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Sample records for staging n0 oral

  1. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  2. Staging N0 Oral Cancer: Lymphoscintigraphy and Conventional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, J.B.; Soerensen, J.A.; Grupe, P.; Karstoft, J.; Krogdahl, A. [Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Depts. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, and Pathology

    2005-08-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1 and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by a gamma probe and Patent Blue. Palpation, Doppler ultrasonography, MRI, and sentinel lymph node biopsy were compared to a combination of histopathology and follow-up. Diagnostic testing was performed using the x2 test. RESULTS: Histopathological examination revealed metastatic spread to the neck in 14 of 40 patients. One patient had bilateral neck disease. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography were performed in 80 neck sides of 40 patients and MRI in 70 neck sides (5 patients were claustrophobic). SN revealed suspicious lymph nodes in 12 necks, ultrasonography in 23 necks, and MRI in 9 necks. The positive predictive value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 100%, ultrasonography 57%, and MRI 56%. The respective negative predictive values were 96%, 96%, and 85%. The sensitivity of sentinel lymph node biopsy 80% was comparable to ultrasonography 87%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and Doppler ultrasonography may further improve staging. MRI and simple palpation results were poor.

  3. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically N0 T1-T2 staged oral cancer: the Dutch multicenter trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, G.B.; Bloemena, E.; Klop, W.M.C.; van Es, R.J.J.; Schepman, K.P.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Castelijns, J.A.; Leemans, C.R.; de Bree, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Results of the Dutch multi-institutional trial on sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in oral cancer. Patients and methods Patients were consecutively enrolled from 4 institutions, with T1/T2 oral cancer and cN0 neck based on palpation and ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology.

  4. Clinical study on N0-stage tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruoka, Yasubumi; Ando, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Makoto; Sangu, Yoshikuni; Ogiuchi, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the cases of N0-stage tongue cancer patients treated at the Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, between January 1980 and December 2000. Primary tongue cancers were treated by surgery (52%) and radiotherapy (48%). In principle, we did not perform elective neck dissection for N0-stage necks. Instead, a policy of careful observation was adopted for the management of N0-stage necks in patients with tongue cancer, and a radical neck dissection or modified radical neck dissection was performed in the event of a secondary neck metastasis. A local recurrence was confirmed in 25 patients. Twenty of the 25 local recurrences were successfully controlled by a therapy. The incidence of secondary neck metastasis was 4/46 (8%) for T1 patients, 21/48 (45%) for T2 patients, and 9/15 (60%) for T3/T4 patients. Overall, secondary neck metastases occurred in 34 out of 109 (32%) patients, and eventually 12 patients died from uncontrolled tumors. As for the distribution of involved lymph nodes, level I to level III nodes were involved in 30 (88%) patients, and level IV nodes were involved in 4 patients. (author)

  5. Role of Neck Dissection in Clinical T3N0M0 Lesion of Oral Cavity: Changing Trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Arjun; Singhal, Surinder K; Punia, Rps; Gupta, Nitin; Verma, Hitesh; Budhiraja, Shilpi; Salaria, Minakshi

    2017-08-01

    Neck dissection is an important part in the management of head and neck malignancies especially in terms of control of nodal metastasis. The study is focused on evaluating the profile of lymph nodes in T 3 N 0 M 0 lesion of different subsides of oral cavity. To evaluate the utility of neck dissection in T 3 N 0 M 0 stage of carcinomas of the different region of oral cavity. Ninety patients aged 20 to 70 years underwent treatment for carcinoma of the oral cavity at our center between 2005 and 2013. Of these, 39 patients were stage T 3 N 0 M 0 and underwent excision of the primary lesion with neck dissection. The data were collected retrospectively from hospital record library. These patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and compared with intra operative finding. Addition of radiotherapy was decided on final histopathology. Out of 39 patients, the site of primary tumour in 21 patients was tongue, in 13 patients was Buccal Mucosa (BM), in 2 patients was lip and in 3 patients was Floor of Mouth (FOM) with tongue. In patients with clinically negative neck nodes, ultrasonography and intra-operative examination revealed the presence of suspicious nodes in 35.9% and 30.7% cases respectively. Occult metastasis in the nodes was identified on histopathological examination in 15 patients (38.5%). A total of 14 patients of carcinoma of tongue and one patient of BM showed positive nodes on histopathology. These patients with positive neck nodes on histopathology, were sent for postoperative radiotherapy. At follow up examination, four patients showed local and distal recurrence and they were managed accordingly. Out of 39 patients, 11 patients of BM, 2 patients of lip, 1 patient of FOM and 6 patients of tongue were disease free in last follow up. Selective neck dissection is an effective therapeutic intervention in patients without clinically involved neck nodes. It can upstage the tumour and additional treatment may be advised. In patients with carcinoma of buccal

  6. Residual pathological stage at radical cystectomy significantly impacts outcomes for initial T2N0 bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbarn, Hendrik; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Capitanio, Umberto; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Sagalowsky, Arthur I; Lotan, Yair; Schoenberg, Mark P; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Sonpavde, Guru

    2009-08-01

    We hypothesized that in patients with T2N0 stage disease at transurethral bladder tumor resection a lower residual cancer stage (P1N0 or less) at radical cystectomy may correlate with improved outcomes relative to those with residual P2N0 disease. We analyzed 208 patients with T2N0 stage disease at transurethral bladder tumor resection whose tumors were organ confined at radical cystectomy (P2 or lower, pN0). None received perioperative chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier as well as univariable and multivariable Cox regression models addressed the effect of residual pT stage at radical cystectomy on recurrence and cancer specific mortality rates. Covariates consisted of age, gender, grade, lymphovascular invasion, carcinoma in situ, number of lymph nodes removed and year of surgery. Residual pT stage at radical cystectomy was P0 in 24 (11.5%) patients, Pa in 9 (4.3%), PCIS in 22 (10.6%), P1 in 35 (16.8%) and P2 in 118 (56.7%). Median followup of censored patients was 55.7 months for recurrence and 52.1 months for cancer specific mortality analyses. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rates of patients with P0/Pa/PCIS, P1 and P2 stage disease were 100%, 85% and 75%, respectively. The 5-year cancer specific survival rates for the same cohorts were 100%, 93% and 81%, respectively. On multivariable analysis the effect of residual stage P1 or lower at radical cystectomy achieved independent predictor status for recurrence (adjusted HR 0.20, p = 0.002) and cancer specific mortality (adjusted HR 0.24, p = 0.02). Down staging from initial T2N0 bladder cancer at transurethral bladder tumor resection to lower stage at radical cystectomy significantly reduces recurrence and cancer specific mortality. Further validation of this finding is warranted.

  7. Exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue: prognostic factors for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frezza, G.; Baldissera, A.; Bunkheila, F.; Caliceti, U.; Galuppi, A.; Guidetti, A.; Sorrenti, G.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The files of a group of patients (pts) treated with brachytherapy alone for cancer of the oral tongue were reviewed to assess the prognostic role of T stage, volume of disease, total dose and dose-rate. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 46 pts (29 males, 17 females, age 38-84 years, median 63.1 years) were treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy, in 2 cases followed by prophylactic neck dissection for cancer of the oral tongue (T1N0: 19 pts; T2N0: 27 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins in the early years of the study (17 pts) and more recently with plastic tubes (29 pts), according to the Parts System. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose-rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Volume of the disease was retrospectively assessed as the product of the three diameters of the lesion calculated for provisional dosimetry (range 0.25- 16 cc.). Median follow up is 72 mos (range: 14-153 mos). RESULTS: Overall local control was 82.6% ((38(46)) pts; T1: (18(19)), 94.7 %; T2: (22(27)), 81.5 %). Five of 8 pts who recurred were submitted to salvage surgery, and 3 of them are alive and free from disease at 34, 52 and 87 mos respectively. Recurrences appeared after 3-13 mos (median 5.5 mos) and were related to total dose ( 63 Gy (1(18)); 5.5 %) and to dose-rate ( 45 cGy/h (4(36)): 11.1 %). The volume of disease was not of prognostic significance since local control was 79.6 % ((6(28)) pts) in pts with a disease smaller than 3 cc. and 88.9 % in pts with large volume ((2(18)) pts). Seven (15.2 %) grade 3 complications (necrosis of the mandibular bone and- or of the soft tissues) were observed. Complication rate was higher in the high dose group (>63 Gy (4(18)) pts: 22.2 %) and was less affected by dose-rate (> 45 cGy/h (6(36)) pts: 16.6 %). No relationship between complications and volume was observed ( 3cc.: 16.6 %). All complications healed spontaneously. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: For T1-T2 cancer of the oral tongue exclusive

  8. [Application of central lymph node dissection to surgical operation for clinical stage n0 papillary thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Shi, Jun-Yi; Sheng, Yuan; Ll, Li

    2008-03-01

    The treatment for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) without cervical lymph node metastasis (cN0) is controversial. This study was to explore a suitable method to dissect cervical lymph nodes for stage cN0 PTC patients. Eighty-four stage cN0 PTC patients, diagnosed by B ultrasound or cervical MRI from 2005--2006, were randomly divided into two groups. Thyroidectomy and ipsilateral central lymph node dissection were performed in Group A, while only thyroidectomy was performed in Group B. Each group contained 42 patients. Both groups took thyroxin tablets after operation. An average of 3 lymph nodes were found in each case of Group A, and the lymph node metastasis rate was 47.62%. The occurrence rates of complications were not significantly different between the two groups (P<0.05). Thyroidectomy plus ipsilateral central lymph node dissection is recommended for the treatment of stage cN0 PTC. It can also avoid damage of recurrent laryngeal nerve in re-dissection.

  9. The value of lymphoscintigraphy for cervical sentinel lymph node detection in patients with clinically N0 oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sheng; Jiang Ningyi; Lu Xianping; Liang Jiugen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of lymphoscintigraphy for cervical sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: Twenty-one patients with clinically N 0 oral squamous carcinoma underwent preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative methylene blue location. The results were compared with pathological findings. Results: 1) The sensitivity of lymphoscintigraphy for detecting SLN was 100%(21/21), and methylene blue was 85% (17/20). 2)Both SLN biopsy and cervical ablative dissection confirmed that 33.3% (7/21) patients were with cervical lymph node metastasis. Fourteen non-metastatic SLNs comfirmed by biopsy were also proved with the findings of neck dissection, and the specificity was 100%. Conclusion: Lymphoscintigraphy can detect the cervical SLN and accurately predict cervical lymph node metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.(authors)

  10. Evaluation of treatment results in patients with early glottic cancer (stage T 1a N 0, T 1b N 0) treated with Manchester irradiation modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przeorek, W.; Skladowski, K.; Przeorek, C.

    2007-01-01

    Data charts of 64 patients with stage I glottic cancer treated with Manchester irradiation modality in the 1 st Radiotherapy Clinic of Msc Memorial Institute in Gliwice has been retrospectively analyzed. There were 55 males and 9 females at median age 63 years (range from 37 to 83 years). In 40 (62%) patients pathological subtype of squamous cell cancer has not been established. In 19 (30%) patients microscopic examination revealed keratinizing and in 5 (8%) nonkeratinizing type of neoplasm. In 49 (77%) patients the tumour involved only one vocal cord, in 11 (17%) both, in 3 (5%) vocal cord and commissure and 1 (1%) patient both cords and commissure. All patients were treated with 60C o machines (36 patients - 56%) or high energy photons (28 patients - 44%). Radiotherapy was conducted with so called Manchester modality with one daily fraction of 3 Gy to a total dose of 51-54 Gy. Overall treatment time varied between 21 and 23 days. Acute mucosal reaction was evaluated with the morphological-functional Dische scale as well as with the EORTC/RTOG scoring system. The criteria of treatment efficacy were: 5-year local control, 5-year survival without serious complications (3 and 4 EORTC) and 5-year survival after salvage surgery in relapsed patients. In 63 patients complete regression of the tumour was observed up to 6 months of follow-up. One patient failed at the time of radiotherapy ending. In one case distant metastases to lungs were noticed. In 6 patients local relapses were discovered of which 3 were successfully salvaged with the surgery. In one patient, 18 months after radiotherapy massive oedema of laryngeal mucosa occurred. In this case tracheostomy was needed. 5-year local control, local control after salvage surgery and survival without serious complication rates are 89%, 97% and 95% respectively. 1. Radiotherapy with Manchester modality is a safe and effective treatment of stage I glottic cancer. 2. Despite hypofractionation the risk of severe complication

  11. The pattern of relapse and survival of elective irradiation of the upper neck for stage N0 nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiayun; Pan, Ziqiang; Guo, Xiaomao; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Zhen; He, Shaoqin; Liu, Taifu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate patterns of failure and survival rates of elective irradiation of upper neck in N0 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. From February 1996 to November 2002, 97 patients without cervical lymph node involvement were admitted for radiotherapy alone. Before treatment, each patient underwent enhanced CT of nasopharynx and neck. All patients received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base, and upper neck drainage areas (including levels II, III, and VA). The upper neck was irradiated to a total dose of 50-56 Gy/25-28 fractions/5-5.6 weeks. For the primary tumor, 22 patients used conventional fractionation for a total dose of 70 Gy/35 fractions/7 weeks, and 75 patients used an accelerated hyperfractionationated schedule for a total dose of 78 Gy/60 fractions/6 weeks. The median follow-up of these 97 patients was 7.75 years. 10 patients had recurrences in the nasopharynx, 8 had distant metastasis, and 5 had recurrences in the cervical lymph nodes. Among the cervical lymph node failures, the areas of recurrence were in the II drainage areas in 4 patients who had neck dissections afterwards, and in IA drainage areas in 1 patient who also had recurrence in the nasopharynx. The causes of death were recurrence in the nasopharynx for 8 patients, 1 of these also had recurrence in the neck, distant metastases in 8 patients, and non-neoplastic diseases in 3 patients. The causes of failure of N0 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy alone to the nasopharynx and upper neck were nasopharyngeal recurrence, distant metastasis, and cervical recurrence in order of frequency. Elective irradiation of upper neck (II, III, VA) is advised for stage N0 patients diagnosed by enhanced CT of neck. Cervical recurrence alone is rare, which did not greatly affect the long-term survival after salvage neck dissection

  12. Complete pathological response (ypT0N0M0) after preoperative chemotherapy alone for stage IV rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiken, Surennaidoo P; Toso, Christian; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Thomopoulos, Theodoros; Roth, Arnaud; Mentha, Gilles; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2014-01-17

    Complete pathological response occurs in 10-20% of patients with rectal cancer who are treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy prior to pelvic surgery. The possibility that complete pathological response of rectal cancer can also occur with neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (without radiation) is an intriguing hypothesis. A 66-year old man presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum with nine liver metastases (T3N1M1). He was included in a reverse treatment, aiming at first downsizing the liver metastases by chemotherapy, and subsequently performing the liver surgery prior to the rectum resection. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted in a combination of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, irinotecan, leucovorin and bevacizumab (OCFL-B). After a right portal embolization, an extended right liver lobectomy was performed. On the final histopathological analysis, all lesions were fibrotic, devoid of any viable cancer cells. One month after liver surgery, the rectoscopic examination showed a near-total response of the primary rectal adenocarcinoma, which convinced the colorectal surgeon to perform the low anterior resection without preoperative radiation therapy. Macroscopically, a fibrous scar was observed at the level of the previously documented tumour, and the histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal any malignant cells in the rectal wall as well as in the mesorectum. All 15 resected lymph nodes were free of tumour, and the final tumour stage was ypT0N0M0. Clinical outcome was excellent, and the patient is currently alive 5 years after the first surgery without evidence of recurrence. The presented patient with stage IV rectal cancer and liver metastases was in a unique situation linked to its inclusion in a reversed treatment and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone. The observed achievement of a complete pathological response after chemotherapy should promote the design of prospective randomized studies to evaluate the benefits of chemotherapy

  13. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1–2N0 Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1–2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1–2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1–2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1–2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1–2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  14. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1-2N0 Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chun-Ta [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences of Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Fan, Kang-Hsing [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences of Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Hema-Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1-2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1-2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1-2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1-2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1-2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  15. Elective Inguinal Node Irradiation in Early-Stage T2N0 Anal Cancer: Prognostic Impact on Locoregional Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Zilli@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Betz, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Radiation Oncology Institute, Hirslanden Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bieri, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Ris, Frederic; Roche, Bruno [Department of Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Roth, Arnaud D. [Oncosurgery Unit, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Allal, Abdelkarim S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Radiation Oncology,Hôpital Fribourgeois, Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of elective inguinal node radiation therapy (INRT) on locoregional control (LRC) in patients with early-stage T2N0 anal cancer treated conservatively with primary RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1976 and 2008, 116 patients with T2 node-negative anal cancer were treated curatively with RT alone (n=48) or by combined chemoradiation therapy (CRT) (n=68) incorporating mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. Sixty-four percent of the patients (n=74) received elective INRT. Results: Over a median follow-up of 69 months (range, 4-243 months), 97 (84%) and 95 patients (82%) were locally and locoregionally controlled, respectively. Rates for 5-year actuarial local control, LRC, cancer-specific, and overall survival for the entire population were 81.7% ± 3.8%, 79.2% ± 4.1%, 91.1% ± 3.0%, and 72.1% ± 4.5%, respectively. The overall 5-year inguinal relapse-free survival was 92.3% ± 2.9%. Isolated inguinal recurrence occurred in 2 patients (4.7%) treated without INRT, whereas no groin relapse was observed in those treated with INRT. The 5-year LRC rates for patients treated with and without INRT and with RT alone versus combined CRT were 80.1% ± 5.0% versus 77.8% ± 7.0% (P=.967) and 71.0% ± 7.2% versus 85.4% ± 4.5% (P=.147), respectively. A trend toward a higher rate of grade ≥3 acute toxicity was observed in patients treated with INRT (53% vs 31%, P=.076). Conclusions: In cases of node-negative T2 anal cancer, the inguinal relapse rate remains relatively low with or without INRT. The role of INRT in the treatment of early-stage anal carcinoma needs to be investigated in future prospective trials.

  16. Evaluation of the reliability of clinical staging of T2 N0 esophageal cancer: a review of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Traves D; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Puri, Varun; Burfeind, William; Bharat, Ankit; Patterson, G Alexander; Hofstetter, Wayne; Meyers, Bryan F

    2013-08-01

    Clinical staging of esophageal cancer has improved with positron-emission tomography/computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Despite such progress, small single-center studies have questioned the reliability of clinical staging of T2 N0 esophageal cancer. This study broadly examines the adequacy of clinical staging of T2 N0 disease using The Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. We retrospectively studied 810 clinical stage T2 N0 patients from 2002 to 2011, with 58 excluded because of incomplete pathologic staging data. Clinical stage, pathologic stage, and preoperative characteristics were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with upstaging at the time of surgical intervention. Among 752 clinical stage T2 N0 patients, 270 (35.9%) received induction therapy before the operation. Of 482 patients who went directly to surgical intervention, 132 (27.4%) were confirmed as pathologic T2 N0, 125 (25.9%) were downstaged (ie, T0-1 N0), and 225 (46.7%) were upstaged at the operation (T3-4 N0 or Tany N1-3). Exclusive tumor upstaging (ie, pathologic T3-4 N0) accounted for 41 patients (18.2%), whereas exclusive nodal upstaging (ie, pathological T1-2 N1-3) accounted for 100 (44.5%). Combined tumor and nodal upstaging (ie, pathological T3-4 N1-3) accounted for 84 patients (37.3%). Among patients who received induction therapy, 103 (38.1%) were upstaged vs 225 (46.7%) without induction therapy (p = 0.026). Comparing the induction therapy group and the primary surgical group, postoperative 30-day mortality (3.7% vs 3.7%, p > 0.99) and morbidity (46.3% vs 45%, p = 0.76) were similar. Despite advances in staging techniques, clinical staging of T2 N0 esophageal cancer remains unreliable. Recognizing T2 N0 as a threshold for induction therapy in esophageal cancer, many surgeons have opted to treat T2 N0 disease with induction therapy, even though one-quarter of these patients will be pathologic T1 N0. Although this study

  17. Results of a survey of the treatment policy for early stage tongue and oral floor cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Kohji; Kataura, Akikatsu; Hareyama, Masato

    1998-01-01

    To realize the treatment policy for early stage oral cancer, a survey of 102 institutes in Japan was performed by questionnaire. A majority of the otolaryngologists preferred surgery for the treatment of T1N0 and T2N0 cases of oral cancer. The preferred method of treatment for the T1N0 cases was simple tumor resection and that for the T2N0 cases was extended tumor resection with plastic surgery, elective neck dissection and combined radio-and/or chemotherapy. A majority of the radiologists preferred brachytherapy for T1N0 and non-invasive T2N0 cases. For invasive cases of T2N0 oral cancer, radiologists preferred either surgical treatment or the combination of brachytherapy and external irradiation. (author)

  18. FDG PET in oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Value for confirmation of N0 neck and detection of occult metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Christiaan A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Pruim, Jan; van der Laan, Bernard F. M.; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Gravendeel, Joost P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Treatment of the clinical NO neck in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of oral cavity and oropharynx remains a dilemma. None of the current imaging modalities are able to detect the presence of micrometastases in the lymph nodes of clinical NO necks reliably. The aim of this study was to determine the

  19. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Eun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T1-2N0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T1-2N0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3% received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT. Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. Results The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth. In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions In T1-2N0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features.

  20. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Su Jung; Cha, Jihye; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3%) received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth). In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. In T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features

  1. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Jwa

    Full Text Available The locoregional recurrence (LRR rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT.In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307 and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study.After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6-11.3 years, 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01 and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04 were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03 was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer.Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes.

  2. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins (≤4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion

  3. CT characteristics and pathological implications of early stage (T1N0M0) lung adenocarcinoma with pure ground-glass opacity

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    Jin, Xin; Zhao, Shao-hong; Wu, Jian; Wu, Chong-chong; Chang, Rui-ping; Ju, Hai-yue [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Gao, Jie; Wang, Dian-jun [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To analyze the CT characteristics and pathological classification of early lung adenocarcinoma (T1N0M0) with pure ground-glass opacity (pGGO). Ninety-four lesions with pGGO on CT in 88 patients with T1N0M0 lung adenocarcinoma were selected from January 2010 to December 2012. All lesions were confirmed by pathology. CT appearances were analyzed including lesion location, size, density, uniformity, shape, margin, tumour-lung interface, internal and surrounding malignant signs. Lesion size and density were compared using analysis of variance, lesion size also assessed using ROC curves. Gender of patients, lesion location and CT appearances were compared using χ2-test. There were no significant differences in gender, lesion location and density with histological invasiveness (P > 0.05). The ROC curve showed that the possibility of invasive lesion was 88.73 % when diameter of lesion was more than 10.5 mm. There was a significant difference between lesion uniformity and histological invasiveness (P = 0.01). There were significant differences in margin, tumour-lung interface, air bronchogram with histological invasiveness (P = 0.02,P = 0.00,P = 0.048). The correlation index of lesion size and uniformity was r = 0.45 (P = 0.00). The lesion size and uniformity, tumour-lung interface and the air bronchogram can help predict invasive extent of early stage lung adenocarcinoma with pGGO. (orig.)

  4. Comparison between computed tomography with oral oil-based contrast and laparotomy for gastric cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, S. F.; Garcia-Vila, J. H.; Cervera, J.; Gomez, R.; Piqueras, R. M.; Perona, I.; Escrig, J.; Salvador, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    To compare the utility of conventional computed tomography (CT) with oral oil-based contrast with that of laparotomy in the preoperative staging of gastric cancer. We prospectively studied 41 patients diagnosed as having gastric adenocarcinoma according to the results of endoscopy and biopsy. Applying the TNM classification for gastric cancer staging, we compared the findings in CT associated with oral oil-based contrast and intraoperative staging with definitive postoperative pathological staging. Definitive pathological studies demonstrated that there were 7 stage T1-T2 lesions, 26 stage T3 and 8 stage T4. The assessment of lymph node involvement showed that 10 patients presented stage N0 and 31 stage N1-N3. Ten patients had metastases. The diagnostic reliability for tumor staging according to CT was 56% versus 80% for laparotomy. In the determination of nodal involvement CT had a diagnostic yield of 71% versus 6% for laparotomy. Metastatic disease was correctly diagnosed by CT in 83% of cases versus 88% by laparotomy. There were no statistically significant differences between CT with oral oil-based contrast and laparotomy for the staging of nodal involvement and metastases. However, the CT diagnosis was significantly more reliable than laparotomy for the determination of tumor infiltration. (Author) 21 refs

  5. Factors on prognosis in patients of stage pT3N0M0 thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after two-field esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: For patients of pT3N0M0 thoracic ESCC, the independent factors were the site of a lesion for OS and PFS, Hb levels, small LN in CT, and number of removed LN for OS. The value of postoperative adjuvant therapy need be further proved.

  6. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were ≤40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  7. Staging of Cervical Lymph Nodes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Buron, Birgitte Marie Due; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical staging of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is crucial for the choice of treatment. Computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically recommended and used for staging of the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). Although ultrasonography (US...

  8. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

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    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  9. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for systematic nodal staging of lung cancer in patients with N0 disease by computed tomography and integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Philip; Grosu, Horiana; Eapen, George A; Rodriguez, Macarena; Lazarus, Donald; Ost, David; Jimenez, Carlos A; Morice, Rodolfo; Bandi, Venkata; Tamara, Luis; Cornwell, Lorraine; Green, Linda; Zhu, Angela; Casal, Roberto F

    2015-03-01

    Data regarding the sensitivity of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for staging of lung cancer in patients with radiographic N0 disease is scant and inconsistent. With increasing use of nonoperative ablative therapies, studies focusing on the performance characteristics of EBUS-TBNA in this population are important. To evaluate the sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and radiographic N0 disease both by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. This was a retrospective review of EBUS-TBNA performed for lung cancer staging at two major academic centers from 2009 to 2014. Patients with radiographic N0 disease (lymph nodes [LN]≤1 cm in the short axis and maximum standardized uptake value≤2.5 by PET-CT) were included. Primary outcome was sensitivity and NPV of EBUS-TBNA. Two hundred twenty patients with radiographic N0 disease underwent EBUS-TBNA, and 734 LN were sampled (median 3, range 1-6). Median LN diameter was 0.72 cm. One hundred patients (45.5%) underwent surgery, and 120 patients (54.5%) had nonsurgical therapy. N status was up-staged in 49 patients (22.3%): 18 by EBUS-TBNA (N1=11, N2=6, N3=1), 27 by surgery (N1 intralobar=16, N1 extralobar=3, N2=8 [5 LN in stations 4 and 7, and 3 LN in stations 5-6), and 4 by imaging follow-up (N1=2, N2=2). Overall false-negative rate of EBUS was 14.1% (sensitivity, 36.7%; specificity, 100%; and NPV, 84.7%). False-negative rate was 27 and 3.3% in surgical and nonsurgical populations, respectively. Excluding patients with occult disease "outside" the reach of EBUS, the overall false-negative rate of EBUS-TBNA was 5.5% (sensitivity, 60%; specificity, 100%; and NPV, 93.4%). This is the largest report of EBUS-TBNA in patients with N0 disease by "integrated" PET-CT. The majority of false-negative EBUS results were in LN stations outside its reach. In our study, both sensitivity and NPV of

  10. Cochliomyia Homnivorax in an advanced stage in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Gomes

    Full Text Available Myiasis is characterized by the invasion of body or cavity tissues of live animals by larva. It is most frequently observed in underdeveloped and tropical countries, but there are cases described worldwide. Conventional treatment consists of mechanical removal of the larvae, one by one, which is a painful, embarrassing and repugnant process, both for the professional and patient. Although it is not considered rare, it has been observed that the dental professional has little knowledge for the diagnosis and treatment of this pathology. For this reason, this study reports a case of oral myiasis at an advanced stage, which affected a nine-year-old patient, treated at a medical-dental clinic. Diagnosis was based on the visual presence of Cochliomyia homnivorax larvae, diptera of the Calliphoridae family, which were between the second and third stages of development. Predisposing factors, such as the lack of information, malnutrition, poor oral hygiene, preexistenceof oral lesions and severe halitosis have a decisive influence in the appearance and progression of oral myiasis. A brief literaturereview was also conducted, in which this pathology was discussed, including the importance of early clinical diagnosis, its etiology, possible associations with other pathologies, and different types of treatment.

  11. Malignant tumours of the oral cavity and oropharynx: staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssefzadeh, S.; Pamberger, P.; Baumgartner, W.; Burian, M.; Becherer, A.; Wachter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Staging of malignant tumours of the oral cavity and the oropharynx not only requires far more than a basic knowledge of anatomy and the usual pathways of spread, but also a broad understanding of the diagnostic benefits of current imaging modalities. As radiology should never try to replace histology, the main aim should be precise prediction of tumour margins and differention of tumour from edema and posttherapeutic changes. Only then will imaging studies have a significant clinical impact. (orig.) [de

  12. Successful Completion of the Pilot Phase of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy to No Further Axillary Staging in Patients with Clinical T1-T2 N0 Breast Cancer and Normal Axillary Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Amy E; Tucker, Natalia; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Margenthaler, Julie A; Aft, Rebecca L; Eberlein, Timothy J; Appleton, Catherine M; Zoberi, Imran; Thomas, Maria A; Gao, Feng; Gillanders, William E

    2016-08-01

    Axillary surgery is not considered therapeutic in patients with clinical T1-T2 N0 breast cancer. The importance of axillary staging is eroding in an era in which tumor biology, as defined by biomarker and gene expression profile, is increasingly important in medical decision making. We hypothesized that axillary ultrasound (AUS) is a noninvasive alternative to sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), and AUS could replace SLNB without compromising patient care. Patients with clinical T1-T2 N0 breast cancer and normal AUS were eligible for enrollment. Subjects were randomized to no further axillary staging (arm 1) vs SLNB (arm 2). Descriptive statistics were used to describe the results of the pilot phase of the randomized controlled trial. Sixty-eight subjects were enrolled in the pilot phase of the trial (34 subjects in arm 1, no further staging; 32 subjects in arm 2, SLNB; and 2 subjects voluntarily withdrew from the trial). The median age was 61 years (range 40 to 80 years) in arm 1 and 59 years (range 31 to 81 years) in arm 2, and there were no significant clinical or pathologic differences between the arms. Median follow-up was 17 months (range 1 to 32 months). The negative predictive value (NPV) of AUS for identification of clinically significant axillary disease (>2.0 mm) was 96.9%. No axillary recurrences have been observed in either arm. Successful completion of the pilot phase of the randomized controlled trial confirms the feasibility of the study design, and provides prospective evidence supporting the ability of AUS to exclude clinically significant disease in the axilla. The results provide strong support for a phase 2 randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary Surgery vs Radiotherapy for Early Stage Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark A; Graboyes, Evan M; Wahlquist, Amy E; Neskey, David M; Kaczmar, John M; Schopper, Heather K; Sharma, Anand K; Morgan, Patrick F; Nguyen, Shaun A; Day, Terry A

    2018-04-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to determine the effect of primary surgery vs radiotherapy (RT) on overall survival (OS) in patients with early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC). In addition, this study attempts to identify factors associated with receiving primary RT. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting National Cancer Database (NCDB, 2004-2013). Subjects and Methods Reviewing the NCDB from 2004 to 2013, patients with early stage I to II OCSCC were identified. Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival, Cox regression analysis, and propensity score matching were used to examine differences in OS between primary surgery and primary RT. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with primary RT. Results Of the 20,779 patients included in the study, 95.4% (19,823 patients) underwent primary surgery and 4.6% (956 patients) underwent primary RT. After adjusting for covariates, primary RT was associated with an increased risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.97; 99% confidence interval [CI], 1.74-2.22). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with primary RT included age ≥70 years, black race, Medicaid or Medicare insurance, no insurance, oral cavity subsite other than tongue, clinical stage II disease, low-volume treatment facilities, and earlier treatment year. Conclusion Primary RT for early stage OCSCC is associated with increased mortality. Approximately 5% of patients receive primary RT; however, this percentage is decreasing. Patients at highest risk for receiving primary RT include those who are elderly, black, with public insurance, and treated at low-volume facilities.

