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) by dominant host genes leads to host cell death, which allows the pathogen to gain nutrients an...

  17. Genetic dissection of Lactuca saligna nonhost resistance to downy mildew at various lettuce developmental stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, N.; Lindhout, P.; Niks, R.E.; Jeuken, M.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study used the pathosystem of lettuce (Lactuca spp.) and downy mildew (Bremia lactucae) as a model to investigate the inheritance of nonhost resistance, and focused on the contribution of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to nonhost resistance at various developmental stages in the lettuce life

  18. Resilience of diversity-disease risk interactions following wildfire disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devon A. Gaydos; Krishna Pacifici; Ross K. Meentemeyer; David. M. Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    The potential for biodiversity to mitigate risk of infectious diseases in ecological communities – known as the diversity-disease risk hypothesis – is fundamental to understanding links between landscape change and environmental health of forests affected by sudden oak death (SOD). Previous research of the Phytophthora ramorum pathosystem...

  19. Cladosporium fulvum Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wit, de, Pierre J.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I recount my personal history. My drive to study host-pathogen interactions was to find alternatives for agrochemicals, which was triggered after reading the book "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson. I reflect on my research at the Laboratory of Phytopathology at Wageningen University, where I have worked for my entire career on the interaction between Cladosporium fulvum and tomato, and related gene-for-gene pathosystems. I describe different methods used to identify and sequenc...

  20. A Greenhouse Bioassay for the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense x ‘Grand Naine’ (Musa, AAA, Cavendish Subgroup) Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dita Rodriguez, M.A.; Waalwijk, C.; Paiva, L.V.; Souza, M.T.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Several disease resistance screening protocols for Fusarium wilt of banana (causal agent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense - Foc) under greenhouse conditions have been reported. Here, we report a standardised rapid and reliable greenhouse bioassay for this pathosystem. This is indispensable for banana phenotyping, particularly since the occurrence of tropical race 4 (TR4), which is a significant threat for the global Cavendish-based banana export industry. Using a double-pot system, hardened ...

  1. Artificial neural network for prediction of the area under the disease progress curve of tomato late blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pedrosa Alves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Artificial neural networks (ANN are computational models inspired by the neural systems of living beings capable of learning from examples and using them to solve problems such as non-linear prediction, and pattern recognition, in addition to several other applications. In this study, ANN were used to predict the value of the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC for the tomato late blight pathosystem. The AUDPC is widely used by epidemiologic studies of polycyclic diseases, especially those regarding quantitative resistance of genotypes. However, a series of six evaluations over time is necessary to obtain the final area value for this pathosystem. This study aimed to investigate the utilization of ANN to construct an AUDPC in the tomato late blight pathosystem, using a reduced number of severity evaluations. For this, four independent experiments were performed giving a total of 1836 plants infected with Phytophthora infestans pathogen. They were assessed every three days, comprised six opportunities and AUDPC calculations were performed by the conventional method. After the ANN were created it was possible to predict the AUDPC with correlations of 0.97 and 0.84 when compared to conventional methods, using 50 % and 67 % of the genotype evaluations, respectively. When using the ANN created in an experiment to predict the AUDPC of the other experiments the average correlation was 0.94, with two evaluations, 0.96, with three evaluations, between the predicted values of the ANN and they were observed in six evaluations. We present in this study a new paradigm for the use of AUDPC information in tomato experiments faced with P. infestans. This new proposed paradigm might be adapted to different pathosystems.

  2. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  3. Survey of microfungi in the Kleinwalsertal (Austrian alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M; Ale-Agha, N; Brassmann, M

    2008-01-01

    During an excursion to the Alps near the German/Austrian border (Kleinwalsertal) in August 2007, we were able to collect more than 40 species of microfungi as parasites or saprophytes on different parts of wild plants. Some of them have been observed only rarely until now. Most of the species collected belong to the classes Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina, and Deuteromycotina. For example: -Leptosphaeria jaceae Holm on Centaurea jacea L.; -Mycosphaerella equiseticola Bond.-Mont. on Equisetum telmateia Ehrh.; -Erysiphe cichoracearum DC. on Adenostyles alliariae (Gouan) Kerner, Centaurea phrygia, Cicerbita alpina (L.) Wallr.; -Podosphaera fusca (Fr.) U. Braun comb. nov. on Petasites paradoxus (Retz.) Baumg. and Senecio alpinus (L.) Scop.; -Pirottaea veneta Sacc. and Speg. on Lamium maculatum L.; -Coleosporium tussilaginis (Pers.) Kleb. on Adenostyles alliariae, Petasites paradoxus; -Puccinia mulgedii (West.) Syd. on Cicerbita alpinl; -Titleospora equiseti (Desm.) Vassil., -Stagonospora equiseti Fautr. on Equisetum telmateia, -Valdensia heterodoxa Peyronel on Cicerbita alpina.

  4. Diversity of Mn oxides produced by Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2011-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are environmentally abundant, highly reactive mineral phases that mediate the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, contaminants, carbon, and numerous other elements. Despite the belief that microorganisms (specifically bacteria and fungi) are responsible for the majority of Mn oxide formation in the environment, the impact of microbial species, physiology, and growth stage on Mn oxide formation is largely unresolved. Here, we couple microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the Mn oxides produced by four different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi ( Plectosphaerella cucumerina strain DS2psM2a2 , Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, and Acremonium strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) isolated from acid mine drainage treatment systems in central Pennsylvania. The site of Mn oxide formation varies greatly among the fungi, including deposition on hyphal surfaces, at the base of reproductive structures (e.g., fruiting bodies), and on envisaged extracellular polymers adjacent to the cell. The primary product of Mn(II) oxidation for all species growing under the same chemical and physical conditions is a nanoparticulate, poorly-crystalline hexagonal birnessite-like phase resembling synthetic δ-MnO 2. The phylogeny and growth conditions (planktonic versus surface-attached) of the fungi, however, impact the conversion of the initial phyllomanganate to more ordered phases, such as todorokite ( A. strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) and triclinic birnessite ( Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a). Our findings reveal that the species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi impacts the size, morphology, and structure of Mn biooxides, which will likely translate to large differences in the reactivity of the Mn oxide phases.

  5. Interaction between pathogens and water in disease development in agriculture and forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Vettraino

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports on the role of water in plant pathology as possible stress factor and vector of pathogen. The latter aspect is considered in a scenario of general risk of introduction and spread of invasive plant pathogens. In addition to peculiar epidemiology aspects, the possible diagnostic methodologies and control methods are considered. The role of water as stress factor is analysed in a general frame of climatic global changes that could enhance the risk of severe drought events. Within this frame some model pathosystems are described where water plays a role as co-factor or inciting factor in disease development.

  6. The quantitative basis of the Arabidopsis innate immune system to endemic pathogens depends on pathogen genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used...... the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B...... shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen genotypes....

  7. Discovery of Phytophthora infestans Genes Expressed in Planta through Mining of cDNA Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Diego; Pinzón, Andrés; Grajales, Alejandro; Rojas, Alejandro; Mutis, Gabriel; Cárdenas, Martha; Burbano, Daniel; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary causes late blight of potato and tomato, and has a broad host range within the Solanaceae family. Most studies of the Phytophthora – Solanum pathosystem have focused on gene expression in the host and have not analyzed pathogen gene expression in planta. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe in detail an in silico approach to mine ESTs from inoculated host plants deposited in a database in order to identify particular pathogen sequences associated with disease. We identified candidate effector genes through mining of 22,795 ESTs corresponding to P. infestans cDNA libraries in compatible and incompatible interactions with hosts from the Solanaceae family. Conclusions/Significance We annotated genes of P. infestans expressed in planta associated with late blight using different approaches and assigned putative functions to 373 out of the 501 sequences found in the P. infestans genome draft, including putative secreted proteins, domains associated with pathogenicity and poorly characterized proteins ideal for further experimental studies. Our study provides a methodology for analyzing cDNA libraries and provides an understanding of the plant – oomycete pathosystems that is independent of the host, condition, or type of sample by identifying genes of the pathogen expressed in planta. PMID:20352100

  8. Discovery of Phytophthora infestans genes expressed in planta through mining of cDNA libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sierra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary causes late blight of potato and tomato, and has a broad host range within the Solanaceae family. Most studies of the Phytophthora--Solanum pathosystem have focused on gene expression in the host and have not analyzed pathogen gene expression in planta. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe in detail an in silico approach to mine ESTs from inoculated host plants deposited in a database in order to identify particular pathogen sequences associated with disease. We identified candidate effector genes through mining of 22,795 ESTs corresponding to P. infestans cDNA libraries in compatible and incompatible interactions with hosts from the Solanaceae family. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We annotated genes of P. infestans expressed in planta associated with late blight using different approaches and assigned putative functions to 373 out of the 501 sequences found in the P. infestans genome draft, including putative secreted proteins, domains associated with pathogenicity and poorly characterized proteins ideal for further experimental studies. Our study provides a methodology for analyzing cDNA libraries and provides an understanding of the plant--oomycete pathosystems that is independent of the host, condition, or type of sample by identifying genes of the pathogen expressed in planta.

  9. A role in immunity for Arabidopsis cysteine protease RD21, the ortholog of the tomato immune protease C14.

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    Takayuki Shindo

    Full Text Available Secreted papain-like Cys proteases are important players in plant immunity. We previously reported that the C14 protease of tomato is targeted by cystatin-like EPIC proteins that are secreted by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pinf during infection. C14 has been under diversifying selection in wild potato species coevolving with Pinf and reduced C14 levels result in enhanced susceptibility for Pinf. Here, we investigated the role C14-EPIC-like interactions in the natural pathosystem of Arabidopsis with the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa. In contrast to the Pinf-solanaceae pathosystem, the C14 orthologous protease of Arabidopsis, RD21, does not evolve under diversifying selection in Arabidopsis, and rd21 null mutants do not show phenotypes upon compatible and incompatible Hpa interactions, despite the evident lack of a major leaf protease. Hpa isolates express highly conserved EPIC-like proteins during infections, but it is unknown if these HpaEPICs can inhibit RD21 and one of these HpaEPICs even lacks the canonical cystatin motifs. The rd21 mutants are unaffected in compatible and incompatible interactions with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but are significantly more susceptible for the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, demonstrating that RD21 provides immunity to a necrotrophic pathogen.

  10. Resistance to rust ( Puccinia psidii Winter) in eucalyptus: mode of inheritance and mapping of a major gene with RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, D T; Alfenas, A C; Brommonschenkel, S H; Oda, S; Mello, E J; Grattapaglia, D

    2003-12-01

    Rust is one of the most-damaging eucalypt diseases in Brazil and is considered a potential threat to eucalypt plantations worldwide. To determine the mode of inheritance of resistance in the Eucalyptus grandis- Puccinia psidii pathosystem, ten full-sib families, generated from crosses between susceptible and resistant trees, were inoculated with a single-pustule isolate of the pathogen and rust severity was scored. The observed segregation ratios in segregating families suggested major gene control of rust resistance, although clearly incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and minor genes are also involved in the global rust-resistance response. To identify markers linked to the resistance locus, screening of RAPD polymorphisms was conducted using bulked segregant analysis in a large full-sib family. A linkage group was built around the Ppr1 gene ( P. psidii resistance gene 1) encompassing six RAPD markers, with a genetic window spanning 5 cM with the two most-closely linked flanking markers. Besides these two flanking markers, RAPD marker AT9/917 co-segregated with Ppr1 without a single recombinant in 994 meioses. This tightly linked marker should prove useful for marker-assisted introgression and will provide an initial lead for a positional cloning effort of this resistance allele. This is the first report of a disease resistance gene identified in Eucalyptus, and one of the few examples of the involvement of a major gene in a non-coevolved pathosystem.

  11. Gain of virulence by Soybean mosaic virus on Rsv4-genotype soybeans is associated with a relative fitness loss in a susceptible host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Hajimorad, M R

    2016-09-01

    'Gene-for-gene' theory predicts that gain of virulence by an avirulent pathogen on plants expressing resistance (R) genes is associated with fitness loss in susceptible hosts. However, the validity of this prediction has been studied in only a few plant viral pathosystems. In this study, the Soybean mosaic virus (SMV)-Rsv4 pathosystem was exploited to test this prediction. In Rsv4-genotype soybeans, P3 of avirulent SMV strains provokes an as yet uncharacterized resistance mechanism that restricts the invading virus to the inoculated leaves. A single amino acid substitution in P3 functionally converts an avirulent to a virulent strain, suggesting that the genetic composition of P3 plays a crucial role in virulence on Rsv4-genotype soybeans. In this study, we examined the impact of gain of virulence mutation(s) on the fitness of virulent variants derived from three avirulent SMV strains in a soybean genotype lacking the Rsv4 gene. Our data demonstrate that gain of virulence mutation(s) by all avirulent viruses on Rsv4-genotype soybean is associated with a relative fitness loss in a susceptible host. The implications of this finding on the durable deployment of the Rsv4 gene in soybean are discussed. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Plant virus emergence and evolution: origins, new encounter scenarios, factors driving emergence, effects of changing world conditions, and prospects for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger A C

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on virus-plant pathosystems at the interface between managed and natural vegetation, and describes how rapid expansion in human activity and climate change are likely to impact on plants, vectors and viruses causing increasing instability. It starts by considering virus invasion of cultivated plants from their wild ancestors in the centres of plant domestication in different parts of the world and subsequent long distance movement away from these centres to other continents. It then describes the diverse virus-plant pathosystem scenarios possible at the interface between managed and natural vegetation and gives examples that illustrate situations where indigenous viruses emerge to damage introduced cultivated plants and newly introduced viruses become potential threats to biodiversity. These examples demonstrate how human activities increasingly facilitate damaging new encounters between plants and viruses worldwide. The likely effects of climate change on virus emergence are emphasised, and the major factors driving virus emergence, evolution and greater epidemic severity at the interface are analysed and explained. Finally, the kinds of challenges posed by rapidly changing world conditions to achieving effective control of epidemics of emerging plant viruses, and the approaches needed to address them, are described.

  13. An In Vitro Method for Studying the Three-Way Interaction between Soybean, Rhizophagus irregularis and the Soil-Borne Pathogen Fusarium virguliforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. Giachero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we described an in vitro system adequate for investigating the pathosystem soybean/arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF/Fusarium virguliforme. Pre-mycorrhized plantlets with Rhizophagus irregularis were infected by F. virguliforme either locally via a plug of gel supporting mycelium (Method 1 or via a macroconidia suspension applied to the medium surface (Method 2. Root colonization by the AMF and infection by the pathogen were similar to the usual observations in pot experiments. Within a period of 18 days, more than 20% of the roots were colonized by the AMF and infection by the pathogen was observed in all the plants. In presence of AMF, a decrease in symptoms and in the level of root tissue infection was noticed. With Method 1, smaller necrotic lesions were observed in the pre-mycorrhized plantlets. In Method 2, pathogen infection was slower but more homogenous. These results demonstrated the suitability of the in vitro cultivation system to study the pathosystem soybean/AMF/F. virguliforme. We propose this in vitro cultivation system for studying the mechanisms involved in the biocontrol conferred by AMF against F. virguliforme in soybean.

  14. Insights into Tan Spot and Stem Rust Resistance and Susceptibility by Studying the Pre-Green Revolution Global Collection of Wheat

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    Sidrat Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tan spot (TS, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died Drechs, is an important foliar disease of wheat and has become a threat to world wheat production since the 1970s. In this study a globally diverse pre-1940s collection of 247 wheat genotypes was evaluated against Ptr ToxA, P. tritici-repentis race 1, and stem rust to determine if; (i acquisition of Ptr ToxA by the P. tritici-repentis from Stagonospora nodorum led to increased pathogen virulence or (ii incorporation of TS susceptibility during development stem rust resistant cultivars led to an increase in TS epidemics globally. Most genotypes were susceptible to stem rust; however, a range of reactions to TS and Ptr ToxA were observed. Four combinations of disease-toxin reactions were observed among the genotypes; TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA sensitive, TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA insensitive, TS resistant-Ptr ToxA insensitive, and TS resistant-Ptr ToxA toxin sensitive. A weak correlation (r = 0.14 for bread wheat and −0.082 for durum was observed between stem rust susceptibility and TS resistance. Even though there were no reported epidemics in the pre-1940s, TS sensitive genotypes were widely grown in that period, suggesting that Ptr ToxA may not be an important factor responsible for enhanced prevalence of TS.

  15. Insights into Tan Spot and Stem Rust Resistance and Susceptibility by Studying the Pre-Green Revolution Global Collection of Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sidrat; Sehgal, Sunish Kumar; Jin, Yue; Turnipseed, Brent; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-04-01

    Tan spot (TS), caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died) Drechs, is an important foliar disease of wheat and has become a threat to world wheat production since the 1970s. In this study a globally diverse pre-1940s collection of 247 wheat genotypes was evaluated against Ptr ToxA, P. tritici-repentis race 1, and stem rust to determine if; (i) acquisition of Ptr ToxA by the P. tritici-repentis from Stagonospora nodorum led to increased pathogen virulence or (ii) incorporation of TS susceptibility during development stem rust resistant cultivars led to an increase in TS epidemics globally. Most genotypes were susceptible to stem rust; however, a range of reactions to TS and Ptr ToxA were observed. Four combinations of disease-toxin reactions were observed among the genotypes; TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA sensitive, TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA insensitive, TS resistant-Ptr ToxA insensitive, and TS resistant-Ptr ToxA toxin sensitive. A weak correlation (r = 0.14 for bread wheat and -0.082 for durum) was observed between stem rust susceptibility and TS resistance. Even though there were no reported epidemics in the pre-1940s, TS sensitive genotypes were widely grown in that period, suggesting that Ptr ToxA may not be an important factor responsible for enhanced prevalence of TS.

  16. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  17. A new and distinct species in the genus Caulimovirus exists as an endogenous plant pararetroviral sequence in its host, Dahlia variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahalawatta, Vihanga; Druffel, Keri; Pappu, Hanu

    2008-07-05

    Viruses in certain genera in family Caulimoviridae were shown to integrate their genomic sequences into their host genomes and exist as endogenous pararetroviral sequences (EPRV). However, members of the genus Caulimovirus remained to be the exception and are known to exist only as episomal elements in the infected cell. We present evidence that the DNA genome of a new and distinct Caulimovirus species, associated with dahlia mosaic, is integrated into its host genome, dahlia (Dahlia variabilis). Using cloned viral genes as probes, Southern blot hybridization of total plant DNA from dahlia seedlings showed the presence of viral DNA in the host DNA. Fluorescent in situ hybridization using labeled DNA probes from the D10 genome localized the viral sequences in dahlia chromosomes. The natural integration of a Caulimovirus genome into its host and its existence as an EPRV suggests the co-evolution of this plant-virus pathosystem.

  18. Resurgence of Pseudoperonospora cubensis: The Causal Agent of Cucurbit Downy Mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yigal; Van den Langenberg, Kyle M; Wehner, Todd C; Ojiambo, Peter S; Hausbeck, Mary; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Lebeda, Aleš; Sierotzki, Helge; Gisi, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The downy mildew pathogen, Pseudoperonospora cubensis, which infects plant species in the family Cucurbitaceae, has undergone major changes during the last decade. Disease severity and epidemics are far more destructive than previously reported, and new genotypes, races, pathotypes, and mating types of the pathogen have been discovered in populations from around the globe as a result of the resurgence of the disease. Consequently, disease control through host plant resistance and fungicide applications has become more complex. This resurgence of P. cubensis offers challenges to scientists in many research areas including pathogen biology, epidemiology and dispersal, population structure and population genetics, host preference, host-pathogen interactions and gene expression, genetic host plant resistance, inheritance of host and fungicide resistance, and chemical disease control. This review serves to summarize the current status of this major pathogen and to guide future management and research efforts within this pathosystem.

  19. Induced expression of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis upon infection with Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Bouwmeester, Klaas; van de Mortel, Judith E; Shan, Weixing; Govers, Francine

    2013-07-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants initiates defense responses including activation of defense-related genes and production of antimicrobial compounds. Recently, we reported that Phytophthora capsici can successfully infect Arabidopsis and revealed interaction specificity among various accession-isolate combinations. We used this novel pathosystem to demonstrate that camalexin, indole glucosinolates (iGS) and salicylic acid (SA) have a role in defense against P. capsici. To further investigate the role of camalexin-, iGS- and SA-related pathways in the differential interaction between Arabidopsis and P. capsici, we monitored expression of marker genes over time during infection. In both compatible and incompatible interactions, induction of expression was detected, but in compatible interactions transcript levels of camalexin and iGS marker genes were higher.

  20. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Davis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL. This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.

  1. Genetic transformation with the gfp gene of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates from coffee with blister spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Armesto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Blister spot (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is now widespread in most coffee producing states of Brazil, becoming a limiting factor for production. The lack of data relating to the reproduction of typical symptoms (light green, oily patches leaves a gap within the pathosystem, forcing the search for new methodologies for monitoring the disease. Monitoring of genetically modified organisms has proven to be an effective tool in understanding the host x pathogen interactions. Thus, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two systems of genetic transformation in obtaining mutants using the gfp reporter gene. Using the two transformation systems (PEG and electroporation revealed the efficiency of both, confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and resistance to the antibiotic hygromycin-B, when incorporated into the culture medium. The fungus maintained its cultural and morphological characteristics when compared to wild strains. When inoculated on coffee seedlings, it was found that the pathogenicity of the processed isolates had not changed.

  2. Prevalence of type III secretion system in effective biocontrol pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almario, Juliana; Gobbin, Davide; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Rezzonico, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Functional type III secretion system (T3SS) genes are needed for effective biocontrol of Pythium damping-off of cucumber by Pseudomonas fluorescens KD, but whether biocontrol Pseudomonas strains with T3SS genes display overall a higher plant-protecting activity is unknown. The assessment of 198 biocontrol fluorescent pseudomonads originating from 60 soils worldwide indicated that 32% harbour the ATPase-encoding T3SS gene hrcN, which was most often found in tomato isolates. The hrcN(+) biocontrol strains (and especially those also producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and displaying 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity) displayed higher plant-protecting ability in comparison with hrcN(-) biocontrol strains, both in the Pythium/cucumber and Fusarium/cucumber pathosystems. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogen refuge: a key to understanding biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth B

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen refuge is the idea that some potentially infectious pathogen propagules are not susceptible to the influence of an antagonistic microbial agent. The existence of a refuge can be attributable to one or more factors, including temporal, spatial, structural, and probabilistic, or to the pathogen's evolved ability to acquire antagonist-free space prior to ingress into a plant host. Within a specific pathosystem, refuge size can be estimated in experiments by measuring the proportion of pathogen propagules that remain infective as a function of the amount of antagonist introduced to the system. Refuge size is influenced by qualities of specific antagonists and by environment but less so by the quantity of antagonist. Consequently, most efforts to improve and optimize biological control are in essence efforts to reduce refuge size. Antagonist mixtures, optimal timing of antagonist introductions, integrated biological and chemical control, environmental optimization, and the utilization of disarmed pathogens as antagonists are strategies with potential to minimize a pathogen refuge.

  4. Cytological Evidence of an Active Role of Silicon in Wheat Resistance to Powdery Mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, R R; Benhamou, Nicole; Menzies, J G

    2003-04-01

    ABSTRACT Silicon (Si) amendments in the form of exogenously supplied nutrient solution or calcium silicate slag protect wheat plants from powdery mildew disease caused by the fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici. The most striking difference between Si- and Si+ plants challenged with B. graminis f. sp. tritici was the extent of epidermal cell infection and colonization by B. graminis f. sp. tritici. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed that epidermal cells of Si+ plants reacted to B. graminis f. sp. tritici attack with specific defense reactions including papilla formation, production of callose, and release of electron-dense osmiophilic material identified by cytochemical labeling as glycosilated phenolics. Phenolic material not only accumulated along the cell wall but also was associated with altered integrity of haustoria in a manner similar to localized phytoalexins as reported from other pathosystems. These results strongly suggest that Si mediates active localized cell defenses against B. graminis f. sp. tritici attack.

  5. Real-time PCR for the quantification of fungi in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Methods enabling quantification of fungi in planta can be useful for a variety of applications. In combination with information on plant disease severity, indirect quantification of fungi in planta offers an additional tool in the screening of plants that are resistant to fungal diseases. In this chapter, a method is described for the quantification of DNA from a fungus in plant leaves using real-time PCR (qPCR). Although the method described entails quantification of the fungus Verticillium dahliae in lettuce leaves, the methodology described would be useful for other pathosystems as well. The method utilizes primers that are specific for amplification of a β-tubulin sequence from V. dahliae and a lettuce actin gene sequence as a reference for normalization. This approach enabled quantification of V. dahliae in the amount of 2.5 fg/ng of lettuce leaf DNA at 21 days following plant inoculation.

  6. Identification of wheat gene Sr35 that confers resistance to Ug99 stem rust race group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintenac, Cyrille; Zhang, Wenjun; Salcedo, Andres; Rouse, Matthew N; Trick, Harold N; Akhunov, Eduard; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is a devastating disease that can cause severe yield losses. A previously uncharacterized Pgt race, designated Ug99, has overcome most of the widely used resistance genes and is threatening major wheat production areas. Here, we demonstrate that the Sr35 gene from Triticum monococcum is a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat gene that confers near immunity to Ug99 and related races. This gene is absent in the A-genome diploid donor and in polyploid wheat but is effective when transferred from T. monococcum to polyploid wheat. The cloning of Sr35 opens the door to the use of biotechnological approaches to control this devastating disease and to analyses of the molecular interactions that define the wheat-rust pathosystem.

  7. Sudden Oak Death: Interactions of the Exotic Oomycete Phytophthora ramorum with Naïve North American Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    Ten years after a threatening and previously unknown disease of oaks and tanoaks appeared in coastal California, a significant amount of progress has been made toward the understanding of its causal agent Phytophthora ramorum and of the novel pathosystems associated with this exotic organism. However, a complete understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of this species still eludes us. In part, our inability to fully understand this organism is due to its phylogenetic, phylogeographic, phenotypic, and epidemiological complexities, all reviewed in this paper. Most lines of evidence suggest that the high degree of disease severity reported in California is not simply due to a generalized lack of resistance or tolerance in naïve hosts but also to an innate ability of the pathogen to survive in unfavorable climatic conditions and to reproduce rapidly when conditions become once again favorable. PMID:23002108

  8. Small RNA and mRNA Profiling of Arabidopsis in Response to Phytophthora Infection and PAMP Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (smRNAs) regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Well known for their roles in development, smRNAs have emerged as important regulators of plant immunity. Upon pathogen perception, accumulation of specific smRNAs are found to be altered, presumably as a host defense response. Therefore, identification of differentially accumulated smRNAs and their target genes would provide important insight into the regulation mechanism of immune responses. Here, we describe the detailed experimental procedure using Illumina sequencing to analyze the expression profiles of smRNAs and mRNAs in Arabidopsis. We focus on a newly developed pathosystem using Phytophthora capsici as the pathogen and include the treatment of Arabidopsis leaves with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of Phytophthora.

  9. Genome sequence resource for the oomycete taro pathogen Phytophthora colocasiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukuri, Ramesh Raju; Kushwaha, Sandeep; Sen, Diya; Whisson, Stephen C; Lamour, Kurt; Grenville-Briggs, Laura

    2018-03-20

    Phytophthora colocasiae is a phytopathogenic oomycete that causes leaf blight and corm rot on taro (Colocasia esculenta), an important staple crop in the tropics. The impact of P. colocasiae is a serious concern for food security in Asian and Oceanic regions. Vietnamese strain 7290 of P. colocasiae was sequenced (Illumina) to assemble a draft genome of 56.6 Mb, comprised of 19853 scaffolds and 19984 predicted protein-coding genes. As in other Phytophthora species, P. colocasiae possesses numerous pathogenicity-related genes, such as the RxLR class of effectors. This draft genome sequence of P. colocasiae provides a resource for underpinning the first steps into determining the molecular mechanisms of disease development in this pathosystem.

  10. Dissecting Phaseolus vulgaris Innate Immune System against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Bablu; Caldas, Danielle Gregório Gomes; Tsai, Siu Mui; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Melotto, Maeli

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Colletotrichum is one of the most economically important plant pathogens, causing anthracnose on a wide range of crops including common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Crop yield can be dramatically decreased depending on the plant cultivar used and the environmental conditions. This study aimed to identify potential genetic components of the bean immune system to provide environmentally friendly control measures against this fungus. Methodology and Principal Findings As the common bean is not amenable to reverse genetics to explore functionality and its genome is not fully curated, we used putative Arabidopsis orthologs of bean expressed sequence tag (EST) to perform bioinformatic analysis and experimental validation of gene expression to identify common bean genes regulated during the incompatible interaction with C. lindemuthianum. Similar to model pathosystems, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated that hormone biosynthesis and signaling in common beans seem to be modulated by fungus infection. For instance, cytokinin and ethylene responses were up-regulated and jasmonic acid, gibberellin, and abscisic acid responses were down-regulated, indicating that these hormones may play a central role in this pathosystem. Importantly, we have identified putative bean gene orthologs of Arabidopsis genes involved in the plant immune system. Based on experimental validation of gene expression, we propose that hypersensitive reaction as part of effector-triggered immunity may operate, at least in part, by down-regulating genes, such as FLS2-like and MKK5-like, putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes involved in pathogen perception and downstream signaling. Conclusions/Significance We have identified specific bean genes and uncovered metabolic processes and pathways that may be involved in the immune response against pathogens. Our transcriptome database is a rich resource for mining novel defense-related genes, which enabled us to develop a model of

  11. SNP design from 454 sequencing of Podosphaera plantaginis transcriptome reveals a genetically diverse pathogen metapopulation with high levels of mixed-genotype infection.

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    Charlotte Tollenaere

    Full Text Available Molecular tools may greatly improve our understanding of pathogen evolution and epidemiology but technical constraints have hindered the development of genetic resources for parasites compared to free-living organisms. This study aims at developing molecular tools for Podosphaera plantaginis, an obligate fungal pathogen of Plantago lanceolata. This interaction has been intensively studied in the Åland archipelago of Finland with epidemiological data collected from over 4,000 host populations annually since year 2001.A cDNA library of a pooled sample of fungal conidia was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 549,411 reads were obtained and annotated into 45,245 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 65.2% of the assembled sequences. The transcriptome assembly was screened for SNP loci, as well as for functionally important genes (mating-type genes and potential effector proteins. A genotyping assay of 27 SNP loci was designed and tested on 380 infected leaf samples from 80 populations within the Åland archipelago. With this panel we identified 85 multilocus genotypes (MLG with uneven frequencies across the pathogen metapopulation. Approximately half of the sampled populations contain polymorphism. Our genotyping protocol revealed mixed-genotype infection within a single host leaf to be common. Mixed infection has been proposed as one of the main drivers of pathogen evolution, and hence may be an important process in this pathosystem.The developed SNP panel offers exciting research perspectives for future studies in this well-characterized pathosystem. Also, the transcriptome provides an invaluable novel genomic resource for powdery mildews, which cause significant yield losses on commercially important crops annually. Furthermore, the features that render genetic studies in this system a challenge are shared with the majority of obligate parasitic species, and hence our results provide methodological insights from SNP calling to field

  12. Common motifs in the response of cereal primary metabolism to fungal pathogens are not based on similar transcriptional reprogramming

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    Lars Matthias Voll

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During compatible interactions with their host plants, biotrophic plant pathogens subvert host metabolism to ensure the sustained provision of nutrient assimilates by the colonized host cells. To investigate, whether common motifs can be revealed in the response of primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism towards colonization with biotrophic fungi in cereal leaves, we have conducted a combined metabolome and transcriptome study of three quite divergent pathosystems, the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei, the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola, the latter being a hemibiotroph that only exhibits an initial biotrophic phase during its establishment.Based on the analysis of 42 water-soluble metabolites, we were able to separate early biotrophic from late biotrophic interactions by hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, irrespective of the plant host. Interestingly, the corresponding transcriptome dataset could not discriminate between these stages of biotrophy, irrespective, of whether transcript data for genes of central metabolism or the entire transcriptome dataset was used. Strong differences in the transcriptional regulation of photosynthesis, glycolysis, the TCA cycle, lipid biosynthesis, and cell wall metabolism were observed between the pathosystems. Increased contents of Gln, Asn, and glucose as well as diminished contents of PEP and 3-PGA were common to early post-penetration stages of all interactions. On the transcriptional level, genes of the TCA cycle, nucleotide energy metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis exhibited consistent trends among the compared biotrophic interactions, identifying the requirement for metabolic energy and the rearrangement of amino acid pools as common transcriptional motifs during early biotrophy. Both metabolome and transcript data were employed to generate models of leaf primary metabolism during

  13. Host growth can cause invasive spread of crops by soilborne pathogens.

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    Melen Leclerc

    Full Text Available Invasive soilborne plant pathogens cause substantial damage to crops and natural populations, but our understanding of how to prevent their epidemics or reduce their damage is limited. A key and experimentally-tested concept in the epidemiology of soilborne plant diseases is that of a threshold spacing between hosts below which epidemics (invasive spread can occur. We extend this paradigm by examining how plant-root growth may alter the conditions for occurrence of soilborne pathogen epidemics in plant populations. We hypothesise that host-root growth can 1 increase the probability of pathogen transmission between neighbouring plants and, consequently, 2 decrease the threshold spacing for epidemics to occur. We predict that, in systems initially below their threshold conditions, root growth can trigger soilborne pathogen epidemics through a switch from non-invasive to invasive behaviour, while in systems above threshold conditions root growth can enhance epidemic development. As an example pathosystem, we studied the fungus Rhizoctonia solani on sugar beet in field experiments. To address hypothesis 1, we recorded infections within inoculum-donor and host-recipient pairs of plants with differing spacing. We translated these observations into the individual-level concept of pathozone, a host-centred form of dispersal kernel. To test hypothesis 2 and our prediction, we used the pathozone to parameterise a stochastic model of pathogen spread in a host population, contrasting scenarios of spread with and without host growth. Our results support our hypotheses and prediction. We suggest that practitioners of agriculture and arboriculture account for root system expansion in order to reduce the risk of soilborne-disease epidemics. We discuss changes in crop design, including increasing plant spacing and using crop mixtures, for boosting crop resilience to invasion and damage by soilborne pathogens. We speculate that the disease-induced root growth

  14. The development of quick, robust, quantitative phenotypic assays for describing the host-nonhost landscape to stripe rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andrew M; Bettgenhaeuser, Jan; Gardiner, Matthew; Green, Phon; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Hubbard, Amelia; Moscou, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Nonhost resistance is often conceptualized as a qualitative separation from host resistance. Classification into these two states is generally facile, as they fail to fully describe the range of states that exist in the transition from host to nonhost. This poses a problem when studying pathosystems that cannot be classified as either host or nonhost due to their intermediate status relative to these two extremes. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the Poaceae-stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend.) interaction for describing the host-nonhost landscape. First, using barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv. We observed that macroscopic symptoms of chlorosis and leaf browning were associated with hyphal colonization by P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, respectively. This prompted us to adapt a protocol for visualizing fungal structures into a phenotypic assay that estimates the percent of leaf colonized. Use of this assay in intermediate host and intermediate nonhost systems found the frequency of infection decreases with evolutionary divergence from the host species. Similarly, we observed that the pathogen's ability to complete its life cycle decreased faster than its ability to colonize leaf tissue, with no incidence of pustules observed in the intermediate nonhost system and significantly reduced pustule formation in the intermediate host system as compared to the host system, barley-P. striiformis f. sp. hordei. By leveraging the stripe rust pathosystem in conjunction with macroscopic and microscopic phenotypic assays, we now hope to dissect the genetic architecture of intermediate host and intermediate nonhost resistance using structured populations in barley and B. distachyon.

  15. Common Motifs in the Response of Cereal Primary Metabolism to Fungal Pathogens are not Based on Similar Transcriptional Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voll, Lars Matthias; Horst, Robin Jonathan; Voitsik, Anna-Maria; Zajic, Doreen; Samans, Birgit; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Doehlemann, Gunther; Münch, Steffen; Wahl, Ramon; Molitor, Alexandra; Hofmann, Jörg; Schmiedl, Alfred; Waller, Frank; Deising, Holger Bruno; Kahmann, Regine; Kämper, Jörg; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    During compatible interactions with their host plants, biotrophic plant–pathogens subvert host metabolism to ensure the sustained provision of nutrient assimilates by the colonized host cells. To investigate, whether common motifs can be revealed in the response of primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism toward colonization with biotrophic fungi in cereal leaves, we have conducted a combined metabolome and transcriptome study of three quite divergent pathosystems, the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei), the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, and the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola, the latter being a hemibiotroph that only exhibits an initial biotrophic phase during its establishment. Based on the analysis of 42 water-soluble metabolites, we were able to separate early biotrophic from late biotrophic interactions by hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, irrespective of the plant host. Interestingly, the corresponding transcriptome dataset could not discriminate between these stages of biotrophy, irrespective, of whether transcript data for genes of central metabolism or the entire transcriptome dataset was used. Strong differences in the transcriptional regulation of photosynthesis, glycolysis, the TCA cycle, lipid biosynthesis, and cell wall metabolism were observed between the pathosystems. However, increased contents of Gln, Asn, and glucose as well as diminished contents of PEP and 3-PGA were common to early post-penetration stages of all interactions. On the transcriptional level, genes of the TCA cycle, nucleotide energy metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis exhibited consistent trends among the compared biotrophic interactions, identifying the requirement for metabolic energy and the rearrangement of amino acid pools as common transcriptional motifs during early biotrophy. Both metabolome and transcript data were employed to generate models of leaf primary metabolism during early

  16. The development of quick, robust, quantitative phenotypic assays for describing the host-nonhost landscape to stripe rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Marc Dawson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonhost resistance is often conceptualized as a qualitative separation from host resistance. Classification into these two states is generally facile, as they fail to fully describe the range of states that exist in the transition from host to nonhost. This poses a problem when studying pathosystems that cannot be classified as either host or nonhost due to their intermediate status relative to these two extremes. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the Poaceae-stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend. interaction for describing the host-nonhost landscape. First, using barley (Hordeum vulgare L. and Brachypodium distachyon (L. P. Beauv. we observed that macroscopic symptoms of chlorosis and leaf browning were associated with hyphal colonization by P. striiformis f. sp. tritici, respectively. This prompted us to adapt a protocol for visualizing fungal structures into a phenotypic assay that estimates the percent of leaf colonized. Use of this assay in intermediate host and intermediate nonhost systems found the frequency of infection decreases with evolutionary divergence from the host species. Similarly, we observed that the pathogen’s ability to complete its life cycle decreased faster than its ability to colonize leaf tissue, with no incidence of pustules observed in the intermediate nonhost system and significantly reduced pustule formation in the intermediate host system as compared to the host system, barley-P. striiformis f. sp. hordei. By leveraging the stripe rust pathosystem in conjunction with macroscopic and microscopic phenotypic assays, we now hope to dissect the genetic architecture of intermediate host and intermediate nonhost resistance using structured populations in barley and B. distachyon.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A; Purvine, Samuel O; Zink, Erika M; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  18. Diversity of fungal endophytes in non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Keith; Shearin, Zachery; Bourke, Kimberly; Bickford, Wesley A.; Kowalski, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–microbial interactions may play a key role in plant invasions. One common microbial interaction takes place between plants and fungal endophytes when fungi asymptomatically colonize host plant tissues. The objectives of this study were to isolate and sequence fungal endophytes colonizing non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes region to evaluate variation in endophyte community composition among three host tissue types and three geographical regions. We collected entire ramets from multiple clones and populations, surface sterilized plant tissues, and plated replicate tissue samples from leaves, stems, and rhizomes on corn meal agar plates to culture and isolate fungal endophytes. Isolates were then subjected to Sanger sequencing of the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Sequences were compared to fungal databases to define operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were analyzed statistically for community composition. In total, we obtained 173 endophyte isolates corresponding to 55 OTUs, 39 of which were isolated only a single time. The most common OTU corresponded most closely to Sarocladium strictum and comprised 25 % of all fungal isolates. More OTUs were found in stem tissues, but endophyte diversity was greatest in rhizome tissues. PERMANOVA analyses indicated significant differences in endophyte communities among tissue types, geographical regions, and the interaction between those factors, but no differences among individual ramets were detected. The functional role of the isolated endophytes is not yet known, but one genus isolated here (Stagonospora) has been reported to enhance Phragmites growth. Understanding the diversity and functions of Phragmites endophytes may provide targets for control measures based on disrupting host plant/endophyte interactions.

  19. Quantitative iTRAQ-based secretome analysis reveals species-specific and temporal shifts in carbon utilization strategies among manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Wu, Si; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2017-09-01

    Fungi generate a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes and reactive metabolites, collectively known as the secretome, that synergistically drive plant litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or directly compared temporal patterns of enzyme utilization among diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon (C) degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of iTRAQ proteomics and custom bioinformatic analyses to compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi over a three-week time course. We demonstrate that although the fungi produce a similar suite of extracellular enzymes, they exhibit striking differences in the regulation of these enzymes among species and over time, revealing species-specific and temporal shifts in C utilization strategies as they degrade the same substrate. Specifically, our findings suggest that Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a and Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f employ sequential enzyme secretion patterns concomitant with decreasing resource availability, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a preferentially degrades proteinaceous substrate before switching to carbohydrates, and Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a utilizes primarily peptidases to aggressively attack carbon sources in a concentrated burst. This work highlights the diversity of operative metabolic strategies among cellulose-degrading Ascomycetes and enhances our understanding of their role in C turnover in the environment.

  20. Finished genome of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola reveals dispensome structure, chromosome plasticity, and stealth pathogenesis.

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    Stephen B Goodwin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production. Control of the disease has been hampered by a limited understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases of pathogenicity, including mechanisms of infection and of resistance in the host. Unlike most other plant pathogens, M. graminicola has a long latent period during which it evades host defenses. Although this type of stealth pathogenicity occurs commonly in Mycosphaerella and other Dothideomycetes, the largest class of plant-pathogenic fungi, its genetic basis is not known. To address this problem, the genome of M. graminicola was sequenced completely. The finished genome contains 21 chromosomes, eight of which could be lost with no visible effect on the fungus and thus are dispensable. This eight-chromosome dispensome is dynamic in field and progeny isolates, is different from the core genome in gene and repeat content, and appears to have originated by ancient horizontal transfer from an unknown donor. Synteny plots of the M. graminicola chromosomes versus those of the only other sequenced Dothideomycete, Stagonospora nodorum, revealed conservation of gene content but not order or orientation, suggesting a high rate of intra-chromosomal rearrangement in one or both species. This observed "mesosynteny" is very different from synteny seen between other organisms. A surprising feature of the M. graminicola genome compared to other sequenced plant pathogens was that it contained very few genes for enzymes that break down plant cell walls, which was more similar to endophytes than to pathogens. The stealth pathogenesis of M. graminicola probably involves degradation of proteins rather than carbohydrates to evade host defenses during the biotrophic

  1. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Zeiner

    Full Text Available Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a. We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  3. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly eDzhavakhiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or chemosensitization. Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of A. alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of F. sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  4. Fungal Planet description sheets: 281-319.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Schumacher, R K; Summerell, B A; Giraldo, A; Gené, J; Guarro, J; Wanasinghe, D N; Hyde, K D; Camporesi, E; Gareth Jones, E B; Thambugala, K M; Malysheva, E F; Malysheva, V F; Acharya, K; Álvarez, J; Alvarado, P; Assefa, A; Barnes, C W; Bartlett, J S; Blanchette, R A; Burgess, T I; Carlavilla, J R; Coetzee, M P A; Damm, U; Decock, C A; den Breeÿen, A; de Vries, B; Dutta, A K; Holdom, D G; Rooney-Latham, S; Manjón, J L; Marincowitz, S; Mirabolfathy, M; Moreno, G; Nakashima, C; Papizadeh, M; Shahzadeh Fazeli, S A; Amoozegar, M A; Romberg, M K; Shivas, R G; Stalpers, J A; Stielow, B; Stukely, M J C; Swart, W J; Tan, Y P; van der Bank, M; Wood, A R; Zhang, Y; Groenewald, J Z

    2014-12-01

    Novel species of fungi described in the present study include the following from South Africa: Alanphillipsia aloeicola from Aloe sp., Arxiella dolichandrae from Dolichandra unguiscati, Ganoderma austroafricanum from Jacaranda mimosifolia, Phacidiella podocarpi and Phaeosphaeria podocarpi from Podocarpus latifolius, Phyllosticta mimusopisicola from Mimusops zeyheri and Sphaerulina pelargonii from Pelargonium sp. Furthermore, Barssia maroccana is described from Cedrus atlantica (Morocco), Codinaea pini from Pinus patula (Uganda), Crucellisporiopsis marquesiae from Marquesia acuminata (Zambia), Dinemasporium ipomoeae from Ipomoea pes-caprae (Vietnam), Diaporthe phragmitis from Phragmites australis (China), Marasmius vladimirii from leaf litter (India), Melanconium hedericola from Hedera helix (Spain), Pluteus albotomentosus and Pluteus extremiorientalis from a mixed forest (Russia), Rachicladosporium eucalypti from Eucalyptus globulus (Ethiopia), Sistotrema epiphyllum from dead leaves of Fagus sylvatica in a forest (The Netherlands), Stagonospora chrysopyla from Scirpus microcarpus (USA) and Trichomerium dioscoreae from Dioscorea sp. (Japan). Novel species from Australia include: Corynespora endiandrae from Endiandra introrsa, Gonatophragmium triuniae from Triunia youngiana, Penicillium coccotrypicola from Archontophoenix cunninghamiana and Phytophthora moyootj from soil. Novelties from Iran include Neocamarosporium chichastianum from soil and Seimatosporium pistaciae from Pistacia vera. Xenosonderhenia eucalypti and Zasmidium eucalyptigenum are newly described from Eucalyptus urophylla in Indonesia. Diaporthe acaciarum and Roussoella acacia are newly described from Acacia tortilis in Tanzania. New species from Italy include Comoclathris spartii from Spartium junceum and Phoma tamaricicola from Tamarix gallica. Novel genera include (Ascomycetes): Acremoniopsis from forest soil and Collarina from water sediments (Spain), Phellinocrescentia from a Phellinus sp. (French

  5. A fungal phylogeny based on 42 complete genomes derived from supertree and combined gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajich Jason E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, most fungal phylogenies have been derived from single gene comparisons, or from concatenated alignments of a small number of genes. The increase in fungal genome sequencing presents an opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events using entire genomes. As a tool for future comparative, phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies, we used both supertrees and concatenated alignments to infer relationships between 42 species of fungi for which complete genome sequences are available. Results A dataset of 345,829 genes was extracted from 42 publicly available fungal genomes. Supertree methods were employed to derive phylogenies from 4,805 single gene families. We found that the average consensus supertree method may suffer from long-branch attraction artifacts, while matrix representation with parsimony (MRP appears to be immune from these. A genome phylogeny was also reconstructed from a concatenated alignment of 153 universally distributed orthologs. Our MRP supertree and concatenated phylogeny are highly congruent. Within the Ascomycota, the sub-phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina were resolved. Both phylogenies infer that the Leotiomycetes are the closest sister group to the Sordariomycetes. There is some ambiguity regarding the placement of Stagonospora nodurum, the sole member of the class Dothideomycetes present in the dataset. Within the Saccharomycotina, a monophyletic clade containing organisms that translate CTG as serine instead of leucine is evident. There is also strong support for two groups within the CTG clade, one containing the fully sexual species Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii, and the second group containing Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. The second major clade within the Saccharomycotina contains species whose genomes have undergone a whole genome duplication (WGD, and their close

  6. Triticale biotic stresses--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseniuk, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Triticale has been considered as resistant to diseases over a long time. Although, many authors perpetuate this opinion, it is no longer true. However, in comparison to wheat and rye triticale still may look as a healthy crop, but its healthiness has been steadily declining. It could be explained by steady expansion of the growing area and longer exposure to pathogens. On the other hand, triticale is a crop on which meet pathogens of wheat and rye, but there is evidence that on triticale embedded more so called "wheat pathogens", than rye ones. For such an notable example may serve races of Puccinia recondita. In the latter respect triticale also appears to be a bridge facilitating a direct contact between the pathogens, e.g. between physiological forms of the most important cereal rusts. Such contacts stimulate somatic hybridization on bridging triticale plant and may finally result in new hybrid pathotypes carrying virulence genes (factors) to all three hosts, i.e. triticale, wheat and rye. In addition to all triticale commercial and agronomical values, triticale still is and it will continue to be bridging transfers of resistance genes to various pathogens and pests mainly from rye to wheat. The paper will describe main diseases affecting triticale worldwide. The first disease which occurred on this cereal in epidemic proportions was stem rust (Pucinia graminis f. sp. tritici) in Australia. Leaf and stripe rusts (P. recondita f. sp. tritici and P. striiformis) are also have gained in importance everywhere triticale is grown. In recent years, at least in Poland, powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis occurred in epidemic proportions in quite a number of winter triticale cultivars. Similar phenomenon has been observed with quite a number of other diseases caused by facultative pathogens, such as the most damaging to triticale the Stagonospora spp. leaf and glume blotch disease complex and other pathogens like Cochliobolus sativus, Fusarium culmorum, and F

  7. Secretome-based Manganese(II) Oxidation by Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Chaput, D.; Wu, S.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest oxidants in the environment, and Mn(II) oxidation to Mn(III/IV) (hydr)oxides includes both abiotic and microbially-mediated processes. While white-rot Basidiomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) using laccases and Mn peroxidases in association with lignocellulose degradation, the mechanisms by which filamentous Ascomycete fungi oxidize Mn(II) and a physiological role for Mn(II) oxidation in these organisms remain poorly understood. Through a combination of chemical and in-gel assays, bulk mass spectrometry, and iTRAQ proteomics, we demonstrate enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation in the secretomes of three phylogenetically diverse Ascomycetes that were isolated from Mn-laden sediments. Candidate Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes were species-specific and included bilirubin oxidase and tyrosinase in Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, GMC oxidoreductase in Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a, and FAD-binding oxidoreductases in Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a. These findings were supported by full proteomic characterization of the secretomes, which revealed a lack of Mn, lignin, and versatile peroxidases in these Ascomycetes but a substantially higher proportion of LMCOs and GMC oxidoreductases compared to wood-rot Basidiomycetes. We also identified the potential for indirect enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation by hydroxyl radical, as the secretomes were rich in diverse lignocellulose-degrading enzymes that could participate in Fenton chemistry. A link between Mn(II) oxidation and carbon oxidation analogous to white-rot Basidiomycetes remains unknown in these Ascomycetes. Interestingly, growth rates on rich medium were unaffected by the presence of Mn(II), and the production of Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins in the secretome was constitutive and not inducible by Mn(II). Thus, no physiological benefit of Mn(II) oxidation in these Ascomycetes has yet been identified, and Mn(II) oxidation appears to be a side reaction. Future work will explore the lignin-degrading capacity of

  8. Surfactin Protects Wheat against Zymoseptoria tritici and Activates Both Salicylic Acid- and Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Defense Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Le Mire

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural elicitors induce plant resistance against a broad spectrum of diseases, and are currently among the most promising biocontrol tools. The present study focuses on the elicitor properties of the cyclic lipopeptide surfactin on wheat, in order to stimulate the defenses of this major crop against the challenging fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. The protection efficacy of surfactin extracted from the strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S499 was investigated through greenhouse trials. Surfactin protected wheat by 70% against Z. tritici, similarly to the chemical reference elicitor Bion®50WG. In vitro biocidal assays revealed no antifungal activities of surfactin towards the pathogen. A biomolecular RT-qPCR based low-density microarray tool was used to study the relative expression of 23 wheat defense genes. Surfactin significantly induced wheat natural defenses by stimulating both salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways. Surfactin was successfully tested as an elicitor on the pathosystem wheat–Z. tritici. These results promote further sustainable agricultural practices and the reduction of chemical inputs.

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Nor'Aishah; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Rahim, Harun A.; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Mazlan, Norida; Abdullah, Shamsiah

    2016-02-01

    Rice is arguably the most crucial food crops supplying quarter of calories intake. Fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae promotes blast disease unconditionally to gramineous host including rice species. This disease spurred an outbreaks and constant threat to cereal production. Global rice yield declining almost 10-30% including Malaysia. As Magnaphorthe oryzae and its host is model in disease plant study, the rice blast pathosystem has been the subject of intense interest to overcome the importance of the disease to world agriculture. Therefore, in this study, our prime objective was to isolate samples of Magnaphorthe oryzae from diseased leaf obtained from MARDI Seberang Perai, Penang, Malaysia. Molecular identification was performed by sequences analysis from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes. Phylogenetic affiliation of the isolated samples were analyzed by comparing the ITS sequences with those deposited in the GenBank database. The sequence of the isolate demonstrated at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaphorthe oryzae. Morphological observed under microscope demonstrated that the structure of conidia followed similar characteristic as M. oryzae. Finding in this study provide useful information for breeding programs, epidemiology studies and improved disease management.

  10. Memahami Prinsip Ambang Penyakit Serangga dalam Konteks Epizootiologi

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    F. X. Susilo

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Disease phenomena in insect population can be understood through epizootic modeling. In a pathosystem, disease is generated by transmission (ρ and is decayed by death (μ. Mass incidence and decay of disease depend on the disease threshold density (St* which inherently possesses three traits. First, if the density of susceptible insects (St > St* then disease incidence (It will increase ( ΔIt > 0 . Second, if St < St*, then It will decrease ( ΔIt < 0 . Third, if St = St* then there will be no new infection ( ΔIt = 0 . Threshold density can be determined monocyclically through laboratory bioassays and polycyclically through field observation. The values of μ and ρ, which are the principal components of monocyclic threshold density, may indicate whether the corresponding entomopathogen is the better candidate for microbial insecticide or, otherwise, even better as the biological control agent (natural enemy. Meanwhile, the concept of polycyclic threshold density highlights the importance of incorporation of sampling of infected insects into the existing agro-ecosystem monitoring scheme.

  11. An interspecific barberry hybrid enables genetic dissection of non-host resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartaula, Radhika; Melo, Arthur T O; Connolly, Bryan A; Jin, Yue; Hale, Iago

    2018-02-26

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pg), remains a devastating disease of wheat; and the emergence of new Pg races virulent on deployed resistance genes fuels the ongoing search for sources of durable resistance. Despite its intrinsic durability, non-host resistance (NHR) is largely unexplored as a protection strategy against Pg, partly due to the inherent challenge of developing a genetically tractable system within which NHR segregates. Here we demonstrate that Pg's far less-studied ancestral host, barberry (Berberis spp.), provides such a unique pathosystem. Characterization of a natural population of B. ×ottawensis (B×o), an interspecific hybrid of Pg-susceptible B. vulgaris and Pg-resistant B. thunbergii (Bt), reveals that this uncommon nothospecies can be used to dissect the genetic mechanism(s) of Pg-NHR exhibited by Bt. Artificial inoculation of a natural population of B×o accessions, verified via genotyping-by-sequencing to be first generation hybrids, revealed 51% susceptible, 33% resistant, and 16% intermediate phenotypes. Characterization of a B×o full-sib family excluded the possibility of maternal inheritance of the resistance. By demonstrating segregation of Pg-NHR in a hybrid population, this study challenges the assumed irrelevance of Bt to Pg epidemiology and lays a novel foundation for the genetic dissection of NHR to one of agriculture's most studied pathogens.