  14. Oral misoprostol versus oxytocin in the management of third stage of labour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, S.; Kazi, S.; Haq, G.; Soomro, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare oral misoprostol versus intramuscular oxytocin in the management of third stage of labour. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit II, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from June 20 to December 19, 2006. A total of 70 patients diagnosed in active phase of labour who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected by non-probability convenience sampling. These patients were divided into 2 groups of 35 patients each, for Oxytocin (Group 1) and misoprostol (Group 2). Main and secondary outcome measures were analysed. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Average amount of blood loss(ml) was 267.14+-140.35 with Oxytocin versus 302.86+-160.4, with Misoprostol, this difference was statistically insignificant (p=0.236). Average drop in haemoglobin concentration (g/dl) with Oxytocin was 1.55+-0.38 vs 1.66+-0.61 with Misoprostol (p=0.684). Drop in haematocrit (%) was 4.18+-0.64 with Oxytocin vs. 4.50+-0.92 with Misoprostol (p=0.133). There was also insignificant difference in duration of third stage of labour, between oxytocin and Misoprostol groups (5.37+-2.20 vs. 5.23+-2.46, p=0.451) Shivering, in Misoprostol group occured in n=11 (31.4%) vs n=3 (8.6%) with Oxytocin (p=0.017) and pyrexia in n=6 (17.1%) with misoprostol vs n=0, with oxytocin (p=0.025) thus significantly higher in misoprostol group. Conclusion: There were no major differences in oral misoprostol and intramuscular oxytocin in the management of third stage of labour. (author)

  15. Comparison between computed tomography with oral oil-based contrast and laparotomy for gastric cancer staging; Tomografia computerizada con contraste oral graso frente a lapartomia en la estadificacion del cancer gastrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, S. F.; Garcia-Vila, J. H.; Cervera, J.; Gomez, R.; Piqueras, R. M.; Perona, I.; Escrig, J.; Salvador, J. L. [Hospital General de Castello. Castellon (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To compare the utility of conventional computed tomography (CT) with oral oil-based contrast with that of laparotomy in the preoperative staging of gastric cancer. We prospectively studied 41 patients diagnosed as having gastric adenocarcinoma according to the results of endoscopy and biopsy. Applying the TNM classification for gastric cancer staging, we compared the findings in CT associated with oral oil-based contrast and intraoperative staging with definitive postoperative pathological staging. Definitive pathological studies demonstrated that there were 7 stage T1-T2 lesions, 26 stage T3 and 8 stage T4. The assessment of lymph node involvement showed that 10 patients presented stage N0 and 31 stage N1-N3. Ten patients had metastases. The diagnostic reliability for tumor staging according to CT was 56% versus 80% for laparotomy. In the determination of nodal involvement CT had a diagnostic yield of 71% versus 6% for laparotomy. Metastatic disease was correctly diagnosed by CT in 83% of cases versus 88% by laparotomy. There were no statistically significant differences between CT with oral oil-based contrast and laparotomy for the staging of nodal involvement and metastases. However, the CT diagnosis was significantly more reliable than laparotomy for the determination of tumor infiltration. (Author) 21 refs.

  16. A novel wavelet neural network based pathological stage detection technique for an oral precancerous condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R R; Mukherjee, A; Dutta, P K; Banerjee, S; Pal, M; Chatterjee, J; Chaudhuri, K; Mukkerjee, K

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To describe a novel neural network based oral precancer (oral submucous fibrosis; OSF) stage detection method. Method: The wavelet coefficients of transmission electron microscopy images of collagen fibres from normal oral submucosa and OSF tissues were used to choose the feature vector which, in turn, was used to train the artificial neural network. Results: The trained network was able to classify normal and oral precancer stages (less advanced and advanced) after obtaining the image as an input. Conclusions: The results obtained from this proposed technique were promising and suggest that with further optimisation this method could be used to detect and stage OSF, and could be adapted for other conditions. PMID:16126873

  17. Treatment outcome with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early-stage oral tongue cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalavat Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Although radical radiotherapy is known to be equally effective for early-stage oral tongue cancers (T1-2 N0 with the added advantage of organ and function preservation, surgery remains the preferred treatment. We present outcome of patients treated with brachytherapy (BT either radical or boost. Materials and Methods : Fifty-seven patients (T1/T2 31/26 were studied. Seventeen patients (30% were treated with radical BT (50-67 Gy while 40 (70% with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT + BT (36-56 Gy + 15-38 Gy]. Low-dose-rate (LDR BT was delivered with 192 Ir wires, using plastic bead technique with varied dose rates (< 60 cGy/h in 29 patients, 60-90 cGy/h in 17, and> 90 cGy/h in 11. Results : The overall local control (LCR was achieved in 59.7% (34/57 patients. LCR for T1 and T2 was 67.8% and 50%, respectively. A total of 23 patients had failures [local: 20 (T1: 8; T2: 12 patients, node: 5 (T1:2; T2: 3, and local + nodal: 3]. Overall 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival (OAS were 51% and 67%, respectively and those for T1 and T2 was 64.5/77.4% and 38.5/54% respectively (P = 0.002. All 16 patients were salvaged. Median survival after salvage treatment was 13.5 months (6-100 months. Soft tissue necrosis was observed in 12.3% (7/57 and osteoradionecrosis in two patients. Conclusion : BT, as an integral part of radical radiation therapy in early-stage tongue cancers, appears to be an effective alternative treatment modality with preservation of the organ and function without jeopardizing the outcome.

  18. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  19. Harvesting oral mucosa for one-stage anterior urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Balwant Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosa has been the most popular substitute material for urethral reconstructive surgery because it is easy to harvest, is easy to access, has a concealed donor site scar, and obviates most of the problems associated with other grafts. However, the success of using oral mucosa for urethral surgery is mainly attributed to the biological properties of this tissue. Herein, the surgical steps of harvesting oral mucosa from the inner cheek are presented with an emphasis on tips and tricks to render the process easier and more reproducible and to prevent intra and post-operative complications. The following steps are emphasized: Nasal intubation, ovoid shape graft, delicate harvesting leaving the muscle intact, donor site closure and removal of submucosal tissue.

  20. Photodynamic therapy of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms: an outcome analysis of 170 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakullukcu, Baris; van Oudenaarde, Kim; Copper, Marcel P.; Klop, W. M. C.; van Veen, Robert; Wildeman, Maarten; Bing Tan, I.

    2011-01-01

    The indications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms are not well defined. The main reason is that the success rates are not well established. The current paper analyzes our institutional experience of early stage oral cavity and oropharynx neoplasms (Tis-T2) to

  1. The added value of SPECT-CT for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes in early stage oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toom, Inne J. den; Bree, Remco de; Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Weert, Stijn van; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Bloemena, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    To assess the role of single-photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography (SPECT-CT) for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with early stage (T1-T2) oral cancer and a clinically negative neck (cN0). In addition to planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT-CT was performed in 66 consecutive patients with early stage oral cancer and a clinically negative neck. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar images was retrospectively analyzed for the number of additional SLNs, more precise localization of SLNs, and importance of anatomical information by a team consisting of a nuclear physician, surgeon, and investigator. Identification rate for both imaging modalities combined was 98% (65/66). SPECT-CT identified 15 additional SLNs in 14 patients (22%). In 2/15 (13%) of these additional SLNs, the only metastasis was found, resulting in an upstaging rate of 3% (2/65). In 20% of the patients with at least one positive SLN, the only positive SLN was detected due to the addition of SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT was considered to add important anatomical information in two patients (3%). In 5/65 (8%) of the patients initially scored SLNs on planar lymphoscintigrams were scored as non-SLNs when SPECT-CT was added. There were four false-negative SLN biopsy procedures in this cohort. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar lymphoscintigraphy is recommended for the identification of more (positive) SLNs and better topographical orientation for surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy for early stage oral cancer. (orig.)

  2. The added value of SPECT-CT for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes in early stage oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toom, Inne J. den; Bree, Remco de [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center, Department of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Weert, Stijn van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karagozoglu, K.H. [VU University Medical Center/Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) Amsterdam, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bloemena, Elisabeth [VU University Medical Center/Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) Amsterdam, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    To assess the role of single-photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography (SPECT-CT) for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with early stage (T1-T2) oral cancer and a clinically negative neck (cN0). In addition to planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT-CT was performed in 66 consecutive patients with early stage oral cancer and a clinically negative neck. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar images was retrospectively analyzed for the number of additional SLNs, more precise localization of SLNs, and importance of anatomical information by a team consisting of a nuclear physician, surgeon, and investigator. Identification rate for both imaging modalities combined was 98% (65/66). SPECT-CT identified 15 additional SLNs in 14 patients (22%). In 2/15 (13%) of these additional SLNs, the only metastasis was found, resulting in an upstaging rate of 3% (2/65). In 20% of the patients with at least one positive SLN, the only positive SLN was detected due to the addition of SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT was considered to add important anatomical information in two patients (3%). In 5/65 (8%) of the patients initially scored SLNs on planar lymphoscintigrams were scored as non-SLNs when SPECT-CT was added. There were four false-negative SLN biopsy procedures in this cohort. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar lymphoscintigraphy is recommended for the identification of more (positive) SLNs and better topographical orientation for surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy for early stage oral cancer. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of Oral Hygiene in Patients with Generalized Periodontitis of II Degree and Stage II Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Vivcharenko

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions. The level of oral hygiene in patients of both groups was low due to incorrect selection of personal hygiene products or their untimely replacement. In patients with generalized periodontitis of II degree and stage II hypertension, the level of oral hygiene was lower than in somatically healthy persons: the worse status of oral cavity hygiene – the more pronounced changes in the periodontal tissues. We can suppose that high blood pressure affects the status of the oral cavity, creates a higher risk and exacerbates the periodontal diseases.

  4. Treatment of the glottic squamous cell carcinoma in stages T1-T2, N0: surgery versus radiotherapy: retrospective study of 50 patients attended at the Hospital Mexico in the period 2005 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Munoz, Angie

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence rates are compared in patients with glottic cancer in early stages, treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The study was composed by all patients diagnosed with glottic cancer in the Servicio de Otorrinolaringologia from Hospital Mexico, in early stages during the period 2005 to 2011. The local and locoregional recurrence rates are determined. Differences in recurrence rates are analyzed. Factors associated to higher recurrence rates are identified. Treatment with radiotherapy has had statistically a higher proportion of local recurrence than treatment with surgery [es

  5. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Oral Cavity Neoplasm; Oropharyngeal Neoplasm; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  6. Acute oral toxicity of chemicals in terrestrial life stages of amphibians: Comparisons to birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Mark; Finnegan, Meaghean; Weltje, Lennart; Kosmala-Grzechnik, Sylwia; Gross, Melanie; Wheeler, James R

    2016-10-01

    Amphibians are currently the most threatened and rapidly declining group of vertebrates and this has raised concerns about their potential sensitivity and exposure to plant protection products and other chemicals. Current environmental risk assessment procedures rely on surrogate species (e.g. fish and birds) to cover the risk to aquatic and terrestrial life stages of amphibians, respectively. Whilst a recent meta-analysis has shown that in most cases amphibian aquatic life stages are less sensitive to chemicals than fish, little research has been conducted on the comparative sensitivity of terrestrial amphibian life stages. Therefore, in this paper we address the questions "What is the relative sensitivity of terrestrial amphibian life stages to acute chemical oral exposure when compared with mammals and birds?" and "Are there correlations between oral toxicity data for amphibians and data for mammals or birds?" Identifying a relationship between these data may help to avoid additional vertebrate testing. Acute oral amphibian toxicity data collected from the scientific literature and ecotoxicological databases were compared with toxicity data for mammals and birds. Toxicity data for terrestrial amphibian life stages are generally sparse, as noted in previous reviews. Single-dose oral toxicity data for terrestrial amphibian life stages were available for 26 chemicals and these were positively correlated with LD50 values for mammals, while no correlation was found for birds. Further, the data suggest that oral toxicity to terrestrial amphibian life stages is similar to or lower than that for mammals and birds, with a few exceptions. Thus, mammals or birds are considered adequate toxicity surrogates for use in the assessment of the oral exposure route in amphibians. However, there is a need for further data on a wider range of chemicals to explore the wider applicability of the current analyses and recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronological shifts and changing causes of death after radiotherapy for early-stage oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Rina; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Harata, Naoki; Yuasa-Nakagawa, Keiko; Toda, Kazuma; Hayashi, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    Following recent improvements in the curability of oral cancer, chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death after treatment have been observed. We conducted a review of the post-treatment causes of death following radiotherapy for oral cancers. The medical records of 966 patients with early-stage (stage I and II) oral cancer treated at our institute between 1980 and 2001 were reviewed, and the chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death after radiotherapy were assessed. Of the 966 patients enrolled in this study, 365 have died to date. Two hundred and eleven patients died of their primary malignancy; 193 of these deaths occurred within 5 years of treatment for the primary oral cancer. The second most frequent cause of death was second primary cancer (n = 90). Twenty-three patients with head and neck cancers and 18 patients with esophageal cancers died within 10 years of radiotherapy, and six patients with lung cancers died after more than 10 years. Within the first 5 years following treatment, the major cause of death was the primary oral cancer. After 5-10 years, a second primary cancer, such as head and neck cancer or esophageal cancer, became the leading cause of death. Over a 10-year period, the proportion of deaths from a second primary cancer in the lung was significant. We have demonstrated that there are chronological shifts and changes in the causes of death following treatment for early-stage oral cancer.

  8. Dependence of therapeutic gain factor on stage of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, J.; Solomon, J.G.R.; Koteshwer Rao, K.; Supe, S.S.; Prasad, G.N.S.

    1998-01-01

    To achieve therapeutic gain, unconventional dose per fraction has been employed in radiotherapy, in addition to the conventional dose per fraction of 2 Gy. Dose fractionation factor (DFF) and therapeutic gain factor (TGF) have been utilised to test the efficiency of such unconventional fractionation schedules. In this study, isoeffective dose for 100% tumour regression and mucosal and skin reactions were estimated. CRE, TDF and ERD values for tumour and normal tissue reactions were evaluated. DEF and TGF values have been determined on the basis of dose, CRE, TDF and ERD, in order to understand the influence of these bioeffect models and stage of cancer on TGF associated with differing fractionation schedules. There was a noticeable difference in TGF values determined on the basis of four criteria, which is in agreement with radiobiological phenomenon, that tissues with different α/β values differ in their responsiveness. (author)

  9. To evaluate disparity between clinical and pathological tumor-node-metastasis staging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients and its impact on overall survival: An institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accurate clinical staging is important for patient counseling, treatment planning, prognostication, and rational design of clinical trials. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, discrepancy between clinical and pathological staging has been reported. Objective: To evaluate any disparity between clinical and pathological tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC patients and any impact of the same on survival. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review from year 2007 to 2013, at a tertiary care center. Statistical Analysis: All survival analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows version 15 (Chicago, IL, USA. Disease-free survival curves were generated using Kaplan-Meier algorithm. Results: One hundred and twenty-seven patients with OCSCC were analyzed. Seventy-nine (62.2% were males and 48 (37.8% females with a mean age at presentation 43.6 years (29-79 years. The highest congruence between clinical and pathological T-staging seen for clinical stage T1 and T4 at 76.9% and 73.4% with pathological T-stage. Similarly, the highest congruence between clinical and pathological N-stage seen for clinical N0 and N3 at 86.4% and 91.7% with pathological N-stage. Of clinically early stage patients, 67.5% remained early stage, and 32.5% were upstaged to advanced stage following pathological analysis. Of the clinically advanced stage patients, 75% remained advanced, and 25% were pathologically downstaged. This staging discrepancy did not significantly alter the survival. Conclusion: Some disparity exists in clinical and pathological TNM staging of OCSCC, which could affect treatment planning and survival of patients. Hence, more unified and even system of staging for the disease is required for proper decision-making.

  10. To evaluate disparity between clinical and pathological tumor-node-metastasis staging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients and its impact on overall survival: An institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Karan; Panda, Naresh K; Bakshi, Jaimanti; Das, Ashim

    2015-01-01

    Accurate clinical staging is important for patient counseling, treatment planning, prognostication, and rational design of clinical trials. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, discrepancy between clinical and pathological staging has been reported. To evaluate any disparity between clinical and pathological tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) patients and any impact of the same on survival. Retrospective chart review from year 2007 to 2013, at a tertiary care center. All survival analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows version 15 (Chicago, IL, USA). Disease-free survival curves were generated using Kaplan-Meier algorithm. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with OCSCC were analyzed. Seventy-nine (62.2%) were males and 48 (37.8%) females with a mean age at presentation 43.6 years (29-79 years). The highest congruence between clinical and pathological T-staging seen for clinical stage T1 and T4 at 76.9% and 73.4% with pathological T-stage. Similarly, the highest congruence between clinical and pathological N-stage seen for clinical N0 and N3 at 86.4% and 91.7% with pathological N-stage. Of clinically early stage patients, 67.5% remained early stage, and 32.5% were upstaged to advanced stage following pathological analysis. Of the clinically advanced stage patients, 75% remained advanced, and 25% were pathologically downstaged. This staging discrepancy did not significantly alter the survival. Some disparity exists in clinical and pathological TNM staging of OCSCC, which could affect treatment planning and survival of patients. Hence, more unified and even system of staging for the disease is required for proper decision-making.

  11. Clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Irfan; Sefvan, Omer; Luqman, Uzair; Ibrahim, Waseem; Mehmood, Sana; Alamgir, Wajiha

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral cancer. Early diagnosis ensures better prognosis. Late diagnosis is however common around the world and contributes to the high morbidity and mortality related to oral cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. This retrospective study was carried out on 334 oral cancer patients who presented to the outdoor departments of Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from July 2008 to December 2009. The records that were reviewed included history and clinical examination findings. OPG and CT scans of the head and neck region, chest X-rays, abdominal ultrasounds and liver function tests. Size of the primary tumour, the size, number and laterality of the involved cervical lymph nodes and the presence/absence of distant metastases were documented and statistically analysed using SPSS-17. Out of the 334 patients, 203 (60.8%) were males and 131 (39.2%) females. The age range was from 21 to 88 years. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly involved site (32%). The primary tumour was 4 Cm or more in size, (T3/T4) 71.25% of the cases. Cervical lymph nodes were involved in 211 patients (63.2%) and distant metastases were present in 39 patients (11.7%). Overall, clinical stage IV was the most common (57.18%) followed by stage III (24.55%), stage II (13.77%) and stage I (4.49%). Oral cancers are diagnosed late (Stage III and IV) in Pakistan and need immediate public and professional attention.

  12. Clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of initial diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, I.; Sefvan, O.; Luqman, Z.; Ibrahim, W.; Mehmood, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral cancer. Early diagnosis ensures better prognosis. Late diagnosis is however common around the world and contributes to the high morbidity and mortality related to oral cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. Methods: This retrospective study was carried out on 334 oral cancer patients who presented to the outdoor departments of Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from July 2008 to December 2009. The records that were reviewed included history and clinical examination findings, OPG and CT scans of the head and neck region, chest X-rays, abdominal ultrasounds and liver function tests. Size of the primary tumour, the size, number and laterality of the involved cervical lymph nodes and the presence/absence of distant metastases were documented and statistically analysed using SPSS-17. Results: Out of the 334 patients, 203 (60.8%) were males and 131 (39.2%) females. The age range was from 21 to 88 years. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly involved site (32 %). The primary tumour was 4 Cm or more in size, (T3/T4) 71.25% of the cases. Cervical lymph nodes were involved in 211 patients (63.2%) and distant metastases were present in 39 patients (11.7%). Overall, clinical stage IV was the most common (57.18%) followed by stage III(24.55%), stage II (13.77%) and stage I (4.49%). Conclusion: Oral cancers are diagnosed late (Stage III and IV) in Pakistan and need immediate public and professional attention. (author)

  13. Oral and pharyngeal cancer : Analysis of patient delay at different tumor stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouha, XDR; Tromp, DM; Hordijk, GJ; Winnubst, JAM; de Leeuw, JRJ

    2005-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to examine which factors are related to patient delay in a cohort of consecutive patients with pharyngeal cancer and oral cancer and to determine whether the different stages of patient delay (ie, appraisal, illness, behavioral, and scheduling) were related to

  14. A retrospective analysis of preoperative staging modalities for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähling, Ch; Langguth, T; Roller, F; Kroll, T; Krombach, G; Knitschke, M; Streckbein, Ph; Howaldt, H P; Wilbrand, J-F

    2016-12-01

    An accurate preoperative assessment of cervical lymph node status is a prerequisite for individually tailored cancer therapies in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. The detection of malignant spread and its treatment crucially influence the prognosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the different staging modalities used among patients with a diagnosis of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2015. An analysis of preoperative staging findings, collected by clinical palpation, ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT), was performed. The results obtained were compared with the results of the final histopathological findings of the neck dissection specimens. A statistical analysis using McNemar's test was performed. The sensitivity of CT for the detection of malignant cervical tumor spread was 74.5%. The ultrasound obtained a sensitivity of 60.8%. Both CT and ultrasound demonstrated significantly enhanced sensitivity compared to the clinical palpation with a sensitivity of 37.1%. No significant difference was observed between CT and ultrasound. A combination of different staging modalities increased the sensitivity significantly compared with ultrasound staging alone. No significant difference in sensitivity was found between the combined use of different staging modalities and CT staging alone. The highest sensitivity, of 80.0%, was obtained by a combination of all three staging modalities: clinical palpation, ultrasound and CT. The present study indicates that CT has an essential role in the preoperative staging of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Its use not only significantly increases the sensitivity of cervical lymph node metastasis detection but also offers a preoperative assessment of local tumor spread and resection borders. An additional non-invasive cervical lymph node examination increases the sensitivity of the tumor staging process and reduces the risk of occult metastasis. Copyright © 2016 European

  15. The development and validation of oral cancer staging using administrative health data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Ting, Chang; Chung-Ho, Chen; Yi-Hsin, Yang; Pei-Shan, Ho

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major global health problem. The complexity of histological prognosticators in oral cancer makes it difficult to compare the benefits of different treatment regimens. The Taiwanese National Health database provides an opportunity to assess correlations between outcome and treatment protocols and to compare the effects of different treatment regimens. However, the absence of indices of disease severity is a critical problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain how accurately we could assess the severity of oral cancer at the time of initial diagnosis on the basis of variables in a national database. In the cancer registry database of a medical center in Taiwan, we identified 1067 histologically confirmed cases of oral cancer (ICD9 codes 140, 141 and 143–145) that had been first diagnosed and subjected to initial treatment in this hospital. The clinical staging status was considered as the gold standard and we used concordance (C)-statistics to assess the model’s predictive performance. We added the predictors of treatment modality, cancer subsite, and age group to our models. Our final overall model included treatment regimen, site, age, and two interaction terms; namely, interactions between treatment regimen and age and those between treatment regimen, site, and age. In this model, the C-statistics were 0.82–0.84 in male subjects and 0.96–0.99 in female subjects. Of the models stratified by age, the model that considered treatment regimen and site had the highest C-statistics for the interaction term, this value being greater than 0.80 in male subjects and 0.9 in female subjects. In this study, we found that adjusting for sex, age at first diagnosis, oral cancer subsite, and therapy regimen provided the best indicator of severity of oral cancer. Our findings provide a method for assessing cancer severity when information about staging is not available from a national health-related database

  16. A loss of profilin-1 in late-stage oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Guy R; O'Callaghan, Thomas N; Kolokythas, Antonia; Cabay, Robert J; Zhou, Yalu; Schwartz, Joel L

    2017-08-01

    The genes for PFN1 and TMSB4 are both highly expressed in oral tissue and both encode actin monomer binding proteins thought to play a role in cell motility and possibly other crucial parts of tumor progression. Oral brush cytology of epithelium from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was used to measure PFN1 and TMSB4 mRNA in OSCC, while immunohistochemical analysis of tissue was used to check protein levels. High but variable expression of mRNAs encoding these two proteins was observed suggesting they may contribute to tumor characteristics in a subset of OSCCs. Both proteins were highly expressed in normal appearing basal epithelium, in the cytoplasm, and perinuclear area, while expression was minimal in upper epithelial layers. In OSCCs, expression of these proteins varied. In tumors classified as later stage, based on size and/or lymph node involvement, PFN1 levels were lower in tumor epithelium. A control gene, KRT13, showed expression in normal differentiated basal and suprabasal oral mucosa epithelial cells and as reported was lost in OSCC cells. Loss of PFN1 in tumor cells has been associated with lymph node invasion and metastasis in other tumor types, strengthening the argument that the protein has the potential to be a tumor suppressor in late-stage OSCC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. TFM classification and staging of oral submucous fibrosis: A new proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Thomas, Deepak; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Hunasgi, Santosh; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Hale, Beverley; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Rahimi, Siavash; Merkx, Matthias A W; Brennan, Peter A

    2018-04-01

    We have evaluated the rationale of existing grading and staging schemes of oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) based on how they are categorized. A novel classification and staging scheme is proposed. A total of 300 OSMF patients were evaluated for agreement between functional, clinical, and histopathological staging. Bilateral biopsies were assessed in 25 patients to evaluate for any differences in histopathological staging of OSMF in the same mouth. Extent of clinician agreement for categorized staging data was evaluated using Cohen's weighted kappa analysis. Cross-tabulation was performed on categorical grading data to understand the intercorrelation, and the unweighted kappa analysis was used to assess the bilateral grade agreement. Probabilities of less than 0.05 were considered significant. Data were analyzed using SPSS Statistics (version 25.0, IBM, USA). A low agreement was found between all the stages depicting the independent nature of trismus, clinical features, and histopathological components (K = 0.312, 0.167, 0.152) in OSMF. Following analysis, a three-component classification scheme (TFM classification) was developed that describes the severity of each independently, grouping them using a novel three-tier staging scheme as a guide to the treatment plan. The proposed classification and staging could be useful for effective communication, categorization, and for recording data and prognosis, and for guiding treatment plans. Furthermore, the classification considers OSMF malignant transformation in detail. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Profiling of antioxidant superoxide dismutase in saliva of oral submucous fibrosis patients to categorize its diagnosis in varying stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirohi, Y.; Shetty, D.C.; Urs, A.B.; Rai, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis is a pre malignant condition in Indian and South-East Asia. Role of oxidant-antioxidant in causation and progression of cancer and pre cancers is known. Reactive oxygen species are generated in the oral cavity during chewing areca nut, the major etiological agent in oral submucous fibrosis. Objectives: To see the alterations in the salivary superoxide dismutase levels in various clinical and histopathological grades of oral submucous fibrosis. Materials and Methods: Unstimulated saliva was collected from 25 oral submucous fibrosis patients and age and gender matched controls. The saliva was assessed for superoxide dismutase value by spectrophotometric method using assay kit (Bio Vision Catalog number K335-100). The oral submucous fibrosis cases were grouped into clinical stages and histopathological grades and superoxide dismutase values were compared in different clinical stages and histopathological grades. Results: The superoxide dismutase levels were reduced in oral submucous fibrosis as compared to controls. A steady decline in the levels was seen as the clinical stage and histopathological grade of oral submucous fibrosis advanced. Conclusions: Salivary superoxide dismutase levels can be alternatively used as a surrogate marker for the diagnosis of oral submucous fibrosis. Policy message: Oral physicians should advise the pan chewers to regularly check their salivary superoxide dismutase levels so as to ease the early diagnosis of oral submucous fibrosis. (author)

  19. Submandibular Gland Involvement in Early Stage Oral Cavity Carcinomas: Can the Gland be left behind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashfaq, K.; Ashfaq, M.; Ahmed, A.; Khan, M.; Azhar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of submandibular gland involvement in early oral cavity tumors. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: ENT Department, CMH, Rawalpindi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Data of 110 oral cavity tumors operated over 2008 - 2011 was retrieved from ENT OPD, tumor registry in AFIP and from Head and Neck Oncology Forum Registry. Cases of oral cavity tumors that had undergone elective neck dissections were retrospectively studied for invasion of the submandibular gland, TNM Staging, perineural, perivascular, lymphovascular invasion, site specific frequency of oral cavity tumors and frequency of lymph node metastasis. Results: Tumors of tongue were the most common constituting 42%, squamous cell carcinoma was the histological diagnosis in 90% cases. Sixty eight (61.8%) cases were node negative. Selective neck dissection was done in 55.5% of the cases. Submandibular gland was involved in 2 cases (1.8%). Conclusion: Submandibular gland metastasis from early oral cavity tumors is rare; any neoplastic involvement of the gland usually occurs via direct spread. (author)

  20. The role of the computed tomography in head and neck cancer: Comparison of CT staging with clinical staging in oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Yul; Han, Man Chung

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-six patients (24 with oral cavity or oropharynx cancers and 12 larynx cancers) were prospectively examined with computed tomography (CT) to determine its value in staging the primary tumor and to compare with the clinical staging. The CT staging agreed with the clinical staging in 50% (12/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx cancers and in 67% (8/12) of the larynx cancers. The CT upgraded the clinical staging in 29% (7/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx tumors and in 33% (4/12) of the larynx cancers, whereas the CT downgrade the clinical staging in 21% (5/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx cancers. There is no downgrade on CT in larynx cancer. The post-surgical confirmation was not made in most of the cases. The possible causes of disagreement between the CT and the clinical staging, and the diagnostic value of the CT in evaluation of the primary tumor in oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx were discussed

  1. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yen Huang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group, and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group. The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107. Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  2. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  3. Radiotherapy for primary localized (stage I and II) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaba, Kohji; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Okada, Norihiko; Amagasa, Teruo; Enomoto, Shoji; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of primary localized (Stage I: 24 cases and Stage II: 13 cases) non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) of the oral cavity. Methods and Materials: In total, 37 patients (27 male, 10 female) with primary localized NHL of the oral cavity have been treated with radiotherapy alone (23 cases) or radiation with chemotherapy (14 cases). The age range was 29 to 86 years (median: 65). Clinical and treatment variables with potential prognostic significance for survival were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Of the 37 patients, 31 (84%) had intermediate-grade lymphomas and six (14%) had high-grade lymphomas. Four patients showed necrotic ulcer in the central portion of the hard palate. Results: The 5-year actuarial survival rate for all cases was 73%. The 5-year survival rates for intermediate-grade and high-grade lymphoma were 85% and 14%, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were histologic grade of malignancy (p = 0.02) and central necrotic ulcer in the tumor (p = 0.02). Chemotherapy did not improve survival (p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that radiotherapy alone may be approved as the treatment for localized oral NHL with no ulceration and intermediate histology. However, patients with high-grade lymphoma and/or necrotic ulcer are difficult to cure with radiation alone and aggressive treatment should be advocated to improve survival

  4. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  6. Does Clinical Staging and Histological Grading Show Parallelism In Oral Submucous Fibrosis? A Retrospective Study from an Indian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Narayan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: There was no correlation between clinical staging and histopathological grading of oral submucous fibrosis. The test results were statistically not significant. (p=0.635 This may be due to difference in severity and extent of fibrosis in different parts of the oral mucosa. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(3.000: 145-149

  7. Comparative Study of Clinical Staging of Oral Submucous Fibrosis with Qualitative Analysis of Collagen Fibers Under Polarized Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Neha; Tamgadge, Sandhya; Tamgadge, Avinash; Bhalerao, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a condition where excessive deposition of dense collagen fibers occurred in the connective tissue of oral mucosa. An alteration of collagen necessitates an in depth understanding of collagen in oral tissues as no breakthrough studies have been reported. T herefore the aim was to correlate the clinical, functional and histopathological staging and to analyze the polarization colors and thickness of the collagen fibers in different stages of OSMF using picrosirius red stain under polarizing microscopy so as to assess the severity of disease. The study was conducted in the department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology at Padm. Dr. D. Y Patil Dental and Hospital, Navi Mumbai, India (2012-13). A sample size was of a total 40 subjects, of which 30 patients had OSMF, and 10 were in control group. Clinical, functional and histopathological staging were done depending upon definite criteria. Collagen fibers were analyzed for polarizing colors and thickness. Further clinical, functional and histopathological stages as well as qualitative parameters of collagen fibers were compared. The correlation between clinical and functional staging was not significant ( P >0.05) whereas the comparison of the functional staging with histopathological staging was more reliable ( P qualitative change in the collagen fibers of OSMF patients using polarized microscopy would help to assess its role in diagnostic evaluation, to determine the prognosis of the disease as well as to provide useful predictive treatment modalities to them.

  8. [Dynamic concept of oral lichen planus. The diagnosis easy at early stages may become difficult in ancient lichen planus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Tommaso; Küffer, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic concept of oral lichen planus. The diagnosis easy at early stages may become difficult in ancient lichen planus. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis of the skin, skin appendages and mucous membranes, which frequently affects the oral mucosa. Its aetiology still remains unknown, and currently accepted pathogenesis is that of an autoimmune cell-mediated disease. To the contrary of skin lichen planus, oral lichen planus is a long-term chronic disease with dynamic evolution, in which progressive and profound changes of the clinical and histopathological aspects occur over time and under the influence of various exogenous factors. By convention, in the history of the oral lichen planus four successive stages can be distinguished without well-defined boundaries between them. These stages can be defined as an initial phase; a long intermediate phase with alternating periods of activity and quiescence, which has a gradually increasing risk of malignant transformation; a late stage which activity is traditionally diminished; and a post-lichen cicatricial stage with an absent or negligible and undetectable activity, often undiagnosed because clinically unrecognized; in this stage, the lesion does not respond to usual treatments, but retains the same risk of malignant transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. T1N0 to T2N0 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Glottic Larynx Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the glottic larynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 585 patients with T1N0 to T2N0 invasive SCCA of the glottic larynx treated between 1964 and 2006 with RT alone. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up, had histologic diagnosis of invasive SCCA, and received continuous-course RT. None of these patients received chemotherapy or had elective nodal RT. The probabilities of local control (LC), ultimate LC, ultimate LC with larynx preservation, neck control, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median follow-up for survivors was 12 years. Five-year LC rates were as follows: T1A, 94%; T1B, 93%; T2A, 80%; and T2B, 70%. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall treatment time greater than 41 days (p = 0.001) and poorly differentiated histology (p = 0.016) adversely affected LC. Five-year rates of ultimate LC with laryngeal preservation were: T1A, 95%; T1B, 94%, T2A, 81%; and T2B, 74%. Twenty-four (4%) of 585 patients failed in the neck; only 7 neck failures (1%) were isolated. Five-year CSS and OS rates were as follows: T1A, 97% and 82%; T1B, 99% and 83%; T2A, 94% and 76%; and T2B, 90% and 78%, respectively. Ten (1.7%) patients had severe and/or fatal complications. One patient died of a radiation-induced carotid artery angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Based on our study results, RT cures a high proportion of patients with T1N0 to T2N0 glottic SCCAs and has a low rate of severe complications.