  12. Unraveling the Wheat Stem Rust Infection Process on Barley Genotypes Through Relative qPCR and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurn, J D; Dugyala, S; Borowicz, P; Brueggeman, R; Acevedo, M

    2015-05-01

    The infection process of wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) on barley (Hordeum vulgare) is often observed as a mesothetic infection type at the seedling stages, and cultivars containing the same major resistance genes often show variation in the level of resistance provided against the same pathogen race or isolate. Thus, robust phenotyping data based on quantification of fungal DNA can improve the ability to elucidate host-pathogen interaction, especially at early time points of infection when disease symptoms are not yet evident. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to determine the amount of fungal DNA relative to host DNA in infected tissue, providing new insights about fungal development and host resistance during the infection process in this pathosystem. The stem rust susceptible 'Steptoe', resistant cultivars containing only Rpg1 ('Beacon', 'Morex', and 'Chevron'), and the resistant line Q21861 containing Rpg1 and the rpg4/Rpg5 complex were evaluated using the traditional 0-to-4 rating scale, fluorescence microscopy, and qPCR. Statistical differences (Pwheat stem rust infection process, indicating potential host genotype contributions related to basal defense during the wheat stem rust infection process.

  13. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

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    Thomas E Simon

    Full Text Available Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed.

  14. Insights into Genome Plasticity and Pathogenicity of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Revealed by the Complete Genome Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Frank; Koebnik, Ralf; Bekel, Thomas; Berger, Carolin; Boch, Jens; Büttner, Daniela; Caldana, Camila; Gaigalat, Lars; Goesmann, Alexander; Kay, Sabine; Kirchner, Oliver; Lanz, Christa; Linke, Burkhard; McHardy, Alice C.; Meyer, Folker; Mittenhuber, Gerhard; Nies, Dietrich H.; Niesbach-Klösgen, Ulla; Patschkowski, Thomas; Rückert, Christian; Rupp, Oliver; Schneiker, Susanne; Schuster, Stephan C.; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Weber, Ernst; Pühler, Alfred; Bonas, Ulla; Bartels, Daniela; Kaiser, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria is the causative agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato plants, which leads to economically important yield losses. This pathosystem has become a well-established model for studying bacterial infection strategies. Here, we present the whole-genome sequence of the pepper-pathogenic Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria strain 85-10, which comprises a 5.17-Mb circular chromosome and four plasmids. The genome has a high G+C content (64.75%) and signatures of extensive genome plasticity. Whole-genome comparisons revealed a gene order similar to both Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and a structure completely different from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. A total of 548 coding sequences (12.2%) are unique to X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. In addition to a type III secretion system, which is essential for pathogenicity, the genome of strain 85-10 encodes all other types of protein secretion systems described so far in gram-negative bacteria. Remarkably, one of the putative type IV secretion systems encoded on the largest plasmid is similar to the Icm/Dot systems of the human pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii. Comparisons with other completely sequenced plant pathogens predicted six novel type III effector proteins and several other virulence factors, including adhesins, cell wall-degrading enzymes, and extracellular polysaccharides. PMID:16237009

  15. Contribution of proteomics to the study of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Raquel; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V

    2012-01-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi are one of the most damaging plant parasitic organisms, and can cause serious diseases and important yield losses in crops. The study of the biology of these microorganisms and the interaction with their hosts has experienced great advances in recent years due to the development of moderm, holistic and high-throughput -omic techniques, together with the increasing number of genome sequencing projects and the development of mutants and reverse genetics tools. We highlight among these -omic techniques the importance of proteomics, which has become a relevant tool in plant-fungus pathosystem research. Proteomics intends to identify gene products with a key role in pathogenicity and virulence. These studies would help in the search of key protein targets and in the development of agrochemicals, which may open new ways for crop disease diagnosis and protection. In this review, we made an overview on the contribution of proteomics to the knowledge of life cycle, infection mechanisms, and virulence of the plant pathogenic fungi. Data from current, innovative literature, according to both methodological and experimental systems, were summarized and discussed. Specific sections were devoted to the most studied fungal phytopathogens: Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Fusarium graminearum.

  16. Complex Interactions between Fungal Avirulence Genes and Their Corresponding Plant Resistance Genes and Consequences for Disease Resistance Management

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    Yohann Petit-Houdenot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During infection, pathogens secrete an arsenal of molecules, collectively called effectors, key elements of pathogenesis which modulate innate immunity of the plant and facilitate infection. Some of these effectors can be recognized directly or indirectly by resistance (R proteins from the plant and are then called avirulence (AVR proteins. This recognition usually triggers defense responses including the hypersensitive response and results in resistance of the plant. R—AVR gene interactions are frequently exploited in the field to control diseases. Recently, the availability of fungal genomes has accelerated the identification of AVR genes in plant pathogenic fungi, including in fungi infecting agronomically important crops. While single AVR genes recognized by their corresponding R gene were identified, more and more complex interactions between AVR and R genes are reported (e.g., AVR genes recognized by several R genes, R genes recognizing several AVR genes in distinct organisms, one AVR gene suppressing recognition of another AVR gene by its corresponding R gene, two cooperating R genes both necessary to recognize an AVR gene. These complex interactions were particularly reported in pathosystems showing a long co-evolution with their host plant but could also result from the way agronomic crops were obtained and improved (e.g., through interspecific hybridization or introgression of resistance genes from wild related species into cultivated crops. In this review, we describe some complex R—AVR interactions between plants and fungi that were recently reported and discuss their implications for AVR gene evolution and R gene management.

  17. Comparative Methods for Molecular Determination of Host-Specificity Factors in Plant-Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilam Borah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many plant-pathogenic fungi are highly host-specific. In most cases, host-specific interactions evolved at the time of speciation of the respective host plants. However, host jumps have occurred quite frequently, and still today the greatest threat for the emergence of new fungal diseases is the acquisition of infection capability of a new host by an existing plant pathogen. Understanding the mechanisms underlying host-switching events requires knowledge of the factors determining host-specificity. In this review, we highlight molecular methods that use a comparative approach for the identification of host-specificity factors. These cover a wide range of experimental set-ups, such as characterization of the pathosystem, genotyping of host-specific strains, comparative genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as gene prediction and functional gene validation. The methods are described and evaluated in view of their success in the identification of host-specificity factors and the understanding of their functional mechanisms. In addition, potential methods for the future identification of host-specificity factors are discussed.

  18. Fusarium verticillioides: Advancements in Understanding the Toxicity, Virulence, and Niche Adaptations of a Model Mycotoxigenic Pathogen of Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacutt, Alex A; Gold, Scott E; Voss, Kenneth A; Gao, Minglu; Glenn, Anthony E

    2018-03-01

    The importance of understanding the biology of the mycotoxigenic fungus Fusarium verticillioides and its various microbial and plant host interactions is critical given its threat to maize, one of the world's most valuable food crops. Disease outbreaks and mycotoxin contamination of grain threaten economic returns and have grave implications for human and animal health and food security. Furthermore, F. verticillioides is a member of a genus of significant phytopathogens and, thus, data regarding its host association, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and other metabolic (degradative) capabilities are consequential to both basic and applied research efforts across multiple pathosystems. Notorious among its secondary metabolites are the fumonisin mycotoxins, which cause severe animal diseases and are implicated in human disease. Additionally, studies of these mycotoxins have led to new understandings of F. verticillioides plant pathogenicity and provide tools for research into cellular processes and host-pathogen interaction strategies. This review presents current knowledge regarding several significant lines of F. verticillioides research, including facets of toxin production, virulence, and novel fitness strategies exhibited by this fungus across rhizosphere and plant environments.

  19. Networks in plant epidemiology: from genes to landscapes, countries, and continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslonka-Lefebvre, Mathieu; Finley, Ann; Dorigatti, Ilaria; Dehnen-Schmutz, Katharina; Harwood, Tom; Jeger, Michael J; Xu, Xiangming; Holdenrieder, Ottmar; Pautasso, Marco

    2011-04-01

    There is increasing use of networks in ecology and epidemiology, but still relatively little application in phytopathology. Networks are sets of elements (nodes) connected in various ways by links (edges). Network analysis aims to understand system dynamics and outcomes in relation to network characteristics. Many existing natural, social, and technological networks have been shown to have small-world (local connectivity with short-cuts) and scale-free (presence of super-connected nodes) properties. In this review, we discuss how network concepts can be applied in plant pathology from the molecular to the landscape and global level. Wherever disease spread occurs not just because of passive/natural dispersion but also due to artificial movements, it makes sense to superimpose realistic models of the trade in plants on spatially explicit models of epidemic development. We provide an example of an emerging pathosystem (Phytophthora ramorum) where a theoretical network approach has proven particularly fruitful in analyzing the spread of disease in the UK plant trade. These studies can help in assessing the future threat posed by similar emerging pathogens. Networks have much potential in plant epidemiology and should become part of the standard curriculum.

  20. Common foliar fungi of Populus trichocarpa modify Melampsora rust disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Peay, Kabir G; Newcombe, George

    2016-03-01

    Nonpathogenic foliar fungi (i.e. endophytes and epiphytes) can modify plant disease severity in controlled experiments. However, experiments have not been combined with ecological studies in wild plant pathosystems to determine whether disease-modifying fungi are common enough to be ecologically important. We used culture-based methods and DNA sequencing to characterize the abundance and distribution of foliar fungi of Populus trichocarpa in wild populations across its native range (Pacific Northwest, USA). We conducted complementary, manipulative experiments to test how foliar fungi commonly isolated from those populations influence the severity of Melampsora leaf rust disease. Finally, we examined correlative relationships between the abundance of disease-modifying foliar fungi and disease severity in wild trees. A taxonomically and geographically diverse group of common foliar fungi significantly modified disease severity in experiments, either increasing or decreasing disease severity. Spatial patterns in the abundance of some of these foliar fungi were significantly correlated (in predicted directions) with disease severity in wild trees. Our study reveals that disease modification is an ecological function shared by common foliar fungal symbionts of P. trichocarpa. This finding raises new questions about plant disease ecology and plant biodiversity, and has applied potential for disease management. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Plants versus fungi and oomycetes: pathogenesis, defense and counter-defense in the proteomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; El-Bebany, Ahmed F; Yao, Zhen; Adam, Lorne R; El Hadrami, Ismailx; Daayf, Fouad

    2012-01-01

    Plant-fungi and plant-oomycete interactions have been studied at the proteomic level for many decades. However, it is only in the last few years, with the development of new approaches, combined with bioinformatics data mining tools, gel staining, and analytical instruments, such as 2D-PAGE/nanoflow-LC-MS/MS, that proteomic approaches thrived. They allow screening and analysis, at the sub-cellular level, of peptides and proteins resulting from plants, pathogens, and their interactions. They also highlight post-translational modifications to proteins, e.g., glycosylation, phosphorylation or cleavage. However, many challenges are encountered during in planta studies aimed at stressing details of host defenses and fungal and oomycete pathogenicity determinants during interactions. Dissecting the mechanisms of such host-pathogen systems, including pathogen counter-defenses, will ensure a step ahead towards understanding current outcomes of interactions from a co-evolutionary point of view, and eventually move a step forward in building more durable strategies for management of diseases caused by fungi and oomycetes. Unraveling intricacies of more complex proteomic interactions that involve additional microbes, i.e., PGPRs and symbiotic fungi, which strengthen plant defenses will generate valuable information on how pathosystems actually function in nature, and thereby provide clues to solving disease problems that engender major losses in crops every year.

  2. Semiautomated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: Microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minker, Katharine R; Biedrzycki, Meredith L; Kolagunda, Abhishek; Rhein, Stephen; Perina, Fabiano J; Jacobs, Samuel S; Moore, Michael; Jamann, Tiffany M; Yang, Qin; Nelson, Rebecca; Balint-Kurti, Peter; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Wisser, Randall J; Caplan, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-01

    The study of phenotypic variation in plant pathogenesis provides fundamental information about the nature of disease resistance. Cellular mechanisms that alter pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy; however, systematic phenotyping platforms-from sample processing to image analysis-to investigate this do not exist. We have developed a platform for 3D phenotyping of cellular features underlying variation in disease development by fluorescence-specific resolution of host and pathogen interactions across time (4D). A confocal microscopy phenotyping platform compatible with different maize-fungal pathosystems (fungi: Setosphaeria turcica, Cochliobolus heterostrophus, and Cercospora zeae-maydis) was developed. Protocols and techniques were standardized for sample fixation, optical clearing, species-specific combinatorial fluorescence staining, multisample imaging, and image processing for investigation at the macroscale. The sample preparation methods presented here overcome challenges to fluorescence imaging such as specimen thickness and topography as well as physiological characteristics of the samples such as tissue autofluorescence and presence of cuticle. The resulting imaging techniques provide interesting qualitative and quantitative information not possible with conventional light or electron 2D imaging. Microsc. Res. Tech., 81:141-152, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Morphological and molecular characterization of fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Nor’Aishah; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Rahim, Harun A.; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Mazlan, Norida; Abdullah, Shamsiah

    2016-01-01

    Rice is arguably the most crucial food crops supplying quarter of calories intake. Fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae promotes blast disease unconditionally to gramineous host including rice species. This disease spurred an outbreaks and constant threat to cereal production. Global rice yield declining almost 10-30% including Malaysia. As Magnaphorthe oryzae and its host is model in disease plant study, the rice blast pathosystem has been the subject of intense interest to overcome the importance of the disease to world agriculture. Therefore, in this study, our prime objective was to isolate samples of Magnaphorthe oryzae from diseased leaf obtained from MARDI Seberang Perai, Penang, Malaysia. Molecular identification was performed by sequences analysis from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes. Phylogenetic affiliation of the isolated samples were analyzed by comparing the ITS sequences with those deposited in the GenBank database. The sequence of the isolate demonstrated at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaphorthe oryzae. Morphological observed under microscope demonstrated that the structure of conidia followed similar characteristic as M. oryzae. Finding in this study provide useful information for breeding programs, epidemiology studies and improved disease management

  4. Temporal Effects of a Begomovirus Infection and Host Plant Resistance on the Preference and Development of an Insect Vector, Bemisia tabaci, and Implications for Epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarrea, Saioa; Barman, Apurba; Marchant, Wendy; Diffie, Stan; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent plant viruses, by altering phenotypic and physiological traits of their hosts, could modulate the host preference and fitness of hemipteran vectors. A majority of such modulations increase vector preference for virus-infected plants and improve vector fitness, ultimately favouring virus spread. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how these virus-induced modulations on vectors vary temporally, and whether host resistance to the pathogen influences such effects. This study addressed the two questions using a Begomovirus-whitefly-tomato model pathosystem. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) -susceptible and TYLCV-resistant tomato genotypes were evaluated by whitefly-mediated transmission assays. Quantitative PCR revealed that virus accumulation decreased after an initial spike in all genotypes. TYLCV accumulation was less in resistant than in susceptible genotypes at 3, 6, and 12 weeks post inoculation (WPI). TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies over time from resistant and susceptible genotypes was also consistent with virus accumulation in the host plant. Furthermore, preference assays indicated that non-viruliferous whiteflies preferred virus-infected plants, whereas viruliferous whiteflies preferred non-infected plants. However, this effect was prominent only with the susceptible genotype at 6 WPI. The development of whiteflies on non-infected susceptible and resistant genotypes was not significantly different. However, developmental time was reduced when a susceptible genotype was infected with TYLCV. Together, these results suggest that vector preference and development could be affected by the timing of infection and by host resistance. These effects could play a crucial role in TYLCV epidemics. PMID:26529402

  5. Revisiting Vitis vinifera subtilase gene family: a possible role in grapevine resistance against Plasmopara viticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Figueiredo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subtilisin-like proteases, also known as subtilases, are a very diverse family of serine peptidases present in many organisms. In grapevine, there are hints of the involvement of subtilases in defence mechanisms, but their role is not yet understood. The first characterization of the subtilase gene family was performed in 2014. However, simultaneously, the grapevine genome was re-annotated and several sequences were re-annotated or retrieved. We have performed a re-characterization of this family in grapevine and identified 82 genes coding for 97 putative proteins, as result of alternative splicing. All the subtilases identified present the characteristic S8 peptidase domain and the majority of them also have a pro-domain I9 inhibitor, a protease-associated (PA domain and a signal peptide for targeting to the secretory pathway. Phylogenetic studies revealed six subtilase groups denominated VvSBT1 to VvSBT6. As several evidences have highlighted the participation of plant subtilases in response to biotic stimulus, we have investigated subtilase participation in grapevine resistance to Plasmopara viticola, the causative agent of downy mildew. Fourteen grapevine subtilases presenting either high homology to P69C from tomato, SBT3.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana or located near the Resistance to Plasmopara viticola (RPV locus were selected. Expression studies were conducted in the grapevine-P. viticola pathosystem with resistant and susceptible cultivars. Our results may indicate that some of grapevine subtilisins are potentially participating in the defence response against this biotrophic oomycete.

  6. Narrative History of the Resistance Screening Center: It’s Origins, Leadership and Partial List of Public Benefits and Scientific Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Young

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Forty years ago, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA Forest Service developed and currently operates the Resistance Screening Center near Asheville, North Carolina, as a service to both industry and university-based tree improvement programs and tree-seed exporting companies in the southern US, Mexico, and Central America. Seed lots from more than 15,000 selections of slash and loblolly pines have been evaluated for genetically-controlled resistance to fusiform rust and other diseases including pitch canker, dogwood anthracnose, and brown spot needle blight. The screening system uses a greenhouse-based artificial inoculation system with controlled density of inoculum from geographically diverse sources of the rust pathogen. Results are completed in 6–9 months and are reasonably well-correlated with field-based progeny tests. Operating costs of the Center are shared by both the USDA Forest Service and its clients. The technologically sophisticated methods and professional skills of the Center staff have been applied to facilitate and accelerate progress in region-wide timber production, scientific understanding of the fusiform rust pathosystem, and graduate education of forest geneticists and pathologists in universities.

  7. Fungal colonization and host defense reactions in Ulmus americana callus cultures inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Mirella; Rioux, Danny; Simard, Marie; Bernier, Louis

    2009-06-01

    The host-pathogen interaction leading to Dutch elm disease was analyzed using histo- and cyto-chemical tests in an in vitro system. Friable and hard susceptible Ulmus americana callus cultures were inoculated with the highly aggressive pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. Inoculated callus tissues were compared with water-treated callus tissues and studied with light microscopy (LM), transmission-electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). New aspects of this interaction are described. These include the histological observation, for the first time in plant callus cultures, of suberin with its typical lamellar structure in TEM and the intracellular presence of O. novo-ulmi. Expression of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase gene, monitored by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was correlated with the accumulation of suberin, phenols, and lignin in infected callus cultures. This study validates the potential use of the in vitro system for genomic analyses aimed at identifying genes expressed during the interaction in the Dutch elm disease pathosystem.

  8. Respective contribution of CML8 and CML9, two arabidopsis calmodulin-like proteins, to plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Perez, Manon; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2017-05-04

    In their natural environment, plants have to continuously face constraints such as biotic and abiotic stresses. To achieve their life cycle, plants have to perceive and interpret the nature, but also the strength of environmental stimuli to activate appropriate physiological responses. Nowadays, it is well established that signaling pathways are crucial steps in the implementation of rapid and efficient plant responses such as genetic reprogramming. It is also reported that rapid raises in calcium (Ca 2+ ) levels within plant cells participate in these early signaling steps and are essential to coordinate adaptive responses. However, to be informative, calcium increases need to be decoded and relayed by calcium-binding proteins also referred as calcium sensors to carry-out the appropriate responses. In a recent study, we showed that CML8, an Arabidopsis calcium sensor belonging to the calmodulin-like (CML) protein family, promotes plant immunity against the phytopathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (strain DC3000). Interestingly, other CML proteins such as CML9 were also reported to contribute to plant immunity using the same pathosystem. In this addendum, we propose to discuss about the specific contribution of these 2 CMLs in stress responses.

  9. The pmk1-like mitogen-activated protein kinase from Lecanicillium (Verticillium) fungicola is not required for virulence on Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collopy, Patrick D; Amey, Richard C; Sergeant, Martin J; Challen, Michael P; Mills, Peter R; Foster, Gary D; Bailey, Andy M

    2010-05-01

    In plant-pathogenic fungi, the pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway plays an essential role in regulating the development of penetration structures and the sensing of host-derived cues, but its role in other pathosystems such as fungal-fungal interactions is less clear. We report the use of a gene disruption strategy to investigate the pmk1-like MAPK, Lf pmk1 in the development of Lecanicillium fungicola (formerly Verticillium fungicola) infection on the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Lf pmk1 was isolated using a degenerate PCR-based approach and was shown to be present in a single copy by Southern blot analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR showed the transcript to be fivefold upregulated in cap lesions compared with pure culture. Agrobacterium-mediated targeted disruption was used to delete a central portion of the Lf pmk1 gene. The resulting mutants showed normal symptom development as assessed by A. bisporus mushroom cap assays, sporulation patterns were normal and there were no apparent changes in overall growth rates. Our results indicate that, unlike the situation in fungal-plant pathogens, the pmk1-like MAPK pathway is not required for virulence in the fungal-fungal interaction between the L. fungicola pathogen and A. bisporus host. This observation may be of wider significance in other fungal-fungal and/or fungal-invertebrate interactions.

  10. Effects of simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2levels on Nicotiana benthamiana and its infection by different positive-sense RNA viruses are cumulative and virus type-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Rakhshandehroo, Farshad; Larruy, Beatriz; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Tenllado, Francisco; Canto, Tomás

    2017-11-01

    We have studied how simultaneously elevated temperature and CO 2 levels [climate change-related conditions (CCC) of 30°C, 970 parts-per-million (ppm) of CO 2 vs. standard conditions (SC) of 25°C, ~ 405ppm CO 2 ] affect physiochemical properties of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, and also its infection by several positive-sense RNA viruses. In previous works we had studied effects of elevated temperature, CO 2 levels separately. Under CCC, leaves of healthy plants almost doubled their area relative to SC but contained less protein/unit-of-area, similarly to what we had found under conditions of elevated CO 2 alone. CCC also affected the sizes/numbers of different foliar cell types differently. Under CCC, infection outcomes in titers and symptoms were virus type-specific, broadly similar to those observed under elevated temperature alone. Under either condition, infections did not significantly alter the protein content of leaf discs. Therefore, effects of elevated temperature and CO 2 combined on properties of the pathosystems studied were overall cumulative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Feasible Management of Southern Corn Leaf Blight via Induction of Systemic Resistance by Bacillus cereus C1L in Combination with Reduced Use of Dithiocarbamate Fungicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ru Lai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dithiocarbamate fungicides such as maneb and mancozeb are widely used nonsystemic protectant fungicides to control various plant fungal diseases. Dithiocarbamate fungicides should be frequently applied to achieve optimal efficacy of disease control and avoid either decline in effectiveness or wash-off from leaf surface. Dithiocarbamates are of low resistance risk but have the potential to cause human neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a strategy to effectively control plant disease with reduced use of dithiocarbamtes. Southern corn leaf blight was the model pathosystem for the investigation. When corn plants were drench-treated with Bacillus cereus C1L, a rhizobacterium able to induce systemic resistance in corn plants against southern leaf blight, frequency of spraying dithiocarbamate fungicides could be decreased. The treatment of B. cereus C1L was able to protect maize from southern leaf blight while residues of dithiocarbamates on leaf surface were too low to provide sufficient protection. On the other hand, frequent sprays of mancozeb slightly but significantly reduced growth of corn plants under natural conditions. In contrast, application of B. cereus C1L can significantly promote growth of corn plants whether sprayed with mancozeb or not. Our results provide the information that plant disease can be well controlled by rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in combination with reduced but appropriate application of dithiocarbamate fungicides just before a heavy infection period. An appropriate use of rhizobacteria can enhance plant growth and help plants overcome negative effects caused by dithiocarbamates.

  12. Layers of defense responses to Leptosphaeria maculans below the RLM1- and camalexin-dependent resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mattias; Staal, Jens; Oide, Shinichi; Dixelius, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Plants have evolved different defense components to counteract pathogen attacks. The resistance locus resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans 1 (RLM1) is a key factor for Arabidopsis thaliana resistance to L. maculans. The present work aimed to reveal downstream defense responses regulated by RLM1. Quantitative assessment of fungal colonization in the host was carried out using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and GUS expression analyses, to further characterize RLM1 resistance and the role of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET) in disease development. Additional assessments of A. thaliana mutants were performed to expand our understanding of this pathosystem. Resistance responses such as lignification and the formation of vascular plugs were found to occur in an RLM1-dependent manner, in contrast to the RLM1-independent increase in reactive oxygen species at the stomata and hydathodes. Analyses of mutants defective in hormone signaling in the camalexin-free rlm1(Ler)pad3 background revealed a significant influence of JA and ET on symptom development and pathogen colonization. The overall results indicate that the defense responses of primary importance induced by RLM1 are all associated with physical barriers, and that responses of secondary importance involve complex cross-talk among SA, JA and ET. Our observations further suggest that ET positively affects fungal colonization.

  13. Zinc triggers signaling mechanisms and defense responses promoting resistance to Alternaria brassicicola in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Cabot, Catalina; Llugany, Mercè; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    According to the elemental defense hypothesis the accumulation of trace elements by plants may substitute for organic defenses, while the joint effects hypothesis proposes that trace elements and organic defenses can have additive or synergistic effects against pathogens or herbivores. To evaluate these hypotheses the response of the pathosystem Alternaria brassicicola-Arabidopsis thaliana to control (2μM) and surplus (12μM) Zn was evaluated using the camalexin deficient mutant pad3-1 and mtp1-1, a mutant with impaired Zn vacuolar storage, along with the corresponding wildtypes. In vitro, a 50% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved by 440μM Zn. A. thaliana leaves could accumulate equivalent concentrations without harm. In fact, surplus Zn enhanced the resistance of A. thaliana to fungal attack in Columbia (Col-0), Wassilewskija (WS), and mtp1-1. However, surplus Zn was unable to protect pad3-1 demonstrating that Zn cannot substitute for camalexin, the main organic defense in A. thaliana. High, non phytotoxic leaf Zn concentrations enhanced the resistance to A. brassicicola of A. thaliana genotypes able to produce camalexin. This was mainly due to Zn-induced enhancement of the JA/ETH signaling pathway leading to enhanced PAD3 expression. These results support the joint effects hypothesis and highlight the importance of adequate Zn supply for reinforced pathogen resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates by their response to different osmotic potentials and AFLP

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    Bárbara J. Gutiérrez Cedeño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal rot of Phaseolus vulgaris is caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, the disease is associated with high temperature and water stress. The objective of this study was to characterize isolates of M. phaseolina by their response to different osmotic potentials and AFLP. The growth of 11 isolates was determined on potato dextrose agar at 48 and 72 h in a gradient of osmotic potential induced using NaCl as well as their effects on germination of sclerotia. Three water groups were statistically different indicating differential response to osmotic potential and all sclerotia grown under these conditions, germinated between 24 and 48h. There were groups of isolates that were tolerant to water stress induced. The AFLP genotyping allowed the formation of five genetic groups, showing a wide genetic variability. Of the nine starters CTA-AT showed a high degree of confidence in the identification of genotypes of M. phaseolina and CAA-AC had the lowest discriminatory power. These results show that M. phaseolina isolates responded differently to osmotic potential and are genetically different between them. Although there was a clear correspondence of genetic groups to water groups; these responses are important features in the search for alternative management in black bean pathosystem. Keywords: molecular marker, M. phaseolina, water deficit

  15. Distinct mechanisms govern the dosage-dependent and developmentally regulated resistance conferred by the maize Hm2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintamanani, Satya; Multani, Dilbag S; Ruess, Holly; Johal, Gurmukh S

    2008-01-01

    The maize Hm2 gene provides protection against the leaf spot and ear mold disease caused by Cochliobolus carbonum race 1 (CCR1). In this regard, it is similar to Hm1, the better-known disease resistance gene of the maize-CCR1 pathosystem. However, in contrast to Hm1, which provides completely dominant resistance at all stages of plant development, Hm2-conferred resistance is only partially dominant and becomes fully effective only at maturity. To investigate why Hm2 behaves in this manner, we cloned it on the basis of its homology to Hm1. As expected, Hm2 is a duplicate of Hm1, although the protein it encodes is grossly truncated compared with HM1. The efficacy of Hm2 in conferring resistance improves gradually over time, changing from having little or no impact in seedling tissues to providing complete immunity at anthesis. The developmentally specified phenotype of Hm2 is not dictated transcriptionally, because the expression level of the gene, whether occurring constitutively or undergoing substantial and transient induction in response to infection, does not change with plant age. In contrast, however, the Hm2 transcript is much more abundant in plants homozygous for this gene compared with plants that contain only one copy of the gene, suggesting a transcriptional basis for the dosage-dependent nature of Hm2. Thus, different mechanisms seem to underlie the developmentally programmed versus the partially dominant resistance phenotype of Hm2.

  16. Twilight, a Novel Circadian-Regulated Gene, Integrates Phototropism with Nutrient and Redox Homeostasis during Fungal Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhen Deng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Phototropic regulation of circadian clock is important for environmental adaptation, organismal growth and differentiation. Light plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. However, it is unclear what governs the intracellular metabolic response to such dark-light rhythms in fungi. Here, we describe a novel circadian-regulated Twilight (TWL function essential for phototropic induction of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The TWL transcript oscillates during circadian cycles and peaks at subjective twilight. GFP-Twl remains acetylated and cytosolic in the dark, whereas light-induced phosphorylation (by the carbon sensor Snf1 kinase drives it into the nucleus. The mRNA level of the transcription/repair factor TFB5, was significantly down regulated in the twl∆ mutant. Overexpression of TFB5 significantly suppressed the conidiation defects in the twl∆ mutant. Furthermore, Tfb5-GFP translocates to the nucleus during the phototropic response and under redox stress, while it failed to do so in the twl∆ mutant. Thus, we provide mechanistic insight into Twl-based regulation of nutrient and redox homeostasis in response to light during pathogen adaptation to the host milieu in the rice blast pathosystem.

  17. Robust RNA silencing-mediated resistance to Plum pox virus under variable abiotic and biotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola, Elisa; Tavazza, Mario; Lucioli, Alessandra; Salandri, Laura; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2014-10-01

    Some abiotic and biotic conditions are known to have a negative impact on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), thus representing a potential concern for the production of stable engineered virus resistance traits. However, depending on the strategy followed to achieve PTGS of the transgene, different responses to external conditions can be expected. In the present study, we utilized the Nicotiana benthamiana–Plum pox virus (PPV) pathosystem to evaluate in detail the stability of intron-hairpin(ihp)-mediated virus resistance under conditions known to adversely affect PTGS. The ihp plants grown at low or high temperatures were fully resistant to multiple PPV challenges, different PPV inoculum concentrations and even to a PPV isolate differing from the ihp construct by more than 28% at the nucleotide level. In addition, infections of ihp plants with viruses belonging to Cucumovirus, Potyvirus or Tombusvirus, all known to affect PTGS at different steps, were not able to defeat PPV resistance. Low temperatures did not affect the accumulation of transgenic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), whereas a clear increase in the amount of siRNAs was observed during infections sustained by Cucumber mosaic virus and Potato virus Y. Our results show that the above stress factors do not represent an important concern for the production,through ihp-PTGS technology, of transgenic plants having robust virus resistance traits.

  18. Assembly, Annotation, and Comparative Genomics in PATRIC, the All Bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R; Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J; Gerdes, Svetlana; Kenyon, Ronald; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Pusch, Gordon D; Shukla, Maulik P; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Xia, Fangfang; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2018-01-01

    In the "big data" era, research biologists are faced with analyzing new types that usually require some level of computational expertise. A number of programs and pipelines exist, but acquiring the expertise to run them, and then understanding the output can be a challenge.The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC, www.patricbrc.org ) has created an end-to-end analysis platform that allows researchers to take their raw reads, assemble a genome, annotate it, and then use a suite of user-friendly tools to compare it to any public data that is available in the repository. With close to 113,000 bacterial and more than 1000 archaeal genomes, PATRIC creates a unique research experience with "virtual integration" of private and public data. PATRIC contains many diverse tools and functionalities to explore both genome-scale and gene expression data, but the main focus of this chapter is on assembly, annotation, and the downstream comparative analysis functionality that is freely available in the resource.

  19. Short Rotations in Forest Plantations Accelerate Virulence Evolution in Root-Rot Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Soularue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As disease outbreaks in forest plantations are causing concern worldwide, a clear understanding of the influence of silvicultural practices on the development of epidemics is still lacking. Importantly, silvicultural practices are likely to simultaneously affect epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations. We propose a genetically explicit and individual-based model of virulence evolution in a root-rot pathogenic fungus spreading across forest landscapes, taking the Armillaria ostoyae–Pinus pinaster pathosystem as reference. We used the model to study the effects of rotation length on the evolution of virulence and the propagation of the fungus within a forest landscape composed of even-aged stands regularly altered by clear-cutting and thinning operations. The life cycle of the fungus modeled combines asexual and sexual reproduction modes, and also includes parasitic and saprotrophic phases. Moreover, the tree susceptibility to the pathogen is primarily determined by the age of the stand. Our simulations indicated that the shortest rotation length accelerated both the evolution of virulence and the development of the epidemics, whatever the genetic variability in the initial fungal population and the asexuality rate of the fungal species

  20. H2O2 plays an important role in the lifestyle of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides during interaction with cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Ygor R G; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Barreto, Ana L H; Freire-Filho, Francisco R; Oliveira, Jose T A

    2015-08-01

    Plant-fungus interactions usually generate H(2)O(2) in the infected plant tissue. H(2)O(2) has a direct antimicrobial effect and is involved in the cross-linking of cell walls, signaling, induction of gene expression, hypersensitive cell death and induced systemic acquired resistance. This has raised the hypothesis that H(2)O(2) manipulation by pharmacological compounds could alter the lifestyle of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides during interaction with the BR-3-Tracuateua cowpea genotype. The primary leaves of cowpea were excised, infiltrated with salicylic acid (SA), glucose oxidase + glucose (GO/G), catalase (CAT) or diphenyliodonium chloride (DPI), followed by spore inoculation on the adaxial leaf surface. SA or GO/G-treated plantlets showed increased H(2)O(2) accumulation and lipid peroxidation. The fungus used a subcuticular, intramural necrotrophic strategy, and developed secondary hyphae associated with the quick spread and rapid killing of host cells. However, CAT or DPI-treated leaves exhibited decreased H(2)O(2) concentration and lipid peroxidation and the fungus developed intracellular hemibiotrophic infection with vesicles, in addition to primary and secondary hyphal formation. These results suggest that H(2)O(2) plays an important role in the cowpea (C. gloeosporioides) pathosystem given that it affected fungal lifestyle during interaction. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A theoretical framework for biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens: Identifying effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Nik J; Gilligan, Christopher A

    2011-06-07

    We develop and analyse a flexible compartmental model of the interaction between a plant host, a soil-borne pathogen and a microbial antagonist, for use in optimising biological control. By extracting invasion and persistence thresholds of host, pathogen and biological control agent, performing an equilibrium analysis, and numerical investigation of sensitivity to parameters and initial conditions, we determine criteria for successful biological control. We identify conditions for biological control (i) to prevent a pathogen entering a system, (ii) to eradicate a pathogen that is already present and, if that is not possible, (iii) to reduce the density of the pathogen. Control depends upon the epidemiology of the pathogen and how efficiently the antagonist can colonise particular habitats (i.e. healthy tissue, infected tissue and/or soil-borne inoculum). A sharp transition between totally effective control (i.e. eradication of the pathogen) and totally ineffective control can follow slight changes in biologically interpretable parameters or to the initial amounts of pathogen and biological control agent present. Effective biological control requires careful matching of antagonists to pathosystems. For preventative/eradicative control, antagonists must colonise susceptible hosts. However, for reduction in disease prevalence, the range of habitat is less important than the antagonist's bulking-up efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determining putative vectors of the Bogia Coconut Syndrome phytoplasma using loop-mediated isothermal amplification of single-insect feeding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hengyu; Wilson, Bree A. L.; Ash, Gavin J.; Woruba, Sharon B.; Fletcher, Murray J.; You, Minsheng; Yang, Guang; Gurr, Geoff M.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect vectored mollicutes responsible for disease in many economically important crops. Determining which insect species are vectors of a given phytoplasma is important for managing disease but is methodologically challenging because disease-free plants need to be exposed to large numbers of insects, often over many months. A relatively new method to detect likely transmission involves molecular testing for phytoplasma DNA in sucrose solution that insects have fed upon. In this study we combined this feeding medium method with a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to study 627 insect specimens of 11 Hemiptera taxa sampled from sites in Papua New Guinea affected by Bogia coconut syndrome (BCS). The LAMP assay detected phytoplasma DNA from the feeding solution and head tissue of insects from six taxa belonging to four families: Derbidae, Lophopidae, Flatidae and Ricaniidae. Two other taxa yielded positives only from the heads and the remainder tested negative. These results demonstrate the utility of combining single-insect feeding medium tests with LAMP assays to identify putative vectors that can be the subject of transmission tests and to better understand phytoplasma pathosystems. PMID:27786249

  3. Host genetic resistance to root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., in Solanaceae: from genes to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, Arnaud; Djian-Caporalino, Caroline; Palloix, Alain; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) heavily damage most solanaceous crops worldwide. Fortunately, major resistance genes are available in a number of plant species, and their use provides a safe and economically relevant strategy for RKN control. From a structural point of view, these genes often harbour NBS-LRR motifs (i.e. a nucleotide binding site and a leucine rich repeat region near the carboxy terminus) and are organised in syntenic clusters in solanaceous genomes. Their introgression from wild to cultivated plants remains a challenge for breeders, although facilitated by marker-assisted selection. As shown with other pathosystems, the genetic background into which the resistance genes are introgressed is of prime importance to both the expression of the resistance and its durability, as exemplified by the recent discovery of quantitative trait loci conferring quantitative resistance to RKNs in pepper. The deployment of resistance genes at a large scale may result in the emergence and spread of virulent nematode populations able to overcome them, as already reported in tomato and pepper. Therefore, careful management of the resistance genes available in solanaceous crops is crucial to avoid significant reduction in the duration of RKN genetic control in the field. From that perspective, only rational management combining breeding and cultivation practices will allow the design and implementation of innovative, sustainable crop production systems that protect the resistance genes and maintain their durability. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Inhibition of Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici Germination and Partial Enhancement of Wheat Defenses by Milsana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randoux, Béatrice; Renard, Delphine; Nowak, Emmanuel; Sanssené, Jean; Courtois, Josiane; Durand, Roger; Reignault, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT The prophylactic efficiency of Milsana against powdery mildew was evaluated on wheat (Triticum aestivum). A single short spraying on 10-day-old plantlets reduced the infection level by 85% and two long sprayings led to the total restriction of the disease. Although microscopic studies showed that Milsana treatments enhance hydrogen peroxide accumulation at the fungal penetration site, biochemical analysis did not allow us to correlate this accumulation with the activation of several enzyme activities involved in active oxygen species (AOS) metabolism. Only lipoxygenase activity, which is involved in both AOS metabolism and lipid peroxidation, showed a 26 to 32% increase 48-h posttreatment in leaves infiltrated with Milsana. This weak effect of Milsana on wheat lipid metabolism was confirmed at the lipid peroxidation level, which surprisingly, was shown to decrease in treated plants. In order to explain the high efficacy of Milsana, the fungistatic effect on conidia germination was also examined. In planta, we showed that a Milsana treatment resulted in a higher proportion of abnormally long appressorial germ tubes, whereas in vitro, it dramatically inhibited fungal conidia germination. The partial activity of Milsana in terms of defense response induction in the wheat/powdery mildew pathosystem and its newly described direct fungistatic activity are discussed.

  5. daTALbase: A Database for Genomic and Transcriptomic Data Related to TAL Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Lamy, Léo; Zarate, Carlos A; Cunnac, Sébastien; Doyle, Erin; Bogdanove, Adam; Szurek, Boris; Dereeper, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins found in the genus Xanthomonas of phytopathogenic bacteria. These proteins enter the nucleus of cells in the host plant and can induce the expression of susceptibility genes (S genes), triggering disease. TALEs bind the promoter region of S genes following a specific code, which allows the prediction of binding sites based on TALEs amino acid sequences. New candidate S genes can then be discovered by finding the intersection between genes induced in the presence of TALEs and genes containing predicted effector binding elements. By contrasting differential expression data and binding site predictions across different datasets, patterns of TALE diversification or convergence may be unveiled, but this requires the seamless integration of different genomic and transcriptomic data. With this in mind, we present daTALbase, a curated relational database that integrates TALE-related data including bacterial TALE sequences, plant promoter sequences, predicted TALE binding sites, transcriptomic data of host plants in response to TALE-harboring bacteria, and other associated data. The database can be explored to uncover new candidate S genes as well as to study variation in TALE repertories and their corresponding targets. The first version of the database here presented includes data for Oryza sp.-Xanthomonas pv. oryzae interactions. Future versions of the database will incorporate information for other pathosystems involving TALEs.

  6. First Experimental Assessment of Protein Intrinsic Disorder Involvement in an RNA Virus Natural Adaptive Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Justine; Barra, Amandine; Walter, Jocelyne; Millot, Pauline; Hébrard, Eugénie; Moury, Benoît; Michon, Thierry

    2018-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) in proteins is defined as a lack of stable structure in physiological conditions. Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are highly abundant in some RNA virus proteomes. Low topological constraints exerted on IDRs are expected to buffer the effect of numerous deleterious mutations and could be related to the remarkable adaptive potential of RNA viruses to overcome resistance of their host. To experimentally test this hypothesis in a natural pathosystem, a set of four variants of Potato virus Y (PVY; Potyvirus genus) containing various ID degrees in the Viral genome-linked (VPg) protein, a key determinant of potyvirus adaptation, was designed. To estimate the ID contribution to the VPg-based PVY adaptation, the adaptive ability of the four PVY variants was monitored in the pepper host (Capsicum annuum) carrying a recessive resistance gene. Intriguingly, the two mutants with the highest ID content displayed a significantly higher ability to restore infection in the resistant host, whereas the less intrinsically disordered mutant was unable to restore infection. The role of ID on virus adaptation may be due either to a larger exploration of evolutionary pathways or the minimization of fitness penalty caused by resistance-breaking mutations. This pioneering study strongly suggests the positive impact of ID in an RNA virus adaptive capacity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Selection of Trichoderma isolates for biological control of Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mecatti Elias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lettuce drop is one of the most important and difficult-to-control diseases affecting lettuce in Brazil and worldwide. This study was carried out to select Trichoderma isolates antagonistic to Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum, aiming to develop biological control for this pathosystem in Brazil. Thirty-one Trichoderma isolates were obtained with the use of baits and were tested under laboratory conditions for their ability to control S. minor and S. sclerotiorum in seedlings of lettuce cultivar Tainá cultured in Petri dishes containing water-agar medium. Subsequently, four isolates effective for control and showing high sporulation under laboratory conditions were evaluated in greenhouse in two experiments carried out with both pathogens in lettuce seedlings of the same cultivar. Twenty-two isolates showed ability to control S. minor and S. sclerotiorum in the in vitro experiments. The isolates tested under greenhouse conditions, identified as T. asperellum (IBLF 897, IBLF 904 and IBLF 914 and T. asperelloides (IBLF 908, reduced lettuce drop of seedlings caused by both pathogens but were more effective against S. minor. Biological control is a promising technology for the management of lettuce drop, especially because S. minor is the predominant species in infested lettuce fields in Brazil.

  8. Cerebroside elicitor confers resistance to fusarium disease in various plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Kenji; Tanino, Shigeki; Nagatsuka, Tadako; Koga, Jinichiro; Iwata, Michiaki; Nagashima, Kenji; Amemiya, Yoshimiki

    2004-08-01

    ABSTRACT In the rice blast fungus pathosystem, cerebroside, a compound categorized as a sphingolipid, was found in our previous study to be a non-racespecific elicitor, which elicits defense responses in rice. Here we describe that cerebroside C is produced in diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a common soilborne agent of wilt disease affecting a wide range of plant species. In addition, some type of cerebroside elicitor involving cerebroside A, B, or C was detected in other soilborne phytopathogens, such as Pythium and Botrytis. Treatment of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), melon (Cucumis melo), and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) with cerebroside B resulted in resistance to infection by each pathogenic strain of F. oxysporum. Induction of pathogenesis-related genes and H(2)O(2) production by treatment with cerebroside B were observed in tomato root tissues. The cerebroside elicitor showed no antifungal activity against F. oxysporum in vitro, indicating that the cerebroside elicitor activates defense mechanisms to confer resistance to Fusarium disease. These results suggest that cerebroside functions as a non-race-specific elicitor in a wide range of plant-phytopathogenic fungus interactions. Additionally, cerebroside elicitor serves as a potential biologically derived control agent.

  9. Construction and comparison of gene co-expression networks shows complex plant immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Leal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene co-expression networks (GCNs are graphic representations that depict the coordinated transcription of genes in response to certain stimuli. GCNs provide functional annotations of genes whose function is unknown and are further used in studies of translational functional genomics among species. In this work, a methodology for the reconstruction and comparison of GCNs is presented. This approach was applied using gene expression data that were obtained from immunity experiments in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, soybean, tomato and cassava. After the evaluation of diverse similarity metrics for the GCN reconstruction, we recommended the mutual information coefficient measurement and a clustering coefficient-based method for similarity threshold selection. To compare GCNs, we proposed a multivariate approach based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA. Branches of plant immunity that were exemplified by each experiment were analyzed in conjunction with the PCA results, suggesting both the robustness and the dynamic nature of the cellular responses. The dynamic of molecular plant responses produced networks with different characteristics that are differentiable using our methodology. The comparison of GCNs from plant pathosystems, showed that in response to similar pathogens plants could activate conserved signaling pathways. The results confirmed that the closeness of GCNs projected on the principal component space is an indicative of similarity among GCNs. This also can be used to understand global patterns of events triggered during plant immune responses.

  10. Novel Rosaceae plant elicitor peptides as sustainable tools to control Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni in Prunus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristina; Nadal, Anna; Montesinos, Emilio; Pla, Maria

    2018-02-01

    Fruit crops are regarded as important health promoters and constitute a major part of global agricultural production, and Rosaceae species are of high economic impact. Their culture is threatened by bacterial diseases, whose control is based on preventative treatments using compounds of limited efficacy and negative environmental impact. One of the most economically relevant examples is the pathogen Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni (Xap) affecting Prunus spp. The plant immune response against pathogens can be triggered and amplified by plant elicitor peptides (Peps), perceived by specific receptors (PEPRs). Although they have been described in various angiosperms, scarce information is available on Rosaceae species. Here, we identified the Pep precursor (PROPEP), Pep and PEPR orthologues of 10 Rosaceae species and confirmed the presence of the Pep/PEPR system in this family. We showed the perception and elicitor activity of Rosaceae Peps using the Prunus-Xap pathosystem as proof-of-concept. Treatment with nanomolar doses of Peps induced the corresponding PROPEP and a set of defence-related genes in Prunus leaves, and enhanced resistance against Xap. Peps from the same species had the highest efficiencies. Rosaceae Peps could potentially be used to develop natural, targeted and environmentally friendly strategies to enhance the resistance of Prunus species against biotic attackers. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. ASPECTOS EPIDEMIOLÓGICOS DA PODRIDÃO-DE-RAÍZES DA ERVA-MATE (Ilex paraguariensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Poletto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe root-rot of erva-mate, caused forFusariumspp.,Rhizoctoniasp. andPythiumsp., is the main disease ofthe culture and causes serious damages in nurseries and forest stands. However, few studies exist regardingto the epidemiology of this disease. Thus, the present work studied and described the main epidemic aspectsrelated to erva-mate root-rot in nurseries and forest stands. For that, nurseries and forest stands were chosenfor studies in Vale do Taquari, RS state, where flowers, fruits, seeds, plantlets, seedlings and soil werecollected for laboratory analyses. It was observed that the pathogens can enter in the patho-system throughthe flowers, because 80% of them presented contamination ofFusariumsp. and 15% ofRhizoctoniasp.Moreover, the obtaining method and stratification of the seeds, used in the nurseries, contribute to theincrease of contamination, reaching 100% of the seeds in the moment of sowing. It was also observed thatcontaminated seedlings may be symptomless and, after transplanting in the field, contaminate pathogen freeareas. Pathogenicity tests with some isolates showed their capacity of causing the disease.

  12. Gene expression trade-offs between defence and growth in English elm induced by Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero, Pedro; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Venturas, Martin; Martín, Juan Antonio; Gil, Luis; Collada, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Wilt diseases caused by vascular pathogens include some of the most damaging stresses affecting trees. Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, destroyed most of North American and European elm populations in the 20th century. The highly susceptible English elm, also known as Atinian clone, suffered the highest mortality rates during the last pandemic event, probably due to its lack of genetic diversity. To study the DED pathosystem, we inoculated English elm ramets with O. novo-ulmi and evaluated xylem anatomy, molecular response, and disease symptoms. The high DED susceptibility of the clone was linked to xylem structure. The transcript levels changed significantly for 1,696 genes during O. novo-ulmi invasion. Genes covering different steps of the plant immune system were identified, many of which showed homology with Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in systemic acquired resistance. Induction of several pathogenesis-related proteins and repression of fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and other cell wall biosynthesis pathways evidence unbalanced costs between growth and defence mechanisms far from the inoculation point. This study sheds light on elm molecular defence mechanisms against DED. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Diagrammatic scale for the assessment of blast on wheat spikes

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    João Leodato Nunes Maciel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The correct quantification of blast caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae on wheat (Triticum aestivum spikes is an important component to understand the development of this disease aimed at its control. Visual quantification based on a diagrammatic scale can be a practical and efficient strategy that has already proven to be useful against several plant pathosystems, including diseases affecting wheat spikes like glume blotch and fusarium head blight. Spikes showing different disease severity values were collected from a wheat field with the aim of elaborating a diagrammatic scale to quantify blast severity on wheat spikes. The spikes were photographed and blast severity was determined by using resources of the software ImageJ. A diagrammatic scale was developed with the following disease severity values: 3.7, 7.5, 21.4, 30.5, 43.8, 57.3, 68.1, 86.0, and 100.0%. An asymptomatic spike was added to the scale. Scale validation was performed by eight people who estimated blast severity by using digitalized images of 40 wheat spikes. The precision and the accuracy of the evaluations varied according to the rater (0.82

  14. Effector proteins of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future.

  15. Plant-pathogen interactions: leaf physiology alterations in poplars infected with rust (Melampsora medusae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortari, Fermín; Guiamet, Juan José; Graciano, Corina

    2018-01-23

    Rust produced by Melampsora sp. is considered one of the most relevant diseases in poplar plantations. Growth reduction in poplar plantations takes place because rust, like other pathogens, alters leaf physiology. There is not a complete evaluation of several of the physiological traits that can be affected by rust at leaf level. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate, in an integrative way and in the same pathosystem, which physiological processes are affected when Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. leaves are infected by rust (Melampsora medusae Thümen). Leaves of two clones with different susceptibility to rust were analyzed. Field and pot experiments were performed, and several physiological traits were measured in healthy and infected leaves. We conclude that rust affects leaf mesophyll integrity, and so water movement in the leaf in liquid phase is affected. As a consequence, gas exchange is reduced, affecting both carbon fixation and transpiration. However, there is an increase in respiration rate, probably due to plant and fungal respiration. The increase in respiration rate is important in the reduction of net photosynthetic rate, but also some damage in the photosynthetic apparatus limits leaf capacity to fix carbon. The decrease in chlorophyll content would start later and seems not to explain the reduction in net photosynthetic rate. Both clones, although they have different susceptibility to rust, are affected in the same physiological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The 'Green Revolution' dwarfing genes play a role in disease resistance in Triticum aestivum and Hordeum vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, R J; Gosman, N; Burt, C J; Makepeace, J; Steed, A; Corbitt, M; Chandler, E; Brown, J K M; Boulton, M I; Nicholson, P

    2012-02-01

    The Green Revolution dwarfing genes, Rht-B1b and Rht-D1b, encode mutant forms of DELLA proteins and are present in most modern wheat varieties. DELLA proteins have been implicated in the response to biotic stress in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Using defined wheat Rht near-isogenic lines and barley Sln1 gain of function (GoF) and loss of function (LoF) lines, the role of DELLA in response to biotic stress was investigated in pathosystems representing contrasting trophic styles (biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, and necrotrophic). GoF mutant alleles in wheat and barley confer a resistance trade-off with increased susceptibility to biotrophic pathogens and increased resistance to necrotrophic pathogens whilst the converse was conferred by a LoF mutant allele. The polyploid nature of the wheat genome buffered the effect of single Rht GoF mutations relative to barley (diploid), particularly in respect of increased susceptibility to biotrophic pathogens. A role for DELLA in controlling cell death responses is proposed. Similar to Arabidopsis, a resistance trade-off to pathogens with contrasting pathogenic lifestyles has been identified in monocotyledonous cereal species. Appreciation of the pleiotropic role of DELLA in biotic stress responses in cereals has implications for plant breeding.

  17. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano S Mendes

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC, a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12 strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  18. Effect of salicylic acid on phenolic compounds related to date palm resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. albedinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dihazi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid (SA plays a key role in establishing resistance to pathogens in many plants. To study the possible involvement of SA in the resistance of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis (FOA, we investigated levels of phenolic compounds, known as indicators of resistance in the date palm/ Fusarium pathosystem. After treatment with SA the content of root soluble phenolics in F. oxysporum inoculated date palm seedlings was about 4 times higher in cv. Bousthami noir and 6 times higher in cv. Jihel than that in untreated plants showing disease symptoms. The largest increase was at a SA concentration of 50 µM. SA treatment also enhanced the content of cell wall phenolics. In addition, inoculation of SA-treated roots of date palm with FOA (strain ZAG resulted in a greater number of plants showing only limited hypersensitive reaction-like necrotic lesions. In contrast, SA-untreated plants normally showed spreading necrosis in response to fungus inoculation.