  10. Stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.; Coste, A.; Martin, M.; Levy, C.; Raynal, M.; Pavlovitch, J.M.; Peynegre, R.; Perquin, B.; Bourgeois, J.P. le

    1991-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 233 evaluable patients with stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by definitive brachytherapy. Minimum follow-up is 3 years. Treatment of the neck was chosen by a multidisciplinary team, according to age, medical status and availability for follow-up. One hundred and ten patients (47 percent) underwent elective neck dissection (END), 28 (25 percent) had positive nodes and received neck irradiation post-operatively. One hundred and twenty-three patients (53 percent) were regularly followed up only, with therapeutic neck dissection (TND) reserved for cases of node relapses. In the END group, there were 19 neck relapses (17 percent): 12/60 (20 percent) in patients with mobile tongue carcinoma and 7/50 (14 percent) in patients with floor of the mouth carcinoma. Salvage treatment was successful in 13-21 (62 percent) cases. Ten-year survival is 37 percent for the END-group and 31 percent for the TND group. Tumour stage and infiltration into underlying tissues increased the probability of neck relapse and death. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that patients treated in the TND group had a higher probability of death than patients treated in the END group (p<0.04). (author). 30 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  11. Expression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme in the tissue samples of patients with various clinicopathological stages of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Aruldoss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 enzyme in the tissue samples of patients with various clinicopathological stages of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Materials and Methods: The samples for the study were divided into 4 groups. Group A comprised 20 healthy individuals with no habits. Twenty healthy individuals with habitual tobacco usage and no oral lesions were included in Group B. Twenty cases of leukoplakia diagnosed clinically and histopathologically were included in Group C. Staging was done using the modified classification and staging system of oral leukoplakia. Twenty cases of OSCC diagnosed clinically and histopathologically were included in Group D. Immunohistochemical staining was done on these 80 samples (paraffin blocks for COX-2 expression by indirect method using polymer based Horseradish peroxidase system. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman′s rank correlation test. Results: Significant and proportional increase of COX-2 staining was noted with the increase in the severity of dysplasia. Eighty percent of OSCC expressed COX-2, increasing in its intensity of staining with the decrease in differentiation. Seventy five percent of leukoplakia showed positive COX-2 expression. Only 15% of positive controls were COX-2 positive. No normal mucosa showed positive expression of COX-2. Conclusion: High expression of COX-2 is seen in advanced stages of leukoplakia and OSCC. Hence, COX-2 enzyme increases cell proliferation, promotes angiogenesis and inhibits immune surveillance in carcinogenesis; it can be an early detection marker in oral leukoplakia and a prognostic marker of OSCC.

  12. The relevance of uniform reporting in oral leukoplakia: Definition, certainty factor and staging based on experience with 275 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, E.R.E.A.; Baart, J.A.; Bloemena, E.; Karagozoglu, H.; van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the definition of oral leukoplakia, proposed by the WHO in 2005 and taking into account a previously reported classification and staging system, including the use of a Certainty factor of four levels with which the diagnosis of leukoplakia can be

  13. Safety, pharmacokinetic, and efficacy studies of oral DB868 in a first stage vervet monkey model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available There are no oral drugs for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness. A successful oral drug would have the potential to reduce or eliminate the need for patient hospitalization, thus reducing healthcare costs of HAT. The development of oral medications is a key objective of the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development (CPDD. In this study, we investigated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of a new orally administered CPDD diamidine prodrug, 2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868; CPD-007-10, in the vervet monkey model of first stage HAT. DB868 was well tolerated at a dose up to 30 mg/kg/day for 10 days, a cumulative dose of 300 mg/kg. Mean plasma levels of biomarkers indicative of liver injury (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase were not significantly altered by drug administration. In addition, no kidney-mediated alterations in creatinine and urea concentrations were detected. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma confirmed that DB868 was orally available and was converted to the active compound DB829 in both uninfected and infected monkeys. Treatment of infected monkeys with DB868 began 7 days post-infection. In the infected monkeys, DB829 attained a median C(max (dosing regimen that was 12-fold (3 mg/kg/day for 7 days, 15-fold (10 mg/kg/day for 7 days, and 31-fold (20 mg/kg/day for 5 days greater than the IC50 (14 nmol/L against T. b. rhodesiense STIB900. DB868 cured all infected monkeys, even at the lowest dose tested. In conclusion, oral DB868 cured monkeys with first stage HAT at a cumulative dose 14-fold lower than the maximum tolerated dose and should be considered a lead preclinical candidate in efforts to develop a safe, short course (5-7 days, oral regimen for first stage HAT.

  14. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.; Schuller, A.A.; Huse, S.M.; Montijn, R.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years) in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial

  15. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.; Schuller, A.A.; Huse, S.M.; Montijn, R.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years) in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial

  16. Influence of Educational Level, Stage, and Histological Type on Survival of Oral Cancer in a Brazilian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Thinali Sousa; de Barros Silva, Paulo Goberlânio; Sousa, Eric Fernandes; da Cunha, Maria do PSS; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate associated with oral cancer is estimated at approximately 12,300 deaths per year, and the survival rate is only 40% to 50% for diagnosed patients and is closely related to the duration of time between disease perception and its diagnosis and treatment. Socioeconomic risk factors are determinants of the incidence and mortality related to oral cancer. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 573 records of patients with oral cancer at Haroldo Juaçaba Hospital – Cancer Institute of Ceará from 2000 to 2009 to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic factors on survival and epidemiological behavior of this neoplasia in a Brazilian population. In this study, patients with oral cancer were males greater than 60 years of age, presented squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of mouth and were characterized by low education levels. A total of 573 lesions were found in oral cavities. Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that the histological type, tumor stage, and low degree of education significantly influenced survival. A lower patient survival rate was correlated with a more advanced stage of disease and a worse prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a higher mortality when compared with other histological types of malign neoplasia. PMID:26817864

  17. Exploring the oral microbiota of children at various developmental stages of their dentition in the relation to their oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montijn Roy C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of the relation of commensal microbiota to health is essential in preventing disease. Here we studied the oral microbial composition of children (N = 74, aged 3 - 18 years in natural transition from their deciduous to a permanent dentition and related the microbial profiles to their oral health status. The microbial composition of saliva was assessed by barcoded pyrosequencing of the V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16 S rRNA, as well as by using phylogenetic microarrays. Results Pyrosequencing reads (126174 reads, 1045 unique sequences represented 8 phyla and 113 higher taxa in saliva samples. Four phyla - Firmicutes, Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria - predominated in all groups. The deciduous dentition harboured a higher proportion of Proteobacteria (Gammaproteobacteria, Moraxellaceae than Bacteroidetes, while in all other groups Bacteroidetes were at least as abundant as Proteobacteria. Bacteroidetes (mainly genus Prevotella, Veillonellaceae family, Spirochaetes and candidate division TM7 increased with increasing age, reflecting maturation of the microbiome driven by biological changes with age. Microarray analysis enabled further analysis of the individual salivary microbiota. Of 350 microarray probes, 156 gave a positive signal with, on average, 77 (range 48-93 probes per individual sample. A caries-free oral status significantly associated with the higher signal of the probes targeting Porphyromonas catoniae and Neisseria flavescens. Conclusions The potential role of P. catoniae and N. flavescens as oral health markers should be assessed in large-scale clinical studies. The combination of both, open-ended and targeted molecular approaches provides us with information that will increase our understanding of the interplay between the human host and its microbiome.

  18. The role of lymphoscintigraphy, sentinel mode biopsy and positron emission tomography in the staging of the neck in early oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Nicholas Charles

    This thesis explores the limitations of current imaging modalities in the evaluation of the clinically node negative (N0) neck in early oral squamous cell carcinoma and evaluates the utility of two new interventions. It will become evident that the use of clinical parameters and conventional imaging to detect clinically occult cervical lymph node metastases is an imprecise science. The presence of metastases in the neck is the single most important determinant of survival. Hitherto the lack of timely intervention in this regard may have been contributory in amplifying their effect upon survival. There is an obvious requirement for a more accurate technique to stage the neck in this patient group. Therefore the application of lymphoscintigraphy in combination with sentinel node biopsy (SNB), and positron emission tomography (PET) have been investigated. It appears that PET, whilst having a number of useful roles in the generic head and neck oncology patient, has little to contribute in the diagnosis of occult neck disease. In contra-distinction lymphoscintigraphy and SNB are not only feasible in the diagnosis of occult metastases, but also enhance our knowledge of lymphatic drainage from the oral cavity. This has, in some circumstances, led to the modification of initially prescribed treatment plans. Such is the current pace of technological advance that over the course of this research an entirely new imaging modality has emerged - PET/CT. Whilst it has not been possible to apply this retrospectively to the original patient population early experience of this novel technique in head and neck malignancy is explored and reported. The results of these initial applications are encouraging.

  19. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity in an HIV-positive patient: staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Lisbona, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity is a very rare and only recently recognized entity that has been identified almost exclusively in HIV-infected individuals. It has a predilection for the oral cavity, often exhibits very aggressive behavior and has a poor prognosis. The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of HIV-associated lymphomas is a recent development, and its use in the staging of plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity has not been previously reported. This rare report highlights the usefulness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the staging of plasmablastic lymphoma of the oral cavity

  20. Side-effects of oral misoprostol in the third stage of labour – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postpartum blood loss in the first hour was measured by collection in a special ... of postpartum oral misoprostol 600 Jlg with shivering, pyrexia and hypertension. ... as for the trend towards increased abdominal pain, may be secondary to the ...

  1. End Stage Renal Disease: Not a Contraindication for Minor Oral Surgery-Protocol for the Management of Oral Surgery patients with ESRD on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendem, Sneha; Lakshmi Narayana, G; Ravi, Poornima

    2017-06-01

    To describe a safe and effective protocol for the management of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing minor oral surgery. A prospective cohort study was conducted on all patients with ESRD who were referred for dental consultation. A definite protocol was designed in consultation with the nephrologist to minimize the risk of bleeding and wound healing complications during and after the minor surgical procedures. 36 patients consented for the protocol to be followed while 4 patients did not comply with the protocol and in 2 cases the protocol could be followed. The intra operative, post operative bleeding, and the wound healing were assessed in these patients. 36 patients had uneventful extractions as the blood pressure was brought down to pre hypertensive stage following the protocol. 4 patients who did not comply with the protocol had episodes of bleeding in the post operative period. There were two special scenarios where additional precautions had to be taken have been discussed. The wound healing was satisfactory in all these patients. The protocol discussed in this article helps us provide safe minor oral surgical treatment in patients with ESRD.

  2. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase IIb trial studies how well ACTOplus met XR works in treating in patients with stage I-IV oral cavity or oropharynx cancer that are undergoing definitive treatment. Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep oral cavity or oropharynx cancer from forming or coming back. The use of ACTOplus met XR may slow disease progression in patients with oral cavity or

  3. Prediction of lymphatic metastasis based on gene expression profile analysis after brachytherapy for early-stage oral tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Mogushi, Kaoru; Miura, Masahiko; Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Noda, Shuhei; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The management of lymphatic metastasis of early-stage oral tongue carcinoma patients is crucial for its prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of lymphatic metastasis after brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage tongue carcinoma based on gene expression profiling. Patients and methods: Pre-therapeutic biopsies from 39 patients with T1 or T2 tongue cancer were analyzed for gene expression signatures using Codelink Uniset Human 20K Bioarray. All patients were treated with low dose-rate BRT for their primary lesions and underwent strict follow-up under a wait-and-see policy for cervical lymphatic metastasis. Candidate genes were selected for predicting lymph-node status in the reference group by the permutation test. Predictive accuracy was further evaluated by the prediction strength (PS) scoring system using an independent validation group. Results: We selected a set of 19 genes whose expression differed significantly between classes with or without lymphatic metastasis in the reference group. The lymph-node status in the validation group was predicted by the PS scoring system with an accuracy of 76%. Conclusions: Gene expression profiling using 19 genes in primary tumor tissues may allow prediction of lymphatic metastasis after BRT for early-stage oral tongue carcinoma

  4. Comparison of orofacial pain of patients with different stages of precancer and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Peipei; Li, Wenlu

    2017-03-16

    Orofacial pain impairs a patient's speech, swallowing, eating and interpersonal relations. Thirty-seven patients with a premalignant oral lesion, 124 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC), and 21 patients with a recurrence of OSSC were evaluated for their orofacial pain. The University of California San Francisco Oral Cancer Pain Questionnaire was administered to these patients at their initial visit, before they were prescribed analgesics for pain and before any treatment. Significant differences with respect to orofacial pain between the groups could be evaluatedwere observed. Patients with recurrence had the highest facial pain and patients with precancer had the lowest. Patients with OSSC and recurrence of OSSC reported significant levels of orofacial pain and functional restriction because of pain. Moreover, patients with recurrence of OSSC experienced significantly higher function-related pain, rather than pain qualities. These findings suggest that an important predictor for recurrence of OSSC may be the onset of orofacial pain that is exacerbated during function. The present study examined orofacial pain depending on the disease severity of precancer and oral cancer patients. Earlier recognition of symptoms of OSSC may improve early detection of its recurrence.

  5. Is it time to incorporate 'depth of infiltration' in the T staging of oral tongue and floor of mouth cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cesare; Montalto, Nausica; Paderno, Alberto; Taglietti, Valentina; Nicolai, Piero

    2014-04-01

    To summarize recent acquisitions in three-dimensional tongue and floor of mouth anatomy that can help in better evaluation of the pathways of cancer progression within these oral subsites, thus giving some hints for refining of the current TNM staging system. The Visual Human Project is an initiative aimed at establishing a three-dimensional dataset of anatomy of two cadavers made available free to the scientific community. Visual human data have been analyzed by specific software thus improving our three-dimensional understanding of the tongue myostructure. It is already known that there is limited prognostic utility in using the two-dimensional surface diameter alone as criterion for T1-T3 definition. Recently, also the T4a categorization for the infiltration of 'deep' or extrinsic tongue muscles has been criticized. This is largely because the descriptor 'deep' does not take into account the fact that considerable portions of these muscles lie in a very superficial plane. Different prognosticators have been proposed for inclusion into the TNM staging system of oral cancer but 'depth of tumor infiltration' seems to be the most robust, universally recognized, and reproducible in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings. Oral tongue and floor of mouth cancer needs to be classified according to a revised TNM staging system in which 'depth of infiltration' should be taken into account. An 'ideal cut off' for distinguishing 'low' (T1-T2) from 'high-risk' (T3-T4) categories has been proposed based on the literature review, but needs retrospective as well as large prospective trials before its validation.

  6. HIF1-alpha overexpression indicates a good prognosis in early stage squamous cell carcinomas of the oral floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joos Ulrich

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 is a transcription factor, which plays a central role in biologic processes under hypoxic conditions, especially concerning tumour angiogenesis. HIF-1α is the relevant, oxygen-dependent subunit and its overexpression has been associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of malignant tumours. Therefore, HIF-1α expression in early stage oral carcinomas was evaluated in relation to established clinico-pathological features in order to determine its value as a prognostic marker. Methods 85 patients with histologically proven surgically treated T1/2 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the oral floor were eligible for the study. Tumor specimens were investigated by means of tissue micro arrays (TMAs and immunohistochemistry for the expression of HIF-1. Correlations between clinical features and the expression of HIF-1 were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results HIF-1α was frequently overexpressed in a probably non-hypoxia related fashion. The expression of HIF-1α was related with a significantly improved 5-year survival rate (p Conclusion HIF-1α overexpression is an indicator of favourable prognosis in T1 and T2 SCC of the oral floor. Node negative patients lacking HIF-1α expression may therefore be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  7. HIF1-alpha overexpression indicates a good prognosis in early stage squamous cell carcinomas of the oral floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillies, Thomas; Werkmeister, Richard; Diest, Paul J van; Brandt, Burkhard; Joos, Ulrich; Buerger, Horst

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor, which plays a central role in biologic processes under hypoxic conditions, especially concerning tumour angiogenesis. HIF-1α is the relevant, oxygen-dependent subunit and its overexpression has been associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of malignant tumours. Therefore, HIF-1α expression in early stage oral carcinomas was evaluated in relation to established clinico-pathological features in order to determine its value as a prognostic marker. 85 patients with histologically proven surgically treated T1/2 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral floor were eligible for the study. Tumor specimens were investigated by means of tissue micro arrays (TMAs) and immunohistochemistry for the expression of HIF-1. Correlations between clinical features and the expression of HIF-1 were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression analysis. HIF-1α was frequently overexpressed in a probably non-hypoxia related fashion. The expression of HIF-1α was related with a significantly improved 5-year survival rate (p < 0.01) and a significantly increased disease free period (p = 0.01) independent from nodal status and tumour size. In primary node negative T1/T2 SCC of the oral floor, absence of HIF-1α expression specified a subgroup of high-risk patients (p < 0.05). HIF-1α overexpression is an indicator of favourable prognosis in T1 and T2 SCC of the oral floor. Node negative patients lacking HIF-1α expression may therefore be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy

  8. Curative Radiation Therapy for T2N0M0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Kyu; Kim, Jae Choel

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Surgery is the treatment of choice for resectable non-small cell lung cancer. For patients who are medically unable to tolerate a surgical resection or who refuse surgery, radiation therapy is an acceptable alternative. A retrospective analysis of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with curative radiation therapy was performed to determine the results of curative radiation therapy and patterns of failure, and to identify factors that may influence survival. Materials and Methods : From 1986 through 1993, 39 patients with T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer were treated with curative radiation therapy at department of radiation oncology, Kyungpook national university hospital All patients were not candidates for surgical resection because of either patient refusal (16 patients), poor pulmonary function (12 patients), old age (7 patients), poor performance (2 patients) or coexisting medical disease (2 patients). Median age of patients was 67 years. Histologic cell type was squamous cell carcinoma in 1. All patients were treated with megavoltage irradiation and radiation dose raged from 5000cGy to 6150 cGy with a median dose of 600cGy. The median follow-up was 17 months with a range of 4 to 82 months. Survival was measured from the date therapy initiated. Results : The overall survival rate for entire patients was 40.6% at 2 years and 27.7% at 3 years, with a median survival time of 21 months he disease-free survival at 2 and 3 years was 51.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Of evaluable 20 Patients with complete response, 15 Patients were considered to have failed. Of these, 13 patients showed local failure and 2 patients failed distantly. Response to treatment (p=0.0001), tumor size (p=0.0019) and age p=0.0247) were favorably associated with overall survival. Only age was predictive for disease-free survival (p=0.0452). Conclusion : Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for small (less than 3 cm) tumors, and should be offered as an

  9. Superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for stage III/IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity: Midterm results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, I.; Korogi, Y.; Ishii, A.; Hirai, T.; Yamura, M.; Nishimura, R.; Baba, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Shinohara, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We performed superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (SIC) according to a protocol in which drug distribution is evaluated by the use of interventional radiology (IVR)-computed tomography (CT) system, and the chemotherapy is combined with medium-dose conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We analyzed retrospectively the factors that affect the midterm survival ratio, including local response, for stage III and IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Materials and methods: Forty consecutive patients with stage III and IV squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and who had undergone both SIC and CRT were enrolled. A microcatheter was placed in the appropriate feeding artery of the tumor and cisplatin (50 mg/body) was infused twice. CRT was administered with a dual-energy (4 and 10 MV) linear accelerator. The total and daily doses delivered were 30 and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Histopathologic effects were classified into five grades: grade 0 or 1 was defined as a poor response, and grade II or higher as a good response. Age, sex, stage, local response to treatment, mode of invasion and lymph node metastasis were analyzed, and differences in the midterm survival ratio were assessed. Results: The 3-year survival ratio of the 40 cases was 67%. A good local response (III or IV) was achieved in 75% of the cases. The survival ratio of the good local response group was significantly better than that of the poor response group (p = 0.04). Mode of invasion (p = 0.03) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.01) were also predictive of survival. In the multivariable analysis of survival, however, no variables including good local response (p = 0.12), were predictive. Conslusion: Our new protocol improved local response, but it did not contribute to the survival ratio

  10. Stimuli-disassembling gold nanoclusters for diagnosis of early stage oral cancer by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo; Ingato, Dominique; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping; Kwon, Young Jik

    2018-01-01

    A key design consideration in developing contrast agents is obtaining distinct, multiple signal changes in diseased tissue. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been developed as contrast agents due to their strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This study aims to demonstrate that stimuli-responsive plasmonic Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) can be used as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting early-stage cancer. Au NPs were clustered via acid-cleavable linkers to synthesize Au NCs that disassemble under mildly acidic conditions into individual Au NPs, simultaneously diminishing SPR effect (quantified by scattering intensity) and increasing Brownian motion (quantified by Doppler variance). The acid-triggered morphological and accompanying optico-physical property changes of the acid-disassembling Au NCs were confirmed by TEM, DLS, UV/Vis, and OCT. Stimuli-responsive Au NCs were applied in a hamster check pouch model carrying early-stage squamous carcinoma tissue. The tissue was visualized by OCT imaging, which showed reduced scattering intensity and increased Doppler variance in the dysplastic tissue. This study demonstrates the promise of diagnosing early-stage cancer using molecularly programmable, inorganic nanomaterial-based contrast agents that are capable of generating multiple, stimuli-triggered diagnostic signals in early-stage cancer.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. The role of whole-body FDG-PET in preoperative assessment of tumor staging in oral cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasone, Yoshiki; Inoue, Tomio; Oriuchi, Noboru; Negishi, Akihide; Endo, Keigo; Mogi, Kenji [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2001-12-01

    diagnostic tool for the evaluation of tumor staging in patients with oral cancer. Tumor staging by whole-body FDG-PET may, in fact, supplement the conventional staging by means of CT/MRI and physical findings. (author)

  12. Performance characteristics and physiological response of broiler chickens at finisher stage to oral supplementation with fluted pumpkin, Telfairia occidentalis leaf extract

    OpenAIRE

    Olufemi ALABI; Mathew AYOOLA; Oyebola AKINOSO

    2017-01-01

    The performance characteristics and physiological response of broiler chickens to oral supplementation with Telfairia occidentalis leaf extract (TOLE) at finisher stage were investigated. One hundred and twenty unsexed broilers of Arbor Acre strain at 28-day-old were randomly divided into four treatment groups of oral supplementation each with three replicates. The treatment groups are: T1=Water (control), T2=Vitalyte, T3=15% TOLE, and T4=30% TOLE. The experiment lasted for 70 days, during wh...

  13. Need for intensive histopathologic analysis to determine lymph node metastases when using sentinel node biopsy in oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive value of sentinel node biopsy (SNB)-assisted neck dissection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stage T1 to 2N0M0 and to determine the incidence of subclinical metastases. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Fifty-one patients...... feasible in identifying subclinical metastasis, thus accurately staging the neck with a high degree of sensitivity in patients with oral SCC T1 to 2N0M0 when additional histopathology was performed. The vast majority of patients in this study would have been spared selective neck dissection had reliance...... dissection in patients with oral SCC....

  14. Comparison of Oral Contrast-Enhanced Transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging With Transverse Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography in Preoperative Tumor Staging of Advanced Gastric Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Sun, Jing; Huang, Xiaoling; Zeng, Chun; Ge, Yinggang; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Jingxian

    2017-12-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic performance of transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging for preoperative tumor staging of advanced gastric carcinoma by comparing it with transverse contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 42 patients with advanced gastric cancer who underwent laparoscopy, radical surgery, or palliative surgery because of serious complications and had a body mass index of less than 25 kg/m 2 . A cereal-based oral contrast agent was used for transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced US. Retrospective analyses were conducted using preoperative tumor staging data acquired by either transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced US or transverse contrast-enhanced CT. Both contrast-enhanced US and contrast-enhanced CT examinations were reviewed by 2 experienced radiologists independently for preoperative tumor staging according to the seventh edition of the TNM classification. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated by comparing the results of contrast-enhanced US and contrast-enhanced CT with pathologic findings. The overall accuracies of the imaging modalities were compared by the McNemar test. No significant difference was noted in the overall accuracy of transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced US (86% [36 of 42]) and transverse contrast-enhanced CT (83% [35 of 42] P > .999). For stage T2 to T4 gastric cancer, the accuracies of transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced US were 88%, 86%, and 98%, respectively, and those of transverse contrast-enhanced CT were 93%, 83%, and 90%. The overall accuracy of transabdominal oral contrast-enhanced US was comparable with that of transverse contrast-enhanced CT for preoperative tumor staging of advanced gastric cancer. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Return probabilities for the reflected random walk on N_0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essifi, R.; Peigné, M.

    2015-01-01

    Let \\((Y_n)\\) be a sequence of i.i.d. \\(\\mathbb{Z }\\)-valued random variables with law \\(\\mu \\). The reflected random walk \\((X_n)\\) is defined recursively by \\(X_0=x \\in \\mathbb{N }_0, X_{n+1}=\\vert X_n+Y_{n+1}\\vert \\). Under mild hypotheses on the law \\(\\mu \\), it is proved that, for any \\( y \\in

  16. In vivo effect of single oral dose of artemether against early juvenile stages of Schistosoma mansoni Egyptian strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Beshbishi, Samar N; Taman, Amira; El-Malky, Mohamed; Azab, Manar S; El-Hawary, Amira K; El-Tantawy, Dina A

    2013-10-01

    The current treatment and control of schistosomiasis, rely on a single drug, praziquantel, although, it has minor activity against juvenile stages of the parasite. Studies have shown that artemether (ART) exhibits effects against juveniles of Schistosoma mansoni Liberian and Puerto Rican strains, Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma haematobium. Aiming to assess the in vivo activity of single oral dose of ART against early juvenile stages of S. mansoni Egyptian strain, this study was established. Mice were treated with ART (400 mg/kg) at two time points evenly spaced over the period of larval development (7 and 21 days post-infection; pi), and a third treatment point (day 49 pi) was included to elucidate when susceptibility decreases. Administration of ART on day 7 pi reduced the total worm burden by 85.94%. The greatest reductions were seen when treatment was given on day 21 pi, with total and female worm burden reductions of 91.52% and 90.57%, respectively, and cessation of oviposition. Similar dose given on day 49 pi reduced total worm burden by 55.17% and female worm burden by 66.51%. Moreover, it induced significant reduction in the tissue egg load and significant alterations in the oogram pattern with decreased immature eggs and increased dead eggs. Antipathological activities were evident in significant reductions in granulomata count and diameter. In conclusion, ART exhibits major in vivo schistosomicidal effects against the early larval migratory stages of S. mansoni Egyptian strain, mainly the 21-day old schistosomula, hence preventing disease progression and morbidity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of whole-body FDG-PET in preoperative assessment of tumor staging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Yoshiki; Inoue, Tomio; Oriuchi, Noboru; Negishi, Akihide; Endo, Keigo; Mogi, Kenji; Takeuchi, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    evaluation of tumor staging in patients with oral cancer. Tumor staging by whole-body FDG-PET may, in fact, supplement the conventional staging by means of CT/MRI and physical findings. (author)

  18. Observation and explanation of the JET n=0 chirping mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, C.J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]. E-mail: christopher.boswell@navy.mil; Berk, H.L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1060 (United States); Borba, D.N. [Centro de Fusao Nuclear Associacao Euratom-IST, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049001 Lisbon (Portugal); EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Johnson, T. [Alfven Laboratory, KTH, Euratom-VR Association (Sweden); Pinches, S.D. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sharapov, S.E. [Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-09

    Persistent rapid up and down frequency chirping modes with a toroidal mode number of zero (n=0) have been observed in the JET tokamak when energetic ions, with a mean energy {approx}500keV, were created by high field side ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating. This heating method enables the formation of an energetically inverted ion distribution function that allows ions to spontaneously excite the observed instability, identified as a global geodesic acoustic mode. The interpretation is that phase space structures form and interact with the fluid zonal flow to produce the pronounced frequency chirping.

  19. Oral cancer trends in a single head-and-neck cancer center in the Netherlands; decline in T-stage at the time of admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, M.; Leemans, C.R.; Aartman, I.H.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated the possible epidemiologic changes of oral cancer patients in the Netherlands between the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004. We specifically studied the differences in male-female ratio, age, TNM-stage, site distribution, and alcohol and tobacco use. MATERIALS AND

  20. Treatment results of Stage I and II oral tongue cancer with interstitial brachytherapy: maximum tumor thickness is prognostic of nodal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Kanji; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Fujita, Minoru; Akagi, Yukio; Ito, Katsuhide

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic importance of T classification and maximum tumor thickness (MTT) on the treatment results of Stage I and II oral tongue cancer treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1981 and December 1993, 173 cases were eligible for this retrospective analysis. Of 173 patients, 75 were classified as Stage I and 98 as Stage II: maximum tumor length ranged from 6 to 40 mm. MTT, which ranged from 2 to 38 mm, was measured with ultrasonography and/or palpation. Brachytherapy was performed with iridium hairpins or radium needles following external irradiation in 66 patients, or exclusively in 107 patients. Results: The 5-year local recurrence rates were Stage I, 7%; Stage II, 22%; MTT < 8 mm, 8%; and MTT ≥ 8 mm, 28%. The 5-year regional recurrence rates were Stage I, 15%; Stage II, 29%; MTT < 8 mm, 18%; and MTT ≥ 8 mm, 31%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence rates of the patients with Stage I and MTT < 8 mm of the brachytherapy only group were significantly better than those of Stage II and MTT ≥ 8 mm (5% and 6% vs. 16% and 24%). The 5-year regional recurrence rates of the patients with Stage I and MTT < 8 mm of the brachytherapy-only group were significantly better than those of Stage II and MTT ≥ 8 mm (14% and 16% vs. 34% and 46%). There was no significant difference in the 5-year regional recurrence rates between the two groups of Stage I and Stage II, MTT < 8 mm. However, there was a significant difference in the 5-year regional recurrence rates between the two groups of MTT ≥ 8 mm (p < 0.005). Conclusions: For patients with Stage I and II oral tongue cancer, tumor thickness as well as T classification were prognostic for nodal metastasis and prognosis. Patients with MTT ≥ 8 mm are more likely to fail in the neck region. These findings suggest that MTT should be considered along with T stage in determining strategies for Stage I and II oral tongue cancer

  1. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  2. Explanation of the JET n=0 chirping mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Boswell, C.J.; Borba, D.; Figueiredo, A.C.A.; Nave, M.F.F.; Johnson, T.; Pinches, S.D.; Sharapov, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Persistent rapid up and down frequency chirping modes with a toroidal mode number of zero (n=0) are observed in the JET tokomak when energetic ions, in the range of several hundred keV, are created by high field side ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating. Fokker-Planck calculations demonstrate that the heating method enables the formation of an energetically inverted ion distribution which supplies the free energy for the ions to excite a mode related to the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The large frequency shifts of this mode are attributed to the formation of phase space structures whose frequencies, which are locked to an ion orbit bounce resonance frequency, are forced to continually shift so that energetic particle energy can be released to counterbalance the energy dissipation present in the background plasma. (author)

  3. Definitive radiation therapy for clinical stage N0-N1 epidermoid carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Furuta, Masaya; Niibe, Hideo

    1993-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 94 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the lung without mediastinal nodal involvement were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV X-rays and the mediastinum was treated in 86% of the patients. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 80 Gy with once-daily conventional fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 44% and 22%, respectively, with a median survival time (MST) of 17 months. Patients with a performance status of 0-1 lived longer than those with a status of 2 or more (MST 22.5 vs. 12 months). The survival of 60 patients with T2 tumors was better than that of 24 patients with T3 tumors (MST 19 vs. 13.5 months). Forty-seven patients with tumors less than 5 cm in diameter had a two-year progression rate of 25%, in comparison with 39% for 47 patients with tumors greater than 5 cm. The survival difference between these two groups was statistically significant (p<0.01). Patients given a total dose of 80 Gy or over had only 20% local progression at the time of the last follow-up, but they had a lower long-term survival rate than those given a total dose of 60-74 Gy because of the development of pulmonary insufficiency after high-dose irradiation. There was no relapse in the field given 40 Gy or more to the mediastinum for prophylaxis in the patients with no evidence of primary progression. The actuarial five-year survival rates for the patients given 40 Gy or more to the mediastinum, and for the patients given less than 40 Gy were 32% and 9%, respectively. These was a statistically significant difference between these two survival curves, (p<0.05). Differences in survival did not depend on age, sex, or location of the primary tumor. These results should provide support for definitive RT to manage patients with medically inoperable or unresectable epidermoid carcinoma of the lung without mediastinal nodal involvement. (author)

  4. Proteomics-based investigation of multiple stages of OSCC development indicates that the inhibition of Trx-1 delays oral malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xijuan; Hu, Qinchao; Wu, Tong; Wang, Chunyang; Xia, Juan; Yang, Linglan; Cheng, Bin; Chen, Xiaobing

    2018-03-01

    The majority of cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) develop from oral potentially malignant disorders, which have been confirmed to be involved in chronic oxidative stimulation. However, no effective treatment approaches have been used to prevent the development of dysplasia into cancerous lesions thus far. In the present study, a well-established OSCC model was used to detect proteomics profiles at different stages during oral malignant transformation. Of the 15 proteins that were found to be upregulated in both the dysplasia and carcinoma stages, the oxidative stress-associated proteins, thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), glutaredoxin-1 and peroxiredoxin-2 were note as the proteins with significant changes in expression Trx-1 was identified to be the most significantly upregulated protein in the precancerous stage. Validation experiments confirmed that Trx-1 was overexpressed both in dysplasia and cancerous tissue samples, and the inhibition of Trx-1 was able to promote the apoptosis of OSCC cells under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the experimental application of a Trx-1-specific inhibitory agent in an animal model led to a lower cancerization rate and a delay in tumor formation. The possible mechanisms were associated with the increased apoptosis via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that Trx-1 may be an important target for delaying oral malignant transformation, which provides a novel therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of OSCC.