  19. Geographical and Temporal Dynamics of Chaetocnema Pulicaria and Their Role in Stewart's Disease of Corn in Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esker, Paul David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigated the biology and importance of the corn flea beetle vector and its role in the Stewart's disease of corn pathosystem. This was accomplished by determining the number of corn flea beetle generations that occur in Iowa and by quantifying the proportions of those populations found to be infested with the causal agent of Stewart's disease, pantoea stewartii. In addition, a preliminary study was conducted to determine how soil temperature was influenced by air temperature and how this may be applied to forecasting for Stewart's disease of corn. Research using yellow sticky cards and sweep netting demonstrated that there are overwintering, first, and second field generations of the corn flea beetle in Iowa. It was also observed that there was a period during June of both 1999 and 2000 when corn flea beetles were not found, which is important new management information. This research has also demonstrated that the incidence of P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetles can be monitored by ELISA testing and that the incidence fluctuates greatly throughout the corn growing season. The initial level of inoculum (P. stewartii-infested corn flea beetles in the adult overwintering generation) does not remain static during the spring as was previously hypothesized. This signals that additional research is needed concerning the mechanisms of fluctuation in the proportion of beetles infested with P. stewartii.

  20. A paralogous decoy protects Phytophthora sojae apoplastic effector PsXEG1 from a host inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenchuan; Zhu, Lin; Song, Tianqiao; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yeqiang; Qiu, Min; Lin, Yachun; Li, Haiyang; Kong, Liang; Fang, Yufeng; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yan; Dong, Suomeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Tyler, Brett M; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-02-17

    The extracellular space (apoplast) of plant tissue represents a critical battleground between plants and attacking microbes. Here we show that a pathogen-secreted apoplastic xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase, PsXEG1, is a focus of this struggle in the Phytophthora sojae -soybean interaction. We show that soybean produces an apoplastic glucanase inhibitor protein, GmGIP1, that binds to PsXEG1 to block its contribution to virulence. P. sojae , however, secretes a paralogous PsXEG1-like protein, PsXLP1, that has lost enzyme activity but binds to GmGIP1 more tightly than does PsXEG1, thus freeing PsXEG1 to support P. sojae infection. The gene pair encoding PsXEG1 and PsXLP1 is conserved in many Phytophthora species, and the P. parasitica orthologs PpXEG1 and PpXLP1 have similar functions. Thus, this apoplastic decoy strategy may be widely used in Phytophthora pathosystems. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. An analysis of the risk of cocoa moniliasis occurrence in Brazil as the result of climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson Bucker Moraes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential risk of moniliasis occurrence and the impacts of climate change on this disease in the coming decades, should this pathogen be introduced in Brazil. To this end, climate favorability maps were devised for the occurrence of moniliasis, both for the present and future time. The future scenarios (A2 and B2 focused on the decades of 2020, 2050 and 2080. These scenarios were obtained from six global climate models (GCMs made available by the third assessment report of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC. Currently, there are large areas with favorable climate conditions for moniliasis in Brazil, especially in regions at high risk of introduction of that pathogen. Considering the global warming scenarios provided by the IPCC, the potential risk of moniliasis occurrence in Brazil will be reduced. This decrease is predicted for both future scenarios, but will occur more sharply in scenario A2. However, there will still be areas with favorable climate conditions for the development of the disease, particularly in Brazil's main producing regions. Moreover, pathogen and host alike may undergo alterations due to climate change, which will affect the extent of their impacts on this pathosystem.

  2. The Fusarium oxysporum effector Six6 contributes to virulence and suppresses I-2-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehns, F; Houterman, P M; Ichou, F Ait; Michielse, C B; Hijdra, M; Cornelissen, B J C; Rep, M; Takken, F L W

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate their host and facilitate colonization. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Upon infection, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici secretes numerous small proteins into the xylem sap (Six proteins). Most Six proteins are unique to F. oxysporum, but Six6 is an exception; a homolog is also present in two Colletotrichum spp. SIX6 expression was found to require living host cells and a knockout of SIX6 in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici compromised virulence, classifying it as a genuine effector. Heterologous expression of SIX6 did not affect growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana toward Verticillium dahliae, Pseudomonas syringae, or F. oxysporum, suggesting a specific function for F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Six6 in the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici- tomato pathosystem. Remarkably, Six6 was found to specifically suppress I-2-mediated cell death (I2CD) upon transient expression in N. benthamiana, whereas it did not compromise the activity of other cell-death-inducing genes. Still, this I2CD suppressing activity of Six6 does not allow the fungus to overcome I-2 resistance in tomato, suggesting that I-2-mediated resistance is independent from cell death.

  3. Agrobacteria Enhance Plant Defense Against Root-Knot Nematodes on Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamovšek, Janja; Stare, Barbara Gerič; Pleško, Irena Mavrič; Širca, Saša; Urek, Gregor

    2017-06-01

    The increased incidence of the crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens has long been associated with activities of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Pot experiments on tomato were designed to assess plant vitality, nematode reproduction, and crown gall incidence in combined infection with Agrobacterium and Meloidogyne spp. on tomato roots. Results suggest that tomato plants infected with pathogenic A. tumefaciens 2 days before the nematodes show enhanced plant defense against M. ethiopica resulting in lower egg and gall counts on roots 45 and 90 days postinoculation (dpi); no significantly enhanced defense was observed when the plant was inoculated with bacteria and nematodes at the same time. Split-root experiments also showed that the observed interaction was systemic. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis that targeted several genes under plant hormonal control suggests that the suppression was mediated via systemic acquired resistance by the pathogenesis-related protein 1 and that M. ethiopica did not enhance the defense reaction of tomato against Agrobacterium spp. Nematodes completely inhibited tumor growth in a 45-day experiment if inoculated onto the roots before the pathogenic bacteria. We conclude that the observed antagonism in the tested pathosystem was the result of initially strong plant defense that was later suppressed by the invading pathogen and pest.

  4. Analysis of genes that are differentially expressed during the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum–Phaseolus vulgaris interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Barros Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary, one of the most important plant pathogens, causes white mold on a wide range of crops. Crop yield can be dramatically decreased due to this disease, depending on the plant cultivar and environmental conditions. In this study, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library approach was used for the identification of pathogen and plant genes that were differentially expressed during infection of the susceptible cultivar BRS Pérola of Phaseolus vulgaris L. A total of 979 unigenes (430 contigs and 549 singletons were obtained and classified according to their functional categories. The transcriptional profile of 11 fungal genes related to pathogenicity and virulence were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Additionally, the temporal expression profile obtained by RT-qPCR was evaluated for the following categories of plant defense-related genes: pathogenesis-related genes (PvPR1, PvPR2, and PvPR3, phenylpropanoid pathway genes (PvIsof, PvFPS1, and 4CL, and genes involved in defense and stress-related categories (PvLox, PvHiprp, PvGST, PvPod, and PvDox. Data obtained in this study provide a starting point for achieving a better understanding of the pathosystem S. sclerotiorum–P. vulgaris.

  5. VapD in Xylella fastidiosa Is a Thermostable Protein with Ribonuclease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Juliano S; Santiago, André da S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K; Favaro, Marianna T P; Santos, Clelton A; Horta, Maria Augusta C; Crucello, Aline; Beloti, Lilian L; Romero, Fabian; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Alessandra A; de Souza, Anete P

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain 9a5c is a gram-negative phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), a disease that is responsible for economic losses in Brazilian agriculture. The most well-known mechanism of pathogenicity for this bacterial pathogen is xylem vessel occlusion, which results from bacterial movement and the formation of biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying the virulence caused by biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we provide evidence showing that virulence-associated protein D in X. fastidiosa (Xf-VapD) is a thermostable protein with ribonuclease activity. Moreover, protein expression analyses in two X. fastidiosa strains, including virulent (Xf9a5c) and nonpathogenic (XfJ1a12) strains, showed that Xf-VapD was expressed during all phases of development in both strains and that increased expression was observed in Xf9a5c during biofilm growth. This study is an important step toward characterizing and improving our understanding of the biological significance of Xf-VapD and its potential functions in the CVC pathosystem.

  6. Response of Xylella fastidiosa to zinc: decreased culturability, increased exopolysaccharide production, and formation of resilient biofilms under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa produces biofilm that accumulates in the host xylem vessels, affecting disease development in various crops and bacterial acquisition by insect vectors. Biofilms are sensitive to the chemical composition of the environment, and mineral elements being transported in the xylem are of special interest for this pathosystem. Here, X. fastidiosa liquid cultures were supplemented with zinc and compared with nonamended cultures to determine the effects of Zn on growth, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production under batch and flow culture conditions. The results show that Zn reduces growth and biofilm production under both conditions. However, in microfluidic chambers under liquid flow and with constant bacterial supplementation (closer to conditions inside the host), a dramatic increase in biofilm aggregates was seen in the Zn-amended medium. Biofilms formed under these conditions were strongly attached to surfaces and were not removed by medium flow. This phenomenon was correlated with increased EPS production in stationary-phase cells grown under high Zn concentrations. Zn did not cause greater adhesion to surfaces by individual cells. Additionally, viability analyses suggest that X. fastidiosa may be able to enter the viable but nonculturable state in vitro, and Zn can hasten the onset of this state. Together, these findings suggest that Zn can act as a stress factor with pleiotropic effects on X. fastidiosa and indicate that, although Zn could be used as a bactericide treatment, it could trigger the undesired effect of stronger biofilm formation upon reinoculation events.

  7. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-08-12

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR.

  8. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive tree (Olea europaea L.) with a focus on the Mediterranean Basin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadine; Chapuis, Elodie; Tavoillot, Johannes; Mateille, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The olive tree (Olea europaea ssp. europaea.) is one of the most ancient cultivated trees. It is an emblematic species owing to its ecological, economic and cultural importance, especially in the Mediterranean Basin. Plant-parasitic nematodes are major damaging pests on olive trees, mainly in nurseries. They significantly contribute to economic losses in the top-ten olive-producing countries in the world. However, the damages they induce in orchards and nurseries are specifically documented only in a few countries. This review aims to update knowledge about the olive-nematode pathosystem by: (1) updating the list of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with olive trees; (2) analysing their diversity (taxonomic level, trophic groups, dominance of taxa), which allowed us (i) to assess the richness observed in each country, and (ii) to exhibit and describe the most important taxa able to induce damages on olive trees such as: Meloidogyne, Pratylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Xiphinema, Tylenchulus, Rotylenchulus, Heterodera (distribution especially in the Mediterranean Basin, pathogenicity and reactions of olive trees); (3) describing some management strategies focusing on alternative control methods; (4) suggesting new approaches for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes based on the management of the diversity of their communities, which are structured by several environmental factors such as olive diversity (due to domestication of wild olive in the past, and to breeding now), cropping systems (from traditional to high-density orchards), irrigation, and terroirs. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A single amino acid change in HC-Pro of soybean mosaic virus alters symptom expression in a soybean cultivar carrying Rsv1 and Rsv3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that infidelity of RNA virus replication combined with R-gene-driven selection is one of the major evolutionary forces in overcoming host resistance. In this study, we utilized an avirulent soybean mosaic virus (SMV) mutant to examine the possibility of emergence of mutant viruses capable of overcoming R-gene-mediated resistance during serial passages. Interestingly, we found that the emerged progeny virus induced severe rugosity and local necrotic lesions in Jinpumkong-2 (Rsv1 + Rsv3) plants, while SMV-G7H provoked a lethal systemic hypersensitive response. Genome sequence analysis of the emerged progeny virus revealed that the mutation in CI that had caused SMV-G7H to lose its virulence was restored to the original sequence, and a single amino acid was newly introduced into HC-Pro, which means that the symptom alteration was due to this single amino acid mutation in HC-Pro. Our results suggest that SMV HC-Pro functions as a symptom determinant in the SMV-soybean pathosystem.

  10. Phytoplasmas-The "Crouching Tiger" Threat of Australian Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Gopurenko, David; Fletcher, Murray J; Johnson, Anne C; Gurr, Geoff M

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-vectored bacteria that cause disease in a wide range of plant species. The increasing availability of molecular DNA analyses, expertise and additional methods in recent years has led to a proliferation of discoveries of phytoplasma-plant host associations and in the numbers of taxonomic groupings for phytoplasmas. The widespread use of common names based on the diseases with which they are associated, as well as separate phenetic and taxonomic systems for classifying phytoplasmas based on variation at the 16S rRNA-encoding gene, complicates interpretation of the literature. We explore this issue and related trends through a focus on Australian pathosystems, providing the first comprehensive compilation of information for this continent, covering the phytoplasmas, host plants, vectors and diseases. Of the 33 16Sr groups reported internationally, only groups I, II, III, X, XI and XII have been recorded in Australia and this highlights the need for ongoing biosecurity measures to prevent the introduction of additional pathogen groups. Many of the phytoplasmas reported in Australia have not been sufficiently well studied to assign them to 16Sr groups so it is likely that unrecognized groups and sub-groups are present. Wide host plant ranges are apparent among well studied phytoplasmas, with multiple crop and non-crop species infected by some. Disease management is further complicated by the fact that putative vectors have been identified for few phytoplasmas, especially in Australia. Despite rapid progress in recent years using molecular approaches, phytoplasmas remain the least well studied group of plant pathogens, making them a "crouching tiger" disease threat.

  11. Cultivar Variation in Hormonal Balance Is a Significant Determinant of Disease Susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Tabibul Islam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to directly elucidate cultivar variation in disease susceptibility and disease responses in relation to hormonal status in the interaction of Brassica napus cultivars and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, the causal agent of black rot disease. Fully expanded leaves of six B. napus cultivars (cvs. Capitol, Youngsan, Saturnin, Colosse, Tamra, and Mosa were inoculated with Xcc. At 14 days post-inoculation with Xcc, cultivar variation in susceptibility or resistance was interpreted with defense responses as estimated by redox status, defensive metabolites, and expression of phenylpropanoid synthesis-related genes in relation to endogenous hormonal status. Disease susceptibility of six cultivars was distinguished by necrotic lesions in the Xcc-inoculated leaves and characterized concurrently based on the higher increase in reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. Among these cultivars, as the susceptibility was higher, the ratios of abscisic acid (ABA/jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA/JA tended to increase with enhanced expression of SA signaling regulatory gene NPR1 and transcriptional factor TGA1 and antagonistic suppression of JA-regulated gene PDF 1.2. In the resistant cultivar (cv. Capitol, accumulation of defensive metabolites with enhanced expression of genes involved in flavonoids (chalcone synthase, proanthocyanidins (anthocyanidin reductase, and hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulate-5-hydroxylase biosynthesis and higher redox status were observed, whereas the opposite results were obtained for susceptible cultivars (cvs. Mosa and Tamra. These results clearly indicate that cultivar variation in susceptibility to infection by Xcc was determined by enhanced alteration of the SA/JA ratio, as a negative regulator of redox status and phenylpropanoid synthesis in the Brasica napus–Xcc pathosystem.

  12. Phytophthora infestans Effectors IPI-O1 and IPI-O4 Each Contribute to Pathogen Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2017-05-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, because newly evolved pathogen strains have overcome major resistance genes quickly. The RB protein, from the diploid wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to most P. infestans strains through its recognition of members of the corresponding pathogen effector protein family IPI-O. IPI-O comprises a multigene family and while some variants are recognized by RB to elicit host resistance (e.g., IPI-O1 and IPI-O2), others are able to elude detection (e.g., IPI-O4). IPI-O1 is almost ubiquitous in global P. infestans strains while IPI-O4 is more rare. No direct experimental evidence has been shown to demonstrate the effect of IPI-O on pathogen virulence in the P. infestans-potato pathosystem. Here, our work has demonstrated that in planta expression of both IPI-O1 and IPI-O4 increases P. infestans aggressiveness resulting in enlarged lesions in potato leaflets. We have previously shown that IPI-O4 has gained the ability to suppress the hypersensitive response induced by IPI-O1 in the presence of RB. In this study, our work has shown that this gain-of-function of IPI-O4 does not compromise its virulence effect, as IPI-O4 overexpression results in larger lesions than IPI-O1. We have also found that higher expression of IPI-O effectors correlates with enlarged lesions, indicating that IPI-O can contribute to virulence quantitatively. In summary, this study has provided accurate and valuable information on IPI-O's virulence effect on the potato host.

  13. A global study of transcriptome dynamics in canola (Brassica napus L.) responsive to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection using RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Raj Kumar; Megha, Swati; Rahman, Muhammad Hafizur; Basu, Urmila; Kav, Nat N V

    2016-09-15

    The necrotrophic phytopathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, causes Sclerotinia stem rot, which is a serious constraint to canola (Brassica napus L.) production worldwide. To understand the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying host response to Sclerotinia infection, we analyzed the transcript level changes in canola post-infection with S. sclerotiorum in a time course of a compatible interaction using strand specific whole transcriptome sequencing. Following infection, 161 and 52 genes (P≤0.001) were induced while 24 and 23 genes were repressed at 24h post-inoculation (hpi) and 48hpi, respectively. This suggests that, a gradual increase in host cell lyses and increase virulence of the pathogen led to the expression of only a fewer host specific genes at the later stage of infection. We observed rapid induction of key pathogen responsive genes, including glucanases, chitinases, peroxidases and WRKY Transcription factors (TFs) within 24hpi, indicating early detection of the pathogen by the host. Only 16 genes were significantly induced at both the time points suggesting a coordinated suppression of host responses by the pathogen. In addition to genes involved in plant-pathogen interactions, many novel disease responsive genes, including various TF sand those associated with jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling were identified. This suggests that canola adopts multiple strategies in mediating plant responses to the pathogen attack. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) validation of a selected set of genes demonstrated a similar trend as observed by RNA-Seq analysis and highlighted the potential involvement of these genes by the host to defend itself from pathogen attack. Overall, this work presents an in-depth analysis of the interaction between host susceptibility and pathogen virulence in the agriculturally important B. napus-S. sclerotiorum pathosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Native root-associated bacteria rescue a plant from a sudden-wilt disease that emerged during continuous cropping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Luu, Van Thi; Weinhold, Arne; Goldberg, Jay; Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants maintain microbial associations whose functions remain largely unknown. For the past 15 y, we have planted the annual postfire tobacco Nicotiana attenuata into an experimental field plot in the plant’s native habitat, and for the last 8 y the number of plants dying from a sudden wilt disease has increased, leading to crop failure. Inadvertently we had recapitulated the common agricultural dilemma of pathogen buildup associated with continuous cropping for this native plant. Plants suffered sudden tissue collapse and black roots, symptoms similar to a Fusarium–Alternaria disease complex, recently characterized in a nearby native population and developed into an in vitro pathosystem for N. attenuata. With this in vitro disease system, different protection strategies (fungicide and inoculations with native root-associated bacterial and fungal isolates), together with a biochar soil amendment, were tested further in the field. A field trial with more than 900 plants in two field plots revealed that inoculation with a mixture of native bacterial isolates significantly reduced disease incidence and mortality in the infected field plot without influencing growth, herbivore resistance, or 32 defense and signaling metabolites known to mediate resistance against native herbivores. Tests in a subsequent year revealed that a core consortium of five bacteria was essential for disease reduction. This consortium, but not individual members of the root-associated bacteria community which this plant normally recruits during germination from native seed banks, provides enduring resistance against fungal diseases, demonstrating that native plants develop opportunistic mutualisms with prokaryotes that solve context-dependent ecological problems. PMID:26305938

  15. Patterns of variation at Ustilago maydis virulence clusters 2A and 19A largely reflect the demographic history of its populations.

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    Ronny Kellner

    Full Text Available The maintenance of an intimate interaction between plant-biotrophic fungi and their hosts over evolutionary times involves strong selection and adaptative evolution of virulence-related genes. The highly specialised maize pathogen Ustilago maydis is assigned with a high evolutionary capability to overcome host resistances due to its high rates of sexual recombination, large population sizes and long distance dispersal. Unlike most studied fungus-plant interactions, the U. maydis - Zea mays pathosystem lacks a typical gene-for-gene interaction. It exerts a large set of secreted fungal virulence factors that are mostly organised in gene clusters. Their contribution to virulence has been experimentally demonstrated but their genetic diversity within U. maydis remains poorly understood. Here, we report on the intraspecific diversity of 34 potential virulence factor genes of U. maydis. We analysed their sequence polymorphisms in 17 isolates of U. maydis from Europe, North and Latin America. We focused on gene cluster 2A, associated with virulence attenuation, cluster 19A that is crucial for virulence, and the cluster-independent effector gene pep1. Although higher compared to four house-keeping genes, the overall levels of intraspecific genetic variation of virulence clusters 2A and 19A, and pep1 are remarkably low and commensurate to the levels of 14 studied non-virulence genes. In addition, each gene is present in all studied isolates and synteny in cluster 2A is conserved. Furthermore, 7 out of 34 virulence genes contain either no polymorphisms or only synonymous substitutions among all isolates. However, genetic variation of clusters 2A and 19A each resolve the large scale population structure of U. maydis indicating subpopulations with decreased gene flow. Hence, the genetic diversity of these virulence-related genes largely reflect the demographic history of U. maydis populations.

  16. Inverse pH regulation of plant and fungal sucrose transporters: a mechanism to regulate competition for sucrose at the host/pathogen interface?

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    Kathrin Wippel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant sucrose transporter activities were shown to respond to changes in the extracellular pH and redox status, and oxidizing compounds like glutathione (GSSG or H(2O(2 were reported to effect the subcellular targeting of these proteins. We hypothesized that changes in both parameters might be used to modulate the activities of competing sucrose transporters at a plant/pathogen interface. We, therefore, compared the effects of redox-active compounds and of extracellular pH on the sucrose transporters UmSRT1 and ZmSUT1 known to compete for extracellular sucrose in the Ustilago maydis (corn smut/Zea mays (maize pathosystem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present functional analyses of the U. maydis sucrose transporter UmSRT1 and of the plant sucrose transporters ZmSUT1 and StSUT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in Xenopus laevis oocytes in the presence of different extracellular pH-values and redox systems, and study the possible effects of these treatments on the subcellular targeting. We observed an inverse regulation of host and pathogen sucrose transporters by changes in the apoplastic pH. Under none of the conditions analyzed, we could confirm the reported effects of redox-active compounds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that changes in the extracellular pH but not of the extracellular redox status might be used to oppositely adjust the transport activities of plant and fungal sucrose transporters at the host/pathogen interface.

  17. The Quantitative Basis of the Arabidopsis Innate Immune System to Endemic Pathogens Depends on Pathogen Genetics.

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    Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie; Subedy, Anushriya; Eshbaugh, Robert; Palmer, Christine; Maloof, Julin; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B. cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs), were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60%) when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen genotypes.

  18. Reduced Carbohydrate Availability Enhances the Susceptibility of Arabidopsis toward Colletotrichum higginsianum1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Horst, Robin J.; Pröls, Reinhard; Pröschel, Marlene; Dietz, Franziska; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Voll, Lars M.

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is a hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus that is adapted to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). After breaching the host surface, the fungus establishes an initial biotrophic phase in the penetrated epidermis cell, before necrotrophic growth is initiated upon further host colonization. We observed that partitioning of major leaf carbohydrates was shifted in favor of sucrose and at the expense of starch during necrotrophic fungal growth. Arabidopsis mutants with impaired starch turnover were more susceptible toward C. higginsianum infection, exhibiting a strong negative correlation between diurnal carbohydrate accumulation and fungal proliferation for the tested genotypes. By altering the length of the light phase and employing additional genotypes impaired in nocturnal carbon mobilization, we revealed that reduced availability of carbon enhances susceptibility in the investigated pathosystem. Systematic starvation experiments resulted in two important findings. First, we showed that carbohydrate supply by the host is dispensable during biotrophic growth of C. higginsianum, while carbon deficiency was most harmful to the host during the necrotrophic colonization phase. Compared with the wild type, the increases in the total salicylic acid pool and camalexin accumulation were reduced in starch-free mutants at late interaction stages, while an increased ratio of free to total salicylic acid did not convey elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression in starch-free mutants. These observations suggest that reduced carbon availability dampens induced defense responses. In contrast, starch-free mutants were more resistant toward the fungal biotroph Erysiphe cruciferarum, indicating that reduced carbohydrate availability influences susceptibility differently in the interaction with the investigated hemibiotrophic and biotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:23487433

  19. The Quantitative Basis of the Arabidopsis Innate Immune System to Endemic Pathogens Depends on Pathogen Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Corwin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B. cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs, were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60% when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen

  20. A genome survey of Moniliophthora perniciosa gives new insights into Witches' Broom Disease of cacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondego, Jorge MC; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Costa, Gustavo GL; Formighieri, Eduardo F; Parizzi, Lucas P; Rincones, Johana; Cotomacci, Carolina; Carraro, Dirce M; Cunha, Anderson F; Carrer, Helaine; Vidal, Ramon O; Estrela, Raíssa C; García, Odalys; Thomazella, Daniela PT; de Oliveira, Bruno V; Pires, Acássia BL; Rio, Maria Carolina S; Araújo, Marcos Renato R; de Moraes, Marcos H; Castro, Luis AB; Gramacho, Karina P; Gonçalves, Marilda S; Neto, José P Moura; Neto, Aristóteles Góes; Barbosa, Luciana V; Guiltinan, Mark J; Bailey, Bryan A; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Cascardo, Julio CM; Pereira, Gonçalo AG

    2008-01-01

    Background The basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' Broom Disease (WBD) in cacao (Theobroma cacao). It is a hemibiotrophic pathogen that colonizes the apoplast of cacao's meristematic tissues as a biotrophic pathogen, switching to a saprotrophic lifestyle during later stages of infection. M. perniciosa, together with the related species M. roreri, are pathogens of aerial parts of the plant, an uncommon characteristic in the order Agaricales. A genome survey (1.9× coverage) of M. perniciosa was analyzed to evaluate the overall gene content of this phytopathogen. Results Genes encoding proteins involved in retrotransposition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) resistance, drug efflux transport and cell wall degradation were identified. The great number of genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (1.15% of gene models) indicates that M. perniciosa has a great potential for detoxification, production of toxins and hormones; which may confer a high adaptive ability to the fungus. We have also discovered new genes encoding putative secreted polypeptides rich in cysteine, as well as genes related to methylotrophy and plant hormone biosynthesis (gibberellin and auxin). Analysis of gene families indicated that M. perniciosa have similar amounts of carboxylesterases and repertoires of plant cell wall degrading enzymes as other hemibiotrophic fungi. In addition, an approach for normalization of gene family data using incomplete genome data was developed and applied in M. perniciosa genome survey. Conclusion This genome survey gives an overview of the M. perniciosa genome, and reveals that a significant portion is involved in stress adaptation and plant necrosis, two necessary characteristics for a hemibiotrophic fungus to fulfill its infection cycle. Our analysis provides new evidence revealing potential adaptive traits that may play major roles in the mechanisms of pathogenicity in the M. perniciosa/cacao pathosystem. PMID:19019209

  1. Deciphering the Niches of Colonisation of Vitis vinifera L. by the Esca-Associated Fungus Phaeoacremonium aleophilum Using a gfp Marked Strain and Cutting Systems.

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    Romain Pierron

    Full Text Available Esca disease has become a major threat for viticulture. Phaeoacremonium aleophilum is considered a pioneer of the esca complex pathosystem, but its colonisation behaviour inside plants remains poorly investigated.In this study, P. aleophilum::gfp7 colonisation was assessed six and twelve weeks post-inoculation in two different types of tissues: in the node and the internode of one year-old rooted cuttings of Cabernet Sauvignon. These processes of colonisation were compared with the colonisation by the wild-type strain using a non-specific lectin probe Alexa Fluor 488-WGA.Data showed that six weeks post-inoculation of the internode, the fungus had colonised the inoculation point, the bark and xylem fibres. Bark, pith and xylem fibres were strongly colonised by the fungus twelve weeks post-inoculation and it can progress up to 8 mm from the point of inoculation using pith, bark and fibres. P. aleophilum was additionally detected in the lumen of xylem vessels in which tyloses blocked its progression. Different plant responses in specific tissues were additionally visualised. Inoculation of nodes led to restricted colonisation of P. aleophilum and this colonisation was associated with a plant response six weeks post-inoculation. The fungus was however detected in xylem vessels, bark and inside the pith twelve weeks post-inoculation.These results demonstrate that P. aleophilum colonisation can vary according to the type of tissues and the type of spread using pith, bark and fibres. Woody tissues can respond to the injury and to the presence of this fungus, and xylem fibres play a key role in the early colonisation of the internode by P. aleophilum before the fungus can colonise xylem vessels.