  5. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  6. Angiolymphatic invasion as a prognostic fator in resected N0 pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ricardo Vitor Silva de; Pacheco, Adhemar Monteiro; Silva, Rodrigo Altenfelder; Moricz, André de; Campos, Tércio de

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the worst digestive cancers. Surgical resection is the main target when treating a patient with curative intent. To assess angiolymphatic invasion as a prognostic factor in resected pN0 pancreatic cancer. Thirty-eight patients were submitted to pancreatoduodenectomy due to head pancreatic cancer. Tumor size, margins, lymph nodes, pTNM staging, angiolymphatic and perineural invasion were described in the pathologists' reports. Most patients were female. Overall median survival was 13 months. Gemcitabine was the regimen of choice for chemotherapy in selected patients; however, it did not improve overall survival. pR0 resection had better survival compared with pR1. Within the pN0 group, survival was significantly better in patients without angiolymphatic invasion. Angiolymphatic invasion in N0 pancreatoduodenectomy can be demonstrated by the Hematoxylin-Eosin stain and may predict a poor prognosis factor for those patients. Adenocarcinoma pancreático continua sendo um dos piores cânceres do aparelho digestivo. A ressecção cirúrgica é o principal objetivo quando se trata de intenção curativa. Avaliar a invasão angiolinfática como um fator prognóstico no câncer da cabeça do pâncreas ressecado pN0. Trinta e oito pacientes foram submetidos a duodenopancreatectomia por câncer da cabeça do pâncreas. Tamanho do tumor, margens, linfonodos, estadiamento pTNM, invasão angiolinfática e perineural foram descritos nos laudos anatomopatológicos. A maioria foi de mulheres. A sobrevida mediana global foi de 13 meses. Gencitabina foi a droga de escolha para quimioterapia nos pacientes selecionados, entretanto não aumentou a sobrevida global. Pacientes com ressecção pR0 tiveram sobrevida global superior quando comparados com ressecção pR1. Dentro do grupo de pacientes com pN0, a sobrevida foi significativamente melhor no grupo de pacientes que não apresentavam invasão angiolinfática. A invasão angiolinfática da

  7. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP) using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery for stage III and IV oral cancer. Possibility of organ preservation in advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2006-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via the superficial temporal artery has become feasible for daily concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. This novel method was used for oral cancer, and its efficacy was evaluated. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (Docetaxel (DOC) total 60 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin (CDDP) total 100 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent radiotherapy (total 40 Gy) for four weeks as preoperative therapy. Thirty-four patients with stage III and IV oral cancer received surgery after this treatment, and pathological CR was obtained in 31 patients (91%). The possibility of organ preservation for advanced oral cancer was evaluated from this result. Patients with oral cancer stage III and IV were treated for four-week daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the clinical response was evaluated after treatment. Clinical CR of primary sites was obtained in 15 patients, and the same treatment was continued one or two weeks. Thirteen patients (80%) were disease-free in the primary sites, and two (20%) relapsed. Two patients died of distant metastasis, and one died of local recurrence. This method can preserve organs and minimize functional disturbance, thus contributing to patient QOL. (author)

  8. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with S-1 in patients with stage III-IV oral squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective analysis of nodal classification based on the neck node level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ryuji; Semba, Akiko; Kawahara, Kenta; Matsuyama, Keiya; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nagata, Masashi; Toya, Ryo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Nakayama, Hideki

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the treatment outcomes of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, for advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The study population consisted of 47 patients with clinical stage III or IV oral SCC, who underwent CCRT with S-1. Pretreatment variables, including patient age, clinical stage, T classification, midline involvement of the primary tumor and nodal status, were analyzed as predictors of survival. In addition to the N classification (node-positive, multiple and contralateral), the prognostic impact of the level of nodal involvement was assessed. Nodal involvement was mainly observed at levels Ib and II; involvement at levels Ia and III-V was considered to be anterior and inferior extension, respectively, and was recorded as extensive nodal involvement (ENI). The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 37 and 27%, respectively. A finding of ENI was a significant factor for OS [hazard ratio (HR)=2.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-4.55; P=0.038] and PFS (HR=2.65; 95% CI: 1.32-5.33; P=0.005); the 3-year OS and PFS rates in patients with vs. those without ENI were 23 vs. 50% and 9 vs. 43%, respectively. The other variables were not significant. Therefore, CCRT with S-1 may be an alternative treatment for advanced oral SCC; favorable outcomes are expected in patients without ENI.

  9. Chemotherapy of second stage human African trypanosomiasis: comparison between the parenteral diamidine DB829 and its oral prodrug DB868 in vervet monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness ranks among the most neglected tropical diseases based on limited availability of drugs that are safe and efficacious, particularly against the second stage (central nervous system [CNS] of infection. In response to this largely unmet need for new treatments, the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development developed novel parenteral diamidines and corresponding oral prodrugs that have shown cure of a murine model of second stage HAT. As a rationale for selection of one of these compounds for further development, the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intramuscular (IM active diamidine 2,5-bis(5-amidino-2-pyridylfuran (DB829; CPD-0802 and oral prodrug2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868 were compared in the vervet monkey model of second stage HAT. Treatment was initiated 28 days post-infection of monkeys with T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. Results showed that IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, 5 mg/kg/day every other day for 5 doses, or 2.5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days cured all monkeys (5/5. Oral DB868 was less successful, with no cures (0/2 at 3 mg/kg/day for 10 days and cure rates of 1/4 at 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days and 20 mg/kg/day for 10 days; in total, only 2/10 monkeys were cured with DB868 dose regimens. The geometric mean plasma Cmax of IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg following the last of 5 doses was 25-fold greater than that after 10 daily oral doses of DB868 at 20 mg/kg. These data suggest that the active diamidine DB829, administered IM, should be considered for further development as a potential new treatment for second stage HAT.

  10. Antimalarial Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles: Lead Optimization, Parasite Life Cycle Stage Profile, Mechanistic Evaluation, Killing Kinetics, and in Vivo Oral Efficacy in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kawaljit; Okombo, John; Brunschwig, Christel; Ndubi, Ferdinand; Barnard, Linley; Wilkinson, Chad; Njogu, Peter M; Njoroge, Mathew; Laing, Lizahn; Machado, Marta; Prudêncio, Miguel; Reader, Janette; Botha, Mariette; Nondaba, Sindisiwe; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Lauterbach, Sonja; Churchyard, Alisje; Coetzer, Theresa L; Burrows, Jeremy N; Yeates, Clive; Denti, Paolo; Wiesner, Lubbe; Egan, Timothy J; Wittlin, Sergio; Chibale, Kelly

    2017-02-23

    Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on the recently identified pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole (PBI) antimalarials have led to the identification of potent, metabolically stable compounds with improved in vivo oral efficacy in the P. berghei mouse model and additional activity against parasite liver and gametocyte stages, making them potential candidates for preclinical development. Inhibition of hemozoin formation possibly contributes to the mechanism of action.

  11. Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer: Analysis of therapeutic results in 112 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Oguri, Senri; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Koike, Izumi; Hata, Masaharu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with stage III or IV oral cancer treated with retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Materials and methods: One hundred and twelve patients with stage III and IV oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Catheterization from the superficial temporal and occipital arteries was performed. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total of 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10–76 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, primary site complete response was achieved in 98 (87.5%) of 112 cases. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.3% and 79.3%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included mucositis in 92.0%, neutropenia in 30.4%, dermatitis in 28.6%, anemia in 26.8%, and thrombocytopenia in 7.1% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 72.3%, nausea/vomiting in 21.4%, fever in 8.0%, and renal failure in 0.9% of patients. Conclusion: Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer provided good overall survival and local control

  12. Performance characteristics and physiological response of broiler chickens at finisher stage to oral supplementation with fluted pumpkin, Telfairia occidentalis leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi ALABI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance characteristics and physiological response of broiler chickens to oral supplementation with Telfairia occidentalis leaf extract (TOLE at finisher stage were investigated. One hundred and twenty unsexed broilers of Arbor Acre strain at 28-day-old were randomly divided into four treatment groups of oral supplementation each with three replicates. The treatment groups are: T1=Water (control, T2=Vitalyte, T3=15% TOLE, and T4=30% TOLE. The experiment lasted for 70 days, during which data collection was carried out and blood obtained for analysis at the 70th day. Results revealed that average body weight gain, average daily feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were significantly (P0.05 affected by oral TOLE. Measured blood parameters of the groups on TOLE were significantly (P0.05 by the oral supplementations. Apart from creatinine, uric acid and globulin, other serum metabolites investigated were significantly (P<0.05 affected by TOLE inclusions. No mortality was recorded during the experiment. Oral supplementation of TOLE compared well with conventional vitamin supplement based on measured parameters, 30% supplementation can be used as vitamin supplement in broiler chicken at finisher phase.

  13. Comparative study: Oral mucosal lesions, signs and symptoms in diabetes mellitus patients with end stage renal disease with analogous findings in diabetes mellitus patients with non-end stage renal disease

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    Balasubramani Senthil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare oral signs, symptoms and oral lesions type and prevalence, in end stage renal disease (ESRD with non-end stage renal disease (NESRD in diabetes mellitus (DM patients. Methodology: Two groups of DM patients were studied, Group 1 includes 100 patients with ESRD, who were under hemodialysis therapy, and Group 2 includes100 patients with NESRD whose serum creatinine level is <2.0 mg/dl. The DM status and other laboratory investigations were recorded, with the patients consent and thorough oral examination was performed and the findings were recorded. All the data were entered into Microsoft Excel sheets. Statistical analysis including Pearson's correlation analysis, Chi-square test, and t-test were done using SPSS software SYSTAT version 7.0. Results: On thorough clinical examination, the prevalence of oral lesions was found to be higher in ESRD patients. The most common lesions such as saburral tongue (P ≤ 0.002, petechiae/ecchymoses (P ≤ 0.000, pale mucosa (P ≤ 0.000, stomatitis medicamentosa (P ≤ 0.043 fissured tongue, smooth tongue, candidiasis, dry and fissured lips, angular cheilitis, uremic stomatitis, signs such as uremic fetor (P ≤ 0.000, xerostomia and symptoms like burning tongue, unpleasant taste are noted. Conclusion: The high prevalence of uremic fetor, saburral tongue, pale mucosa, and petechiae/ecchymoses in ESRD patient group can be considered as a possible sign of undiagnosed advanced stage of renal disease in other diabetic patients.

  14. Comparison of health-related quality of life of patients with different precancer and oral cancer stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Majeed; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Rana, Madiha

    2015-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) informations are becoming an important tool for the treatment concept for cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the quality of life depends on the disease severity of pre- and oral cancer patients and which factors influence their quality of life. During this study, 106 patients with a premalignant oral lesion, 174 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC) as well as 21 patients with a recurrence of OSSC were asked about their oral health-related quality of life. Additionally, the UW-QOLv4 was used to record the psychological and clinical symptoms from which the patients of the three groups are suffering. Significant differences with respect to oral HR-QoL of life between the groups could be evaluated. Patients with a recurrence have the lowest and patients with precancer the highest HR-QoL. Within the groups, there is a difference regarding the significance of the psychological factors. The lowest values were achieved for mood within all three groups. Anxiety is of key importance for the precancer group whereas appearance and activity are of importance for the patients having a tumor. The patients of the recurrence group are heavily affected by all factors. The quality of life differs depending on the disease. The patients of the recurrence group have the lowest oral health-related quality of life for all aspects analyzed, and they are suffering the most with respect to the psychological dimensions of the UW-QOLv4. The present study examined the quality of life depending on the severity of the disease of pre- and oral cancer patients and which factors significantly influenced their quality of life. The evaluated findings of relevant variables may have therapeutic relevance for the multidisciplinary treatment of oral cancer patients in the future.

  15. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma

  16. Can neck irradiation be an alternative to neck dissection in early stage carcinoma oral tongue operated for primary alone? Experience from a single institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Ghoshal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study pattern of failure, locoregional control rates (LCR and disease free survival (DFS in post-operative patients of carcinoma oral tongue, and to study the impact of nodal dissection on DFS in stage I and II patients.Methods: 102 patients of carcinoma oral tongue treated between January 2009 and December 2013 were analyzed. All patients were operated for primary disease, but neck dissection was done in 78 (76.5% patients only. However, radiation to primary site along with neck region was received by all patients. Pattern of failure, LCR and DFS were estimated.Results: At median follow up of 12 months, 10.8% patients failed locally, 10.8% in nodal region, 2.9% both at local and nodal site, and 5.9% patients failed distally. 2 year LCR and DFS was 71.2%, 90.9%, 79.5%, 0% and 55.2%, 64.4%, 57.8%, 0% in stage I, II, III, IV respectively. 2 year DFS in stage I patients, who underwent nodal dissection and post-operative radiation (14 patients was 64.3% and in whom only neck irradiation was done (15 patients, it was 45.8%, however difference was not significant (p = 0.5. But in stage II patients, 33 patients who underwent nodal dissection and post-operative radiation, 2 year DFS was 85.4% and it was 21.4% in 7 patients who underwent neck radiation only, and difference showed trend towards significance (p = 0.05. 2 or more positive lymph nodes post dissection was the only poor prognostic factor that correlated with DFS (p = 0.02Conclusion: While in stage I, neck irradiation alone can be a possible alternative to neck dissection and post-operative radiation; for stage II, neck dissection is mandatory.

  17. Expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha in early-stage and in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Maisa; Teixeira, Sarah R; Azevedo, Monarko N; Fraga, Ailton C; Gontijo, Antônio Pm; Vêncio, Eneida F

    2017-04-01

    To investigate hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha expression in distinct oral squamous cell carcinoma subtypes and topographies and correlate with clinicopathological data. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 93 cases of OSCC. Clinical and histopathological data were reviewed from medical records. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha status was distinct according to tumor location, subtype and topography affect. In superficial oral squamous cell carcinomas, most tumor cells overexpressed hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha, whereas hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha was restricted to the intratumoral region in conventional squamous cell carcinomas. All basaloid squamous cell carcinomas exhibited downregulation of hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha. Interestingly, metastatic lymph nodes (91.7%, p = 0.001) and the intratumoral regions of corresponding primary tumors (58.3%, p = 0.142) showed hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha-positive tumor cells. Overall survival was poor in patients with metastatic lymph nodes. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha has distinct expression patterns in different oral squamous cell carcinoma subtypes and topographies, suggesting that low oxygen tension promotes the growth pattern of superficial and conventional squamous cell carcinoma, but not basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Indeed, a hypoxic environment may facilitate regional metastasis, making it a useful diagnostic and prognostic marker in primary tumors.

  18. Pharmacology of DB844, an orally active aza analogue of pafuramidine, in a monkey model of second stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available Novel drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis (HAT are still urgently needed despite the recent addition of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT to WHO Model Lists of Essential Medicines against second stage HAT, where parasites have invaded the central nervous system (CNS. The pharmacology of a potential orally available lead compound, N-methoxy-6-{5-[4-(N-methoxyamidino phenyl]-furan-2-yl}-nicotinamidine (DB844, was evaluated in a vervet monkey model of second stage HAT, following promising results in mice. DB844 was administered orally to vervet monkeys, beginning 28 days post infection (DPI with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense KETRI 2537. DB844 was absorbed and converted to the active metabolite 6-[5-(4-phenylamidinophenyl-furanyl-2-yl]-nicotinamide (DB820, exhibiting plasma C(max values of 430 and 190 nM for DB844 and DB820, respectively, after the 14th dose at 6 mg/kg qd. A 100-fold reduction in blood trypanosome counts was observed within 24 h of the third dose and, at the end of treatment evaluation performed four days post the last drug dose, trypanosomes were not detected in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of any monkey. However, some animals relapsed during the 300 days of post treatment monitoring, resulting in a cure rate of 3/8 (37.5% and 3/7 (42.9% for the 5 mg/kg×10 days and the 6 mg/kg×14 days dose regimens respectively. These DB844 efficacy data were an improvement compared with pentamidine and pafuramidine both of which were previously shown to be non-curative in this model of CNS stage HAT. These data show that synthesis of novel diamidines with improved activity against CNS-stage HAT was possible.

  19. Elevated S100A9 expression in tumor stroma functions as an early recurrence marker for early-stage oral cancer patients through increased tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment and interleukin-6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Liu, Chiang-Shin; Kuo, Yi-Zih; Wang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Kung-Chao; Tsai, Sen-Tien; Chang, Mei-Zhu; Lin, Siao-Han; Wu, Li-Wha

    2015-09-29

    S100A9 is a calcium-binding protein with two EF-hands and frequently deregulated in several cancer types, however, with no clear role in oral cancer. In this report, the expression of S100A9 in cancer and adjacent tissues from 79 early-stage oral cancer patients was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Although S100A9 protein was present in both tumor and stromal cells, only the early-stage oral cancer patients with high stromal expression had reduced recurrence-free survival. High stromal S100A9 expression was also significantly associated with non-well differentiation and recurrence. In addition to increasing cell migration and invasion, ectopic S100A9 expression in tumor cells promoted xenograft tumorigenesis as well as the dominant expression of myeloid cell markers and pro-inflammatory IL-6. The expression of S100A9 in one stromal component, monocytes, stimulated the aggressiveness of co-cultured oral cancer cells. We also detected the elevation of serum S100A9 levels in early-stage oral cancer patients of a separate cohort of 73 oral cancer patients. The release of S100A9 protein into extracellular milieu enhanced tumor cell invasion, transendothelial monocyte migration and angiogenic activity. S100A9-mediated release of IL-6 requires the crosstalk of tumor cells with monocytes through the activation of NF-κB and STAT-3. Early-stage oral cancer patients with both high S100A9 expression and high CD68+ immune infiltrates in stroma had shortest recurrence-free survival, suggesting the use of both S100A9 and CD68 as poor prognostic markers for oral cancer. Together, both intracellular and extracellular S100A9 exerts a tumor-promoting action through the activation of oral cancer cells and their associated stroma in oral carcinogenesis.

  20. Split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, and cisplatin for distant metastases of oesophageal cancer stage IVb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwase H

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, together with cisplatin in patients with distant oesophageal cancer stage IVb metastasis. Methods: Forty-one patients with distant oesophageal cancer metastasis and performance status 0 or 1 received split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and cisplatin. All 41 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy comprised two courses of 30-Gy radiotherapy over three weeks plus daily oral S-1 (70mg/m2/day for two weeks and a 24 h cisplatin infusion (70mg/m2 on Day 8, with a two week interval between the two courses. Results: The most frequent adverse events (AEs were grade 3 and 4 neutropenia (29.2%, thrombocytopenia (9.8%, and anaemia (7.3%. Non-haematological AEs were generally mild. AEs in the initial course of chemoradiotherapy remitted during the second interval week. Overall, the complete response rate was 22.0% and endoscopic complete response rate for primary lesion was 65.9%. Thirty-one patients (75.6% became asymptomatic and regained normal swallowing function. The overall median survival time was 12 months. Conclusion: This retrospective investigation showed that split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and cisplatin had an encouraging safety profile together with good efficacy. Potentially, this regimen may become a standard for distant metastasis of oesophageal cancer stage IVb.

  1. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  2. Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4: Efficacy, Safety, and Effect on Serum Calcification Propensity—A Prospective Randomized Double-Blinded Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Bressendorff

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: Oral Mg supplementation was safe and well tolerated in CKD stages 3 and 4 and improved T50, but did not increase intracellular Mg. Further studies are needed to investigate the long-term effects of Mg supplementation in CKD stage 3 and 4 and whether improvement in calcification propensity is related to clinical endpoints.

  3. A phase II study of cisplatin, oral administration of etoposide, OK-432 and radiation therapy for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshinao; Takahashi, Jutaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of giving cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432 concurrently with conventional radiotherapy (RTx) for patient's with inoperable stage III, based on the TNM classification according to the International Union against Cancer staging system for lung cancer (1987) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 1992 to December 1994, 31 patients with cytologically or histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC were treated with RTx, to a total dose of 56-64 Gy, with concurrent daily oral administration of etoposide (25 mg) and cisplatin (20 mg) for 5 days during the third or fourth week from the start of RTx. The subcutaneous injection of 1 or 2 KE of OK-432, three times a week, for the duration of radiotherapy also started from the beginning of RTx. The number of eligible patients was 29 (26 men and 3 women). Their mean age was 66 years (range, 55-77 years). Six patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) of 0; 15, 1; 8; 2. Three were stage IIIA, and 26, stage IIIB. Histologically, 2 had adenocarcinoma, 23, squamous cell carcinoma, and 4, large cell carcinoma. In 27 of the 29 patients, the RTx schedule was completed. There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 4 toxicity (according to World Health Organisation criteria) leukopenia (700/μl) was observed in 1 patient. The response rate was 79% and the median survival was 17 months. Survival rates at 1, 2 and 3 years were 62%, 31%, and 21%, respectively. The local failure rate was 51%. The combination of cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432, given concurrently with conventional RTx is feasible and effective for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (author)

  4. Managing oral phosphate binder medication expenditures within the Medicare bundled end-stage renal disease prospective payment system: economic implications for large U.S. dialysis organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haesuk; Rascati, Karen L; Keith, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    From January 2016, payment for oral-only renal medications (including phosphate binders and cinacalcet) was expected to be included in the new Medicare bundled end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS). The implementation of the ESRD PPS has generated concern within the nephrology community because of the potential for inadequate funding and the impact on patient quality of care. To estimate the potential economic impact of the new Medicare bundled ESRD PPS reimbursement from the perspective of a large dialysis organization in the United States. We developed an interactive budget impact model to evaluate the potential economic implications of Medicare payment changes to large dialysis organizations treating patients with ESRD who are receiving phosphate binders. In this analysis, we focused on the budget impact of the intended 2016 integration of oral renal drugs, specifically oral phosphate binders, into the PPS. We also utilized the model to explore the budgetary impact of a variety of potential shifts in phosphate binder market shares under the bundled PPS from 2013 to 2016. The base model predicts that phosphate binder costs will increase to $34.48 per dialysis session in 2016, with estimated U.S. total costs for phosphate binders of over $682 million. Based on these estimates, a projected Medicare PPS $33.44 reimbursement rate for coverage of all oral-only renal medications (i.e., phosphate binders and cinacalcet) would be insufficient to cover these costs. A potential renal drugs and services budget shortfall for large dialysis organizations of almost $346 million was projected. Our findings suggest that large dialysis organizations will be challenged to manage phosphate binder expenditures within the planned Medicare bundled rate structure. As a result, large dialysis organizations may have to make treatment choices in light of potential inadequate funding, which could have important implications for the quality of care for patients

  5. Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx: Radiotherapy vs. Trans-Oral Robotic Surgery (ORATOR) – study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Anthony C; Kuruvilla, Sara; Chen, Jeff; Corsten, Martin; Odell, Michael; Eapen, Libni; Theurer, Julie; Doyle, Philip C; Wehrli, Bret; Kwan, Keith; Palma, David A; Yoo, John; Hammond, J Alex; Fung, Kevin; Winquist, Eric; Read, Nancy; Venkatesan, Varagur; MacNeil, S Danielle; Ernst, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has markedly increased over the last three decades due to newly found associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Primary radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice for OPSCC at most centers, and over the last decade, the addition of concurrent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival, but at the cost of increased acute and late toxicity. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has emerged as a promising alternative treatment, with preliminary case series demonstrating encouraging oncologic, functional, and quality of life (QOL) outcomes. However, comparisons of TORS and RT in a non-randomized fashion are susceptible to bias. The goal of this randomized phase II study is to compare QOL, functional outcomes, toxicity profiles, and survival following primary RT (± chemotherapy) vs. TORS (± adjuvant [chemo] RT) in patients with OPSCC. The target patient population comprises OPSCC patients who would be unlikely to require chemotherapy post-resection: Tumor stage T1-T2 with likely negative margins at surgery; Nodal stage N0-2, ≤3 cm in size, with no evidence of extranodal extension on imaging. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio between Arm 1 (RT ± chemotherapy) and Arm 2 (TORS ± adjuvant [chemo] RT). In Arm 1, patients with N0 disease will receive RT alone, whereas N1-2 patients will receive concurrent chemoradiation. In Arm 2, patients will undergo TORS along with selective neck dissections, which may be staged. Pathologic high-risk features will be used to determine the requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is QOL score using the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), with secondary endpoints including survival, toxicity, other QOL outcomes, and swallowing function. A sample of 68 patients is required. This study, if successful, will provide a much-needed randomized comparison of the conventional strategy of primary RT

  6. Ten-year clinico-statistical study of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shinjiro; Kawabe, Ryoichi; Chikumaru, Hiroshi; Saito, Tomokatsu; Hirota, Makoto; Miyake, Tetsumi; Omura, Susumu; Fujita, Kiyohide

    2003-01-01

    This clinico-statistical study includes 232 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma that underwent radical treatment in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Hospital, during the decade from 1991 to 2000. Surgery was principally adopted as the first line for treatment in 199 cases, and radiotherapy in 33 cases. The 5-year overall survival rate was 73.4%. The results according to stage were as follows: stage I, 87.5%; Stage II, 77.9%; Stage III, 63.5%; and Stage IV A, 44.7%. The primary sites were classified as follows: upper gingiva, 85.2%; tongue, 73.7%; floor of mouth, 68.9%; lower gingiva, 66.3%; buccal mucosa, 63.9%; and hard palate, 50%. For tongue cancer, the 5-year overall survival rates by stage were: Stage I, 90.8%; Stage II, 82.1%; Stage III, 40.3%; and Stage IV A, 45.7%. Statistical significance was seen between cases of Stages I and II and those of Stages III and IV A stage. For lower gingival cancer, the 5-year overall survival rates by stage were: Stage I, 90.8%; Stage II, 82.1%; Stage III, 40.3%; and Stage IV A, 45.7%. Even in Stage I lower gingival cancers had unfavorable clinical outcomes. Preventive neck dissections were performed on 52 N 0 neck patients, but clinically negative nodes however showed metastasis in 14 patients (26.9%). (author)

  7. Tumor budding is a strong and reproducible prognostic marker in T3N0 colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Lai Mun

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor budding along the advancing front of colorectal adenocarcinoma is an early event in the metastatic process. A reproducible, prognostic budding scoring system based on outcomes in early stage colorectal cancer has not been established. DESIGN: One hundred twenty-eight T3N0M0 colorectal carcinoma patients with known outcome were identified. Tumor budding was defined as isolated tumor cells or clusters of <5 cells at the invasive tumor front. Tumor bud counts were generated in 5 regions at 200x by 2 pathologists (conventional bud count method). The median bud count per case was used to divide cases into low (median=0) and high budding (median > or =1) groups. Forty cases were reevaluated to assess reproducibility using the conventional and a novel rapid bud count method. RESULTS: Fifty-seven (45%) carcinomas had high and 71 (55%) had low budding scores. High budding was associated with an infiltrative growth pattern (P<0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P=0.005). Five-year cancer-specific survival was significantly poorer in high compared with low budding groups: 63% versus 91%, respectively, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis demonstrated tumor budding to be independently prognostic (hazard ratio=4.76, P<0.001). Interobserver agreement was at least equivalent comparing the conventional to the rapid bud count methods: 87.5% agreement (kappa=0.75) versus 92.5% agreement (kappa=0.85), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor budding is a strong, reproducible, and independent prognostic marker of outcome that is easily assessed on hematoxylin and eosin slides. This may be useful for identifying the subset of T3N0M0 patients at high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  8. Survival of T4aN0 and T3N+ laryngeal cancer patients: a retrospective institutional study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoueir, Nadim; Matar, Nayla; Farah, Chadi; Francis, Evana; Tabchy, Bassam; Haddad, Amine

    2015-01-01

    We aim to assess the correlation of tumor and nodal staging to survival in pT3N+ and T4aN0 laryngeal cancer with subgroup analysis within stage IVa (pT4N0 and pT3N2). Retrospective cohort study with systematic review of the literature. Hotel Dieu de France University Hospital (tertiary referral center). Laryngeal cancer patients' registries were reviewed from 1998 to 2012 selecting pT3N+ and pT4aN0 patients treated by primary total layngectomy. Overall survivals were compared using Log rank and Kaplan-Meier analysis. A systematic review was performed by 2 reviewers including all the articles reporting the outcome of these categories of patients. Online databases, including PubMed and EMBASE, were used. Reference sections of identified studies were examined for additional articles. Thirteen T3N+ patients and 19 T4aN0 patients treated by primary total laryngectomy were included. Five-year overall survival for T3N+, T3N2 and T4aN0 was respectively 33%, 32.1% and 73.7%. Due to the small sample, the difference was not significant. The systematic review revealed three articles reporting overall survival outcome for the T4N0 group and 6 articles for the T3N+. At 5years, the survival ranged from 62.5% to 73% in T4N0 and from 32.2% to 77% in T3N+. In advanced stage laryngeal cancer, T4aN0 tends toward a better survival than T3N+ especially when compared to T3N2 although they are grouped in the same TNM stage IVa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a New Outcome Prediction Model in Early-stage Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Based on Histopathologic Parameters With Multivariate Analysis: The Aditi-Nuzhat Lymph-node Prediction Score (ANLPS) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Aditi; Husain, Nuzhat; Bansal, Ankur; Neyaz, Azfar; Jaiswal, Ritika; Jain, Kavitha; Chaturvedi, Arun; Anand, Nidhi; Malhotra, Kiranpreet; Shukla, Saumya

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the histopathologic parameters that predict lymph node metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to design a new assessment score on the basis of these parameters that could ultimately allow for changes in treatment decisions or aid clinicians in deciding whether there is a need for close follow-up or to perform early lymph node dissection. Histopathologic parameters of 336 cases of OSCC with stage cT1/T2 N0M0 disease were analyzed. The location of the tumor and the type of surgery used for the management of the tumor were recorded for all patients. The parameters, including T stage, grading of tumor, tumor budding, tumor thickness, depth of invasion, shape of tumor nest, lymphoid response at tumor-host interface and pattern of invasion, eosinophilic reaction, foreign-body giant cell reaction, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion, were examined. Ninety-two patients had metastasis in lymph nodes. On univariate and multivariate analysis, independent variables for predicting lymph node metastasis in descending order were depth of invasion (P=0.003), pattern of invasion (P=0.007), perineural invasion (P=0.014), grade (P=0.028), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.038), lymphoid response (P=0.037), and tumor budding (P=0.039). We designed a scoring system on the basis of these statistical results and tested it. Cases with scores ranging from 7 to 11, 12 to 16, and ≥17 points showed LN metastasis in 6.4%, 22.8%, and 77.1% of cases, respectively. The difference between these 3 groups in relation to nodal metastasis was very significant (P<0.0001). A patient at low risk for lymph node metastasis (score, 7 to 11) had a 5-year survival of 93%, moderate-risk patients (score, 12 to 16) had a 5-year survival of 67%, and high-risk patients (score, 17 to 21) had a 5-year survival of 39%. The risk of lymph node metastasis in OSCC is influenced by many histologic parameters that are not routinely analyzed in

  10. Calculations of long-range three-body interactions for He(n0λS )-He(n0λS )-He(n0'λL )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pei-Gen; Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Babb, James F.