  2. The ability of a bymovirus to overcome the rym4-mediated resistance in barley correlates with a codon change in the VPg coding region on RNA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Thomas; Shi, Nongnong; Proeseler, Gerhard; Adams, Michael J; Kanyuka, Konstantin

    2003-10-01

    The genome difference(s) that enable the European pathotype 2 isolates of Barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV-2) to infect barley genotypes with the rym4 resistance gene were investigated. Stable deletions of different sizes occurred in RNA2 of laboratory isolates of the common pathotype (BaYMV-1) and BaYMV-2. After mechanical inoculation of susceptible or rym4 genotypes with a mixture of both isolates, immunocapture-RT-PCR with RNA2-specific primers flanking stable deletion regions was used to detect and distinguish the two pathotypes. Individual leaves contained RNA2 of either or both isolates, showing that RNA2 of BaYMV-1 can replicate and move systemically in rym4 plants when co-inoculated with BaYMV-2. In contrast, sequences of RNA1-specific RT-PCR fragments showed that in resistant plants these were always BaYMV-2, suggesting that the pathogenicity determinant was on RNA1. The complete ORFs of RNA1 of three BaYMV-1 and four BaYMV-2 isolates from the UK and Germany were sequenced, and the RNA2 sequences of one BaYMV-1 and two BaYMV-2 isolates from the UK were also determined. All sequences were very similar to one another and to the published German BaYMV-1 isolate. The only consistent amino acid difference between the BaYMV-1 and BaYMV-2 isolates was in the RNA1-encoded polyproteins and this was confirmed by sequencing the relevant region of eight further German isolates. All BaYMV-1 isolates had lysine at aa 1307, whereas BaYMV-2 isolates had asparagine (or, in one isolate, histidine). The polymorphism occurred in the central region of VPg, which has been shown to be required for pathogenicity on genotypes carrying recessive resistance genes in several potyvirus/dicotyledonous plant pathosystems.

  3. PCR-based analysis of disease in tomato singly or mixed inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici races 1 and 2

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    OLUSEGUN SAMUEL BALOGUN

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic response of two tomato cultivars to races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp.. lycopersici (cv. Momotaro, insensitive to race 1 of the pathogen, and cv. Ponderosa sensitive to race 1, was studied in greenhouse and laboratory experiments by inoculating the cultivars singly with race 1 or race 2, and in mixed inoculation with the two races of the pathogen. A pre-symptom PCR assay two weeks after inoculation showed that a fragment of the intergenic spacer region (IGS of ribosomal DNA was amplifi ed by DNA templates from leaf samples of cv. Momotaro tomato plants inoculated with only race 2, or with race 1+2, but in the cv. Ponderosa the fragment was amplifi ed only in plants inoculated with race 1+2. Race-specifi c analysis using the sp13 and sp23 primers confi rmed that the amplifi ed fragment was from race 2 in cv. Momotaro and from races 1+2 in cv. Ponderosa. Later wilt symptoms mirrored the pre-symptom and post-symptom molecular analytical results: cv. Momotaro plants inoculated with only race 1 remained symptomless, while the ‘Momotaro’ plants inoculated with both races (1+2 did not manifest more severe wilt symptoms than plants inoculated with race 2 alone; cv. Ponderosa plants that were mixed-inoculated with race 1+2 manifested more severe symptoms, and at an earlier date than plants inoculated with only race 2. Growth parameters such as number of leaves and plant height showed the race 1+2 infected cv. Ponderosa were significantly retarded in growth, suggesting that significant synergism between the fungal races in tomato pathosystem can occur only when the host cultivar is sensitive to both races. An additional important finding is that pre-symptom leaf sampling of apparently healthy plants is useful in PCR diagnostic analysis to predict impending fusarial wilt outbreaks in tomato especially in infested soil.

  4. Microbial siderophores exert a subtle role in Arabidopsis during infection by manipulating the immune response and the iron status.

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    Dellagi, Alia; Segond, Diego; Rigault, Martine; Fagard, Mathilde; Simon, Clara; Saindrenan, Patrick; Expert, Dominique

    2009-08-01

    Siderophores (ferric ion chelators) are secreted by organisms in response to iron deficiency. The pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi produces two siderophores, achromobactin and chrysobactin (CB), which are required for systemic dissemination in host plants. Previous studies have shown that CB is produced in planta and can trigger the up-regulation of the plant ferritin gene AtFER1. To further investigate the function of CB during pathogenesis, we analyzed its effect in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants following leaf infiltration. CB activates the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated signaling pathway, while the CB ferric complex is ineffective, suggesting that the elicitor activity of this siderophore is due to its iron-binding property. We confirmed this hypothesis by testing the effect of siderophores structurally unrelated to CB, including deferrioxamine. There was no activation of SA-dependent defense in plants grown under iron deficiency before CB treatment. Transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding the root ferrous ion transporter and ferric chelate reductase, and determination of the activity of this enzyme in response to CB or deferrioxamine, showed that these compounds induce a leaf-to-root iron deficiency signal. This root response as well as ferritin gene up-regulation in the leaf were not compromised in a SA-deficient mutant line. Using the Arabidopsis-E. chrysanthemi pathosystem, we have shown that CB promotes bacterial growth in planta and can modulate plant defenses through an antagonistic mechanism between SA and jasmonic acid signaling cascades. Collectively, these data reveal a new link between two processes mediated by SA and iron in response to microbial siderophores.

  5. Fungal Biofilms: Targets for the Development of Novel Strategies in Plant Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca; Cortesi, Paolo; Kunova, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The global food supply has been facing increasing challenges during the first decades of the 21 st century. Disease in plants is an important constraint to worldwide crop production, accounting for 20-40% of its annual harvest loss. Although the use of resistant varieties, good water management and agronomic practices are valid management tools in counteracting plant diseases, there are still many pathosystems where fungicides are widely used for disease management. However, restrictive regulations and increasing concern regarding the risk to human health and the environment, along with the incidence of fungicide resistance, have discouraged their use and have prompted for a search for new efficient, ecologically friendly and sustainable disease management strategies. The recent evidence of biofilm formation by fungal phytopathogens provides the scientific framework for designing and adapting methods and concepts developed by biofilm research that could be integrated in IPM practices. In this perspective paper, we provide evidence to support the view that the biofilm lifestyle plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of plant diseases. We describe the main factors limiting the durability of single-site fungicides, and we assemble the current knowledge on pesticide resistance in the specific context of the biofilm lifestyle. Finally, we illustrate the potential of antibiofilm compounds at sub-lethal concentrations for the development of an innovative, eco-sustainable strategy to counteract phytopathogenic fungi. Such fungicide-free solutions will be instrumental in reducing disease severity, and will permit more prudent use of fungicides decreasing thus the selection of resistant forms and safeguarding the environment.

  6. Molecular analysis of Colletotrichum species in the carposphere and phyllosphere of olive.

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    Saveria Mosca

    Full Text Available A metagenomic approach based on the use of genus specific primers was developed and utilized to characterize Colletotrichum species associated with the olive phyllosphere and carposphere. Selected markers enabled the specific amplification of almost the entire ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and its use as barcode gene. The analysis of different olive samples (green and senescent leaves, floral residues, symptomatic and asymptomatic fruits, and litter leaves and mummies in three different phenological phases (June, October and December enabled the detection of 12 genotypes associated with 4 phylotypes identified as C. godetiae, C. acutatum s.s., C. gloeosporioides s.s. and C. kahawae. Another three genotypes were not identified at the level of species but were associated with the species complexes of C. acutatum, C. gloeosporioides and C. boninense sensu lato. Colletotrichum godetiae and C. acutatum s.s. were by far the most abundant while C. gloeosporioides s.s. was detected in a limited number of samples whereas ther phylotypes were rarely found. The high incidence of C. acutatum s.s. represents a novelty for Italy and more generally for the Mediterranean basin since it had been previously reported only in Portugal. As regards to the phenological phase, Colletotrichum species were found in a few samples in June and were diffused on all assessed samples in December. According to data new infections on olive tissues mainly occur in the late fall. Furthermore, Colletotrichum species seem to have a saprophytic behavior on floral olive residues. The method developed in the present study proved to be valuable and its future application may contribute to the study of cycle and aetiology of diseases caused by Colletotrichum species in many different pathosystems.

  7. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Mutant with Enhanced Competitive Colonization Ability and Improved Biocontrol Activity against Fungal Root Pathogens ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible. PMID:21685161

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 mutant with enhanced competitive colonization ability and improved biocontrol activity against fungal root pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-08-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible.

  9. In vitro ecology of Seiridium cardinale and allied species: the effect of solute stress and water potential on fungal growth

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    Elena TURCO

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false IT ZH-TW X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Defining the potential implications of global climate change on Mediterranean forest ecosystems requires a basic knowledge on the ecology of fungal pathogens under conditions that would stress host plants. The Mediterranean cypress (Cupressus sempervirens-Seiridium spp. pathosystem represents an important case study. In the last century, epidemics of cypress canker have killed historical plantations and the decades-long host resistance will probably break down in the future as a result of both host and pathogen adaptation to increasing temperature and decreasing summer precipitation. In this study, the effect of osmotic water stress on mycelial growth of Seiridium cardinale, S. unicorne and S. cupressi in culture was examined and compared to that of Diplodia cupressi, which is a pathogen of cypress known to be favoured by host water stress. Growth responses were evaluated on potato sucrose agar amended with KCl or NaCl to give water potentials in the range of -0.34 to -15 MPa. Mycelial growth decreased with decreasing water potential and ceased at -15 MPa, although the mycelium remained alive. Histochemical analysis conducted on S. cardinale grown at -12 MPa revealed melanization and thickening of hyphal walls, in addition to abundance of lipid-rich organelles. These results suggest that the three Seiridium spp. might survive drying cycles in cypress wood, but their tolerance is different. Successful survival strategies may partly result from changes in mycelium structure. Furthermore, S. unicorne was positively stimulated by a water potential of -3 MPa, suggesting that it may have high adaptive potential for life in a drier Mediterranean ecosystem, which is predicted to occur under scenarios of global warming. Normal 0 14 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

  10. FT-ICR/MS and GC-EI/MS metabolomics networking unravels global potato sprout's responses to Rhizoctonia solani infection.

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    Konstantinos A Aliferis

    Full Text Available The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their dissection a challenging task for metabolomics studies. Here we are reporting on an integrated metabolomics networking approach combining gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance/mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS and bioinformatics analyses for the study of interactions in the potato sprout-Rhizoctonia solani pathosystem and the fluctuations in the global metabolome of sprouts. The developed bioanalytical and bioinformatics protocols provided a snapshot of the sprout's global metabolic network and its perturbations as a result of pathogen invasion. Mevalonic acid and deoxy-xylulose pathways were substantially up-regulated leading to the biosynthesis of sesquiterpene alkaloids such as the phytoalexins phytuberin, rishitin, and solavetivone, and steroidal alkaloids having solasodine and solanidine as their common aglycons. Additionally, the perturbation of the sprout's metabolism was depicted in fluctuations of the content of their amino acids pool and that of carboxylic and fatty acids. Components of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR and hypersensitive reaction (HR such as azelaic and oxalic acids were detected in increased levels in infected sprouts and strategies of the pathogen to overcome plant defense were proposed. Our metabolic approach has not only greatly expanded the multitude of metabolites previously reported in potato in response to pathogen invasion, but also enabled the identification of bioactive plant-derived metabolites providing valuable information that could be exploited in biotechnology, biomarker-assisted plant breeding, and crop protection for the development of new crop protection agents.

  11. Coconut Lethal Yellowing Diseases: A Phytoplasma Threat to Palms of Global Economic and Social Significance

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    Gurr, Geoff M.; Johnson, Anne C.; Ash, Gavin J.; Wilson, Bree A. L.; Ero, Mark M.; Pilotti, Carmel A.; Dewhurst, Charles F.; You, Minsheng S.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of Bogia coconut syndrome in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is the first report of a lethal yellowing disease (LYD) in Oceania. Numerous outbreaks of LYDs of coconut have been recorded in the Caribbean and Africa since the late Nineteenth century and have caused the death of millions of palms across several continents during the Twentieth century. Despite the severity of economic losses, it was only in the 1970s that the causes of LYDs were identified as phytoplasmas, a group of insect-transmitted bacteria associated with diseases in many other economically important crop species. Since the development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, knowledge of LYDs epidemiology, ecology and vectors has grown rapidly. There is no economically viable treatment for LYDs and vector-based management is hampered by the fact that vectors have been positively identified in very few cases despite many attempted transmission trials. Some varieties and hybrids of coconut palm are known to be less susceptible to LYD but none are completely resistant. Optimal and current management of LYD is through strict quarantine, prompt detection and destruction of symptomatic palms, and replanting with less susceptible varieties or crop species. Advances in technology such as loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detection and tracking of phytoplasma DNA in plants and insects, remote sensing for identifying symptomatic palms, and the advent of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based tools for gene editing and plant breeding are likely to allow rapid progress in taxonomy as well as understanding and managing LYD phytoplasma pathosystems. PMID:27833616

  12. Proteome and transcript analysis of Vitis vinifera cell cultures subjected to Botrytis cinerea infection.

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    Dadakova, K; Havelkova, M; Kurkova, B; Tlolkova, I; Kasparovsky, T; Zdrahal, Z; Lochman, J

    2015-04-24

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine resulting in significant reductions in yield and fruit quality. In order to examine the molecular mechanisms that characterize the interaction between B. cinerea and the host plant, the grapevine cytoplasmic proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The interaction between Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay cells and B. cinerea was characterized by the increase in spot abundance of 30 proteins, of which 21 were successfully identified. The majority of these proteins were related to defence and stress responses and to cell wall modifications. Some of the modulated proteins have been previously found to be affected by other pathogens when they infect V. vinifera but interestingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were influenced by B. cinerea have not been shown to be modulated by any other pathogen studied to date. Transcript analysis using the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction additionally revealed the up-regulation of several acidic, probably extracellular, chitinases. The results indicate that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are likely to be important mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Although gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine, little information is available about proteomic changes in this pathosystem. These results suggest that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are important molecular mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Surprisingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were modulated by B. cinerea have not been shown to be affected by any other pathogen studied to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical yield-point model to estimate damage caused by brown spot and powdery mildew in barley

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    Lenita Agostinetto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgaris L. is the second most important winter crop in Southern Brazil. The excessive rainfall in this region during the crop-growing season increases the frequency and intensity of foliar fungal diseases. The research aimed to determine the damage function equations (DFE for the multiple pathosystem of barley brown spot and powdery mildew based on the relationship between grain yield and diseases intensity at different 'BRS Cauê' cultivar growth stages (GS during 2009 and 2010 growing seasons in Southern Brazil. The experiments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with nine treatments and four replicates. The disease gradients were generated by strobilurins and triazols fungicides rates and number of applications on barley cv. Cauê. The fungicide applications and disease incidence and severity assessments were performed at the 22, 31, 39, 45 and 56 plant GS. The DFE were obtained by variance analysis and linear regression between grain yield and diseases intensity. Significant and negative DFE were obtained and the damage coefficients (DC varied from 29.48 to 100.08 (2009 and from 36.08 to 113.57kg ha-1 (2010 for incidence, and from 219.5 to 6,276.6 (2009 and 102.3 to 5,292.5kg ha-1 (2010 for severity. The largest damage coefficients were obtained when diseases assessments were made on GS 22 and 31 on both growing seasons evaluated. DFE were used to calculate the economic damage threshold (EDT as a criterion to indicate the fungicide application moment to control the diseases in cultivars similar to 'BRS Cauê' in Southern Brazil.

  14. Modelling the impacts of pests and diseases on agricultural systems.

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    Donatelli, M; Magarey, R D; Bregaglio, S; Willocquet, L; Whish, J P M; Savary, S

    2017-07-01

    The improvement and application of pest and disease models to analyse and predict yield losses including those due to climate change is still a challenge for the scientific community. Applied modelling of crop diseases and pests has mostly targeted the development of support capabilities to schedule scouting or pesticide applications. There is a need for research to both broaden the scope and evaluate the capabilities of pest and disease models. Key research questions not only involve the assessment of the potential effects of climate change on known pathosystems, but also on new pathogens which could alter the (still incompletely documented) impacts of pests and diseases on agricultural systems. Yield loss data collected in various current environments may no longer represent a adequate reference to develop tactical, decision-oriented, models for plant diseases and pests and their impacts, because of the ongoing changes in climate patterns. Process-based agricultural simulation modelling, on the other hand, appears to represent a viable methodology to estimate the impacts of these potential effects. A new generation of tools based on state-of-the-art knowledge and technologies is needed to allow systems analysis including key processes and their dynamics over appropriate suitable range of environmental variables. This paper offers a brief overview of the current state of development in coupling pest and disease models to crop models, and discusses technical and scientific challenges. We propose a five-stage roadmap to improve the simulation of the impacts caused by plant diseases and pests; i) improve the quality and availability of data for model inputs; ii) improve the quality and availability of data for model evaluation; iii) improve the integration with crop models; iv) improve the processes for model evaluation; and v) develop a community of plant pest and disease modelers.

  15. Reducing the Use of Pesticides with Site-Specific Application: The Chemical Control of Rhizoctonia solani as a Case of Study for the Management of Soil-Borne Diseases.

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    Le Cointe, Ronan; Simon, Thomas E; Delarue, Patrick; Hervé, Maxime; Leclerc, Melen; Poggi, Sylvain

    Reducing our reliance on pesticides is an essential step towards the sustainability of agricultural production. One approach involves the rational use of pesticides combined with innovative crop management. Most control strategies currently focus on the temporal aspect of epidemics, e.g. determining the optimal date for spraying, regardless of the spatial mechanics and ecology of disease spread. Designing innovative pest management strategies incorporating the spatial aspect of epidemics involves thorough knowledge on how disease control affects the life-history traits of the pathogen. In this study, using Rhizoctonia solani/Raphanus sativus as an example of a soil-borne pathosystem, we investigated the effects of a chemical control currently used by growers, Monceren® L, on key epidemiological components (saprotrophic spread and infectivity). We tested the potential "shield effect" of Monceren® L on pathogenic spread in a site-specific application context, i.e. the efficiency of this chemical to contain the spread of the fungus from an infected host when application is spatially localized, in our case, a strip placed between the infected host and a recipient bait. Our results showed that Monceren® L mainly inhibits the saprotrophic spread of the fungus in soil and may prevent the fungus from reaching its host plant. However, perhaps surprisingly we did not detect any significant effect of the fungicide on the pathogen infectivity. Finally, highly localized application of the fungicide-a narrow strip of soil (12.5 mm wide) sprayed with Monceren® L-significantly decreased local transmission of the pathogen, suggesting lowered risk of occurrence of invasive epidemics. Our results highlight that detailed knowledge on epidemiological processes could contribute to the design of innovative management strategies based on precision agriculture tools to improve the efficacy of disease control and reduce pesticide use.

  16. Partial Resistance of Carrot to Alternaria dauci Correlates with In Vitro Cultured Carrot Cell Resistance to Fungal Exudates

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    Voisine, Linda; Gatto, Julia; Hélesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Séraphin, Denis; Peña-Rodriguez, Luis M.; Richomme, Pascal; Boedo, Cora; Yovanopoulos, Claire; Gyomlai, Melvina; Briard, Mathilde; Simoneau, Philippe; Poupard, Pascal; Berruyer, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Although different mechanisms have been proposed in the recent years, plant pathogen partial resistance is still poorly understood. Components of the chemical warfare, including the production of plant defense compounds and plant resistance to pathogen-produced toxins, are likely to play a role. Toxins are indeed recognized as important determinants of pathogenicity in necrotrophic fungi. Partial resistance based on quantitative resistance loci and linked to a pathogen-produced toxin has never been fully described. We tested this hypothesis using the Alternaria dauci – carrot pathosystem. Alternaria dauci, causing carrot leaf blight, is a necrotrophic fungus known to produce zinniol, a compound described as a non-host selective toxin. Embryogenic cellular cultures from carrot genotypes varying in resistance against A. dauci were confronted with zinniol at different concentrations or to fungal exudates (raw, organic or aqueous extracts). The plant response was analyzed through the measurement of cytoplasmic esterase activity, as a marker of cell viability, and the differentiation of somatic embryos in cellular cultures. A differential response to toxicity was demonstrated between susceptible and partially resistant genotypes, with a good correlation noted between the resistance to the fungus at the whole plant level and resistance at the cellular level to fungal exudates from raw and organic extracts. No toxic reaction of embryogenic cultures was observed after treatment with the aqueous extract or zinniol used at physiological concentration. Moreover, we did not detect zinniol in toxic fungal extracts by UHPLC analysis. These results suggest that strong phytotoxic compounds are present in the organic extract and remain to be characterized. Our results clearly show that carrot tolerance to A. dauci toxins is one component of its partial resistance. PMID:24983469

  17. Transcriptional regulation of ethylene and jasmonate mediated defense response in apple (Malus domestica) root during Pythium ultimum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sungbong; Lv, Jingyi; Fazio, Gennaro; Mazzola, Mark; Zhu, Yanmin

    2014-01-01

    Apple replant disease (ARD) is a significant economic restraint to the successful re-establishment of new apple orchards on sites previously planted to the same crop. Pythium ultimum, an oomycete, is a significant component of the ARD pathogen complex. Although ethylene (ET)- and jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated defense responses are intensively studied in the foliar pathosystem, the transferability of this knowledge to the interaction between a perennial root system and soilborne pathogens is unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the ET/JA-mediated defense response is conserved in roots of tree crops in response to infection by P. ultimum. Apple genes with the annotated function of ET/JA biosynthesis, MdERF (ethylene response factor) for signaling transduction and a gene encoding a pathogenesis-related (PR) protein (β-chitinase, the target of ERF) were identified from the apple genome sequences. The transcriptional profiles of these genes during P. ultimum infection and after exogenous ET and/or JA treatment were characterized using qRT-PCR. Several genes showed a 10- to 60-fold upregulation in apple root tissue 24-48 h post inoculation (hpi). Exogenous ET and JA treatment exhibited either a positive or negative influence on expression of ET or JA biosynthesis genes, depending upon gene isoforms and the tissue types, while the expression of MdERF and the PR protein encoding gene was upregulated by both ET and JA treatment. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that ET/JA-mediated defense pathways are functional in the root system of perennial tree species defending soilborne pathogens.

  18. Phytoplasmas–The “Crouching Tiger” Threat of Australian Plant Pathology

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    Geoff M. Gurr

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are insect-vectored bacteria that cause disease in a wide range of plant species. The increasing availability of molecular DNA analyses, expertise and additional methods in recent years has led to a proliferation of discoveries of phytoplasma-plant host associations and in the numbers of taxonomic groupings for phytoplasmas. The widespread use of common names based on the diseases with which they are associated, as well as separate phenetic and taxonomic systems for classifying phytoplasmas based on variation at the 16S rRNA-encoding gene, complicates interpretation of the literature. We explore this issue and related trends through a focus on Australian pathosystems, providing the first comprehensive compilation of information for this continent, covering the phytoplasmas, host plants, vectors and diseases. Of the 33 16Sr groups reported internationally, only groups I, II, III, X, XI and XII have been recorded in Australia and this highlights the need for ongoing biosecurity measures to prevent the introduction of additional pathogen groups. Many of the phytoplasmas reported in Australia have not been sufficiently well studied to assign them to 16Sr groups so it is likely that unrecognized groups and sub-groups are present. Wide host plant ranges are apparent among well studied phytoplasmas, with multiple crop and non-crop species infected by some. Disease management is further complicated by the fact that putative vectors have been identified for few phytoplasmas, especially in Australia. Despite rapid progress in recent years using molecular approaches, phytoplasmas remain the least well studied group of plant pathogens, making them a “crouching tiger” disease threat.

  19. Pantoea ananatis Genetic Diversity Analysis Reveals Limited Genomic Diversity as Well as Accessory Genes Correlated with Onion Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Shaun P.; Stumpf, Spencer D.; Gitaitis, Ron D.; Kvitko, Brian H.; Dutta, Bhabesh

    2018-01-01

    Pantoea ananatis is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and an enigmatic plant pathogen with a broad host range. Although P. ananatis strains can be aggressive on onion causing foliar necrosis and onion center rot, previous genomic analysis has shown that P. ananatis lacks the primary virulence secretion systems associated with other plant pathogens. We assessed a collection of fifty P. ananatis strains collected from Georgia over three decades to determine genetic factors that correlated with onion pathogenic potential. Previous genetic analysis studies have compared strains isolated from different hosts with varying diseases potential and isolation sources. Strains varied greatly in their pathogenic potential and aggressiveness on different cultivated Allium species like onion, leek, shallot, and chive. Using multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) and repetitive extragenic palindrome repeat (rep)-PCR techniques, we did not observe any correlation between onion pathogenic potential and genetic diversity among strains. Whole genome sequencing and pan-genomic analysis of a sub-set of 10 strains aided in the identification of a novel series of genetic regions, likely plasmid borne, and correlating with onion pathogenicity observed on single contigs of the genetic assemblies. We named these loci Onion Virulence Regions (OVR) A-D. The OVR loci contain genes involved in redox regulation as well as pectate lyase and rhamnogalacturonase genes. Previous studies have not identified distinct genetic loci or plasmids correlating with onion foliar pathogenicity or pathogenicity on a single host pathosystem. The lack of focus on a single host system for this phytopathgenic disease necessitates the pan-genomic analysis performed in this study. PMID:29491851

  20. Carbon Costs of Constitutive and Expressed Resistance to a Non-Native Pathogen in Limber Pine.

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    Patrick J Vogan

    Full Text Available Increasing the frequency of resistance to the non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola (causative agent of white pine blister rust, WPBR in limber pine populations is a primary management objective to sustain high-elevation forest communities. However, it is not known to what extent genetic disease resistance is costly to plant growth or carbon economy. In this study, we measured growth and leaf-level physiology in (1 seedling families from seed trees that have previously been inferred to carry or not carry Cr4, the dominant R gene allele conferring complete, gene-for-gene resistance to WPBR in limber pine, and (2 populations that were and were not infected with C. ribicola. We found that, in the absence of C. ribicola exposure, there was no significant difference in carbon relations between families born from seed trees that harbor the resistance allele compared to those that lack it, either to plant growth and phenology or leaf-level photosynthetic traits. However, post-infection with C. ribicola, growth was significantly reduced in inoculation survivors expressing complete resistance compared to uninoculated seedlings. Furthermore, inoculation survivors exhibited significant increases in a suite of traits including photosynthetic rate, respiration rate, leaf N, and stomatal conductance and a decrease in photosynthetic water-use efficiency. The lack of constitutive carbon costs associated with Cr4 resistance in non-stressed limber pine is consistent with a previous report that the R gene allele is not under selection in the absence of C. ribicola and suggests that host resistance may not bear a constitutive cost in pathosystems that have not coevolved. However, under challenge by C. ribicola, complete resistance to WPBR in limber pine has a significant cost to plant growth, though enhanced carbon acquisition post-infection may offset this somewhat. These costs and effects on performance further complicate predictions of this species' response in

  1. Covert Infection of Insects by Baculoviruses

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    Trevor Williams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Baculoviruses (Baculoviridae are occluded DNA viruses that are lethal pathogens of the larval stages of some lepidopterans, mosquitoes, and sawflies (phytophagous Hymenoptera. These viruses have been developed as biological insecticides for control of insect pests and as expression vectors in biotechnological applications. Natural and laboratory populations frequently harbor covert infections by baculoviruses, often at a prevalence exceeding 50%. Covert infection can comprise either non-productive latency or sublethal infection involving low level production of virus progeny. Latency in cell culture systems involves the expression of a small subset of viral genes. In contrast, covert infection in lepidopterans is associated with differential infection of cell types, modulation of virus gene expression and avoidance of immune system clearance. The molecular basis for covert infection may reside in the regulation of host–virus interactions through the action of microRNAs (miRNA. Initial findings suggest that insect nudiviruses and vertebrate herpesviruses may provide useful analogous models for exploring the mechanisms of covert infection by baculoviruses. These pathogens adopt mixed-mode transmission strategies that depend on the relative fitness gains that accrue through vertical and horizontal transmission. This facilitates virus persistence when opportunities for horizontal transmission are limited and ensures virus dispersal in migratory host species. However, when host survival is threatened by environmental or physiological stressors, latent or persistent infections can be activated to produce lethal disease, followed by horizontal transmission. Covert infection has also been implicated in population level effects on host–pathogen dynamics due to the reduced reproductive capacity of infected females. We conclude that covert infections provide many opportunities to examine the complexity of insect–virus pathosystems at the organismal

  2. Race Characterization of Phytophthora root rot on Capsicum in Taiwan as a Basis for Anticipatory Resistance Breeding.

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    Barchenger, Derek W; Sheu, Zong-Ming; Kumar, Sanjeet; Lin, Shih-Wen; Burlakoti, Rishi R; Bosland, Paul W

    2018-02-27

    Peppers (Capsicum sp.) are an increasingly important crop because of their use as a vegetable, spice, and food colorant. The oomycete Phytophthora capsici is one of the most devastating pathogens to pepper production worldwide, causing more than $100 million in losses annually. Developing cultivars resistant to P. capsici is challenging because of the many physiological races that exist and new races that are continuously evolving. This problem is confounded by the lack of a universal system of race characterization. As a basis to develop a global anticipatory breeding program, New Mexico Recombinant Inbred Lines (NMRILs) functioned as a host differential for Phytophthora root rot to characterize the race structure of P. capsici populations in Taiwan. Using the NMRILs, 24 new races were identified, illustrating the utility and usefulness of the NMRILs for anticipatory breeding. Virulence of P. capsici was observed to be geographically specific and in two virulence clusters. Interestingly, all but two isolates collected in 2016 were the A2 mating type, which is a shift from the predominantly A1 mating type isolates collected prior to 2008. The NMRILs host differential provides an approach for scientists to work together on a global scale when breeding for resistance as well as on a local level for regional gene deployment. Additionally, we propose that the current race numbering system, which has no biological meaning, be supplemented with the virulence phenotype, based on the susceptible NMRILs to a given isolate. This work provides insights into the population dynamics of P. capsici and interactions within the highly complex Capsicum-Phytophthora pathosystem, and offers a basis for similar research in other crops.