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically investigate long-range interactions between an excited L -state He atom and two identical S -state He atoms for the cases of the three atoms all in spin-singlet states or all in spin-triplet states, denoted by He(n0λS )-He(n0λS )-He(n0'λL ), with n0 and n0' principal quantum numbers, λ =1 or 3 the spin multiplicity, and L the orbital angular momentum of a He atom. Using degenerate perturbation theory for the energies up to second-order, we evaluate the coefficients C3 of the first-order dipolar interactions and the coefficients C6 and C8 of the second-order additive and nonadditive interactions. Both the dipolar and dispersion interaction coefficients, for these three-body degenerate systems, show dependences on the geometrical configurations of the three atoms. The nonadditive interactions start to appear in second-order. To demonstrate the results and for applications, the obtained coefficients Cn are evaluated with highly accurate variationally generated nonrelativistic wave functions in Hylleraas coordinates for He(1 1S ) -He(1 1S ) -He(2 1S ) , He(1 1S ) -He(1 1S ) -He(2 1P ) , He(2 1S ) -He(2 1S ) -He(2 1P ) , and He(2 3S ) -He(2 3S ) -He(2 3P ) . The calculations are given for three like nuclei for the cases of hypothetical infinite mass He nuclei, and of real finite mass 4He or 3He nuclei. The special cases of the three atoms in equilateral triangle configurations are explored in detail, and for the cases in which one of the atoms is in a P state, we also present results for the atoms in an isosceles right triangle configuration or in an equally spaced collinear configuration. The results can be applied to construct potential energy surfaces for three helium atom systems.

  11. [Case report: a recurrent gastric cancer in the terminal stage, associated with obstructive jaundice which responded significantly to oral administration of TS-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaka, K; Tomofuzi, Y; Sugihara, Z; Fukuda, H

    2001-10-01

    TS-1, a novel oral formation of 5-fluorouracil that consists of 1M tegafur (5-FU), 0.4M CDHP and 1M Oxo, is reported to achieve a higher response rate of 49% in patients with advanced gastric cancer in a late phase II study. We report a case of recurrent gastric cancer that responded significantly to the short-term administration of TS-1. A 73-year-old man, who had undergone a curative distal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy 2 years earlier, had presented with obstructive jaundice resulting from cancerous lymphadenopathy. PTCD was performed for drainage, but cholestasis disappeared completely through the two courses of oral administration of TS-1. The serum level of transaminase and bilirubin remained within normal limits, even with PTCD unequipped, until the patient died of the original disease. The adverse effects observed with the drug were anemia (grade 1) and skin pigmentation (grade 2), both of which improved soon after discontinuing the medication. In conclusion, TS-1 may be well-tolerable and effective in some cases of terminal-stage and/or recurrent gastric cancer, especially those associated with obstructive jaundice arising from the cancerous lymphadenopathy, in that patient QOL can be maintained to a much greater extent.

  12. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery. Preoperative therapy for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Mitsudo, Kenji; Nishiguchi, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2005-01-01

    Recently, daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal arterial artery is attracting attention. The catheter with curved tip is inserted superselectively to the feeding artery of the tumor via the superficial temporal artery, allowing long-term catheterization. Forty-one patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy/4 weeks) and superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using docetaxel (total dose: 60 mg/m 2 , 15 mg/m 2 /week) and cisplatin (total dose: 100 mg/m 2 , 5 mg/m 2 /day) were concurrently performed daily, followed by surgery. In 35 patients, intra-arterial infusion was successful (success rate: 85.4%) and no major complication was observed. The clinical effects were complete response (CR) in 29 patients (82.9%), and pathological effects of resected tumor after surgery were pathological CR in 31 (88.6%). This method promises to be a new strategy of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  13. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine on Liver Functions after Transarterial Chemoembolization in Intermediate-Stage HCC Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE is usually followed by hepatic dysfunction. We evaluated the effects of L-carnitine on post-TACE impaired liver functions. Methods. 53 cirrhotic hepatocellular carcinoma patients at Osaka Medical College were enrolled in this study and assigned into either L-carnitine group receiving 600 mg oral L-carnitine daily or control group. Liver functions were evaluated at pre-TACE and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after TACE. Results. The L-carnitine group maintained Child-Pugh (CP score at 1 week after TACE and exhibited significant improvement at 4 weeks after TACE (P<0.01. Conversely, the control group reported a significant CP score deterioration at 1 week (P<0.05 and 12 weeks after TACE (P<0.05. L-carnitine suppressed serum albumin deterioration at 1 week after TACE. There were significant differences between L-carnitine and control groups regarding mean serum albumin changes from baseline to 1 week (P<0.05 and 4 weeks after TACE (P<0.05. L-carnitine caused prothrombin time improvement from baseline to 1, 4 (P<0.05, and 12 weeks after TACE. Total bilirubin mean changes from baseline to 1 week after TACE exhibited significant differences between L-carnitine and control groups (P<0.05. The hepatoprotective effects of L-carnitine were enhanced by branched chain amino acids combination. Conclusion. L-carnitine maintained and improved liver functions after TACE.

  14. Oral Therapy, Microbiological Findings, and Comorbidity Influence the Outcome of Prosthetic Joint Infections Undergoing 2-Stage Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Tiziana; Pagliano, Pasquale; Balato, Giovanni; Mariconda, Massimo; Rotondo, Renato; Esposito, Silvano

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate potential predictive factors of an unfavorable outcome in patients with prosthetic joint infection (PJI) undergoing 2-stage exchange. Patients with PJI undergoing 2-stage exchange and observed over a 5-year period (2009-2013) were included. Cure was defined by the disappearance of infection after a 96-week follow-up period. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test, the Fisher exact test, and the multivariate analysis. One-hundred twenty-two patients with PJI were included (median age, 69 years [range, 36-80 years]; 48% males, 47 hip PJI, and 75 knee PJI). Known comorbidities related to an increased risk of infection were reported in 43 patients (35%). Microbiological definition was obtained in 101 (83%) patients, and Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 44 (36%) patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 41 (34%) patients. A favorable outcome was obtained in 102 of 122 patients (84%). After univariate analysis, bacterial growth from operative specimens (P = .007), growth of Gram-positive bacteria (P rate can be reduced with appropriate treatment choices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Salivary mRNA markers having the potential to detect oral squamous cell carcinoma segregated from oral leukoplakia with dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Evangelia; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Chatzopoulou, Fani; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos; Antoniadis, Konstantinos; Kouidou, Sofia; Markopoulos, Anastasios; Antoniades, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    In the current study the presence of extracellular IL-1B, IL-8, OAZ and SAT mRNAs in the saliva was evaluated as a tool in the early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma. 34 patients with primary oral squamous cell carcinoma stage T1N0M0/T2N0M0, 20 patients with oral leukoplakia and dysplasia (15 patients with mild dysplasia and 5 with severe dysplasia/in situ carcinoma) and 31 matched healthy-control subjects were included in the study. The presence of IL-1B, IL-8, OAZ and SAT mRNA was evaluated in extracellular RNA isolated from saliva samples using sequence-specific primers and real-time RT-PCR. ROC curve analysis was used to estimate the ability of the biomarkers to detect oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The data reveal that the combination of these four biomarkers provides a good predictive probability of up to 80% (AUC=0.799, p=0.002) for patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma but not patients suffering from oral leukoplakia with dysplasia. Moreover, the combination of only the two biomarkers (SAT and IL-8) also raises a high predictive ability of 75.5% (AUC=0.755, p=0.007) approximately equal to the four biomarkers suggesting the use of the two biomarkers only in the prediction model for oral squamous cell carcinoma patients limiting the economic and health cost in half. SAT and IL-8 mRNAs are present in the saliva in high quality and quantity, with a good discriminatory ability for oral squamous cell carcinoma patients only but not for patients with oral leukoplakia and dysplasia an oral potentially malignant disorder. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Active stabilization of n=0 and n=1 modes in the TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F.; Tonetti, G.; Ward, D.J.; Gribov, Yu.

    1991-04-01

    The limits of operation of an elongated tokamak are generally defined by axisymmetric (n=0), free-boundary n=1, and ballooning modes. While it has become common practice to stabilize n=0 modes by a combination of passive and active systems, very few experiments have been done so far to investigate active stabilization of n=1 modes. In this paper, we discuss the possibilities for acitive stabilization of n=0 and n=1 in the TCV tokamak. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  17. Civil liability - aspects of the law n0 6.453 of 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, L.M.G. da

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear damage liability in the Brazilian legal scope is discussed. The law n 0 6.453 of september 1977, which characterizes the nuclear activities criminal illicits and prescribes the correspondent penalties, is analysed. (A.L.) [pt

  18. Risk Factors Associated with Disease Recurrence in Patients with Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Treated with Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anisha R; Greskovich, John F; Han, Jaehong; Reddy, Chandana A; Nwizu, Tobenna I; Khan, Mumtaz F; Scharpf, Joseph; Adelstein, David J; Burkey, Brian B; Koyfman, Shlomo A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify variables associated with high risk of failure in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCC-OC). This retrospective study included 191 patients with stage III-IVb SCC-OC treated with post-operative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) between 1995 and 2013. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed; variables associated with inferior DFS were identified. Seventy-five patients (39%) recurred. DFS and five-year OS were 52% and 54%, respectively. Poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.03), recurrent tumors (p=0.02) and high nodal ratio (p=0.02) were associated with an increased risk of recurrence. CRT was associated with improved DFS in patients with positive margins and/or extracapsular extension (p=0.021). Tumors that are recurrent, high grade, or have high nodal ratio are at risk of recurrence. Presence of these disease features should be taken into consideration for better risk stratification. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Interstitial brachytherapy for stage I and II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue: factors influencing local control and soft tissue complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Minoru; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Kashiwado, Kouzo; Akagi, Yukio; Kashimoto, Kazuki; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Kanji; Ito, Katsuhide

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to study the treatment parameters that influence local control and soft tissue complications (STC) in a series of 207 Stage I and II squamous cell carcinomas of the oral tongue treated by interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) alone (127 patients), or by a combination using external beam irradiation (EBI) (80 patients) between 1980 and 1993. Methods and Materials: The patient distribution was 93 T1, 72 T2a, and 42 T2b. The prescribed BRT dose at the plane 5 mm from the plane of the radioactive sources was 65-70 Gy in BRT alone, and 50-60 Gy in the combined treatment using EBI. Generally, an EBI dose of 30 Gy was used. No prophylactic neck treatment was performed. Results: The 5-year local recurrence-free rate for T1, T2a, and T2b was 92.9%, 81.9%, and 71.8%, respectively (p 85 Gy (p = 0.01), BRT dose > 55 Gy (p = 0.04), and a dose rate = 0.6 Gy/h was significantly related to more STC in BRT alone (p = 0.03), and that a dose rate > = 0.55 Gy/h (p 70 Gy (p 100 Gy (p 85 Gy and 55 Gy and < = 70 Gy, and < 0.55 Gy/h, respectively. We also recommend longer follow-up periods; more than 5 years might be necessary for late local recurrences and for secondary cancers

  20. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3 + apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB + interneurons, although the number of reelin + interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of cholinergic

  1. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshinori [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB{sup +} interneurons, although the number of reelin{sup +} interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of

  2. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. GILT - A randomised phase III study of oral vinorelbine and cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy followed by either consolidation therapy with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin or best supportive care alone in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Wuerzburg (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [University Hospital Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M), Munich (Germany); Engel-Riedel, Walburga [University Hospital Merheim, Dept. of Pneumonology, Cologne (Germany); Andreas, Stefan [Dept. of Pneumonology, Immenhausen (Germany); Kollmeier, Jens [Helios Emil-von-Behring Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Municipal Hospital Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Dickgreber, Nicolas [University Hospital Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Vaissiere, Nathalie; Almeida, Cecilia de [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Edlich, Birgit [Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered standard for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consolidation chemotherapy (CC) following CRT is intended to further improve outcomes, yet studies have shown discordant results. This phase III study assessed CRT followed by best supportive care (BSC) or consolidation with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin. Patients received two cycles of oral vinorelbine (50 mg/m{sup 2} days 1, 8 and 15) + cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-4) q4w + radiotherapy (RT; 66 Gy). Patients with at least stable disease (SD) were randomised to either two cycles oral vinorelbine (60-80 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 and 8) + cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) q3w + BSC or BSC alone. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 279 patients were enrolled for CRT and 201 patients were randomised to CC or BSC. Both CRT and CC were well tolerated, with limited radiation-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC/BSC: oesophagitis-related events 12.9 %/3.1 %/0 %; grade 3 pneumonitis 0 %/0 %/2 %) and chemotherapy-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC: neutropenia 11.2 %/22.1 %; leukopenia 18.3 %/26.7 %; grade 3 nausea 5.0 %/2.3 %, grade 3 vomiting 3.2 %/3.5 %). Median PFS from randomisation was 6.4 (5.0-8.7) and 5.5 (3.8-7.4) months in the CC and BSC arms (hazard ratio, HR = 0.93 [0.69-1.26]; p = 0.63), respectively; median overall survival (OS) 20.8 (13.5-25.3) and 18.5 (13.6-24.7) months, respectively. Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT did not prolong PFS or OS. Concurrent RT with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin demonstrated a favourable safety profile and represents a suitable treatment regimen for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Simultane Radiochemotherapie (CRT) wird als Standardtherapie beim inoperablen Stadium III des nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) angesehen. Konsolidierende Chemotherapie (CC) nach der CRT zielt darauf ab, das Therapieergebnis zu verbessern, allerdings zeigen Studien

  4. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Kundel, Yulia; Purim, Ofer; Keidar, Andrei; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sadot, Eran; Fenig, Eyal; Brenner, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  6. The critical release rates for the dissociating gas N204/N02/N0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1979-03-01

    Dissociating vapour systems have certain characteristics which make them attractive as coolants, notably a large effective specific heat which is significantly greater than that for the individual components of the gas mixture, and also an enhanced boundary layer heat transfer coefficient resulting from the physical characteristics of thermal dissociation. In part these effects ensure that a dissociating gas has a greatly improved thermal capacity and heat transfer capability when compared with most inert gases. In this report the critical release rates for the dissociating vapour system N 2 0 4 -N0 2 -N0 are established, principally in the two phase region, and the thermodynamics of nitrogen tetroxide are examined. (U.K.)

  7. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in n = 0 Landau Band of Graphene with Chern Number Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Koji; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2018-06-01

    Fully taking into account the honeycomb lattice structure, fractional quantum Hall states of graphene are considered by a pseudopotential projected into the n = 0 Landau band. By using chirality as an internal degree of freedom, the Chern number matrices are defined and evaluated numerically. Quantum phase transition induced by changing a range of the interaction is demonstrated that is associated with chirality ferromagnetism. The chirality-unpolarized ground state is consistent with the Halperin 331 state of the bilayer quantum Hall system.

  8. Size-dependent concentration of N0 paramagnetic centres in HPHT nanodiamonds

    OpenAIRE

    Yavkin, Boris V; Mamin, Georgy V; Gafurov, Marat R.; Orlinskii, Sergei B.

    2015-01-01

    Size-calibrated commercial nanodiamonds synthesized by high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) technique were studied by high-frequency W and conventional X band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The numbers of spins in the studied samples were estimated. The core-shell model of the HPHT nanodiamonds was proposed to explain the observed dependence of the concentration of the N0 paramagnetic centers. Two other observed paramagnetic centers are attributed to the two types of str...

  9. Role of sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, L; Bruschini, R; Ansarin, M; Giugliano, G; De Cicco, C; Ionna, F; Paganelli, G; Maffini, F; Werner, J A; Soutar, D

    2006-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity represents about 2% of all malignant neoplasms and 47% of those developing in the head and neck area. The tongue is the most common site involved, and this incidence is increasing mainly in young people, possibly related to human papilloma virus infections. Prognosis depends on the stage: the 5-year survival rate of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, whatever the T stage, is 73% in pN0 cases, 40% in patients with positive nodes without extracapsular spread (pNl ECS-), and 29% when nodes are metastatic with extracapsular spread (pNl ECS+: p > or = 0.0001). Nodal micrometastases (cN0 pN1) are found in up to 50% of cN0 tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients operated on the neck. At present, no clinical, imaging staging modalities or biological markers are available to diagnose nodal micrometastases. The sentinel node biopsy has been tested since 1996 in order to find a solution to this problem. The sentinel node is the first node reached by the lymphatic stream, assuming an orderly and sequential drainage from the tumour site, and should be predictive of the nodal stage. According to the literature, sentinel node biopsy is a reliable technique in selected cN0 cases, but the procedure is still experimental and should not be performed outside validation trials. Successful application of sentinel node biopsy in the head and neck region requires surgical experience and specific technical devices, including pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intra-operative gamma-probe. Moreover, dynamic lymphoscintigraphy seems to be able to show the lymphatic stream from the primary tumour and could allow a selective neck dissection to be tailored thus reducing the related morbidity.

  10. Lymph Node Yield as a Predictor of Survival in Pathologically Node Negative Oral Cavity Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Aaron; Kedarisetty, Suraj; Raju, Sharat; Orosco, Ryan; Coffey, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Even after a pathologically node-negative (pN0) neck dissection for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), patients may develop regional recurrence. In this study, we (1) hypothesize that an increased number of lymph nodes removed (lymph node yield) in patients with pN0 oral SCC predicts improved survival and (2) explore predictors of survival in these patients using a multivariable model. Case series with chart review. Administrative database analysis. The SEER database was queried for patients diagnosed with all-stage oral cavity SCC between 1988 and 2009 who were determined to be pN0 after elective lymph node dissection. Demographic and treatment variables were extracted. The association of lymph node yield with 5-year all-cause survival was studied with multivariable survival analyses. A total of 4341 patients with pN0 oral SCC were included in this study. The 2 highest lymph node yield quartiles (representing >22 nodes removed) were found to be significant predictors of overall survival (22-35 nodes: hazard ratio [HR] = 0.854, P = .031; 36-98 nodes: HR = 0.827, P = .010). Each additional lymph node removed during neck dissection was associated with increased survival (HR = 0.995, P = .022). These data suggest that patients with oral SCC undergoing elective neck dissection may experience an overall survival benefit associated with greater lymph node yield. Mechanisms behind the demonstrated survival advantage are unknown. Larger nodal dissections may remove a greater burden of microscopic metastatic disease, diminishing the likelihood of recurrence. Lymph node yield may serve as an objective measure of the adequacy of lymphadenectomy. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  11. Efficacy of a combined oral formulation of derquantel-abamectin against the adult and larval stages of nematodes in sheep, including anthelmintic-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Peter R; Hodge, Andrew; Maeder, Steven J; Wirtherle, Nicole C; Nicholas, David R; Cox, George G; Conder, George A

    2011-09-27

    Derquantel (DQL), a semi-synthetic member of a novel anthelmintic class, the spiroindoles, in combination with abamectin (ABA) [as the combination product STARTECT(®)] is a new entry for the treatment and control of parasites in sheep. The 19 studies reported herein were conducted in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom to demonstrate the efficacy of derquantel-abamectin (DQL-ABA) against a broad spectrum of gastrointestinal and respiratory nematodes of sheep, and to support registration of the combination product. Eleven studies were conducted using natural or experimental parasite infections with unknown or unconfirmed resistance, while eight studies utilised isolates/strains with confirmed or well characterised resistance to one or more currently available anthelmintics, including macrocyclic lactones. All studies included DQL-ABA and negative control groups, and in selected studies one or more reference anthelmintic groups were included. In all studies the commercial formulation of DQL-ABA was administered orally at 2mg/kg DQL and 0.2mg/kg ABA; placebo was administered in the same volume as DQL-ABA; and reference anthelmintics were administered as per label recommendations, except in one instance where levamisole was administered at twice the label dose. Infection, necropsy, worm collection and worm counting procedures were performed using standard techniques. Efficacy was calculated based on the percentage reduction in geometric mean worm count relative to negative control for each nematode species and lifecycle stage targeted. Twenty-two isolates/strains used in the eight studies targeting resistant worms had proven resistance: three to one anthelmintic class, eleven to two classes and eight to three or more classes; of these resistant strains, 16 demonstrated resistance to a macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic. Regardless of resistance status in the 19 studies, DQL-ABA controlled a broad range of economically important gastrointestinal

  12. N0/N1, PNL, or LNR? The effect of lymph node number on accurate survival prediction in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsangkar, Nakul P; Bush, Devon M; Michaelson, James S; Ferrone, Cristina R; Wargo, Jennifer A; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos; Warshaw, Andrew L; Thayer, Sarah P

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the prognostic accuracy of LN variables (N0/N1), numbers of positive lymph nodes (PLN), and lymph node ratio (LNR) in the context of the total number of examined lymph nodes (ELN). Patients from SEER and a single institution (MGH) were reviewed and survival analyses performed in subgroups based on numbers of ELN to calculate excess risk of death (hazard ratio, HR). In SEER and MGH, higher numbers of ELN improved the overall survival for N0 patients. The prognostic significance (N0/N1) and PLN were too variable as the importance of a single PLN depended on the total number of LN dissected. LNR consistently correlated with survival once a certain number of lymph nodes were dissected (≥13 in SEER and ≥17 in the MGH dataset). Better survival for N0 patients with increasing ELN likely represents improved staging. PLN have some predictive value but the ELN strongly influence their impact on survival, suggesting the need for a ratio-based classification. LNR strongly correlates with outcome provided that a certain number of lymph nodes is evaluated, suggesting that the prognostic accuracy of any LN variable depends on the total number of ELN.

  13. Monoclinic mixed crystals of halogenomethanes CBr4-nCln (n = 0, ..., 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrier, Philippe; Tamarit, Josep Ll.; Barrio, Maria; Pardo, Luis C.; Mondieig, Denise

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the isostructural relationship between the low-temperature monoclinic (C2/c, Z = 32) phases of the halogenomethane CBr 4-n Cl n (n = 0, ..., 4), a set of mixed crystals has been analysed by means of high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction. It is shown that the monoclinic structure of pure and mixed crystals does not depend of the particularities of the dipolar (or dipole induced) interactions of the pure compound, neither on the composition of the mixed crystal, but on the relative content of the halogen atoms which controls the size of the molecule or the average molecule for the case of mixed crystals

  14. Size-dependent concentration of N0 paramagnetic centres in HPHT nanodiamonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Yavkin, G.V. Mamin, M.R. Gafurov, S.B. Orlinskii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Size-calibrated commercial nanodiamonds synthesized by high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT technique were studied by high-frequency W- and conventional X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. The numbers of spins in the studied samples were estimated. The core-shell model of the HPHT nanodiamonds was proposed to explain the observed dependence of the concentration of the N0 paramagnetic centers. Two other observed paramagnetic centers are attributed to the two types of structures in the nanodiamond shell.

  15. Staging of early lymph node metastases with the sentinel lymph node technique and predictive factors in T1/T2 oral cavity cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nicklas Juel; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Hedbäck, Nora

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of detecting lymph node metastases and to identify predictive and prognostic clinicopathological factors in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). METHODS: All...

  16. Pathological analysis of the Candida albicans-infected tongue tissues of a murine oral candidiasis model in the early infection stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Miyasaka, Takahiro; Abe, Shigeru; Satoh, Tazuko

    2013-04-01

    The early pathological process of Candida infection and immunological responses in tongues of the mice with experimental oral candidiasis was analysed. CD-1 mice, pretreated by prednisolone were orally inoculated with Candida albicans. Symptoms were monitored by measuring the area of white tongue coating and number of viable Candida cells in oral cavity. The histopathological analysis was carried by PAS-stain and immunofluorescent staining. IL-4, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, TNF-α in recovered from the homogenates of the tongues were measured by ELISA. The fungus invaded the tongue surface of the mice and white patches developed within 24h after inoculation. Histopathological examination indicated the presence of local acute inflammation in superficial tissues of tongues covered by mycelium of C. albicans. Pathological exacerbation was observed from 24 to 48 h after the inoculation and from then the symptoms of oral candidiasis appeared to move into the recovery phase. Inflammatory cells mainly consisting of neutrophils was accumulated and located under the lesions covered by Candida-hyphae. An increase in IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in tongue homogenates was observed at 48 h after inoculation. The worst condition in the pathological process in experimental oral candidiasis was found 48 h after C. albicans inoculation. When the surface of the Candida-inoculated tongues was covered with Candida-hyphae, a dense accumulation of neutrophils was observed under the lesions and homogenates of the tongues contained increased levels of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ. These suggested that local pathological condition of Candida-infected tongues may be affected by neutrophils accumulation and increased levels of some cytokines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Localization of twisted N=(0,2) gauged linear sigma models in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Closset, Cyril [Simons Center for Geometry and Physics, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Gu, Wei [Department of Physics MC 0435, Virginia Tech, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Jia, Bei [Theory Group, Physics Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78612 (United States); Sharpe, Eric [Department of Physics MC 0435, Virginia Tech, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    We study two-dimensional N=(0,2) supersymmetric gauged linear sigma models (GLSMs) using supersymmetric localization. We consider N=(0,2) theories with an R-symmetry, which can always be defined on curved space by a pseudo-topological twist while preserving one of the two supercharges of flat space. For GLSMs which are deformations of N=(2,2) GLSMs and retain a Coulomb branch, we consider the A/2-twist and compute the genus-zero correlation functions of certain pseudo-chiral operators, which generalize the simplest twisted chiral ring operators away from the N=(2,2) locus. These correlation functions can be written in terms of a certain residue operation on the Coulomb branch, generalizing the Jeffrey-Kirwan residue prescription relevant for the N=(2,2) locus. For abelian GLSMs, we reproduce existing results with new formulas that render the quantum sheaf cohomology relations and other properties manifest. For non-abelian GLSMs, our methods lead to new results. As an example, we briefly discuss the quantum sheaf cohomology of the Grassmannian manifold.

  18. Radiotherapy or surgery for T2N0M0 glottic carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalpers, L.J.A.; Daal, W.A.J. van; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Decision analysis was used to evaluate the results of treatment of T 2 N 0 M 0 glottic carcinoma as presented in the literature. Based on mean values for recurrence, salvage eligibility after recurrence and salvage success, the 5-year survival after radiotherapy and surgery proved to be almost identical, 85 and 86%. If the recurrence rates and the salvage rates were varied, a marginal advantage for surgery in small tumours and a major advantage in more extended tumours was seen if only survival is considered. To take the quality of speech into account, a utility analysis was performed. A utility scale was defined ranging from 0.0 as the value for death, to 1.0 for a successfully irradiated patient with preservation of normal speech. A utility of 0.99 or less for the laryngectomized patient would favour radiotherapy over surgery for all T 2 tumours. In patients with T 2b tumours and in extreme circumstances, e.g. if failure rates of radiotherapy are extremely low, an exact assessment of patient utilities may be pivotal. Under normal circumstances radiotherapy is preferred for T 2 N 0 M 0 glottic carcinoma if both survival and the quality of speech are taken into account. (author). 39 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer.

  1. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ({sup 60}Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  2. Laser-radiation therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toda, Yukihiro; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Ogo, Etuyo; Nakajima, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer in order to preserve the larynx. The subjects consisted of 52 patients with T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer treated with laser-radiation combined therapy between 1980 and 1999. Patients ranged in age from 40-88 years, with a median of 70 years, and included 51 men and one woman. During this period, treatment was administered with different radiation devices ( 60 Co or 4 MV-X ray), and 40-72 Gy (median, 60Gy) of radiation therapy were administered. Tumor and treatment characteristics were correlated with local control at a median follow-up of 61 months (range 12-210 months). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered to 32 patients; 29 were treated with 5-FU and vitamin A (FAR), and 3 were treated with low-dose CDDP. Post treatment vocal function was examined in 37 patients. The voice was evaluated in terms of four parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT), mean air flow rate during phonation over a comfortable duration (MFR), fundamental frequency range of phonation (F0 range), and sound pressure level range of phonation (SPL range). The five-year cause-specific-survival rate was 98.0%, and the local control rate was 91.8%. Three of 4 patients who had locally relapsed were administered total laryngectomy as salvage therapy. One patient was administered the tracheostomy for late complication. The actuarial laryngeal preservation rate was 92.3%. We did not find any significant relationship between local relapse and extent of disease, subglottic extension, or anterior commissure involvement. Concurrent chemotherapy was not a significant prognostic factor. Laser debulking followed by radiation therapy did not change the voice significantly except the F0 range. We conclude that the laser-radiation combined therapy for T2N0M0 laryngeal-glottic cancer was effective therapy for not only preservation of the voice but also for vocal function. (author)

  3. Comparison of oral and intravenous routes of administration of dipyridamole for thallium imaging of type I diabetics with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreau, R.J.; Stony, J.T.; du Cret, R.P.; Kuni, C.C.; Wang, Y.; Wilson, R.F.; Schwartz, J.F.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have frequently seen myocardial infarction after renal transplantation in patient with type I diabetes, and treadmill T1-201 testing in these patients have been inadequate. The authors evaluated dipyridamole (DP) as a substitute for treadmill stress. Because intravenous DP was not approved in the United States at the time of the study, the oral formulation wax used for some patients. The authors have prospectively evaluated 80 uremic diabetics (40 received oral T1-201; 40 received intravenous T1-201). Angiogram and scan observers were blinded. There was not difference in the accuracy of the two routes of administration. Pooling the data gave a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 79%. However, their disease prevalence was high (52%), which precluded the use of any screening test. The authors now have recommended angiography for these patients

  4. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  5. Patterns of failure and overall survival in patients with completely resected T3 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, Perry M.; Bonner, James A.; Sawyer, Timothy E.; Deschamps, Claude; Lange, Carla M.; Li Hongzhe

    1999-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer and chest wall invasion have shown conflicting results with respect to prognosis. Whether high-risk subsets of the T3 N0 M0 population exist with respect to patterns of failure and overall survival has been difficult to ascertain, owing to small numbers of patients in most series. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed to determine patterns of failure and overall survival for patients with completely resected T3 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer. From 1979 to 1993, 92 evaluable patients underwent complete resection for T3 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer. The following potential prognostic factors were recorded from the history: tumor size, location, grade, histology, patient age, use of adjuvant radiation therapy (18 of 92 patients), and type of surgical procedure (chest wall or extrapleural resection). Results: The actuarial 2- and 4-year overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 48% and 35%, respectively. The actuarial local control at 4 years was 94%. Neither the type of surgical procedure performed nor the addition of thoracic radiation therapy impacted local control or overall survival. Conclusion: Patients with completely resected T3 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer have similar local control and overall survival irrespective of primary location, type of surgery performed, or use of adjuvant radiation therapy. Additionally, the tumor recurrence rate and overall survival found in this study support the placement of this group of patients in Stage IIB of the 1997 AJCC lung staging classification

  6. Does T1, N0-1 vulvar cancer treated by vulvectomy but not lymphadenectomy need inguinofemoral radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manavi, Mahmood; Berger, Andreas; Kucera, Elisabeth; Vavra, Norbert; Kucera, Herwig

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of our study was to demonstrate differences in relapse rates, total survival times, and complication rates between inguinofemoral radiation and its absence in cases of invasive vulvar carcinoma without lymph node involvement (FIGO Stages T1, N0-1). Methods and Materials: From 1974 to 1990, 135 patients with invasive vulvar carcinoma in Stage T1 without clinical evidence of inguinal lymph node involvement underwent simple vulvectomy performed by hot-knife resection without lymphadenectomy. Although 65 patients (Group 1) received postoperative inguinofemoral radiation therapy, 70 patients (Group 2) did not, and none received local vulva irradiation. Results: The 5-year survival rates were 93.7% in Group 1 and 91.4% in Group 2 (p = NS). Although clitoris involvement was significantly more prevalent in the irradiation group (p = 0.04), inguinal relapse was found less frequently in Group 1 (4.6% or 3 out of 65 patients) than in group 2 (10% or 7 out of 70 patients) (p = 0.32). The complication rates were, 7.7% in Group 1 and 2.9% in Group 2, 2.7% for vaginal stenosis (two patients in each group), 1.5% for inguinal pain (one patient in Group 1), 1.5% for recto vaginal fistula (one patient in Group 1), 1.5% for vulvar infection (one patient in Group 1). Conclusion: No statistically significant differences in the relapse rates and survival times were found. Risk factors were equally distributed in both study groups except for clitoris involvement. The 5-year survival rates in both groups were similar to those reported in the literature for radical vulvectomy and inguinal lymph-node dissection (83-96%). Morbidity in our study was low. Although our data showed similar results in both groups, we are not recommending at this time to omit groin radiation in general, but it may be justified in low-risk cases

  7. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  8. Intraoperative 3-D imaging improves sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lapa, Constantin; Kuebler, Alexander; Hartmann, Stefan; Linz, Christian; Mueller-Richter, Urs; Geissinger, Eva; Wild, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of freehand single-photon emission computed tomography (fhSPECT) compared with conventional intraoperative localization techniques for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in oral cancer. Between November 2012 and February 2014, 23 consecutive patients with clinical T1/T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and a cN0 neck were recruited. All patients underwent SLNB followed by elective neck dissection (END). All patients received preoperative lymphoscintigraphy. To detect the SLNs intraoperatively, fhSPECT with a combination of conventional acoustic SLN localization and 3-D visual navigation was used. All but one of the SLNs detected by preoperative imaging were successfully mapped intraoperatively by fhSPECT (detection rate 98 %), including those in six patients with a tumour in the floor of the mouth. A histopathology analysis revealed positive SLNs in 22 % of patients. No further metastases were found in LNs resected during END. SLNB correctly predicted the final LN stage in all patients (accuracy 100 %). Additional radioactive LNs, which were not present on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, were observed in three patients. FhSPECT is a feasible technology that allows the accurate identification of SLNs in oral cancer. FhSPECT overcomes the shine-through phenomenon, one of the most important limitations of SLNB, thereby confirming the importance of SLNB in patients with cN0 oral cancer. (orig.)

  9. Intraoperative 3-D imaging improves sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lapa, Constantin [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuebler, Alexander; Hartmann, Stefan; Linz, Christian; Mueller-Richter, Urs [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, Wuerzburg (Germany); Geissinger, Eva; Wild, Vanessa [University Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of freehand single-photon emission computed tomography (fhSPECT) compared with conventional intraoperative localization techniques for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in oral cancer. Between November 2012 and February 2014, 23 consecutive patients with clinical T1/T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and a cN0 neck were recruited. All patients underwent SLNB followed by elective neck dissection (END). All patients received preoperative lymphoscintigraphy. To detect the SLNs intraoperatively, fhSPECT with a combination of conventional acoustic SLN localization and 3-D visual navigation was used. All but one of the SLNs detected by preoperative imaging were successfully mapped intraoperatively by fhSPECT (detection rate 98 %), including those in six patients with a tumour in the floor of the mouth. A histopathology analysis revealed positive SLNs in 22 % of patients. No further metastases were found in LNs resected during END. SLNB correctly predicted the final LN stage in all patients (accuracy 100 %). Additional radioactive LNs, which were not present on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, were observed in three patients. FhSPECT is a feasible technology that allows the accurate identification of SLNs in oral cancer. FhSPECT overcomes the shine-through phenomenon, one of the most important limitations of SLNB, thereby confirming the importance of SLNB in patients with cN0 oral cancer. (orig.)

  10. The histologic risk model is a useful and inexpensive tool to assess risk of recurrence and death in stage I or II squamous cell carcinoma of tongue and floor of mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Namita; Rigby, Matthew H; McNeil, Michael L; Taylor, S Mark; Trites, Jonathan Rb; Hart, Robert D; Bullock, Martin J

    2018-02-02

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for low-stage (stage I/II, ie, T1N0/T2N0) squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. However, a significant percentage of low-stage squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity will develop local recurrence and disease-related mortality. In this study, we stratified 64 patients with low-stage of oral tongue and floor of mouth patients into high-, intermediate- and low-risk categories based on existing histologic risk model. The classification of these risk categories was based on presence or absence of perineural invasion and evaluation of tumor-host junction for worst pattern of invasion and lymphocytic host response. We correlated risk category and other variables with recurrence and death. In a univariate model, high-risk category tumors had a significantly higher rate of recurrence and death due to recurrence compared with low/intermediate-risk categories (P=0.000 and P=0.047, respectively). Controlling for margin status and T-stage, high-risk category had a 12.4 odds ratio of later recurrence when compared with low/intermediate-risk categories, with a P-value of 0.001. In conclusion, we found low-stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients with high-risk category have a significantly higher risk for recurrence when compared with patients in the low- or intermediate-risk category, even when controlling for margin status and T-stage. These patients may be suitable candidates for adjuvant treatment to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with a recurrence. Our results indicate that the histologic risk model is a useful and simple tool to assess risk of recurrence in stage I or II squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 2 February 2018; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.183.

  11. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz; Wygoda, Andrzej; Hutnik, Marcin; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Wydmanski, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Maciejewski, Adam; Szymczyk, Cezary; Wierzgon, Janusz [Dept. of Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Orlef, Andrzej [Dept. of Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy photons as a boost in patients with early-stage oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 2003 and 2006, 16 patients with early-stage cancer of mobile tongue (n = 10 [63%]) or floor of the mouth (n = 6 [37%]) treated at Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Poland, were evaluated for IORT boost with the INTRABEAM {sup registered} System (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH; IORT-PRS) because of the high risk of local recurrence due to positive margins on frozen pathologic section. After tumor resection, the applicator was positioned in the tumor bed. The applicator's diameter (range: 1.5-5 cm) was selected to encompass high-risk area of tumor recurrence. The dose (5 Gy, 7 Gy, or 7.5 Gy) was applied according to tumor volume and bone proximity. External-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was provided to the tumor bed in all patients (50 Gy) and to the nodal area, when needed. Toxicity and local tumor control were assessed. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. IORT did not increase acute mucosal reaction. Local tumor control was found in all cases. Early mucosal reaction did not exceed 3 according to the RTOG scale and healed in median time of 35 days after completion of EBRT. No late adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: This preliminary report has demonstrated the feasibility of IORT-PRS for patients with early oral cancer with the indications for postoperative radiotherapy. This method may be considered an alternative boost technique, although additional studies are needed to establish long-term results in a larger group of patients. (orig.)

  12. Efficacy, Safety, and Dose of Pafuramidine, a New Oral Drug for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness, in a Phase 2a Clinical Study and Phase 2b Randomized Clinical Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Burri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT] is caused by protozoan parasites and characterized by a chronic progressive course, which may last up to several years before death. We conducted two Phase 2 studies to determine the efficacy and safety of oral pafuramidine in African patients with first stage HAT.The Phase 2a study was an open-label, non-controlled, proof-of-concept study where 32 patients were treated with 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day (BID for 5 days at two trypanosomiasis reference centers (Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo [DRC] between August 2001 and November 2004. The Phase 2b study compared pafuramidine in 41 patients versus standard pentamidine therapy in 40 patients. The Phase 2b study was open-label, parallel-group, controlled, randomized, and conducted at two sites in the DRC between April 2003 and February 2007. The Phase 2b study was then amended to add an open-label sequence (Phase 2b-2, where 30 patients received pafuramidine for 10 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was parasitologic cure at 24 hours (Phase 2a or 3 months (Phase 2b after treatment completion. The primary safety outcome was the rate of occurrence of World Health Organization Toxicity Scale Grade 3 or higher adverse events. All subjects provided written informed consent.Pafuramidine for the treatment of first stage HAT was comparable in efficacy to pentamidine after 10 days of dosing. The cure rates 3 months post-treatment were 79% in the 5-day pafuramidine, 100% in the 7-day pentamidine, and 93% in the 10-day pafuramidine groups. In Phase 2b, the percentage of patients with at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event was notably higher after pentamidine treatment (93% than pafuramidine treatment for 5 days (25% and 10 days (57%. These results support continuation of the development program for pafuramidine into Phase 3.

  13. Efficacy, Safety, and Dose of Pafuramidine, a New Oral Drug for Treatment of First Stage Sleeping Sickness, in a Phase 2a Clinical Study and Phase 2b Randomized Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Christian; Yeramian, Patrick D; Allen, James L; Merolle, Ada; Serge, Kazadi Kyanza; Mpanya, Alain; Lutumba, Pascal; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Bilenge, Constantin Miaka Mia; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Mpoto, Alfred Mpoo; Thompson, Mark; Munungu, Blaise Fungula; Manuel, Francisco; Josenando, Théophilo; Bernhard, Sonja C; Olson, Carol A; Blum, Johannes; Tidwell, Richard R; Pohlig, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis [HAT]) is caused by protozoan parasites and characterized by a chronic progressive course, which may last up to several years before death. We conducted two Phase 2 studies to determine the efficacy and safety of oral pafuramidine in African patients with first stage HAT. The Phase 2a study was an open-label, non-controlled, proof-of-concept study where 32 patients were treated with 100 mg of pafuramidine orally twice a day (BID) for 5 days at two trypanosomiasis reference centers (Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo [DRC]) between August 2001 and November 2004. The Phase 2b study compared pafuramidine in 41 patients versus standard pentamidine therapy in 40 patients. The Phase 2b study was open-label, parallel-group, controlled, randomized, and conducted at two sites in the DRC between April 2003 and February 2007. The Phase 2b study was then amended to add an open-label sequence (Phase 2b-2), where 30 patients received pafuramidine for 10 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was parasitologic cure at 24 hours (Phase 2a) or 3 months (Phase 2b) after treatment completion. The primary safety outcome was the rate of occurrence of World Health Organization Toxicity Scale Grade 3 or higher adverse events. All subjects provided written informed consent. Pafuramidine for the treatment of first stage HAT was comparable in efficacy to pentamidine after 10 days of dosing. The cure rates 3 months post-treatment were 79% in the 5-day pafuramidine, 100% in the 7-day pentamidine, and 93% in the 10-day pafuramidine groups. In Phase 2b, the percentage of patients with at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event was notably higher after pentamidine treatment (93%) than pafuramidine treatment for 5 days (25%) and 10 days (57%). These results support continuation of the development program for pafuramidine into Phase 3.

  14. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  15. C, N co-doped TiO_2/TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 composite coatings prepared from TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 powder using ball milling followed by oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Zhenwei; Zheng, Yaoqing; Li, Qianqian; Guan, Sujun; Zhao, Qian; Cheng, Lijun; Lu, Yun; Liu, Jizi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiO_2/TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 coatings were prepared by ball milling followed by oxidation. • In situ co-doping of C and N with simultaneous TiO_2 formation was observed. • Improved photocatalytic activity under UV/visible light was noticed. • Synergism in co-doping and heterojunction formation promoted carrier separation. - Abstract: Ball milling followed by heat oxidation was used to prepared C, N co-doped TiO_2 coatings on the surfaces of Al_2O_3 balls from TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 powder. The as-prepared coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV–vis). The results show that continuous TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 coatings were formed after ball milling. C, N co-doped TiO_2/TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 composite coatings were prepared after the direct oxidization of TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 coatings in the atmosphere. However, TiO_2 was hardly formed in the surface layer of TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 coatings within a depth less than 10 nm during the heat oxidation of TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 coatings in carbon powder. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activity evaluation of these coatings was conducted under the irradiation of UV and visible light. All the coatings showed photocatalytic activity in the degradation of MB no matter under the irradiation of UV or visible light. The C, N co-doped TiO_2/TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 composite coatings showed the most excellent performance. The enhancement under visible light irradiation should attribute to the co-doping of carbon and nitrogen, which enhances the absorption of visible light. The improvement of photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation should attribute to the synergistic effect of C, N co-doping, the formation of rutile-anatase mixed phases and the TiO_2/TiC_0_._7N_0_._3 composite microstructure.

  16. No effect of human serum and erythrocytes enriched in n-3 fatty acids by oral intake on Plasmodium falciparum blood stage parasites in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Hansen, H S; Jakobsen, P H

    1993-01-01

    -s) and pre-intake erythrocyte (pre-e). Also the effect of EPA and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) on the erythrocytic growth of P. falciparum was tested using in vitro assays. The results show that both post-s and post-e had no antimalarial activity on P. falciparum. No differential antimalarial effect...... acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) of 3.5 g/d and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) of 2.5 g/d and 24 mg/d of total tocopherol. Post-intake fish oil serum (post-s) and erythrocytes (post-e) were tested in vitro for inhibitory activity against blood stages of P. falciparum compared with pre-intake serum (pre...

  17. Patterns of failure and overall survival in patients with completely resected T3N0M0 nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, P.M.; Bonner, J.A.; Sawyer, T.E.; Deschamps, C.; Foote, R.L.; Trastek, V.F.; Allen, M.S.; Pairolero, P.C.; Lange, C.; Li, H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Previous studies of patients with surgically resected nonsmall cell lung cancer and chest wall invasion have shown conflicting results with respect to prognosis. Whether high risk subsets of the T3N0M0 population exist with respect to local, regional, and distant control as well as overall survival has been difficult to ascertain due to small numbers of patients in most reported series. Therefore, a review of patients with completely resected T3N0M0 nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken to analyze patient and tumor characteristics as well as surgical interventions that might influence patterns of failure and overall survival. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed for all patients (91) with T3N0M0 nonsmall cell lung cancer who had undergone a complete resection between the years 1979 to 1993. The following potential prognostic factors were recorded from each patients history: tumor size, tumor location (bronchus vs. pleura vs. chestwall), tumor grade, histology, patient age, the use of adjuvant radiation therapy ((17(91)) patients received adjuvant therapy), and the type of surgical procedure performed (chestwall resection vs. extrapleural resection). The actuarial rates of freedom from local recurrence (FFLR), freedom from regional nodal recurrence (FFRR), freedom from distant recurrence (FFDR), and overall survival were calculated from the date of diagnosis by the method of Kaplan-Meier. Results: The following table illustrates two and five year outcomes: None of the patients, tumor, or treatment characteristics that were analyzed were associated with a significant influence on the four parameters outlined in the above table. Conclusion: Patients with completely resected T3N0M0 nonsmall cell lung cancer have a similar local control and overall survival irrespective of primary location, type of surgery performed, or use of adjuvant radiation therapy. Additionally, the tumor recurrence rate and overall survival found in

  18. Is Elective Irradiation to the Lower Neck Necessary for N0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yunsheng; Zhu Guopei; Lu Jiade; Ying Hongmei; Kong Ling; Wu Yongru; Hu Chaosu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize our experience and treatment results in lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2003, 410 patients with lymph node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. The T-stage distribution was 18.8% in T1, 54.6% in T2 (T2a, 41 patients; T2b, 183 patients), 13.2% in T3, and 13.4% in T4. All patients received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base, and upper neck drainage areas, including levels II, III, and VA. The dose was 64-74 Gy, 1. 8-2.0 Gy per fraction over 6.5-7.5 weeks to the primary tumor with 60 Co or 6-MV X-rays, and 50-56 Gy to levels II, III, and VA. Residual disease was boosted with either 192 Ir afterloading brachytherapy or small external beam fields. Results: The median follow-up time was 54 months (range, 3-90 months). Four patients developed neck recurrence, and only 1 patient (0.2%) experienced relapse outside the irradiation fields. The 5-year overall survival rate was 84.2%. The 5-year relapse-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate, and disease-free survival rate were 88.6%, 90.6% and 80.1%, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that T classification was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting overall survival. The observed serious late toxicities were radiation-induced brain damage (7 cases), cranial nerve palsy (16 cases), and severe trismus (13 cases; the distance between the incisors was ≤1 cm). Conclusion: Elective levels II, III, and VA irradiation is suitable for nasopharyngeal carcinoma without neck lymph node metastasis.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  20. Identification of candidates for postmastectomy radiotherapy in patients with pT3N0M0 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Ohsumi, Shozo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Takashima, Shigemitsu; Shinohara, Shuichi; Nakajima, Naomi; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    There is still controversy concerning the indication of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) for pT3N0M0 breast cancer. To identify the candidates for PMRT in this subset, we investigated failure patterns, and searched for risk factors for isolated locoregional failure in pT3N0M0 breast cancer after mastectomy without PMRT. Among 1,176 patients who received mastectomy without PMRT for untreated unilateral breast cancer between 1990 and 2002, 64 patients (5%) had pT3N0M0 breast cancer (age 30-81 years; median 52.5 years). Isolated locoregional failure as the initial failure occurred in three patients. For all 64 patients, the 8-year failure-free survival rate, the isolated locoregional failure-free rate, and the distant failure-free rate were 76, 93, and 82%, respectively. Incidence of isolated locoregional failure as the initial failure was 18% (2/11) for patients 40 years or younger and 2% (1/53) for patients older than 40 years. The 8-year isolated locoregional failure-free rates were 73% for patients 40 years or younger and 98% for patients older than 40 years (p=0.0135). Concerning pT3N0M0 breast cancer, incidence of isolated locoregional failure was comparatively low after mastectomy without PMRT. Routine use of PMRT for all pT3N0M0 patients seemed to be unacceptable. PMRT may be useful for younger patients because of the comparatively high incidence of isolated locoregional failure. Because of the small number of cases in our series, further studies are necessary to determine the usefulness of PMRT for younger patients with pT3N0M0 breast cancer. (author)

  1. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX

  2. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-04

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Incidence and outcome for patients with occult lymph node involvement in T1 and T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mücke, Thomas; Mitchell, David A; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Ritschl, Lucas M; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kanatas, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    The evidence base to inform the decision making process in patients with early stage oral cancer and a clinical and radiological N0 neck remains insufficient to answer the question when it is safe to “watch and wait” and when to proceed with a selective neck dissection. A total of 327 consecutive cases of histopathologically staged T 1–2 , N 0–1 and M 0 , but clinically N 0, squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were prospectively analysed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used for statistical analysis and are represented as Kaplan-Meier analyses or Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. In 61 patients (18.65%) lymph node involvement was found in the histopathological processing. The mean survival of all patients was 73.3 ± 48.6 months. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates of all patients were 87.5% and 68.4%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates for stage N 0 were 89.1% and 70.7% compared to 83.3% and 62.9% in N 1 situations. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates for stage T 1 were 87.9% and 73.6% compared to 87.2% and 65.3% in stage T 2 , respectively . The time to recurrence in stage N 0 was 35.1 ± 30.5 months compared to 25.63 ± 24.6 months in cases with N 1 disease. Stage T 1 was associated with a time to recurrence of 38.1 ± 33.9 months compared with 27.2 ± 22.7 months in patients classified T 2 . Variables found to be strongly associated with survival in the univariate analysis included older age, higher tumour and N stage, and grading. Age, tumour stage (p = 0.011, 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.0), nodal stage (p = 0.038, 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.07), and recurrence were independently and significantly associated with survival in the multivariate analysis. This confirms a high overall disease free survival for patients with T1 and N0 treated with single modality surgery and in common with the literature confirms the poor impact on prognosis of the N positive neck

  4. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  5. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  6. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  7. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  8. Oral Ketamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral Ketamine: A Four-years Experience in ... Key words: Oral Ketamine, Premedication and Oncology. .... form of a letter published in 19835. .... Acta. Anaesthesiol Scandinavica, 1998; 42: 750-758. 4. Murray P. Substitution of another opioid ...

  9. Transoral Robotic Surgery in Treating Patients With Benign or Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage

  10. Liquid phase interaction in TiC0,5N0,5-TiNi-Mo and TiC0,5N0,5-TiNi-Ti-Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarova, L.Kh; Grigorov, I.G.; Zajnulin, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    Using the methods of X ray diffraction analysis, electron microscopy and X ray spectrum microanalysis a study was made into specific features of phase and structure formation in alloys TiC 0,5 N 0,5 -TiNi-Mo and TiC 0,5 N 0,5 -TiNi-Mo in the presence of a liquid phase at temperatures of 1380-1600 deg C. It is revealed that the physical and chemical processes taking place during the liquid-phase sintering result in the formation of a three-phase alloy consisting of nonstoichiometric titanium carbonitride TiC 0.5-x N 0.5-x , a molybdenum base solid solution of titanium, nickel and carbon Mo(Ti, Ni, C) and one of two intermetallic compounds, either TiNi or Ni 3 Ti. Metallic element concentration in individual phase constituents of the alloy is determined by means of X ray spectrum microanalysis

  11. Prognostic value of lymph node involvement in oral cancers: a study of 137 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankéré, F; Camproux, A; Barry, B; Guedon, C; Depondt, J; Gehanno, P

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of lymph node involvement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Retrospective study of 137 patients with T4 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by surgery and radiotherapy (84 N0, 23 N1, 16 N2,14 N3). Twenty-three patients in the N0 group had a history of surgery or radiotherapy. One hundred fourteen patients underwent limited or radical neck dissection unilaterally or bilaterally. The histological charts were reviewed and correlated with preoperative lymph node clinical stage. The local failure rate and the overall survival curves were calculated with respect to clinical and histological stages. The causes of death were analyzed. No evidence of lymph node metastasis was found in 47.4% of cases (54 of 114 patients). Among the node-positive (N+) patients, 39 had rupture of the lymph node capsule (R+). In the N0 group, 27.8% of patients were N+. Regional control rates after surgery and radiotherapy were 95% at 1 year and 85.4% at 5 years. The local failure rates were 6% in N0, 8.7% in N1, 31.2% in N2, 51.7% in N3, 9% in node-negative (N-), and 29% in N+R+ patients. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were, respectively, 44.7% and 34.8% in the N0 group, 37.7% and 37.7% (same rate at 3 and 5 years) in the N1 group, and 31.2% and 15.8% in the N2 group. None of the patients in the N3 group survived beyond 2 years. The overall survival rates at 5 years were 42.8% and 17.5% in the N- and N+ groups, respectively. In patients with locally advanced tumors (T4), clinical nodal status and histological nodal invasion were key prognostic factors. The presence of occult metastases in the N0 group justifies routine neck dissection.

  12. Characteristics of Oral Problems and Effects of Oral Care in Terminally Ill Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa

    2017-06-01

    Various distresses appear in the terminal stage of cancer. Oral problems including dry mouth, stomatitis and candidiasis are one of the important problems which should be resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate oral problems in this stage and improvement of dry mouth by oral care. The study subjects were consecutive terminally ill cancer patients admitted over the past 2 years. Patients were divided based on the status of oral food intake into good oral food intake group (≥30%) and poor oral food intake group. The following 3 items were retrospectively investigated: 1) The incidences of these oral problems, 2) Severity of dry mouth and complication with other oral problems, 3) Improvement of dry mouth using standard oral care by nursing staff and specialist oral care including dentists as needed. There were 115 and 158 patients in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively. 1) The incidences of dry mouth, stomatitis, and candidiasis were significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p oral intake groups, respectively ( p oral intake group ( p = 0.0002). 3) The rate of dry mouth improvement by oral care was 100% in Grade-1, 86% in Grade-2 and 81% in Grade-3. Oral problems occur in many of terminally ill cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of oral problems and corresponding appropriate interventions are important for improving quality of end-of-life care.

  13. Moessbauer study of (Fe1-x Cu x )4N (0.05≤x≤0.15) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khiraoui, S.; Sajieddine, M.; Vergnat, M.; Bauer, Ph.; Mabrouki, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we have prepared nitrogenated Fe 1- x Cu x alloys by reactive evaporation under a flow of nitrogen ions. After annealing, X-ray diffraction shows that we have synthesized the γ'-(Fe 1- x Cu x ) 4 N (0.05≤x≤0.15) compounds. The films were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The crystallographic structure and the respective positions of the Fe and Cu atoms in the compounds have been determined

  14. The location of locoregional recurrence in pathologic T3N0, non-irradiated lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Keum, Ki Chang; Rhee, Woo Joong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Ji; Choi, Seo Hee; Nam, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the patterns of locoregional recurrence of pathologic T3N0 (pT3N0) lower rectal cancer omitting postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and explore the potential of modification of a RT field. From Jan 2003 to Nov 2011, 35 patients omitting preoperative or postoperative RT for pT3N0 lower rectal cancer were included. We defined the lower rectal cancer as the tumor with the inferior margin located below the virtual line-a convergent level between rectal wall and levator ani muscle. All patients had radiologic examinations for recurrence evaluation during the follow-up duration. The median follow-up duration was 66.4 months (range, 1.4 to 126.1 months). Eight (22.9%) of the 35 patients had recurrence. Three (8.6%) was local recurrence (LR) only, 3 (8.6%) was distant metastasis (DM) only, and 2 (5.7%) was LR with DM. All LR were located at primary tumor sites. The overall survival rate, LR-free survival rate, and DM-free survival rate at 5 years was 79.8%, 83%, and 87%, respectively. All LR developed from tumors over 5 cm. However, there was no statistical significance (p = 0.065). There was no other risk factor for LR. Even though the patients included in this study had pathologically favorable pT3N0 rectal cancer, LR developed in 14.3% of patients. Most of the LR was located at primary tumor sites prior to surgery. Based on these findings, it might seem reasonable to consider postoperative RT with a smaller radiation field to the primary tumor site rather than the conventional whole pelvic irradiation.

  15. Decree-Law N0 678 of 26 November 1981 concerning the creation of local health centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Decree-Law provides for direct employment of workers by the Regions in connection with the creation of adequate health centres and radioactive decontamination centres, following nuclear emergencies in areas where nuclear power plants are located. This Decree-Law was converted into Act N 0 12 of 26th January 1982 and published in the Official Gazette of 27th January 1982. (NEA) [fr

  16. National Practice Patterns for Clinical T1N0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer in the Elderly: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Carl M; Lin, Chi; Adeberg, Sebastian; Gupta, Mrigank; Zhen, Weining; Verma, Vivek

    2018-03-01

    The standard of care for T1N0 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is definitive radiation therapy (RT). However, practice patterns in the elderly may not necessarily follow national guidelines. Herein, we investigated national practice patterns for T1N0 NPC. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for clinical T1N0 primary NPC cases (2004-2013) in patients ≥70 years old. Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare overall survival (OS) between patients receiving RT versus those under observation. Logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with receipt of RT. Cox proportional hazards modeling determined variables associated with OS. Landmark analysis of patients surviving 1 year or more was performed to assess survival differences between groups. In total, data of 147 patients were analyzed. RT was delivered to 89 patients (61%), whereas 58 (39%) patients underwent observation. On multivariable analysis, older patients were less likely to receive RT (p=0.003), but there were no differences between groups in terms of Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index. Median and 5-year OS in patients receiving RT versus those under observation were 71 and 33 months, and 59% and 48% (p=0.011), respectively. For patients surviving 1 year or more (n=96), there was a strong trend showing that receipt of RT was associated with better median and 5-year OS. This National Data Base analysis shows that observation is relatively common for T1N0 NPC in the elderly, but is associated with poorer survival. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Factors influencing the treatment outcome for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Ichiro; Kanehira, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Aoki, Manabu; Takagi, Sayako; Shirahama, Jun; Honda, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting local outcomes for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy. A total of 48 patients with T2N0 squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1992 and 2005 were studied. Cumulative probability of overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control and larynx-preserving were calculated according the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic significance of patient's age, number of subsites involved, impaired cord mobility, anterior commisure involved, total dose and overall treatment time were analyzed using the log-rank test in univariate analysis and Cox regression in multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 13 to 141 months (median, 62 months). Five-year survivals were: overall, 95.3%; cause-specific, 97.9% and five years rates were local control, 61.4%; larynx-preserving, 76.4%. Multivariate analyses of the six parameters showed that overall treatment time significantly influenced the probability of local control, and impaired mobility and overall treatment time affected the probability of larynx-preserving. Our study showed that longer overall treatment time significantly worsened the percentage of local control and larynx-preserving for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy. Therefore, we suggest treating, the patients in a shorter treatment course. (author)

  18. The prevalence of occult metastases in nonsentinel lymph nodes after step-serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry in cN0 oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Bilde, Anders; Therkildsen, Marianne H

    2011-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of isolated tumor cells (ITC) and micrometastases (MM) in nonsentinel lymph nodes (NSN) using additional step-serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as for sentinel lymph nodes (SN)....

  19. Prognostic Value of Volume-Based {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT Parameters in Patients with Clinically Node-Negative Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Hwan Joo; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Moon, Seung Hwan; Kim, Byung Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Chung Hwan; Son, Young Ik [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of volume-based metabolic parameters measured with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with clinically node-negative (cN0) oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) as compared with other prognostic factors. In this study, we included a total of 57 patients who had been diagnosed with cN0 tongue cancer by radiologic, ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and physical examinations. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), average SUV (SUVavg), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) for primary tumors were measured with ({sup 18}F-FDG PET. The prognostic significances of these parameters and other clinical variables were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. In the univariate analysis, pathological node (pN) stage, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, SUVmax, SUVavg, MTV, and TLG were significant predictors for survival. On a multivariate analysis, pN stage (hazard ratio = 10.555, p = 0.049), AJCC stage (hazard ratio = 13.220, p = 0.045), and MTV (hazard ratio = 2.698, p 0.033) were significant prognostic factors in cN0 OTSCC patients. The patients with MTV {>=} 7.78 cm{sup 3} showed a worse prognosis than those with MTV < 7.78 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.037). The MTV of primary tumor as a volumetric parameter of ({sup 18}F-FDG PET, in addition to pN stage and AJCC stage, is an independent prognostic factor for survival in cN0 OTSCC.

  20. Risk of biochemical recurrence and timing of radiotherapy in pT3a N0 prostate cancer with positive surgical margin. A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegemann, Nina-Sophie; Morcinek, Sebastian; Corradini, Stefanie; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute; Buchner, Alexander; Karl, Alexander; Stief, Christian; Knuechel, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved biochemical recurrence-free survival rates by the use of immediate adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, disagreement about the need and timing of RT remains. From 2005-2009, 94 patients presenting with a stage pT3a N0 and microscopic positive resection margin were retrospectively analyzed after radical prostatectomy. Special attention was given to patients' outcome, the frequency of additive RT, and its efficacy. Median follow-up was 80 months. A total of 71 patients had a negative postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (<0.07 ng/ml). Thirty-six of them did not experience any PSA relapse (subgroup 1). Fourteen of them received additive RT and during follow-up all 36 patients remained PSA negative. Of 71 initially PSA-negative patients, 35 had a biochemical relapse (subgroup 2); 28 patients underwent salvage RT. The median PSA value before salvage RT was 0.24 ng/ml and was subsequently negative (<0.07 ng/ml) in 23 patients after RT. Of the entire cohort, 23 patients had persisting PSA after surgery (subgroup 3). Of these, 18 patients received salvage RT at a median PSA level of 0.4 ng/ml. One patient in subgroup 1, 5 patients in subgroup 2, and 9 patients in subgroup 3 had ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. The present study of 94 pT3a N0 R1 prostate cancer patients provides insight into medical care of this patient cohort and underlines the need for additive RT for the majority of patients to achieve long-term biochemical control. Although immediate adjuvant RT was applied with restraint (20 %), during the observation period 60 of 94 patients (63.8 %) received RT - highlighting the need of postoperative treatment. (orig.) [de

  1. Results of Neoadjuvant Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for T1-T2 N0 Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arezzo, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.arezzo@unito.it [General Surgery I, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Arolfo, Simone; Allaix, Marco Ettore [General Surgery I, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Munoz, Fernando [Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Cassoni, Paola [Pathology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Monagheddu, Chiara [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Piedmont Reference Centre for Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention, City of Health and Science Hospital of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciccone, Giovannino [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Piedmont Reference Centre for Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention, City of Health and Science Hospital of Torino, Torino (Italy); Morino, Mario [General Surgery I, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course radiation therapy (SCRT) followed by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for T1-T2 N0 extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Recent studies suggest that neoadjuvant radiation therapy followed by TEM is safe and has results similar to those with abdominal rectal resection for the treatment of extraperitoneal early rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We planned a prospective pilot study including 25 consecutive patients with extraperitoneal T1-T2 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing SCRT followed by TEM 4 to 10 weeks later (SCRT-TEM). Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of this treatment modality were compared with historical groups of patients with similar rectal cancer stage and treated with long-course radiation therapy (LCRT) followed by TEM (LCRT-TEM), TEM alone, or laparoscopic rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) at our institution. Results: The study was interrupted after 14 patients underwent SCRT of 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by TEM. Median time between SCRT and TEM was 7 weeks (range: 4-10 weeks). Although no preoperative complications occurred, rectal suture dehiscence was observed in 7 patients (50%) at 4 weeks follow-up, associated with an enterocutaneous fistula in the sacral area in 2 cases. One patient required a colostomy. Quality of life at 1-month follow-up, according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 survey score, was significantly worse in SCRT-TEM patients than in LCRT-TEM patients (P=.0277) or TEM patients (P=.0004), whereas no differences were observed with TME patients (P=.604). At a median follow-up of 10 months (range: 6-26 months), we observed 1 (7%) local recurrence at 6 months that was treated with abdominoperineal resection. Conclusions: SCRT followed by TEM for T1-T2 N0 rectal cancer is burdened by a high rate of painful dehiscence of the suture line and enterocutaneous

  2. Oral lipid-based nanoformulation of tafenoquine enhanced bioavailability and blood stage antimalarial efficacy and led to a reduction in human red blood cell loss in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melariri P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Paula Melariri,1 Lonji Kalombo,2 Patric Nkuna,2 Admire Dube,2,3 Rose Hayeshi,2 Benhards Ogutu,4,5 Liezl Gibhard,6 Carmen deKock,6 Peter Smith,6 Lubbe Wiesner,6 Hulda Swai2 1Polymers and Composites, Material Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Port Elizabeth, South Africa; 2Polymer and Composites, Material Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa; 3School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa; 4Centre for Research in Therapeutic Sciences, Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Centre for Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; 6Division of Pharmacology, University of Cape Town Medical School, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa Abstract: Tafenoquine (TQ, a new synthetic analog of primaquine, has relatively poor bioavailability and associated toxicity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient individuals. A microemulsion formulation of TQ (MTQ with sizes <20 nm improved the solubility of TQ and enhanced the oral bioavailability from 55% to 99% in healthy mice (area under the curve 0 to infinity: 11,368±1,232 and 23,842±872 min·µmol/L for reference TQ and MTQ, respectively. Average parasitemia in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice was four- to tenfold lower in the MTQ-treated group. In vitro antiplasmodial activities against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum indicated no change in half maximal inhibitory concentration, suggesting that the microemulsion did not affect the inherent activity of TQ. In a humanized mouse model of G6PD deficiency, we observed reduction in toxicity of TQ as delivered by MTQ at low but efficacious concentrations of TQ. We hereby report an enhancement in the solubility, bioavailibility, and efficacy of TQ against blood stages of Plasmodium parasites without a corresponding increase in toxicity

  3. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. Cross section measurements of the 10B(d,n0)11C reaction below 160 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stave, S.; Ahmed, M. W.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Henshaw, S. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kingsberry, P.; Perdue, B. A.; Weller, H. R.; Antolak, A. J.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    New data were taken at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to investigate the plausibility of using low energy deuterons and the 10 B(d,n) 11 C reaction as a portable source of 6.3 MeV neutrons. Analysis of the data at and below incident deuteron energies of 160 keV indicates an n 0 neutron cross section that is lower than previous estimates by at least three orders of magnitude. In separate runs, deuterons with two different energies (160 and 140 keV) were stopped in a 10 B target. The resulting n 0 neutrons of approximately 6.3 MeV were detected at angles between 0 deg. and 150 deg. The angle integrated yields were used to determine the astrophysical S factor for this reaction assuming a constant value for the S factor below 160 keV. The cross sections reported between 130 and 160 keV were calculated using the extracted value of the S factor. The measured n 0 cross section is several orders of magnitude smaller than previous results, thus eliminating 10 B(d,n) 11 C as a portable source of intense neutrons with low energy deuteron beams on the order of tens of microamps. In order to gain insight into the reaction dynamics at these low energies the cross section results have been compared with results from calculations using the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and a detailed Hauser-Feshbach calculation performed by the authors. The angular distribution is consistent with the Hauser-Feshbach calculation suggesting a statistical compound nucleus reaction rather than a direct reaction

  5. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage 0 Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Laryngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA

  6. Preoperative multidetector CT manifestations of perigastric lymph nodes in patients with early gastric cancer and pN0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Hyun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Chung, Jae Joon; Lim, Joo Hee; Cho, Eun Suk; Kim, Ki Whang [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    To find the determinant of lymph node (LN) manifestations on preoperative multidetector CT (MDCT) in early gastric cancer (EGC) patients with pN0. One hundred and eighty-six consecutive patients with pT1pN0, the largest perigastric LN on preoperative MDCT, were categorized into two groups according to 8 different parameters [short (SD) and long diameter (LD) 4/6/8 mm, average attenuation 100 Hounsfield unit, short-to-long diameter-ratio (SLR) 0.7], and correlated with the size, gross type, depth of invasion and microscopic type of their primary lesions by the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. When the primary lesion was larger than 3 cm, the LNs were larger in 4 parameters (SD or LD, 4/6 mm; p < 0.05); gross type IIb patients showed smaller LNs in 5 parameters (SD 4/6 mm, LD 4/6/8 mm; p < 0.05); and patients with microscopically-undifferentiated lesions showed larger LNs in SD 4 mm or LD 8 mm by the chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis. The depth of invasion showed no significant difference in LN size. No factors revealed significant difference in LN attenuation or SLR. Benign regional LN enlargement is more frequent in EGC patients with larger size primary lesions or lesion with poor microscopic differentiation. However, this condition is less frequent in gross type IIb patients.