  3. Pushing the boundaries of resistance: insights from Brachypodium-rust interactions

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    Melania eFigueroa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The implications of global population growth urge transformation of current food and bioenergy production systems to sustainability. Members of the family Poaceae are of particular importance both in food security and for their applications as biofuel substrates. For centuries, rust fungi have threatened the production of valuable crops such as wheat, barley, oat and other small grains; similarly, biofuel crops can also be susceptible to these pathogens. Emerging rust pathogenic races with increased virulence and recurrent rust epidemics around the world point out the vulnerability of monocultures. Basic research in plant immunity, especially in model plants, can make contributions to understanding plant resistance mechanisms and improve disease management strategies. The development of the grass Brachypodium distachyon as a genetically tractable model for monocots, especially temperate cereals and grasses, offers the possibility to overcome the experimental challenges presented by the genetic and genomic complexities of economically valuable crop plants. The numerous resources and tools available in Brachypodium have opened new doors to investigate the underlying molecular and genetic bases of plant-microbe interactions in grasses and evidence demonstrating the applicability and advantages of working with B. distachyon is increasing. Importantly, several interactions between B. distachyon and devastating plant pathogens, such rust fungi, have been examined in the context of non-host resistance. Here, we discuss the use of B. distachyon in these various pathosystems. Exploiting B. distachyon to understand the mechanisms underpinning disease resistance to non-adapted rust fungi may provide effective and durable approaches to fend off these pathogens. The close phylogenetic relationship among Brachypodium spp. and grasses with industrial and agronomic value support harnessing this model plant to improve cropping systems and encourage its use in

  4. Generation of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs and investigation of their regulation upon Uromyces appendiculatus infection

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    Nguyen Henry T

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean is the second most important legume crop in the world after soybean. Consequently, yield losses due to fungal infection, like Uromyces appendiculatus (bean rust, have strong consequences. Several resistant genes were identified that confer resistance to bean rust infection. However, the downstream genes and mechanisms involved in bean resistance to infection are poorly characterized. Results A subtractive bean cDNA library composed of 10,581 unisequences was constructed and enriched in sequences regulated by either bean rust race 41, a virulent strain, or race 49, an avirulent strain on cultivar Early Gallatin carrying the resistance gene Ur-4. The construction of this library allowed the identification of 6,202 new bean ESTs, significantly adding to the available sequences for this plant. Regulation of selected bean genes in response to bean rust infection was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Plant gene expression was similar for both race 41 and 49 during the first 48 hours of the infection process but varied significantly at the later time points (72–96 hours after inoculation mainly due to the presence of the Avr4 gene in the race 49 leading to a hypersensitive response in the bean plants. A biphasic pattern of gene expression was observed for several genes regulated in response to fungal infection. Conclusion The enrichment of the public database with over 6,000 bean ESTs significantly adds to the genomic resources available for this important crop plant. The analysis of these genes in response to bean rust infection provides a foundation for further studies of the mechanism of fungal disease resistance. The expression pattern of 90 bean genes upon rust infection shares several features with other legumes infected by biotrophic fungi. This finding suggests that the P. vulgaris-U. appendiculatus pathosystem could serve as a model to explore legume-rust interaction.

  5. The transcriptional landscape of Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA during infection of soybean as defined by RNA-seq.

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    Tanya R Copley

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani Kühn infects most plant families and can cause significant agricultural yield losses worldwide; however, plant resistance to this disease is rare and short-lived, and therefore poorly understood, resulting in the use of chemical pesticides for its control. Understanding the functional responses of this pathogen during host infection can help elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are necessary for successful host invasion. Using the pathosystem model soybean-R. solani anastomosis group AG1-IA, we examined the global transcriptional responses of R. solani during early and late infection stages of soybean by applying an RNA-seq approach. Approximately, 148 million clean paired-end reads, representing 93% of R. solani AG1-IA genes, were obtained from the sequenced libraries. Analysis of R. solani AG1-IA transcripts during soybean invasion revealed that most genes were similarly expressed during early and late infection stages, and only 11% and 15% of the expressed genes were differentially expressed during early and late infection stages, respectively. Analyses of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed shifts in molecular pathways involved in antibiotics biosynthesis, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as pathways involved in antioxidant production. Furthermore, several KEGG pathways were unique to each time point, particularly the up-regulation of genes related to toxin degradation (e.g., nicotinate and nicotinamid metabolism at onset of necrosis, and those linked to synthesis of anti-microbial compounds and pyridoxine (vitamin B6 biosynthesis 24 h.p.o. of necrosis. These results suggest that particular genes or pathways are required for either invasion or disease development. Overall, this study provides the first insights into R. solani AG1-IA transcriptome responses to soybean invasion providing beneficial information for future targeted control methods of this successful pathogen.

  6. Using epidemiological principles to explain fungicide resistance management tactics: why do mixtures outperform alternations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderfield, James A; Lopez Ruiz, Fran; van den Bosch, Frank; Cunniffe, Nik J

    2018-01-29

    Whether fungicide resistance management is optimised by spraying chemicals with different modes of action as a mixture (i.e. simultaneously) or in alternation (i.e. sequentially) has been studied by experimenters and modellers for decades. However results have been inconclusive. We use previously-parameterised and validated mathematical models of wheat septoria leaf blotch and grapevine powdery mildew to test which tactic provides better resistance management, using the total yield before resistance causes disease control to become economically-ineffective ("lifetime yield") to measure effectiveness. We focus on tactics involving the combination of a low-risk and a high-risk fungicide, and the case in which resistance to the high-risk chemical is complete (i.e. in which there is no partial resistance). Lifetime yield is then optimised by spraying as much low-risk fungicide as is permitted, combined with slightly more high-risk fungicide than needed for acceptable initial disease control, applying these fungicides as a mixture. That mixture rather than alternation gives better performance is invariant to model parameterisation and structure, as well as the pathosystem in question. However if comparison focuses on other metrics, e.g. lifetime yield at full label dose, either mixture or alternation can be optimal. Our work shows how epidemiological principles can explain the evolution of fungicide resistance, and also highlights a theoretical framework to address the question of whether mixture or alternation provides better resistance management. It also demonstrates that precisely how spray tactics are compared must be given careful consideration.

  7. A genome survey of Moniliophthora perniciosa gives new insights into Witches' Broom Disease of cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondego, Jorge M C; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Costa, Gustavo G L; Formighieri, Eduardo F; Parizzi, Lucas P; Rincones, Johana; Cotomacci, Carolina; Carraro, Dirce M; Cunha, Anderson F; Carrer, Helaine; Vidal, Ramon O; Estrela, Raíssa C; García, Odalys; Thomazella, Daniela P T; de Oliveira, Bruno V; Pires, Acássia Bl; Rio, Maria Carolina S; Araújo, Marcos Renato R; de Moraes, Marcos H; Castro, Luis A B; Gramacho, Karina P; Gonçalves, Marilda S; Neto, José P Moura; Neto, Aristóteles Góes; Barbosa, Luciana V; Guiltinan, Mark J; Bailey, Bryan A; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Cascardo, Julio Cm; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2008-11-18

    The basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' Broom Disease (WBD) in cacao (Theobroma cacao). It is a hemibiotrophic pathogen that colonizes the apoplast of cacao's meristematic tissues as a biotrophic pathogen, switching to a saprotrophic lifestyle during later stages of infection. M. perniciosa, together with the related species M. roreri, are pathogens of aerial parts of the plant, an uncommon characteristic in the order Agaricales. A genome survey (1.9x coverage) of M. perniciosa was analyzed to evaluate the overall gene content of this phytopathogen. Genes encoding proteins involved in retrotransposition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) resistance, drug efflux transport and cell wall degradation were identified. The great number of genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (1.15% of gene models) indicates that M. perniciosa has a great potential for detoxification, production of toxins and hormones; which may confer a high adaptive ability to the fungus. We have also discovered new genes encoding putative secreted polypeptides rich in cysteine, as well as genes related to methylotrophy and plant hormone biosynthesis (gibberellin and auxin). Analysis of gene families indicated that M. perniciosa have similar amounts of carboxylesterases and repertoires of plant cell wall degrading enzymes as other hemibiotrophic fungi. In addition, an approach for normalization of gene family data using incomplete genome data was developed and applied in M. perniciosa genome survey. This genome survey gives an overview of the M. perniciosa genome, and reveals that a significant portion is involved in stress adaptation and plant necrosis, two necessary characteristics for a hemibiotrophic fungus to fulfill its infection cycle. Our analysis provides new evidence revealing potential adaptive traits that may play major roles in the mechanisms of pathogenicity in the M. perniciosa/cacao pathosystem.

  8. A genome survey of Moniliophthora perniciosa gives new insights into Witches' Broom Disease of cacao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Bryan A

    2008-11-01

    /cacao pathosystem.

  9. Diverse microbial communities in non-aerated compost teas suppress bacterial wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengesha, W K; Powell, S M; Evans, K J; Barry, K M

    2017-03-01

    Non-aerated compost teas (NCTs) are water extracts of composted organic materials and are used to suppress soil borne and foliar disease in many pathosystems. Greenhouse trials were used to test the effectiveness of NCTs to suppress potato bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum on plants grown in soils inoculated with a virulent isolate of the pathogen (biovar II). NCTs prepared from matured compost sources: agricultural waste (AWCT), vermicompost (VCT) and solid municipal waste (SMWCT) were evaluated at three initial application times (7 days before inoculation, at time of inoculation and 7 days after inoculation) prior to weekly applications, in a randomized complete-block design. AWCT applied initially at the time of inoculation resulted in the greatest disease suppression, with the disease severity index 2.5-fold less than the non-treated plants and the "area under the disease progress curve" (AUDPC) 3.2-fold less. VCT and SMWCT were less suppressive than AWCT regardless of initial application time. Next generation sequencing of the v4 region of 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) revealed that diversity and composition of the bacterial and fungal communities across the NCTs varied significantly. Dominant bacterial phyla such as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, and a fungal phylum Ascomycota were detected in all NCTs. AWCT had optimum physico-chemical measurements with higher bacterial Shannon diversity indices (H) and fungal richness (S) than the other treatments. We conclude that bacterial wilt of potatoes grown in controlled conditions can be suppressed by a non-aerated compost tea with a high microbial diversity when applied at planting and weekly thereafter.

  10. Predictive Models for Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Spread Dynamics, Considering Frankliniella occidentalis Specific Life Processes as Influenced by the Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamella Akoth Ogada

    Full Text Available Several models have been studied on predictive epidemics of arthropod vectored plant viruses in an attempt to bring understanding to the complex but specific relationship between the three cornered pathosystem (virus, vector and host plant, as well as their interactions with the environment. A large body of studies mainly focuses on weather based models as management tool for monitoring pests and diseases, with very few incorporating the contribution of vector's life processes in the disease dynamics, which is an essential aspect when mitigating virus incidences in a crop stand. In this study, we hypothesized that the multiplication and spread of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV in a crop stand is strongly related to its influences on Frankliniella occidentalis preferential behavior and life expectancy. Model dynamics of important aspects in disease development within TSWV-F. occidentalis-host plant interactions were developed, focusing on F. occidentalis' life processes as influenced by TSWV. The results show that the influence of TSWV on F. occidentalis preferential behaviour leads to an estimated increase in relative acquisition rate of the virus, and up to 33% increase in transmission rate to healthy plants. Also, increased life expectancy; which relates to improved fitness, is dependent on the virus induced preferential behaviour, consequently promoting multiplication and spread of the virus in a crop stand. The development of vector-based models could further help in elucidating the role of tri-trophic interactions in agricultural disease systems. Use of the model to examine the components of the disease process could also boost our understanding on how specific epidemiological characteristics interact to cause diseases in crops. With this level of understanding we can efficiently develop more precise control strategies for the virus and the vector.

  11. Predictive Models for Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Spread Dynamics, Considering Frankliniella occidentalis Specific Life Processes as Influenced by the Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogada, Pamella Akoth; Moualeu, Dany Pascal; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Several models have been studied on predictive epidemics of arthropod vectored plant viruses in an attempt to bring understanding to the complex but specific relationship between the three cornered pathosystem (virus, vector and host plant), as well as their interactions with the environment. A large body of studies mainly focuses on weather based models as management tool for monitoring pests and diseases, with very few incorporating the contribution of vector's life processes in the disease dynamics, which is an essential aspect when mitigating virus incidences in a crop stand. In this study, we hypothesized that the multiplication and spread of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in a crop stand is strongly related to its influences on Frankliniella occidentalis preferential behavior and life expectancy. Model dynamics of important aspects in disease development within TSWV-F. occidentalis-host plant interactions were developed, focusing on F. occidentalis' life processes as influenced by TSWV. The results show that the influence of TSWV on F. occidentalis preferential behaviour leads to an estimated increase in relative acquisition rate of the virus, and up to 33% increase in transmission rate to healthy plants. Also, increased life expectancy; which relates to improved fitness, is dependent on the virus induced preferential behaviour, consequently promoting multiplication and spread of the virus in a crop stand. The development of vector-based models could further help in elucidating the role of tri-trophic interactions in agricultural disease systems. Use of the model to examine the components of the disease process could also boost our understanding on how specific epidemiological characteristics interact to cause diseases in crops. With this level of understanding we can efficiently develop more precise control strategies for the virus and the vector.

  12. Impact of environmental chemistry on mycogenic Mn oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, C. M.; Farfan, G. A.; Post, A.; Post, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestrial environments and their presence can have broad environmental consequences. In particular, Mn oxides scavenge nutrients and metals, degrade complex organics, and oxidize a variety of inorganic contaminants. The "reactivity" of Mn oxides, however, is highly dependent upon crystallite size, composition, and structure, which are largely determined by environmental factors such as solution chemistry. It is has been suggested that most Mn oxides in terrestrial and aquatic environments are formed by microbial activity; indeed, a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi have been isolated and their mineral byproducts are consistent with those observed in natural systems. Previous studies showed that Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi produce highly-disordered, nanocrystalline Mn oxides that are structurally similar to synthetic δ-MnO2 or natural vernadite. Unlike related studies with Mn-oxidizing bacteria, Mn oxides produced by these fungi did not "age" or transform to more crystalline mineral phases with time. We hypothesize that fungal growth conditions, in particular the low concentration of cations, are inhibiting secondary mineral formation. The overall goal of this research is to examine the structure and speciation of fungally-precipitated Mn oxides with respect to fungal species, time, and concentration of soluble Mn(II), Na, and Ca - three environmentally relevant cations that promote the transformation of δ-MnO2 to more crystalline mineral phases such as feitknechtite, birnessite, or ranciéite. For this study, we examined the Mn oxides formed by different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (Pyrenochaeta sp., Stagonospora sp., Plectosphaerella cucumerina., and Acremonium strictum). Isolates were grown for 8 or 16 days in a nutrient lean media consisting of yeast extract, trace elements and 0.2 mM MnCl2 supplemented with varying concentrations of Na, Ca, or Mn(II) compounds. The

  13. Trophic Relationships between the Parasitic Plant Species Phelipanche ramosa (L.) and Different Hosts Depending on Host Phenological Stage and Host Growth Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Delphine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Girardin, Annette; Pointurier, Olivia; Reibel, Carole; Strbik, Florence; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Colbach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel (branched broomrape) is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host’s expense so that host–parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L.) (oilseed rape) and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.). Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34 to 84%). B. napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per host plant

  14. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato: the right pathogen, of the right plant, at the right time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, G M

    2000-09-01

    Abstract Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and the closely related pathovar P. s. pv. maculicola have been the focus of intensive research in recent years, not only because of the diseases they cause on tomato and crucifers, but because strains such as P. s. pv. tomato DC3000 and P. s. pv. maculicola ES4326 are pathogens of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, both P. s. pv. tomato and P. s. pv. maculicola have been widely used to study the molecular mechanisms of host responses to infection. Analyses of the molecular basis of pathogenesis in P. s. pv. tomato reveal a complex and intimate interaction between bacteria and plant cells that depends on the coordinated expression of multiple pathogenicity and virulence factors. These include toxins, extracellular proteins and polysaccharides, and the translocation of proteins into plant cells by the type III (Hrp) secretion system. The contribution of individual virulence factors to parasitism and disease development varies significantly between strains. Application of functional genomics and cell biology to both pathogen and host within the P. s. pv. tomato/A. thaliana pathosystem provides a unique opportunity to unravel the molecular interactions underlying plant pathogenesis. Taxonomic relationship: Bacteria; Proteobacteria; gamma subdivision; Pseudomonadaceae/Moraxellaceae group; Pseudomonadaceae family; Pseudomonas genus; Pseudomonas syringae species; tomato pathovar. Microbiological properties: Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, polar flagella, oxidase negative, arginine dihydrolase negative, DNA 58-60 mol% GC, elicits the hypersensitive response on tobacco. Primarily studied as the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato and as a model pathogen of A. thaliana, although it has been isolated from a wide range of crop and weed species. Disease symptoms: Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum): Brown-black leaf spots sometimes surrounded by chlorotic margin; dark superficial specks on green fruit

  15. Infection of Brachypodium distachyon by formae speciales of Puccinia graminis: early infection events and host-pathogen incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Figueroa

    Full Text Available Puccinia graminis causes stem rust, a serious disease of cereals and forage grasses. Important formae speciales of P. graminis and their typical hosts are P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pg-tr in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pg-lo in perennial ryegrass and tall fescue, and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pg-pp in timothy grass. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging genetic model to study fungal disease resistance in cereals and temperate grasses. We characterized the P. graminis-Brachypodium pathosystem to evaluate its potential for investigating incompatibility and non-host resistance to P. graminis. Inoculation of eight Brachypodium inbred lines with Pg-tr, Pg-lo or Pg-pp resulted in sporulating lesions later accompanied by necrosis. Histological analysis of early infection events in one Brachypodium inbred line (Bd1-1 indicated that Pg-lo and Pg-pp were markedly more efficient than Pg-tr at establishing a biotrophic interaction. Formation of appressoria was completed (60-70% of germinated spores by 12 h post-inoculation (hpi under dark and wet conditions, and after 4 h of subsequent light exposure fungal penetration structures (penetration peg, substomatal vesicle and primary infection hyphae had developed. Brachypodium Bd1-1 exhibited pre-haustorial resistance to Pg-tr, i.e. infection usually stopped at appressorial formation. By 68 hpi, only 0.3% and 0.7% of the Pg-tr urediniospores developed haustoria and colonies, respectively. In contrast, development of advanced infection structures by Pg-lo and Pg-pp was significantly more common; however, Brachypodium displayed post-haustorial resistance to these isolates. By 68 hpi the percentage of urediniospores that only develop a haustorium mother cell or haustorium in Pg-lo and Pg-pp reached 8% and 5%, respectively. The formation of colonies reached 14% and 13%, respectively. We conclude that Brachypodium is an apt grass model to study the molecular and genetic components of

  16. Infection of Brachypodium distachyon by formae speciales of Puccinia graminis: early infection events and host-pathogen incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Melania; Alderman, Stephen; Garvin, David F; Pfender, William F

    2013-01-01

    Puccinia graminis causes stem rust, a serious disease of cereals and forage grasses. Important formae speciales of P. graminis and their typical hosts are P. graminis f. sp. tritici (Pg-tr) in wheat and barley, P. graminis f. sp. lolii (Pg-lo) in perennial ryegrass and tall fescue, and P. graminis f. sp. phlei-pratensis (Pg-pp) in timothy grass. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging genetic model to study fungal disease resistance in cereals and temperate grasses. We characterized the P. graminis-Brachypodium pathosystem to evaluate its potential for investigating incompatibility and non-host resistance to P. graminis. Inoculation of eight Brachypodium inbred lines with Pg-tr, Pg-lo or Pg-pp resulted in sporulating lesions later accompanied by necrosis. Histological analysis of early infection events in one Brachypodium inbred line (Bd1-1) indicated that Pg-lo and Pg-pp were markedly more efficient than Pg-tr at establishing a biotrophic interaction. Formation of appressoria was completed (60-70% of germinated spores) by 12 h post-inoculation (hpi) under dark and wet conditions, and after 4 h of subsequent light exposure fungal penetration structures (penetration peg, substomatal vesicle and primary infection hyphae) had developed. Brachypodium Bd1-1 exhibited pre-haustorial resistance to Pg-tr, i.e. infection usually stopped at appressorial formation. By 68 hpi, only 0.3% and 0.7% of the Pg-tr urediniospores developed haustoria and colonies, respectively. In contrast, development of advanced infection structures by Pg-lo and Pg-pp was significantly more common; however, Brachypodium displayed post-haustorial resistance to these isolates. By 68 hpi the percentage of urediniospores that only develop a haustorium mother cell or haustorium in Pg-lo and Pg-pp reached 8% and 5%, respectively. The formation of colonies reached 14% and 13%, respectively. We conclude that Brachypodium is an apt grass model to study the molecular and genetic components of incompatiblity

  17. Assessing disease stress and modeling yield losses in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jie

    weight, percentage reflectance (810 nm), and green leaf area index (GLAI). Percentage reflectance (810 nm) assessments had a stronger relationship with dry weight and green leaf area index than percentage defoliation assessments. Our research conclusively demonstrates that percentage reflectance measurements can be used to nondestructively assess green leaf area index which is a direct measure of plant health and an indirect measure of productivity. This research conclusively demonstrates that remote sensing is superior to visual assessment method to assess alfalfa stress and to model yield and GLAI in the alfalfa foliar disease pathosystem.

  18. DspA/E contributes to apoplastic accumulation of ROS in nonhost A. thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban eLaunay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Erwinia amylovora is responsible for the fire blight disease of Maleae, which provokes necrotic symptoms on aerial parts. The pathogenicity of this bacterium in hosts relies on its type three-secretion system (T3SS, a molecular syringe that allows the bacterium to inject effectors into the plant cell. E. amylovora-triggered disease in host plants is associated with the T3SS-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, although ROS are generally associated with resistance in other pathosystems. We showed previously that E. amylovora can multiply transiently in the nonhost plant Arabidopsis thaliana and that a T3SS-dependent production of intracellular ROS occurs during this interaction. In the present work we characterize the localization and source of hydrogen peroxide accumulation following E. amylovora infection. Transmission electron microscope (TEM analysis of infected tissues showed that hydrogen peroxide accumulation occurs in the cytosol, plastids, peroxisomes, and mitochondria as well as in the apoplast. Furthermore, TEM analysis showed that an E. amylovora dspA/E-deficient strain does not induce hydrogen peroxide accumulation in the apoplast. Consistently, a transgenic line expressing DspA/E accumulated ROS in the apoplast. The NADPH oxidase-deficient rbohD mutant showed a very strong reduction in hydrogen peroxide accumulation in response to E. amylovora inoculation. However, we did not find an increase in bacterial titers of E. amylovora in the rbohD mutant and the rbohD mutation did not suppress the toxicity of DspA/E when introgressed into a DspA/E-expressing transgenic line. Co-inoculation of E. amylovora with cycloheximide (CHX, which we found previously to suppress callose deposition and allow strong multiplication of E. amylovora in A. thaliana leaves, led to a strong reduction of apoplastic ROS accumulation but did not affect intracellular ROS. Our data strongly suggest that apoplastic ROS accumulation is

  19. Comparative genomics and prediction of conditionally dispensable sequences in legume-infecting Fusarium oxysporum formae speciales facilitates identification of candidate effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angela H; Sharma, Mamta; Thatcher, Louise F; Azam, Sarwar; Hane, James K; Sperschneider, Jana; Kidd, Brendan N; Anderson, Jonathan P; Ghosh, Raju; Garg, Gagan; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Kistler, H Corby; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah; Buck, Sally-Anne G; Kamphuis, Lars G; Saxena, Rachit; Pande, Suresh; Ma, Li-Jun; Varshney, Rajeev K; Singh, Karam B

    2016-03-05

    Soil-borne fungi of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex cause devastating wilt disease on many crops including legumes that supply human dietary protein needs across many parts of the globe. We present and compare draft genome assemblies for three legume-infecting formae speciales (ff. spp.): F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc-38-1) and f. sp. pisi (Fop-37622), significant pathogens of chickpea and pea respectively, the world's second and third most important grain legumes, and lastly f. sp. medicaginis (Fom-5190a) for which we developed a model legume pathosystem utilising Medicago truncatula. Focusing on the identification of pathogenicity gene content, we leveraged the reference genomes of Fusarium pathogens F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (tomato-infecting) and F. solani (pea-infecting) and their well-characterised core and dispensable chromosomes to predict genomic organisation in the newly sequenced legume-infecting isolates. Dispensable chromosomes are not essential for growth and in Fusarium species are known to be enriched in host-specificity and pathogenicity-associated genes. Comparative genomics of the publicly available Fusarium species revealed differential patterns of sequence conservation across F. oxysporum formae speciales, with legume-pathogenic formae speciales not exhibiting greater sequence conservation between them relative to non-legume-infecting formae speciales, possibly indicating the lack of a common ancestral source for legume pathogenicity. Combining predicted dispensable gene content with in planta expression in the model legume-infecting isolate, we identified small conserved regions and candidate effectors, four of which shared greatest similarity to proteins from another legume-infecting ff. spp. We demonstrate that distinction of core and potential dispensable genomic regions of novel F. oxysporum genomes is an effective tool to facilitate effector discovery and the identification of gene content possibly linked to host

  20. Adjuvantes e herbicidas e a infectividade de Fusarium graminearum, agente potencial de biocontrole de Egeria densa e Egeria najas Adjuvants and herbicides and the infectivity of Fusarium graminearum, a potential biocontrol agent of Egeria densa and Egeria najas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Borges Neto

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os efeitos da adição de adjuvantes e a associação com herbicidas na infectividade do fungo dentro do patossistema Fusarium graminearum x Egeria spp. Foram utilizadas plantas sadias de Egeria densa e E. najas inoculadas com uma suspensão de arroz moído colonizado por F. graminearum, na concentração de 0,7 g L-1. Os tubos de ensaio contendo as plantas imersas na referida suspensão foram mantidos em incubadora à temperatura de 25 ºC e fotoperíodo de 12 horas diárias de luz, por oito dias, durante os quais foram avaliados os sintomas nas plantas a cada dois dias e o crescimento destas através do incremento de matéria fresca ao final do experimento. O efeito de 14 adjuvantes e 6 herbicidas, adicionados à suspensão de inóculo, sobre a ação de F. graminearum em E. densa e E. najas foi avaliado. De modo geral, os adjuvantes melhoraram a eficiência do bioerbicida e a associação herbicida + fungo proporcionou maior severidade de doença e controle do crescimento das plantas.The effects of adding adjuvants and their association with herbicides on fungus infectivity were studied in the Fusarium graminearum x Egeria spp. pathosystem. Healthy Egeria densa and E. naja plants were inoculated with suspension of ground rice with F. graminearum, at a concentration of 0.7 g L-1. The assay tubes with the plants immersed in the suspension were kept in the incubator at the temperature of 25 ºC and photoperiod of 12 hours daily, with plant symptoms being evaluated every two hours and plant growth monitored based on fresh matter increase at the end of the experiment. The effect of 14 adjuvants and 6 herbicides added to the inoculum on the action of F. graminearum against E. densa and E. najas was evaluated. In general, the adjuvants improved bioherbicide efficiency and the herbicide + fungus association increased disease severity and plant growth control.