  7. First-principles study of Mg incorporation at wurtzite InN (0 0 0 1) and (0001-bar) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, S.F.; Qu, X.P.; Fan, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we investigate the energetics of Mg adsorption and incorporation at the InN(0 0 0 1) and InN(0001-bar) surfaces by the method of total energy plane-wave expansions with ultra-soft pseudo potential technology based on the density functional theory (DFT) in the generalized approximation (GGA). It is found that for a 1/4 monolayer (ML) coverage of the InN(0 0 0 1) surface, Mg atoms preferentially adsorb at the bridge sites and T4 sites, but they are unstable when compared with Mg incorporated in the first three layers. For a 1/4 ML coverage of the InN(0001-bar) surface, Mg atoms preferentially adsorb at the H3 sites with the formation energy of -3.49 (eV/(2x2) supercell), which is lower than that of the T4 sites, and the formation energy increases with increasing magnesium coverage. Further study shows that the formation energy for Mg atom is lower than that of In atom, which indicates that magnesium adsorption is more favorable in these conditions.

  8. Crystal structure and optical property of complex perovskite oxynitrides ALi0.2Nb0.8O2.8N0.2, ANa0.2Nb0.8O2.8N0.2, and AMg0.2Nb0.8O2.6N0.4 (A = Sr, Ba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Keon Ho; Avdeev, Maxim; Kim, Young-Il

    2017-10-01

    Oxynitride type complex perovskites AM0.2Nb0.8O3-xNx (A = Sr, Ba; M = Li, Na, Mg) were newly synthesized by the solid state diffusion of Li+, Na+, or Mg2+ into the layered oxide, A5Nb4O15, with concurrent O/N substitution. Neutron and synchrotron X-ray Rietveld refinement showed that SrLi0.2Nb0.8O2.8N0.2, SrNa0.2Nb0.8O2.8N0.2, and SrMg0.2Nb0.8O2.6N0.4 had body-centered tetragonal symmetry (I4/mcm), while those with A = Ba had simple cubic symmetry (Pm 3 ̅ m). In the tetragonal Sr-compounds, the nitrogen atoms were localized on the c-axial 4a site. However, the octahedral cations, M/Nb (M = Li, Na, Mg) were distributed randomly in all six compounds. The lattice volume of AM0.2Nb0.8O3-xNx was dependent on various factors including the type of A and the electronegativity of M. Compared to the simple perovskites, ANbO2N (A = Sr, Ba), AM0.2Nb0.8O3-xNx had wider band gaps (1.76-2.15 eV for A = Sr and 1.65-2.10 eV for A = Ba), but significantly lower sub-gap absorption.

  9. Feasibility of Real-Time Near-Infrared Fluorescence Tracer Imaging in Sentinel Node Biopsy for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Juhl, Karina; Charabi, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is an established method in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for staging the cN0 neck and to select patients who will benefit from a neck dissection. Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has the potential to improve the SNB procedure by facilitating...... intraoperative visual identification of the sentinel lymph node (SN). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of fluorescence tracer imaging for SN detection in conjunction with conventional radio-guided technique. METHODS: Prospective study of patients with primary OSCC planned for tumor...... be identified in vivo using NIRF imaging, and the majority of those were located in level 1 close to the primary tumor. CONCLUSIONS: A combined fluorescent and radioactive tracer for SNB is feasible, and the additional use of NIRF imaging may improve the accuracy of SN identification in oral cancer patients...

  10. Review of sentinel node procedure in cN0 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Guidelines from the French evaluation cooperative subgroup of GETTEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrel, R; Poissonnet, G; Temam, S; Dolivet, G; Fakhry, N; de Raucourt, D

    2017-04-01

    The reliability of the sentinel lymph node (SN) technique has been established for more than ten years in T1-T2 oral cavity and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma. Although most authors stress the necessity of rigorous implementation, there are no agreed guidelines. Moreover, other indications have been described, in other anatomical areas of the upper aerodigestive tract and in case of previous surgery or radiotherapy. SN expert teams, under the GETTEC head and neck tumor study group, conducted a review of the key points for implementation in head and neck cancers through guidelines and a review of classical and extended indications. Reliability depends on respecting key points of preoperative landmarking by lymphoscintigraphy, and intraoperative SN sampling and histological analysis. The SN technique is the best means of diagnosing occult lymph node involvement, whatever the primary tumor location, T stage or patient history. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  12. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research ph...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  13. Stage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shacter, J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage

  14. [Evaluation of central lymph node dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma in cN0 T1/T2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S Y; Ma, Y H; Yin, Z; Zhan, X X; Cheng, R C; Qian, J

    2018-02-07

    Objective: To evaluate the application of the central lymph node dissection (CLND) for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in cN0 T1/T2. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 532 cases with PTC in cN0 T1/T2 who underwent CLND between October 2014 and September 2016 in the Department of Thyroid Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of the Kunming Medical University. The incidence of central lymph node (CLN) metastasis and risk factors were analyzed. Results: CLN metastasis rates: 41.2% (42/102) in males vs 34.9% (150/430) in females, P =0.252; 33.9% (116/342) in single focal carcinoma vs 40.4% (74/183) in multifocal carcinoma, P =0.157; 44.0% (125/284) in patients with 45 years old or less vs 27.0% (67/248) in patients more than 45 years old, P =0.000; 30.3% (113/373) in microcarcinoma vs 50.9% (81/159) in non-microcarcinoma, P =0.000.In unilateral lesions, ipsilateral CLN metastasis was correlated with the tumor diameter ( P =0.012), but not with the number of lesions ( P =0.653). also contralateral CLN metastasis was correlated with the tumor diameter ( P =0.000), but not with the number of lesions ( P =0.815). For the left or right unilateral single focal lesion, the tumor diameter was not correlated with the metastasis of the posterior to right recurrent laryngeal nerve central lymph nodes (LN-prRLN-CLN) ( P =0.652, P =0.088). But in bilateral multifocal carcinoma the tumor diameter was correlated with metastasis of LN-prRLN-CLN ( P =0.039). Conclusions: Prophylactic CLND is reasonable for PTC in cN0 T1/T2. A bilateral CLND should be conducted for patients with bilateral multi-focus cancer and unilateral or bilateral non-microcarcinoma, especially in patients more than 45 years old. For unilateral single focal microcarcinoma on the right, the content of CLND should be from laryngeal nerve on right center to posterior branche; for unilateral single focal microcarcinoma on the left side, the left CLND should be conducted. An ipsilateral CLND can be considered in

  15. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  16. Association between US features of primary tumor and axillary lymph node metastasis in patients with clinical T1-T2N0 breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min Sun; Shin, Sung Ui; Song, Sung Eun; Ryu, Han Suk; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2018-04-01

    Background Most patients with early-stage breast cancer have clinically negative lymph nodes (LNs). However, 15-20% of patients have axillary nodal metastasis based on the sentinel LN biopsy. Purpose To assess whether ultrasound (US) features of a primary tumor are associated with axillary LN metastasis in patients with clinical T1-T2N0 breast cancer. Material and Methods This retrospective study included 138 consecutive patients (median age = 51 years; age range = 27-78 years) who underwent breast surgery with axillary LN evaluation for clinically node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer. Three radiologists blinded to the axillary surgery results independently reviewed the US images. Tumor distance from the skin and distance from the nipple were determined based on the US report. Association between US features of a breast tumor and axillary LN metastasis was assessed using a multivariate logistic regression model after controlling for clinicopathologic variables. Results Of the 138 patients, 28 (20.3%) had nodal metastasis. At univariate analysis, tumor distance from the skin ( P = 0.019), tumor size on US ( P = 0.023), calcifications ( P = 0.036), architectural distortion ( P = 0.001), and lymphovascular invasion ( P = 0.049) were associated with axillary LN metastasis. At multivariate analysis, shorter skin-to-tumor distance (odds ratio [OR] = 4.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-16.19; P = 0.040) and masses with associated architectural distortion (OR = 3.80; 95% CI = 1.57-9.19; P = 0.003) were independent predictors of axillary LN metastasis. Conclusion US features of breast cancer can be promising factors associated with axillary LN metastasis in patients with clinically node-negative early-stage breast cancer.

  17. Molecules for materials: germanium hydride neutrals and anions. Molecular structures, electron affinities, and thermochemistry of GeHn/GeHn- (n = 0-4) and Ge2Hn/Ge2Hn(-) (n = 0-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian-Shu; Lü, Rui-Hua; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2002-12-01

    The GeH(n) (n = 0-4) and Ge(2)H(n) (n = 0-6) systems have been studied systematically by five different density functional methods. The basis sets employed are of double-zeta plus polarization quality with additional s- and p-type diffuse functions, labeled DZP++. For each compound plausible energetically low-lying structures were optimized. The methods used have been calibrated against a comprehensive tabulation of experimental electron affinities (Chemical Reviews 102, 231, 2002). The geometries predicted in this work include yet unknown anionic species, such as Ge(2)H(-), Ge(2)H(2)(-), Ge(2)H(3)(-), Ge(2)H(4)(-), and Ge(2)H(5)(-). In general, the BHLYP method predicts the geometries closest to the few available experimental structures. A number of structures rather different from the analogous well-characterized hydrocarbon radicals and anions are predicted. For example, a vinylidene-like GeGeH(2) (-) structure is the global minimum of Ge(2)H(2) (-). For neutral Ge(2)H(4), a methylcarbene-like HGë-GeH(3) is neally degenerate with the trans-bent H(2)Ge=GeH(2) structure. For the Ge(2)H(4) (-) anion, the methylcarbene-like system is the global minimum. The three different neutral-anion energy differences reported in this research are: the adiabatic electron affinity (EA(ad)), the vertical electron affinity (EA(vert)), and the vertical detachment energy (VDE). For this family of molecules the B3LYP method appears to predict the most reliable electron affinities. The adiabatic electron affinities after the ZPVE correction are predicted to be 2.02 (Ge(2)), 2.05 (Ge(2)H), 1.25 (Ge(2)H(2)), 2.09 (Ge(2)H(3)), 1.71 (Ge(2)H(4)), 2.17 (Ge(2)H(5)), and -0.02 (Ge(2)H(6)) eV. We also reported the dissociation energies for the GeH(n) (n = 1-4) and Ge(2)H(n) (n = 1-6) systems, as well as those for their anionic counterparts. Our theoretical predictions provide strong motivation for the further experimental study of these important germanium hydrides. Copyright 2002 Wiley

  18. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  19. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  20. Quality of life in T1-3N0 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy with minimum 10-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Gray, Christine; Powell, Curt R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe patient-reported quality of life using a validated survey in a cohort of patients who are long-term survivors of definitive radiotherapy for T1-3N0 prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Survivors of a previously reported cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and definitive radiotherapy between November 1974 and August 1988 were queried using a questionnaire incorporating the RAND 36-Item Health Survey and the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index. Responses were reviewed and analyzed. Of the 146 N0 patients, 88 have survived for 10 years postdiagnosis. Fifty-six (64%) of these patients were still alive with valid addresses and were mailed copies of the questionnaires, of which 46 (82%) responded. Median potential follow-up from date of diagnosis was 13.9 years, with a median age of responders of 80 years. Results: The mean sexual function score was 15.4, with a bother score of 42. The mean urinary function score was 65, with a bother score of 61. The mean bowel function score was 72.6, with a bother score of 64.8. The amount of patient bother reported in the sexual category is similar to that previously reported for cohorts of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy or observation. This is despite the fact that sexual function was similar to that previously reported for patients postprostatectomy. Patient-reported function and bother scores in urinary and bowel categories were somewhat more severe than a previously reported radiotherapy cohort with shorter follow-up. Conclusions: With long follow-up, most patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the era described exhibit somewhat worse bladder, bowel, and erectile function than recently published controls without prostate cancer. In this cohort of older men with long follow-up, erectile function is similar to reported prostatectomy series. However, patient bother related to erectile function is similar

  1. Oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S J

    1990-01-01

    In the U.S. oral cancer accounts for 2.1% of all cancers and 1% of cancer deaths. Two to three times as many males as females are affected. Blacks have more intra-oral cancer than whites, and their incidence and mortality rates have increased in recent years. The etiologic process very likely involves several factors. The major etiologic agents are tobacco (all types) and alcoholic beverages. Herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus, and Candida have been implicated. Host factors include poor state of dentition, nutritional aberrations, cirrhosis of liver, lichen planus, and immunologic impairmant. Cellular changes include amplification of some oncogenes, alterations in antigen expression, production of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and disturbance of keratin and involucrin production. Experimentally, cancer is readily produced on the hamster cheek pouch and rat oral mucosa. Unlike oral cancer in humans, most experimental lesions are exophytic, and they rarely metastasize.

  2. Oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-05

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association urges HIV prevention specialists to regard male-to-male oral-genital sex as a low-risk activity and concentrate instead on the danger of unprotected anal intercourse. According to the association, the confusion and mixed messages surrounding oral sex are harming efforts to encourage gay men to make rational choices about truly risky behavior. The recommendations appear in the association's position paper issued March 19, 1996.

  3. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  4. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied ...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  5. Structural stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Mn_4N(0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface formation energy calculations demonstrate a N-dependent stability. • The magnetic alignment of these surfaces remains bulk-like, in a ferrimagnetic fashion. • A ferrimagnetic behavior in both structures is confirmed by density of states calculations. - Abstract: We have carried out spin-polarized first principles calculations to describe the surface stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn_4N(0 0 1) surfaces. Results show two different surface terminations with different N content. The surface formation energies indicate that for manganese rich conditions the most stable structure is a MnN terminated surface. Whereas, from intermediate to nitrogen rich conditions, a MnN terminated surface with excess of nitrogen atoms is the most favorable. The stability of these surfaces can be traced to the formation of Mn–N bonds at the surface. The stable surfaces are Ferrimagnetic along the direction perpendicular to the surface, retaining a bulk-like behavior. However, there is a decrease in the Mn magnetic moments due to the presence of the surface. Density of states shows an asymmetric behavior, inherent of a Ferrimagnetic state. Finally, the surfaces are metallic with the main contributions around the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. The knowledge about the atomic arrangements of the Mn_4N surfaces may serve to explain and understand the formation of more complex and technologically applicable ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic heterostructures.

  6. Preparation of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93 spheres for TRISO coated fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R. D.; Silva, C. M.; Lindemer, T. B.; Johnson, J. A.; Collins, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering a new nuclear fuel that would be less susceptible to ruptures during a loss-of-coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with dense uranium nitride (UN) kernels with diameters of 650 or 800 μm. The objectives of this effort are to make uranium oxide microspheres with adequately dispersed carbon nanoparticles and to convert these microspheres into UN spheres, which could be then sintered into kernels. Recent improvements to the internal gelation process were successfully applied to the production of uranium gel spheres with different concentrations of carbon black. After the spheres were washed and dried, a simple two-step heat profile was used to produce porous microspheres with a chemical composition of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93. The first step involved heating the microspheres to 2023 K in a vacuum, and in the second step, the microspheres were held at 1873 K for 6 h in flowing nitrogen.

  7. Structural stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N(0 0 1) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J., E-mail: guerrero@cnyn.unam.mx; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Surface formation energy calculations demonstrate a N-dependent stability. • The magnetic alignment of these surfaces remains bulk-like, in a ferrimagnetic fashion. • A ferrimagnetic behavior in both structures is confirmed by density of states calculations. - Abstract: We have carried out spin-polarized first principles calculations to describe the surface stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 4}N(0 0 1) surfaces. Results show two different surface terminations with different N content. The surface formation energies indicate that for manganese rich conditions the most stable structure is a MnN terminated surface. Whereas, from intermediate to nitrogen rich conditions, a MnN terminated surface with excess of nitrogen atoms is the most favorable. The stability of these surfaces can be traced to the formation of Mn–N bonds at the surface. The stable surfaces are Ferrimagnetic along the direction perpendicular to the surface, retaining a bulk-like behavior. However, there is a decrease in the Mn magnetic moments due to the presence of the surface. Density of states shows an asymmetric behavior, inherent of a Ferrimagnetic state. Finally, the surfaces are metallic with the main contributions around the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. The knowledge about the atomic arrangements of the Mn{sub 4}N surfaces may serve to explain and understand the formation of more complex and technologically applicable ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic heterostructures.

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Seemed Not to Have Survival Benefit in Rectal Cancer Patients with ypTis-2N0 After Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgery from a Population-Based Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, San-Jun

    2018-04-19

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently offered routinely, as standard, after radical resection for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation. However, the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 has not been documented to the same extent, and the survival benefit remained controversial. The purpose of this work was to determine the role of chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 classification. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database ( n  = 4,217). A propensity score model was utilized to balance baseline covariates. Of the 4,217 included patients, 335 with ypTis-2N0M0 did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There were comparable cancer-specific survivals (CSS) between those undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or not (log-rank test = 0.136, p  = .712) in the overall sample. After propensity score matching, the cancer-specific survival did not differ between the chemotherapy and observation groups (log-rank test = 0.089, p  = .765). Additionally, the Cox model did not demonstrate adjuvant chemotherapy as the prognostic factor, with hazard ratio = 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.32) for CSS. Furthermore, the 10-year cumulative CSS was 78.7% and 79.4% between the chemotherapy and observation groups, indicating no significance, and no impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival was observed in different subgroups stratified by T stage, histological grade, histology, lymph nodes, and tumor size. Patients with ypTis-2N0 rectal cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative radiology and radical surgery in this cohort study. These results provided new insight into the routine use of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer with completed neo-adjuvant radiotherapy and curative surgery. Inconsistent recommendations for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation are offered by clinical guidelines. Adjuvant

  9. Imaging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist

  10. MR spectroscopy in diagnosis of local recurrence of T3N0M0 of prostate cancer after cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Guo Zhi; Si Tongguo; Wang Haitao; Xiao Bohan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in detecting local recurrence in patients with T 3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer after cryotherapy. Methods: Sixty-five patients with T 3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer underwent cryotherapy. The preoperative data of conventional MRI, MRS, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy were collected. After cryotherapy, the prostate specific antigen (PSA) of all patients was detected monthly.If PSA >5 μg/L, MRI, MRS, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were planned within a week. If PSA was unremarkable, MRI, MRS, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were planned 12 months after cryotherapy. The prostate was divided 6 regions and the cancerous and noncancerous were marked. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of choline (Cho), citrate (Cit) and the ratios of Cho + creatine (Cre)/Cit of each regions were measured in pre-operation and postoperation. The patients were divided into non-recurrence and recurrence group according to TRUS-guided biopsy. The S/N of Cho, Cit, and the ratio of Cho + Cre/Cit were compared between the groups before and after cryotherapy by using independent samples t-test. Results: (1) Fifteen patients were confirmed local recurrence 12 months after cryotherapy, including 11 patients with an evaluate PSA level and 4 patients with PSA unremarkable. (2) The S/N of Cho, Cit and the ratios of Cho + Cre/Cit in the cancerous and noncancerous regions before cryotherapy in the sixty-five patients were 25±9, 11±5, and 18±5, and 39 ±12, 2.33±0.60, and 0.53 ± 0.19. There had significant difference between that of two groups (t values were 11.36, 9.81, and 13.39, respectively, P=0.00). (3) In the patients with non-recurrence, The S/N of Cho, Cit in the cancerous and noncancerous regions were 4 ± 2 and 3 ± 2 (t=1.024, P=0.305), and 2±2 and 4 ±3 (t=1.147, P=0.178) and no difference was found. In necrotic area,the ratios of Cho + Cre/Cit could not be calculated because of low level of the

  11. Construction of a pathological risk model of occult lymph node metastases for prognostication by semi-automated image analysis of tumor budding in early-stage oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nicklas Juel; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Lelkaitis, Giedrius

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to identify at diagnosis those patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), who have a poor prognosis and those that have a high risk of harboring occult lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to develop a standardized and objective digital scoring method...

  12. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  14. Effect of Lactoferrin on Oral Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    effect of Lf on the early stages of single-species and multi- species oral biofilm development. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg), Streptococcus mutans ...and biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus mutans have been demonstrated, limited studies have been conducted on its effect...the effect of Lf on the early stages of single- species and multi-species oral biofilm development. Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans

  15. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  16. How much does PSA matter after 10 years? Outcomes in 10-year clinical NED survivors after definitive radiotherapy for T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Peter A. S.; Powell, Curt; Riffenburgh, Robert; Saunders, Eric L.; Bethel, Kelly J.; Huisman, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Institutional policy in the 1970's and 80's dictated that patients with potentially curable prostate cancer undergo PLND prior to definitive XRT. Our group has reported 80% 15-year actuarial cause-specific survival for the 147 patients so treated. Analysis was made of PSA values and clinical outcomes of patients who were clinically without evidence of disease (NED) 10 years after a negative staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and definitive radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients underwent staging pelvic lymphadenectomy between 11/1/74 and 1/1/86, of which 98 had pathologically negative lymph nodes (N 0 ). These patients subsequently underwent definitive radiotherapy; a median dose of 66.6 Gy (range 63-70.2 Gy) was delivered. Forty-two N 0 patients with sufficient follow-up were alive and clinically NED 10 years post-operatively. None of these patients had ever received hormonal therapy. Distribution by disease stage at diagnosis was: Stage A2: 12 pts; Stage B: 19 pts; Stage B2/ C: 6 pts; Stage C: 5 pts. Median follow-up was 12 years 4 months, with a minimum follow-up of 10 years. Results: Of the 42 NED survivors at 10 years, 5 pts died subsequently without PSA data, remaining clinically NED (median 13y 3m post-operatively); 37 patients were alive and without evidence of disease off all therapy at 10 years post-operatively. Most recent PSA data reveal: Bone scans were performed on the 8 patients with elevated PSA. These revealed a single patient with diffuse but asymptomatic bone metastases. Ultrasound-guided sextant biopsies were performed on one 78-year-old patient with elevated PSA 19 years post-operatively, revealing an asymptomatic local recurrence. Conclusions: Radiation therapy delivered to a surgically staged population of prostate cancer patients contributes to normalization of PSA in 78% ((29(37))) of patients with ≥10 year follow-up. Most of these patients will have PSA levels ≤ 1.5 ng/ml. More

  17. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  18. Role of surgery in Stade cT3-4 N0M0 prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Poppel, H.; Joniau, S.; Haustermans, K.

    2007-01-01

    The surgical treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer has often been discouraged and in many cases a combined treatment with radiotherapy and hormone-therapy is proposed. Nevertheless, radical prostatectomy is efficient in mono-therapy in the majority of patients with a P.S.A. lower than 20 μg/l, a unilateral stage T3a and a Gleason score lower than 8. Patients with a more advanced local stage or with a less well differentiated tumour should not be excluded from a surgical treatment as an initial option. The majority of them will benefit from a multimodal treatment. This can consist of adjuvant radiotherapy in case of obvious margin positive disease, a salvage radiotherapy in case of P.S.A. relapse during follow-up, or a hormonal treatment in case of P.S.A. persistence after surgery or in cases of advanced lymph node invasion. The urologist must utilize the results of the definitive pathology and of the post-operative P.S.A. levels in order to find the indications where and when additional treatment can be applied. The results obtained after 10-15 years with a radical prostatectomy, eventually combined with radiation or hormonal treatment are excellent concerning the cancer specific survival at long term. Therefore radiotherapy and hormones is not the treatment of choice for all clinical T3 prostate cancers. (authors)

  19. Critical Appraisal of Nasolabial Flap for Reconstruction of Oral Cavity Defects in Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mebed, A.; Hussein, H.A.; Saber, T.Kh.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Re-evaluation of nasolabial flap in lip and oral cavity reconstruction and role of each of its variants in reconstructing various intermediate size defects was addressed. Patients and Methods: Case-series study was con-ducted in National Cancer Institute, Cairo University over the period from July 2005 - January 2009 which included 23 patients with clinically T-l N0, T-2 N0 invasive squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and the vermilion border of the lower lip. Immediately after surgical excision, one stage reconstruction of the defect was done using a type of nasolabial flap. All patients were followed and the median follow-up period was 7.5 month. Results: Twelve patients with the lower lip carcinoma and 11 patients with the carcinoma of buccal mucosa underwent surgical excision under frozen section control. 19 fasciocutaneous nasolabial flap and 4 facial artery musculomucosal flaps were used for reconstruction. Minor wound complications occurred in 2 flaps and one patient required secondary suture. Flap viability was reliable and was not affected by performance of a synchronous neck dissection. Functional results were satisfactory, cosmetic results were good in most of the patients and excellent when facial artery musculomucosal flap was used. Conclusion: The nasolabial flap is a reliable and minimally traumatic local flap for one stage reconstruction of medium size defects in the oral cavity. The abundant blood supply allowed its modification in order to cover larger defects or to obtain better cosmetic results. This versatility makes it more widely used thus minimizing the use of local tongue flaps and split thickness grafts for covering these medium size defects in cases of buccal mucosa cancer or affecting the other lip or commissure in cases of lip cancer. It has a high viability rate, low complication rate; it is quick and easy to perform in addition to its satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM

  1. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of stromal fibrocytes and myofibroblasts to envision the invasion and lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sowmya J; Rao, Jyothi Bellur Madhava; Rao, Pp Jagadish

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells work in close coordination with stromal elements from its stage of emergence to metastasis. The study was designed to assess the presence and distribution pattern of stromal fibrocytes and myofibroblasts in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Possibility of using these stromal cells as a marker for invasion and lymphnode metastasis was evaluated. A total of 40 cases of OSCC consisting twenty cases of each lymph node positive (pN+) and lymph node negative (pN0) samples and ten normal oral mucosa (NOM) tissues were subjected to double immunostaining using CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antibodies. Stained sections were evaluated semiquantitatively. CD34 fibrocytes were seen in 70% of NOM and none of OSCC samples. α-SMA myofibroblasts were seen in 80% of OSCC and none of NOM samples. A statistically significant difference was found in fibrocyte values ( P < 0.001) and myofibroblast values ( P < 0.001) between NOM and OSCC study samples. No statistical significance in myofibroblast values between pN0 and pN+ study groups; however, their distribution pattern appreciably varied. This study suggested that fibrocytes could be used as one of the markers for early invasion. Abrupt loss of fibrocytes at the transition zone toward carcinoma and statistical significance in their values supported this inference. Heterogeneity in the distribution pattern of myofibroblasts in tumor stroma indicates that this variability may predict the tumor behavior toward nodal metastasis rather than their mere presence or absence.

  3. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  4. For or against adjuvant trastuzumab for pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer patients with HER2-positive tumors: a meta-analysis of published literatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the prognosis of patients with small (≤1cm tumors is generally favorable, emerging data suggests that biological behavior varies between intrinsic subtypes in such patients. Furthermore, it still remains unclear whether HER2-positive pT1a-bN0M0 patients could benefit from adjuvant trastuzumab. For further evaluation, we sought to conduct a meta-analysis so as to get a better understanding of the prognosis for HER2-positive pT1a-bN0M0 patients and their survival benefit from adjuvant trastuzumab, accordingly, offering the implications for current practice. METHODS: The PubMed database, the online proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meetings, the online proceedings of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, and the CD proceedings of the International St. Gallen Breast Cancer Conference were searched for all relevant studies published before September 2012. Relative risks (RRs were used to compare the prognosis of different intrinsic subtypes for pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer. Analyses were also performed to estimate the association between adjuvant trastuzumab and various survival outcomes. RESULTS: With eight eligible studies identified, this meta-analysis demonstrated a deleterious effect of HER2+ phenotype on disease-free survival (DFS; RR = 3.677, 95% CI 2.606-5.189, p <0.001 and distant disease-free survival (DDFS; RR = 3.824, 95% CI 2.249-6.501, p<0.001 as compared to HR+/HER2- subgroup. However, significant difference failed to be achieved in terms of any endpoint between HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC. Besides, a marked improvement in DFS was observed with the addition of trastuzumab for HER2-positive pT1a-bN0M0 patients (RR = 0.323, 95% CI 0.191-0.547, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis clarifies that intrinsic subtypes might be a reliable marker to predict the prognosis in pT1a-bN0M0 breast cancer. Besides, even for such early stage HER2-positive

  5. Ipsilateral irradiation for well lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx: results on tumor control and xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezo, Laura; Martín, Margarita; López, Mario; Marín, Alicia; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    In head and neck cancer, bilateral neck irradiation is the standard approach for many tumor locations and stages. Increasing knowledge on the pattern of nodal invasion leads to more precise targeting and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morbidity and tumor control for patients with well lateralized squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy. Twenty consecutive patients with lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx were treated with a prospective management approach using ipsilateral irradiation between 2000 and 2007. This included 8 radical oropharyngeal and 12 postoperative oral cavity carcinomas, with Stage T1-T2, N0-N2b disease. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence was determined. Late xerostomia was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3. At a median follow-up of 58 months, five-year overall survival and loco-regional control rates were 82.5% and 100%, respectively. No local or contralateral nodal recurrences were observed. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland was 4.72 Gy and to the contralateral submandibular gland was 15.30 Gy. Mean score for dry mouth was 28.1 on the 0-100 QLQ-H&N35 scale. According to CTCAE v3 scale, 87.5% of patients had grade 0-1 and 12.5% grade 2 subjective xerostomia. The unstimulated salivary flow was > 0.2 ml/min in 81.2% of patients and 0.1-0.2 ml/min in 19%. None of the patients showed grade 3 xerostomia. In selected patients with early and moderate stages, well lateralized oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas, ipsilateral irradiation treatment of the primary site and ipsilateral neck spares salivary gland function without compromising loco-regional control

  6. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  7. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yasushi, E-mail: nagat@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibata, Taro [Japan Clinical Oncology Group Data Center, Center for Research Administration and Support, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Chuo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  8. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibata, Taro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Kozuka, Takuyo; Kunieda, Etsuo; Saito, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Hareyama, Masato; Takai, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  9. Adsorption and pathways of single atomistic processes on NbN (0 0 1) and (1 1 1) surfaces: A first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Yuan; Liu, Xuejie; Tan, Xin; Sun, Shiyang; Wei, Huai; Lu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate the behaviors of Nb, Si, N atom on NbN(0 0 1) and (1 1 1) surfaces. • The adsorption and diffusion of single atom on NbN(0 0 1) and (1 1 1) were calculated by DFT. • The potential energy surface of single atom on NbN(0 0 1) and (1 1 1) surfaces were investigated. • The diffusion process of single on NbN(0 0 1) and (1 1 1) were calculated by nudged elastic band. - Abstract: The adsorption and pathway processes of atomistic Nb, Si, and N at high-symmetry sites on NbN (0 0 1) and (1 1 1) surfaces were studied using first-principle method, which is based on the density functional theory. This investigation presents some of the results obtained. The potential energy surface (PES) was obtained by calculating the adsorption of Nb, Si, and N atoms on NbN (0 0 1). The most energetic site for the Nb atom adsorbed on NbN(0 0 1) was the site ‘on-top of face–center cubic’ (HL), whereas those for N and Si were both at the site ‘between TopN and HL’ (TopN-HL). The minimum energy paths of the single atom on NbN (0 0 1) surface diffusion were obtained using the PES calculation results. The Nb and Si atoms were diffused from the TopN to the HL position. The N atom was diffused from the TopNb, whereas the TopN–HL to HL position. The diffusion energies of the Nb, Si, and N atoms on the NbN (0 0 1) surface were 0.32, 0.69, and 1.32 eV, respectively. The pathways of the atomistic diffusion involved the diffusion of atoms from the FCC to the HCP site on the NbN (1 1 1) surface. The results showed that the diffusion energy of Si on the Nb layer was smaller than that on the N layer. Si and N can easily form stable structures while bonding on the N layer. Moreover, Si atoms can stabilize the activity of N atoms while promoting the spread of Nb atoms during deposition

  10. Sentinel lymph nodes in cancer of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Christensen, Rikke Kølby; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2007-01-01

    when compared with (B) step-sectioning and immunostaining of the entire sentinel lymph node at 250 microM levels. METHODS: Forty patients with T1/T2 cN0 oral cancer were enrolled. Three patients were excluded. In one patient no sentinel lymph node was identified. The remaining two had unidentified...