  1. Trophic relationships between the parasitic plant species Phelipanche ramosa (L. and different hosts depending on host phenological stage and host growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Moreau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Phelipanche ramosa (L. Pomel (branched broomrape is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host's expense so that host-parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L. (oilseed rape and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L. Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.. Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34% to 84%. Brassica napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per

  2. Effects of Temperature Stresses on the Resistance of Chickpea Genotypes and Aggressiveness of Didymella rabiei Isolates

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    Seid Ahmed Kemal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an important food and rotation crop in many parts of the world. Cold (freezing and chilling temperatures and Ascochyta blight (Didymella rabiei are the major constraints in chickpea production. The effects of temperature stresses on chickpea susceptibility and pathogen aggressiveness are not well documented in the Cicer-Didymella pathosystem. Two experiments were conducted under controlled conditions using chickpea genotypes and pathogen isolates in 2011 and 2012. In Experiment 1, four isolates of D. rabiei (AR-01, AR-02, AR-03 and AR-04, six chickpea genotypes (Ghab-1, Ghab-2, Ghab-3, Ghab-4, Ghab-5 and ICC-12004 and four temperature regimes (10, 15, 20, and 25°C were studied using 10 day-old seedlings. In Experiment 2, three chickpea genotypes (Ghab-1, Ghab-2, and ICC-12004 were exposed to 5 and 10 days of chilling temperature exposure at 5°C and non-exposed seedlings were used as controls. Seedlings of the three chickpea genotypes were inoculated with the four pathogen isolates used in Experiment 1. Three disease parameters (incubation period, latent period and disease severity were measured to evaluate treatment effects. In Experiment 1, highly significant interactions between genotypes and isolates; genotypes and temperature; and isolate and temperature were observed for incubation and latent periods. Genotype x isolate and temperature x isolate interactions also significantly affected disease severity. The resistant genotype ICC-12004 showed long incubation and latent periods and low disease severity at all temperatures. The highly aggressive isolate AR-04 caused symptoms, produced pycnidia in short duration as well as high disease severity across temperature regimes, which indicated it is adapted to a wide range of temperatures. Short incubation and latent periods and high disease severity were observed on genotypes exposed to chilling temperature. Our findings showed that the significant interactions of

  3. Systemic acquired resistance in Cavendish banana induced by infection with an incompatible strain of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanli; Yi, Ganjun; Peng, Xinxiang; Huang, Bingzhi; Liu, Ee; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-07-15

    Fusarium wilt of banana is caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). The fact that there are no economically viable biological, chemical, or cultural measures of controlling the disease in an infected field leads to search for alternative strategies involving activation of the plant's innate defense system. The mechanisms underlying systemic acquired resistance (SAR) are much less understood in monocots than in dicots. Since systemic protection of plants by attenuated or avirulent pathogens is a typical SAR response, the establishment of a biologically induced SAR model in banana is helpful to investigate the mechanism of SAR to Fusarium wilt. This paper described one such model using incompatible Foc race 1 to induce resistance against Foc tropical race 4 in an in vitro pathosystem. Consistent with the observation that the SAR provided the highest level of protection when the time interval between primary infection and challenge inoculation was 10d, the activities of defense-related enzymes such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) in systemic tissues also reached the maximum level and were 2.00-2.43 times higher than that of the corresponding controls on the tenth day. The total salicylic acid (SA) content in roots of banana plantlets increased from about 1 to more than 5 μg g⁻¹ FW after the second leaf being inoculated with Foc race 1. The systemic up-regulation of MaNPR1A and MaNPR1B was followed by the second up-regulation of PR-1 and PR-3. Although SA and jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling are mostly antagonistic, systemic expression of PR genes regulated by different signaling pathways were simultaneously up-regulated after primary infection, indicating that both pathways are involved in the activation of the SAR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Tripartite interactions of Barley yellow dwarf virus, Sitobion avenae and wheat varieties.

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    Xiao-Feng Liu

    Full Text Available The tripartite interactions in a pathosystem involving wheat (Triticum aestivum L., the Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV, and the BYDV vector aphid Sitobion avenae were studied under field conditions to determine the impact of these interactions on aphid populations, virus pathology and grain yield. Wheat varietal resistance to BYDV and aphids varied among the three wheat varieties studied over two consecutive years. The results demonstrated that (1 aphid peak number (APN in the aphid + BYDV (viruliferous aphid treatment was greater and occurred earlier than that in the non-viruliferous aphid treatment. The APN and the area under the curve of population dynamics (AUC on a S. avenae-resistant variety 98-10-30 was significantly lower than on two aphid-susceptible varieties Tam200(13G and Xiaoyan6. (2 The production of alatae (PA was greater on the variety 98-10-30 than on the other varieties, and PA was greater in the aphid + BYDV treatment on 98-10-30 than in the non-viruliferous aphid treatment, but this trend was reversed on Tam200(13G and Xiaoyan6. (3 The BYDV disease incidence (DIC on the variety 98-10-30 was greater than that on the other two varieties in 2012, and the disease index (DID on Tam200(13G was lower than on the other varieties in the aphid + BYDV and BYDV treatments in 2012, but not in 2011 when aphid vector numbers were generally lower. (4 Yield loss in the aphid + BYDV treatment tended to be greater than that in the aphid or BYDV alone treatments across varieties and years. We suggested that aphid population development and BYDV transmission tend to promote each other under field conditions. The aphids + BYDV treatment caused greater yield reductions than non-viruliferous aphids or virus treatment. Wheat varietal resistance in 98-10-30 affects the aphid dispersal, virus transmission and wheat yield loss though inhibits aphid populations from increasing.

  5. Association analysis for disease resistance to Fusarium oxysporum in cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Guarín, Jaime A; Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Fernández-Pozo, Noé; Mueller, Lukas A; Barrero, Luz Stella

    2016-03-18

    genes involved in the P. peruviana - F. oxysporum pathosystem as a foundation for further validation in marker-assisted selection. The results have important implications for conservation and breeding strategies in cape gooseberry.

  6. Knots Untie: Molecular Determinants Involved in Knot Formation Induced by Pseudomonas savastanoi in Woody Hosts

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    Eloy Caballo-Ponce

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the molecular basis of tree diseases is lately receiving a renewed attention, especially with the emerging perception that pathogens require specific pathogenicity and virulence factors to successfully colonize woody hosts. Pathosystems involving woody plants are notoriously difficult to study, although the use of model bacterial strains together with genetically homogeneous micropropagated plant material is providing a significant impetus to our understanding of the molecular determinants leading to disease. The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi belongs to the intensively studied Pseudomonas syringae complex, and includes three pathogenic lineages causing tumorous overgrowths (knots in diverse economically relevant trees and shrubs. As it occurs with many other bacteria, pathogenicity of P. savastanoi is dependent on a type III secretion system, which is accompanied by a core set of at least 20 effector genes shared among strains isolated from olive, oleander, and ash. The induction of knots of wild-type size requires that the pathogen maintains adequate levels of diverse metabolites, including the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinins, as well as cyclic-di-GMP, some of which can also regulate the expression of other pathogenicity and virulence genes and participate in bacterial competitiveness. In a remarkable example of social networking, quorum sensing molecules allow for the communication among P. savastanoi and other members of the knot microbiome, while at the same time are essential for tumor formation. Additionally, a distinguishing feature of bacteria from the P. syringae complex isolated from woody organs is the possession of a 15 kb genomic island (WHOP carrying four operons and three other genes involved in degradation of phenolic compounds. Two of these operons mediate the catabolism of anthranilate and catechol and, together with another operon, are required for the induction of full-size tumors

  7. Two alternative recessive quantitative trait loci influence resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot in Medicago truncatula

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    Oliver Richard P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the genetic basis of plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens is incomplete and has been characterised in relatively few pathosystems. In this study, the cytology and genetics of resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot caused by Phoma medicaginis, an economically important necrotrophic pathogen of Medicago spp., was examined in the model legume M. truncatula. Results Macroscopically, the resistant response of accession SA27063 was characterised by small, hypersensitive-like spots following inoculation while the susceptible interaction with accessions A17 and SA3054 showed necrotic lesions and spreading chlorosis. No unique cytological differences were observed during early infection (2 populations segregating for resistance to spring black stem and leaf spot were established between SA27063 and the two susceptible accessions, A17 and SA3054. The cross between SA27063 and A17 represented a wider cross than between SA27063 and SA3054, as evidenced by higher genetic polymorphism, reduced fertility and aberrant phenotypes of F2 progeny. In the SA27063 × A17 F2 population a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL, LOD = 7.37; P Phoma medicaginis one (rnpm1 genetically mapped to the top arm of linkage group 4 (LG4. rnpm1 explained 33.6% of the phenotypic variance in the population's response to infection depicted on a 1–5 scale and was tightly linked to marker AW256637. A second highly significant QTL (LOD = 6.77; P rnpm2, was located on the lower arm of LG8 in the SA27063 × SA3054 map. rnpm2 explained 29.6% of the phenotypic variance and was fine mapped to a 0.8 cM interval between markers h2_16a6a and h2_21h11d. rnpm1 is tightly linked to a cluster of Toll/Interleukin1 receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR genes and disease resistance protein-like genes, while no resistance gene analogues (RGAs are apparent in the genomic sequence of the reference accession A17 at the

  8. Transcription Factor Repertoire of Necrotrophic Fungal Phytopathogen Ascochyta rabiei: Predominance of MYB Transcription Factors As Potential Regulators of Secretome

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    Sandhya Verma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are the key players in gene expression and their study is highly significant for shedding light on the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary history of organisms. During host–pathogen interaction, extensive reprogramming of gene expression facilitated by TFs is likely to occur in both host and pathogen. To date, the knowledge about TF repertoire in filamentous fungi is in infancy. The necrotrophic fungus Ascochyta rabiei, that causes destructive Ascochyta blight (AB disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum, demands more comprehensive study for better understanding of Ascochyta-legume pathosystem. In the present study, we performed the genome-wide identification and analysis of TFs in A. rabiei. Taking advantage of A. rabiei genome sequence, we used a bioinformatic approach to predict the TF repertoire of A. rabiei. For identification and classification of A. rabiei TFs, we designed a comprehensive pipeline using a combination of BLAST and InterProScan software. A total of 381 A. rabiei TFs were predicted and divided into 32 fungal specific families of TFs. The gene structure, domain organization and phylogenetic analysis of abundant families of A. rabiei TFs were also carried out. Comparative study of A. rabiei TFs with that of other necrotrophic, biotrophic, hemibiotrophic, symbiotic, and saprotrophic fungi was performed. It suggested presence of both conserved as well as unique features among them. Moreover, cis-acting elements on promoter sequences of earlier predicted A. rabiei secretome were also identified. With the help of published A. rabiei transcriptome data, the differential expression of TF and secretory protein coding genes was analyzed. Furthermore, comprehensive expression analysis of few selected A. rabiei TFs using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed variety of expression patterns during host colonization. These genes were expressed in at least one of the time points tested post

  9. Detection of viruses and the spatial and temporal spread patterns of viral diseases of cucurbits (Cucurbitaceae spp.) in the coastal savannah zone of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyamena, A. E

    2013-07-01

    Cucurbits are susceptible to over 35 plant viruses; each of these viruses is capable of causing total crop failure in a poorly managed virus pathosystem. The objectives of this study were to detect the viruses that infect six cucurbit species in the coastal savannah zone of Ghana and to describe the spatial and temporal spread patterns of virus epidemics in zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) by the use of mathematical and geostatistical models. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Thunb.), zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.), butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne), egushi (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad.) and melon (Cucumis melo L.) were grown on an experimental field in the coastal savannah zone of Ghana and were monitored for the expression of virus and virus-like symptoms. The observed symptoms were further confirmed by Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS ELISA) and mechanical inoculation of indicator plants. The temporal spread patterns of virus disease in zucchini squash were analyzed by exponential logistic, monomolecular and gompertz mechanistic models. The spatial patterns of virus disease spread in zucchini squash field were analyzed by semivariograms and inverse distance weighing (IDW) methods. Cucumber, zucchini squash, melon and butternut squash were infected by both Cucumber mosaic virus (CMW) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W). Egushi was infected by CMW but not PRSV-W. None of the six cucurbit species were infected by Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) or Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). The temporal pattern of disease incidence in the zucchini squash field followed the gompertz function with an average apparent infection rate of 0.026 per day. The temporal pattern of disease severity was best described by the exponential model with coefficient of determination of 94.38 % and rate of progress disease severity of 0.114 per day. As at 49 days after planting (DAP), disease incidence and

  10. Are bacterial volatile compounds poisonous odors to a fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, alarm signals to Arabidopsis seedlings for eliciting induced resistance, or both?

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    Choong-Min eRyu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological control (biocontrol agents act on plants via numerous mechanisms, and can be used to protect plants from pathogens. Biocontrol agents can act directly as pathogen antagonists or competitors or indirectly to promote plant induced systemic resistance (ISR. Whether a biocontrol agent acts directly or indirectly depends on the specific strain and the pathosystem type. We reported previously that bacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs are determinants for eliciting plant ISR. Emerging data suggest that bacterial VOCs also can directly inhibit fungal and plant growth. The aim of the current study was to differentiate direct and indirect mechanisms of bacterial VOC effects against Botrytis cinerea infection of Arabidopsis. Volatile emissions from Bacillus subtilis GB03 successfully protected Arabidopsis seedlings against B. cinerea. First, we investigated the direct effects of bacterial VOCs on symptom development and different phenological stages of B. cinerea including spore germination, mycelial attachment to the leaf surface, mycelial growth, and sporulation in vitro and in planta. Volatile emissions inhibited hyphal growth in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and interfered with fungal attachment on the hydrophobic leaf surface. Second, the optimized bacterial concentration that did not directly inhibit fungal growth successfully protected Arabidopsis from fungal infection, which indicates that bacterial VOC-elicited plant ISR has a more important role in biocontrol than direct inhibition of fungal growth on Arabidopsis. We performed qRT-PCR to investigate the priming of the defense-related genes PR1, PDF1.2, and ChiB at 0, 12, 24, and 36 hours post-infection and 14 days after the start of plant exposure to bacterial VOCs. The results indicate that bacterial VOCs potentiate expression of PR1 and PDF1.2 but not ChiB, which stimulates SA- and JA-dependent signaling pathways in plant ISR and protects plants against pathogen

  11. Involvement of S-nitrosothiols modulation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase in defence responses of lettuce and wild Lactuca spp. to biotrophic mildews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichá, Tereza; Sedlářová, Michaela; Činčalová, Lucie; Trojanová, Zuzana Drábková; Mieslerová, Barbora; Lebeda, Aleš; Luhová, Lenka; Petřivalský, Marek

    2018-02-07

    Resistant Lactuca spp. genotypes can efficiently modulate levels of S-nitrosothiols as reactive nitrogen species derived from nitric oxide in their defence mechanism against invading biotrophic pathogens including lettuce downy mildew. S-Nitrosylation belongs to principal signalling pathways of nitric oxide in plant development and stress responses. Protein S-nitrosylation is regulated by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) as a key catabolic enzyme of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), the major intracellular S-nitrosothiol. GSNOR expression, level and activity were studied in leaves of selected genotypes of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and wild Lactuca spp. during interactions with biotrophic mildews, Bremia lactucae (lettuce downy mildew), Golovinomyces cichoracearum (lettuce powdery mildew) and non-pathogen Pseudoidium neolycopersici (tomato powdery mildew) during 168 h post inoculation (hpi). GSNOR expression was increased in all genotypes both in the early phase at 6 hpi and later phase at 72 hpi, with a high increase observed in L. sativa UCDM2 responses to all three pathogens. GSNOR protein also showed two-phase increase, with highest changes in L. virosa-B. lactucae and L. sativa cv. UCDM2-G. cichoracearum pathosystems, whereas P. neolycopersici induced GSNOR protein at 72 hpi in all genotypes. Similarly, a general pattern of modulated GSNOR activities in response to biotrophic mildews involves a two-phase increase at 6 and 72 hpi. Lettuce downy mildew infection caused GSNOR activity slightly increased only in resistant L. saligna and L. virosa genotypes; however, all genotypes showed increased GSNOR activity both at 6 and 72 hpi by lettuce powdery mildew. We observed GSNOR-mediated decrease of S-nitrosothiols as a general feature of Lactuca spp. response to mildew infection, which was also confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of GSNOR and GSNO in infected plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that GSNOR is differentially modulated in interactions of

  12. Relación entre Incidencia y Severidad de la Roya Asiática de la Soya Causada por Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow & Sydow Relationship Between Incidence and Severity of Asian Soybean Rust Caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow & Sydow

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    Felipe Rafael Garcés Fiallos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se relaciona la incidencia con la severidad de la roya asiática de la soya, donde los valores generados por las ecuaciones pueden ser usados en cualquier estudio de este patosistema, proporcionando una herramienta para evaluar la incidencia como también la severidad. Se generaron gradientes de la enfermedad mediante el uso de fungicidas y momentos de aplicación, de manera preventiva y curativa. El experimento de campo con el cultivar Nidera 5909 RG, fue distribuido en bloques completos al azar. La intensidad de la roya asiática fue medida en los estratos inferior, medio y superior de la planta, a través de diferentes conteos de incidencia (porcentaje y severidad (lesiones cm-2, urédias cm-2 y porcentaje en folíolos. Las regresiones realizadas, presentaron una correlación significativa entre incidencia y severidad a 1% de probabilidad. Con los datos obtenidos, el evaluador puede escoger el método de cuantificación mas razonable o confiable a su criterio para otros trabajos de investigación o aplicar un determinado control de la enfermedad, utilizando las ecuaciones lineales generadas, facilitando el trabajo de cuantificar la roya asiática, bien se busque medir la incidencia (% o el número de lesiones cm-2, urédias cm-2 o severidad (%.Incidence is related to severity of the Asian soybean rust, where values generated by the equations can be used in any study of this pathosystem, providing a tool to evaluate incidence as well severity. Gradients of the disease were generated by means of the use of fungicides and moments of application, in a preventive and curative way. The field experiment with the cultivar Nidera RG 5909, was distributed in a randomized complete block. The intensity of Asian rust layers was measured in the lower, middle and top of the plant, through various counts of incidence (percentage and severity (lesions cm-2, uredinia cm-2 and percentage in leaflets. The regressions showed a significant correlation between

  13. Selection rhizosphere-competent microbes for development of microbial products as biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinistova, A. V.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Shabaev, V. P.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Rhizosphere-borne microorganisms reintroduced to the soil-root interface can establish without inducing permanent disturbance in the microbial balance and effectively colonise the rhizosphere due to carbon sources of plant root exudates. A challenge for future development of microbial products for use in agriculture will be selection of rhizosphere-competent microbes that both protect the plant from pathogens and improve crop establishment and persistence. In this study screening, collection, identification and expression of stable and technological microbial strains living in soils and in the rhizosphere of abundant weed - couch-grass Elytrigia repens L. Nevski were conducted. A total of 98 bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere were assessed for biocontrol activity in vitro against phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium oxysporum, Drechslera teres, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Piricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Colletothrichum atramentarium and Cladosporium sp., Stagonospora nodorum. Biocontrol activity were performed by the following methods: radial and parallel streaks, "host - pathogen" on the cuts of wheat leaves. A culture collection comprising 64 potential biocontrol agents (BCA) against wheat and barley root diseases has been established. Of these, the most effective were 8 isolates inhibitory to at least 4 out of 5 phytopathogenic fungi tested. The remaining isolates inhibited at least 1 of 5 fungi tested. Growth stimulating activity of proposed rhizobacteria-based preparations was estimated using seedling and vegetative pot techniques. Seeds-inoculation and the tests in laboratory and field conditions were conducted for different agricultural crops - wheat and barley. Intact cells, liquid culture filtrates and crude extracts of the four beneficial bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of weed were studied to stimulate plant growth. As a result, four bacterial strains selected from rhizosphere of weed

  14. Bacterial disease management: challenges, experience, innovation and future prospects: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, George W; Castiblanco, Luisa F; Yuan, Xiaochen; Zeng, Quan; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Plant diseases caused by bacterial pathogens place major constraints on crop production and cause significant annual losses on a global scale. The attainment of consistent effective management of these diseases can be extremely difficult, and management potential is often affected by grower reliance on highly disease-susceptible cultivars because of consumer preferences, and by environmental conditions favouring pathogen development. New and emerging bacterial disease problems (e.g. zebra chip of potato) and established problems in new geographical regions (e.g. bacterial canker of kiwifruit in New Zealand) grab the headlines, but the list of bacterial disease problems with few effective management options is long. The ever-increasing global human population requires the continued stable production of a safe food supply with greater yields because of the shrinking areas of arable land. One major facet in the maintenance of the sustainability of crop production systems with predictable yields involves the identification and deployment of sustainable disease management solutions for bacterial diseases. In addition, the identification of novel management tactics has also come to the fore because of the increasing evolution of resistance to existing bactericides. A number of central research foci, involving basic research to identify critical pathogen targets for control, novel methodologies and methods of delivery, are emerging that will provide a strong basis for bacterial disease management into the future. Near-term solutions are desperately needed. Are there replacement materials for existing bactericides that can provide effective disease management under field conditions? Experience should inform the future. With prior knowledge of bactericide resistance issues evolving in pathogens, how will this affect the deployment of newer compounds and biological controls? Knowledge is critical. A comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathosystems is required to not

  15. Conifer root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiegbu, Fred O; Adomas, Aleksandra; Stenlid, Jan

    2005-07-01

    SUMMARY The root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidon annosum is one of the most destructive diseases of conifers in the northern temperate regions of the world, particularly in Europe. Economic losses attributable to Heterobasidion infection in Europe are estimated at 800 million euros annually. The fungus has been classified into three separate European intersterile species P (H. annosum), S (H. parviporum) and F (H. abietinum) based on their main host preferences: pine, spruce and fir, respectively. In North America, two intersterile groups are present, P and S/F, but these have not been given scientific names. The ecology of the disease spread has been intensively studied but the genetics, biochemistry and molecular aspects of pathogen virulence have been relatively little examined. Recent advances in transcript profiling, molecular characterization of pathogenicity factors and establishment of DNA-transformation systems have paved the way for future advances in our understanding of this pathosystem. Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref., H. parviporum Niemelä & Korhonen and H. abietinum Niemelä & Korhonen; kingdom Fungi; class Basidiomycotina; order Aphyllophorales; family Bondarzewiaceae; genus Heterobasidion. presence of the fungus fruit bodies, basidiocarps whitish in the margins, upper surface is tan to dark brown, usually irregular shaped, 3.5 (-7) cm thick and up to 40 cm in diameter; pores 5-19, 7-22 and 13-26 mm(2) for the P, F and S groups, respectively. Small brownish non-sporulating postules develop on the outside of infected roots. Asexual spores (conidiospores) are 3.8-6.6 x 2.8-5.0 microm in size. Mating tests are necessary for identification of intersterility groups. The fungus attacks many coniferous tree species. In Europe, particularly trees of the genera Pinus and Juniperus (P), Picea (S), Abies (F) and in North America Pinus (P) and Picea, Tsuga and Abies (S/F). To a lesser extent it causes root rot on some decidous trees (Betula and Quercus

  16. Bioprospecting endophytic bacteria for biological control of coffee leaf rust Bioprospecção de bactérias endofíticas como agentes de biocontrole da ferrugem do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Franco Shiomi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of plant diseases due to the action of endophytic microorganisms has been demonstrated in several pathosystems. Experiments under controlled conditions involving endophytic bacteria isolated from leaves and branches of Coffea arabica L and Coffea robusta L were conducted with the objective of evaluating the inhibition of germination of Hemileia vastatrix Berk. & Br., race II, urediniospores and the control of coffee leaf rust development in tests with leaf discs, detached leaves, and on potted seedling of cv. Mundo Novo. The endophytic bacterial isolates tested proved to be effective in inhibiting urediniospore germination and/or rust development, with values above 50%, although the results obtained in urediniospore germination tests were inferior to the treatment with fungicide propiconazole. Endophytic isolates TG4-Ia, TF2-IIc, TF9-Ia, TG11-IIa, and TF7-IIa, demonstrated better coffee leaf rust control in leaf discs, detached leaves, and coffee plant tests. The endophytic isolates TG4-Ia and TF9-Ia were identified as Bacillus lentimorbus Dutky and Bacillus cereus Frank. & Frank., respectively. Some endophytic bacterial isolates were effective in controlling the coffee leaf rust, although some increased the severity of the disease. Even though a relatively small number of endophytic bacteria were tested, promising results were obtained regarding the efficiency of coffee leaf rust biocontrol. These selected agents appears to be an alternative for future replacement of chemical fungicide.Supressão de doenças de plantas por microrganismos endofíticos tem sido demonstrada em diversos patossistemas. Neste trabalho foram selecionados isolados de bactérias endofíticas de folhas e ramos de cafeeiro com potencial para o controle biológico da ferrugem do cafeeiro, pois é conhecido que esses microrganismos podem possuir essa característica. Bactérias endofíticas isoladas previamente de folhas e ramos de Coffea arabica L e Coffea