  11. Decree of the President of the Republic of 31 July 1980 concerning the Higher Institute for Safety at Work (Section 23 of Act N0 833 of 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Decree is important as respects nuclear energy insofar as the tasks of the Institute which are mainly of an advisory nature, also concern radiation protection and safety in connection with nuclear activities. It provides for an advisory role to be played by the Institute as regards health protection in the field of nuclear power generation and radioactive materials, including use of and trade in such materials. On the other hand, it does not affect the regulations governing the use of nuclear energy, in particular as concerns Act N 0 1240 of 1971 reorganising the CNEN, Act N 0 1860 of 1962 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, Presidential Decree N 0 185 of 1964 on radiation protection and the decrees implementing these tests (NEA) [fr

  12. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Huisman, Paulien M; van Oort, Rob P; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were asked about their oral symptoms related to mouth opening, dental status, oral sensory function, tongue mobility, salivary function, and pain. They were asked to rank these oral symptoms according to the degree of burden experienced. The Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) was used to assess functional outcome. In a multivariate linear regression analyses, variables related to MFIQ scores (p≤0.10) were entered as predictors with MFIQ score as the outcome. Lack of saliva (52%), restricted mouth opening (48%), and restricted tongue mobility (46%) were the most frequently reported oral symptoms. Lack of saliva was most frequently (32%) ranked as the most burdensome oral symptom. For radiated patients, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, a T3 or T4 stage, and a higher age were predictive of MFIQ scores. For non-radiated patients, a restricted mouth opening, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, restricted tongue mobility, and surgery of the mandible were predictive of MFIQ scores. Lack of saliva was not only the most frequently reported oral symptom after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer, but also the most burdensome. Functional outcome is strongly influenced by an inability to wear a dental prosthesis in both radiated and non-radiated patients.

  13. Measurement of the rates of reaction of the ground and metastable excited states of 02+, N0+ and 0+ with atmospheric gases at thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosik, J.; Rakshit, A.B.; Twiddy, N.D.; Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal-energy reaction rate coefficients and product ion distributions have been measured for reactions of both the ground state and metastable electronic states of 0 2 + , N0 + and 0 + with several neutral species, using a selected-ion flow tube. In general the excited-ion reaction rates are fast, frequently approaching the Langevin limit. Collisional quenching occurs for the reactions of N0 + sup(star) with N 2 ,0 2 and H 2 and the quenching rates have been determined. The ion source also provided a substantial yield of doubly charged 0 2 permitting some measurements of reaction rates of 0 2 2+ . (author)

  14. Theoretical investigations on the elastic and thermodynamic properties of Ti2AlC0.5N0.5 solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Y.L.; Sun, Z.M.; Hashimoto, H.; Barsoum, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed theoretical studies on the elastic and thermodynamic properties of the solid solution: Ti 2 AlC 0.5 N 0.5 . The lattice parameters, elastic constants, bulk, shear, Young's moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature were calculated and compared with those of the end members, Ti 2 AlC and Ti 2 AlN. The temperature dependence of the bulk moduli, thermal expansion coefficient and specific heats of Ti 2 AlC 0.5 N 0.5 were obtained from the quasi-harmonic Debye model. The calculated elastic and thermodynamic properties were compared with experimental data.

  15. Role of Ag-alloy in the thermal stability of Ag-based ohmic contact to GaN(0 0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Zhihua; Qin, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Lanli

    2015-01-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to study Ag and Ag-alloy adsorption stability on GaN(0 0 0 1) surface. We find Ag only contact to GaN surface is unstable under high temperature. While Ag-alloy adsorption exhibits better adsorption stability and electronic properties than that of the Ag only contact,due to the enhanced interaction between Ag-alloy and GaN(0 0 0 1) surface. The Ag-alloy, particularly AgNi, is proposed to be used as very promising ohmic contact to GaN for practical applications

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  17. Significant enhancement of 11-Hydroxy-THC detection by formation of picolinic acid esters and application of liquid chromatography/multi stage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(3) ): Application to hair and oral fluid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Detlef; Sachs, Ulf; Sachs, Hans; Moore, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Formation of picolinic acid esters of hydroxylated drugs or their biotransformation products is a promising tool to improve their mass spectrometric ionization efficiency, alter their fragmentation behaviour and enhance sensitivity and specificity of their detection. The procedure was optimized and tested for the detection of cannabinoids, which proved to be most challenging when dealing with alternative specimens, for example hair and oral fluid. In particular, the detection of the THC metabolites hydroxyl-THC and carboxy-THC requires ultimate sensitivity because of their poor incorporation into hair or saliva. Both biotransformation products are widely accepted as incorporation markers to distinguish drug consumption from passive contamination. The derivatization procedure was carried out by adding a mixture of picolinic acid, 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and 2-methyl-6-nitrobenzoic anhydride in tetrahydrofuran/triethylamine to the dry extraction residues. Resulting derivatives were found to be very stable and could be reconstituted in aqueous or organic buffers and subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Owing to the complex consecutive fragmentation patterns, the application of multistage MS3 proved to be extremely useful for a sensitive identification of doubly picolinated hydroxy-THC in complex matrices. The detection limits - estimated by comparison of corresponding signal-to-noise ratios - increased by a factor of 100 following picolination. All other species examined, like cannabinol, THC, cannabidiol, and carboxy-THC, could also be derivatized exhibiting only moderate sensitivity improvements. The assay was systematically tested using hair samples and exemplarily applied to oral fluid. Concentrations of OH-THC identified in THC-positive hair samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.29pg/mg. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  19. Are we able to reduce the mortality and morbidity of oral cancer; Some considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer makes up 1%-2% of all cancers that may arise in the body. The majority of oral cancers consists of squamous cell carcinomas. Oral cancer carries a considerable mortality rate, being mainly dependent on the stage of the disease at admission. Worldwide some 50% of the patients with oral

  20. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  1. The incidence of late neck recurrence in N0 maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinomas after superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy without prophylactic neck irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Tomohiro; Homma, Akihiro; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kano, Satoshi; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Furusawa, Jun; Yoshida, Daisuke; Fujima, Noriyuki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of elective neck irradiation (ENI) for patients with N0 carcinoma of the maxillary sinus has been controversial. The purpose of our study was to investigate the incidence of late neck recurrence and the mortality rate from regional disease in patients with N0 maxillary sinus cancer after superselective cisplatin infusion and concomitant radiotherapy (RADPLAT) without ENI. We retrospectively analyzed 48 patients with N0 maxillary sinus cancer who underwent RADPLAT. Chemotherapy consisted of 100-120 mg/m(2) superselective intra-arterial cisplatin administered at a median rate of four times weekly. Concurrent radiation therapy was administered at a median dose of 65 Gy without ENI. Late neck recurrence was observed in 8.3% (4/48). Three patients underwent salvage neck dissection and survived without any evidence of disease. The remaining patient did not undergo neck dissection due to coexistence with distant metastasis, and he died of regional disease. The mortality rate from regional disease was calculated to be 2% (1/48). The incidence of late neck recurrence was not frequent, and the mortality rate from regional disease was low. Salvage neck dissection was considered to be feasible for patients with late neck recurrence. When definitive radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy are applied, it is considered that ENI is not required for cases of N0 maxillary sinus cancer.

  2. Study of Cs adsorption on Ga(Mg)0.75Al0.25N (0 0 0 1) surface: A first principle calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mingzhu; Chang, Benkang; Hao, Guanghui; Guo, Jing; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the activation process of Ga 1−x Al x N photocathodes theoretically, models of Cs adsorption on Ga(Mg) 0.75 Al 0.25 N (0 0 0 1) surface are built, then the atomic structure, electronic structure, adsorption energy, work function, dipole moment and optical properties of the models are calculated. All calculations are carried out using Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package (CASTEP) based on first principle. Results show that Cs adsorption on Mg doping Ga 1−x Al x N (0 0 0 1) surface can reduce work function of the surface, and the favorite adsorption site is on the top of p-type impurity. Cs adsorption on p-type Ga 1−x Al x N (0 0 0 1) surface can produce the structure of p-type bulk with n-type surface, which is helpful to surface band bend downward and decrease electron affinity seriously. The absorption coefficient of Cs adsorption system is less than that of the clean surface. Theoretical study of Cs adsorption on Ga 1−x Al x N (0 0 0 1) surface can help to improve activation technology of Ga 1−x Al x N photocathodes.

  3. Long-term results of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 non-small-cell lung cancer: Is low incidence of regional failure due to incidental nodal irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Hayman, James A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel; Fernando, Shaneli; Kong, F.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of high-dose conformal irradiation and examine incidental nodal irradiation and nodal failure in patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included patients with inoperable CT-staged T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated on our prospective dose-escalation trial. Patients were treated with radiation alone (total dose, 63-102.9 Gy in 2.1-Gy daily fractions) with a three-dimensional conformal technique without intentional nodal irradiation. Bilateral highest mediastinal and upper/lower paratracheal, prevascular and retrotracheal, sub- and para-aortic, subcarinal, paraesophageal, and ipsilateral hilar regions were delineated individually. Nodal failure and doses of incidental irradiation were studied. Results: The potential median follow-up was 104 months. For patients who completed protocol treatment, median survival was 31 months. The actuarial overall survival rate was 86%, 61%, 43%, and 21% and the cause-specific survival rate was 89%, 70%, 53%, and 35% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Weight loss (p = 0.008) and radiation dose in Gy (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with overall survival. In only 22% and 13% of patients examined did ipsilateral hilar and paratracheal (and subaortic for left-sided tumor) nodal regions receive a dose of ≥40 Gy, respectively. Less than 10% of all other nodal regions received a dose of ≥40 Gy. No patients failed initially at nodal sites. Conclusions: Radiation dose is positively associated with overall survival in patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 NSCLC, though long-term results remain poor. The nodal failure rate is low and does not seem to be due to high-dose incidental irradiation

  4. Predictive factors of occult neck metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fortes Bittar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: It is well established that cervical lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The definition of parameters and classifications that could separate patients in groups of low, intermediate and high-risk is being attempted for several years. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine possible predictive factors related to the occurrence of occult cervical lymph node metastasis through the analysis of histopathological reports of surgical specimens obtained after oral squamous cell carcinoma resection and selective neck dissections of patients initially classified as N0. METHODS: This was a primary, retrospective, observational, case-control study. Histopathological reports were reviewed to determine if some findings were related to the occurrence of occult lymph node metastasis. The events analyzed were oral cavity subsites, pT-stage, muscular infiltration, desmoplasia, vascular emboli, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and compromised margins. RESULTS: Occult cervical metastasis accounted for 19.10 percent of the cases. Desmoplasia, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and pT4a stage are predictive factors of occult neck metastasis (p-value = 0.0488, 0.0326, 0.0395, 0.0488, respectively. CONCLUSION: The accurate definition of predictive factors of occult cervical metastasis may guide the selection of patients that should be referred to radiotherapy, avoiding the unnecessary exposure of low-risk patients to radiation and allowing a better regional control of the disease in those of moderate or high risk.

  5. The role of SPECT-CT in the lymphoscintigraphic identification of sentinel nodes in patients with oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Anders; Von Buchwald, Christian; Mortensen, Jann

    2006-01-01

    SPECT with higher resolution CT scanners are expected to provide more accurate information about the localization of SNs. OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of combined SPECT-CT in SN identification in the clinically negative neck of patients with OSCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lymphoscintigraphy comprising......CONCLUSION: SPECT-CT may improve the localization of sentinel nodes (SNs) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Compared with planar lymphoscintigraphy SPECT-CT detected more SNs and provided additional anatomical and spatial information about their localization. New generation...... planar and SPECT-CT acquisition was performed in 34 consecutive patients with OSCC stage I and II (T1-2N0M0) prior to sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and selective neck dissection. The number of SNs and anatomical location was recorded according to lymphoscintigraphy and operative findings. RESULTS: SNB...

  6. Age and associated fibrocystic changes are prognostically significant in patients with small node-negative (T1a,bN0) invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Merih Guray; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Hanrahan, Emer O; Broglio, Kristine R; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hunt, Kelly K; Sahin, Aysegul A

    2011-01-01

    Some patients with small (≤1.0 cm) node-negative (T1a,bN0) invasive breast cancer (IBC) who undergo only local therapy experience recurrences. There is limited information on prognostic factors in these patients. We sought to identify prognostic factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with T1a,bN0 IBC. Histologic sections from 273 T1a,bN0 IBC patients treated at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) between 1980 and 1999 were reviewed. Microscopic tumor size; multifocality; histologic type, grade of tumor; presence, type, grade of associated ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS); presence of fibrocystic changes (FCC) with/without atypia; and lymphovascular invasion were identified. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to evaluate DFS and OS. Median patient age was 58 years, median follow-up period was 10.8 years, and median tumor size was 0.8 cm. Multifocal disease was identified in 26% of cases. At 10 years, the DFS and OS rates were 91% and 88%, respectively. Twenty-one percent of patients had extensive (>50%), and 30% had grade 3 DCIS. Nonproliferative FCC and proliferative FCC with/without atypia were present in 80%, 36%, and 38% of patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), grade (p = 0.015), and percent (p = 0.046) of DCIS were significantly associated with DFS; presence of FCC was associated with longer DFS and OS. In multivariable models, age and presence of FCC remained significantly associated with survival. Age at diagnosis and associated FCC are significant factors in predicting recurrence in patients with T1a,bN0 IBC. Adjuvant systemic therapy should be discussed with and considered for young patients with T1a,bN0 IBC. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  8. Oral dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Mahija; Rakesh, S; Savithri, Vindhya

    2014-01-01

    Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  9. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  10. Estimation of cross sections of hypotetical 8n0, 10He2, 13Li3 nuclei production in the framework of fast fragmentation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozhkin, O.V.; Oplavin, V.S.; Yakovlev, Yu.P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities of search for 8 n 0 , 10 He 2 , 13 Li 3 nuclides in the products of nuclear fragmentation under the action of high energy particles are analysed. Conclusions have been drawn that: available experimental data on determination of the upper boundary of a cross section of 8 n 0 fragments production exclude an existence of this nuclide in the form ''usual'' nuclear system; available experimental estimations of cross sections of 10 He and 13 Li production among fragmentation products are, for the present, insufficient to solve a problem of 13 Li nucleus existence in a bound state but testify on 10 He nucleus nuclear instability; serious model estimations of have functions and nuclide binding energy are necessary

  11. Astrophysical S factor for the 7Li(d,n0)8Be and 7Li(d,n1)8Be reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M.W.; Blackston, M.A.; Crowell, A.S.; Howell, C.R.; Perdue, B.A.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H.R.; Prior, R.M.; Spraker, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The absolute astrophysical S factor and cross section for the 7 Li(d,n 0 ) 8 Be and 7 Li(d,n 1 ) 8 Be reactions have been determined using deuteron beams with energies between 45 and 80 keV. The slope of the S factor is consistent with zero in the n 0 case but is slightly negative in the n 1 case. The S factor for the sum of both neutron groups at c.m. energies below 70 keV is S(E)=5400(±1500)-37(±21)E keV b, where E is the c.m. energy in keV

  12. Radiation therapy for T2N0 laryngeal cancer: A retrospective analysis for the impact of concurrent chemotherapy on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ninomiya, Hiroshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of concurrent chemotherapy on the local control in patients with T2N0 laryngeal cancer who receive radiation therapy (RT) was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with T2N0 laryngeal cancer who were treated by definitive RT were analyzed. The primary site of the cancer was the glottis in 50 patients, the supraglottis in 9 patients, and the subglottis in 4 patients. Thirty-six patients were treated by RT alone and the remaining 27 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Results: Complete response (CR) was obtained in 92% of the patients who received RT alone and 100% of the patients who received CRT. Voice preservation in the group who received CRT (89%) was significantly higher than that in the group treated by RT alone (61%). The 5-year disease-free survival rates in those who received concurrent CRT was significantly superior to that in the patients who received RT alone, although no significant difference was seen in the cause-specific survival rate between the 2 groups. The multivariate analysis revealed that the treatment method (RT alone vs. CRT) was the most significant risk factor that predicted recurrence after RT. Conclusion: Concurrent CRT had a positive impact on the local control of T2N0 laryngeal cancer

  13. Evolution of Si-2N2Nb island configuration on NbN (0 0 1) surface: A first-principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Yuan; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Xuejie; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Fucheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We investigate the separation and gathering of Nb, Si and N atom around come to NbN grain. • The adsorption and diffusion of single atom around 2N2Nb island were calculated by DFT. • The adsorption behavior of Si-2N2Nb island on NbN (0 0 1) surface were investigated. • The evolution of Si-2N2Nb island on NbN (0 0 1) were calculated by nudged elastic band. - Abstract: The separation and aggregation of Nb, Si, and N atoms around the NbN grain during the deposition of the Nb–Si–N nanocomposite film were discussed. The evolution behavior of the 2N2Nb island and the adsorption and diffusion energy of Nb, Si, and N atoms around the island on the NbN (0 0 1) surface were investigated using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. Results indicated that the most stable configuration of the Nb–Si–N island was the combination of Nb and N atoms to form the island and the possible aggregation of the Si atom to diagonal Nb atom outside the island. Substitution solid solution was eventually formed, in which the Nb atom of the 2N2Nb island was replaced by the Si atom during deposition. However, the Si atom was easily replaced by the Nb atom at the site with abundant Nb atoms. The diffusion energy of the evolution from Nb-2N1Nb1Si to Si-2N2Nb was 1.58 eV, and the total energy of the configuration decreased. Moreover, the interface of Si and NbN grains tended to separate. The highest energy adsorption sites for Nb, Si, N atoms adsorbed on the NbN (0 0 1) surface around the 2N2Nb island were P3, P1, and P2, respectively. The adsorption energies of Nb, Si, and N atoms on the NbN (0 0 1) surface around the 2N2Nb island were 7.3067, 5.3521, and 6.7113 eV, respectively, and their diffusion energies around the 2N2Nb island were 2.62, 1.35, and 5.094 eV, respectively. The low adsorption and diffusion energies of active Si atoms promoted the distribution of Nb and N atoms during deposition. Furthermore, the Nb

  14. Sentinel Node in Oral Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartaglione, Girolamo; Stoeckli, Sandro J; de Bree, Remco

    2016-01-01

    /static scan and/or SPECT/CT. RESULTS: Lymphoscintigraphy identified 723 lymphatic basins. 1398 sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) were biopsied (3.2 SN per patient; range, 1-10). Dynamic scan allowed the differentiation of sentinel nodes from second tier lymph nodes. SPECT/CT allowed more accurate anatomical......PURPOSE: Nuclear imaging plays a crucial role in lymphatic mapping of oral cancer. This evaluation represents a subanalysis of the original multicenter SENT trial data set, involving 434 patients with T1-T2, N0, and M0 oral squamous cell carcinoma. The impact of acquisition techniques, tracer...... localization and estimated SN depth more efficiently. After pathological examination, 9.9% of the SN excised (138 of 1398 SNs) showed metastases. The first neck level (NL) containing SN+ was NL I in 28.6%, NL IIa in 44.8%, NL IIb in 2.8%, NL III in 17.1%, and NL IV in 6.7% of positive patients. Approximately...

  15. Manifestaciones orales de la sífilis. Caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    Navazo-eguía, Ana Isabel; Rioja-peñaranda, Elena; Echevarria-iturbe, Celina; Terán-muñoz, Danilo; Cordero-civantos, Cristina; Ibañez-muñoz, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Oral manifestations of syphilis are not frequent but may occur in all stages simulating other diseases, delaying diagnosis and treatment. We describe the case of a patient with oral lesions as a manifestation of secondary syphilis. Discussion: oral manifestations of syphilis may mimic other more common oral mucosa lesions, going undiagnosed and with no proper treatment. Although oral lesions m...

  16. Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine, Palonosetron Hydrochloride, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cisplatin in Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Nausea and Vomiting; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  17. Poetry as an oral outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Arden Brill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The text is inspired by some of Freud’s observations, regarding, among other things, the pleasure the child takes from playing with words as preliminary degree of wit. As zealous follower, Brill extends and intensifies the importance of Freud’s thought trying to establish a link, or at least a point of contact between the poetry in a generic sense and the various forms of oral gratification. This gives rise to unusual associations that are for the contemporary reader slightly comical: if poetry can be seen as an expression of the mysteries of oral Erotica, the relationship between poet and gourmet can only be the closest. To define and limit the scopes of fulfillment that is realized in oral poetry, Brill passes rapidly through the various forms this satisfaction takes in neurotics, in psychotics, in the child, in the primitive. The conclusions, unfortunately, are very general: many poets do not go beyond the oral stage and give clear signs of a fixation of libidinal development at this level.

  18. Coping with uncertainty: T1a,bN0M0 HER2-positive breast cancer, do we have a treatment threshold?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent retrospective studies have suggested that patients with T1a,bN0M0 human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer are at a higher risk for recurrence and might benefit from adjuvant trastuzumab. The absolute benefits associated with treating this subgroup are uncertain. Design: We reviewed recent studies examining the prognostic value of HER2 in patients with node-negative T1a,b HER2-positive breast cancer. We calculated the number needed to treat (NNT) using baseline risk estimates for untreated T1a,bN0M0 breast cancer and the number needed to harm (NNH) using the incidence of cardiac events in each of the adjuvant trastuzumab clinical trials. RESULTS: Several studies were identified, each with limitations inherent to retrospective database analyses: small cohort sizes, lack of systematic HER2 testing in older specimens, variations in the use of adjuvant therapy and definitions of study end points, and lack of information relating to comorbidities. The 5-year disease-free survival in the pre-trastuzumab era ranged from 77% to 95%. Comparisons between small HER2 -positive and small HER2 -negative cancers showed numerically worse outcome for the HER2-positive cohort in some but not all studies. In many instances, the NNH was larger (26-250) than the NNT (13-35); however, in a subset of patients, the NNH was lower (6) than the NNT (13-35). CONCLUSIONS: Better prediction tools to estimate more precisely the risk for death due to comorbid illness versus breast cancer are needed. In some patients, the risks of therapy could outweigh the benefits. Treatment selection for T1a,bN0 HER2-positive cancers remains in the transition area between evidence- and subjective judgment-based medicine.

  19. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Ja [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Cheol [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong-Rok [Department of Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwansun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyu-Seog [Division of Colorectal Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Hahn [Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Taek [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Yong [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Bok [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik, E-mail: csyu@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  20. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (-). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (-), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits

  2. The 7Li(d-vector,n0)8Be and 7Li(d-vector,n1)8Be reactions below 160 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M. W.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Joshi, K.; Nelson, S. O.; Perdue, B. A.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.; Braizinha, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2006-01-01

    The polarization observables have been determined for the 7 Li(d-vector,n 0 ) 8 Be and 7 Li(d-vector ,n 1 ) 8 Be reactions at beam energies between 80 and 160 keV. A Transition Matrix Element (TME) analysis revealed unique, dominant p-wave solutions for both neutron channels. The polarization observables were compared with distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and coupled reaction channels (CRC) calculations. The general features of the data can be reproduced by the CRC calculations when a large target spin-orbit interaction is included. However, serious discrepancies are observed when the TMEs of the theory and experiment are compared

  3. The Oral Microbiome of Children: Development, Disease, and Implications Beyond Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Nelson, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    In the era of applied meta-omics and personalized medicine, the oral microbiome is a valuable asset. From biomarker discovery to being a powerful source of therapeutic targets and to presenting an opportunity for developing non-invasive approaches to health care, it has become clear that oral microbes may hold the answer for understanding disease, even beyond the oral cavity. Although our understanding of oral microbiome diversity has come a long way in the past 50 years, there are still many areas that need to be fine-tuned for better risk assessment and diagnosis, especially in early developmental stages of human life. Here, we discuss the factors that impact development of the oral microbiome and explore oral markers of disease, with a focus on the early oral cavity. Our ultimate goal is to put different experimental and methodological views into perspective for better assessment of early oral and systemic disease at an early age and discuss how oral microbiomes-at the community level-could provide improved assessment in individuals and populations at risk.

  4. Practice variation in defining sentinel lymph nodes on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Geke B.; Bree, Remco de [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Witte, Birgit I. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olmos, Renato A.V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klop, W.M.C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Lymphoscintigraphic imaging and adequate interpretation of the lymphatic drainage pattern is an essential step in the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure. In oral cancer, identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) can be challenging. In this study, interobserver variability in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams was evaluated in patients with T1-T2 stage N0 oral cancer. Sixteen observers (head and neck surgeons, nuclear medicine physicians or teams of both) from various institutes were asked which criteria they use to consider a hot focus on the lymphoscintigram as SLN. Lymphoscintigrams of 9 patients with 47 hot foci (3-9 per patient) were assessed, using a scale of 'yes/equivocal/no'. Bilateral drainage was seen in four of nine cases. In three cases additional late single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT scanning was performed. Interobserver variability was evaluated by kappa (κ) analysis, using linear weighted pairwise comparison of the observers. Conservative (equivocal analysed as no) and sensitive (equivocal analysed as yes) assessment strategies were investigated using pairwise kappa analysis. Various definitions of SLN on lymphoscintigrams were given. Interobserver variability of all cases using a 3-point scale showed fair agreement (71 %, κ{sub w} = 0.29). The conservative and sensitive analyses both showed moderate agreement: conservative approach κ = 0.44 (in 80 % of the hot foci the observers agreed) and sensitive approach κ = 0.42 (81 %) respectively. Multidisciplinary involvement in image interpretation and higher levels of observer experience appeared to increase agreement. Among 16 observers, there is practice variation in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients. Interobserver variability of lymphoscintigraphic interpretation shows moderate agreement. In order to achieve better agreement in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams specific guidelines are warranted. (orig.)

  5. Practice variation in defining sentinel lymph nodes on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, Geke B.; Bree, Remco de; Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Witte, Birgit I.; Olmos, Renato A.V.; Klop, W.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoscintigraphic imaging and adequate interpretation of the lymphatic drainage pattern is an essential step in the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure. In oral cancer, identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) can be challenging. In this study, interobserver variability in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams was evaluated in patients with T1-T2 stage N0 oral cancer. Sixteen observers (head and neck surgeons, nuclear medicine physicians or teams of both) from various institutes were asked which criteria they use to consider a hot focus on the lymphoscintigram as SLN. Lymphoscintigrams of 9 patients with 47 hot foci (3-9 per patient) were assessed, using a scale of 'yes/equivocal/no'. Bilateral drainage was seen in four of nine cases. In three cases additional late single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT scanning was performed. Interobserver variability was evaluated by kappa (κ) analysis, using linear weighted pairwise comparison of the observers. Conservative (equivocal analysed as no) and sensitive (equivocal analysed as yes) assessment strategies were investigated using pairwise kappa analysis. Various definitions of SLN on lymphoscintigrams were given. Interobserver variability of all cases using a 3-point scale showed fair agreement (71 %, κ w = 0.29). The conservative and sensitive analyses both showed moderate agreement: conservative approach κ = 0.44 (in 80 % of the hot foci the observers agreed) and sensitive approach κ = 0.42 (81 %) respectively. Multidisciplinary involvement in image interpretation and higher levels of observer experience appeared to increase agreement. Among 16 observers, there is practice variation in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients. Interobserver variability of lymphoscintigraphic interpretation shows moderate agreement. In order to achieve better agreement in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams specific guidelines are warranted. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis of carbon nitride powder by selective etching of TiC0.3N0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at moderate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Jian; Lu Jinjun

    2010-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of carbon nitride powder by extracting titanium from single inorganic precursor TiC 0.3 N 0.7 in chlorine-containing atmosphere at ambient pressure and temperature not exceeding 500 deg. C. The TiC 0.3 N 0.7 crystalline structure acted as a template, supplying active carbon and nitrogen atoms for carbon nitride when it was destroyed in chlorination. X-ray diffraction data showed that the obtained carbon nitride powders were amorphous, which was in good agreement with transmission electron microscope analysis. The composition and structure of carbon nitride powders were analyzed by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that disorder structure was most likely for the carbon nitride powders and the N content depended greatly on the chlorination temperature. Thermal analysis in flowing N 2 indicated that the mass loss started from 300 deg. C and the complete decomposition occurred at around 650 deg. C, confirming the low thermal stability of the carbon nitride material.

  7. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of FenPt13−n clusters with n=0–13: A first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Xiaoli; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Shengli; Wang, Peng; Huang, Shiping; Tian, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of Fe n Pt 13−n (n=0–13) nanoclusters are investigated using a density functional theory. It is found that the original icosahedra structure of Fe n Pt 13−n nanoclusters with n=3–8 deforms completely and exhibits the maximum Fe–Pt bonds. Furthermore, all the energetically preferable Fe n Pt 13−n (n=0–13) nanoclusters are found to be ferromagnetic coupling, and the magnetic moments of both Fe and Pt are enhanced. The large exchange splitting between the majority and the minority spin states indicates high magnetic moments based on the analysis of electronic density of states. In addition, electrons transfer from Fe to Pt atoms enhances the local atomic magnetic moments of Fe and Pt in Fe n Pt 13−n nanoclusters. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of Fe n Pt 13−n are investigated using the density functional theory. • Structure of Fe n Pt 13−n nanoclusters with n=3–8 deforms completely. • Electron transfer from Fe to Pt atoms enhances local atomic magnetic moments. • The large exchange splitting in the spin states indicates high magnetic moments

  8. Effects of bias voltage and annealing on the structure and mechanical properties of WC0.75N0.25 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Y.D.; Hu, C.Q.; Wen, M.; Wang, C.; Liu, D.S.; Zheng, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both bias voltage and annealing on the structure and mechanical properties of WC 0.75 N 0.25 thin films, deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrates by a direct current reactive magnetron sputtering system, in which the negative substrate bias voltage (V b ) was varied from floating (-1.6 V) to -200 V, and the deposited films were annealed at 800 deg. C for 2 h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses, along with the density-functional theory (DFT) calculations on the electronic structure, showed that WC 0.75 N 0.25 films were a single-phase of carbonitrides. After annealing, a significant decrease in hardness for the films was observed, being a result of point-defect annihilation as V b was in the range of floating to -120 V. However, when V b was in the range of -160 to -200 V, the hardness increased from ∼37 GPa for the as-deposited film to a maximum of ∼43 GPa for the annealed one. This increase in hardness after annealing might be attributed to age-hardening.

  9. Changes of electronic properties of p-GaN(0 0 0 1) surface after low-energy N+-ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzicki, M.; Mazur, P.; Ciszewski, A.

    2018-05-01

    The p-GaN(0 0 0 1) crystal with a relatively low acceptor concentration of 5 × 1016 cm-3 is used in these studies, which are carried out in situ under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The p-GaN(0 0 0 1)-(1 × 1) surface is achieved by thermal cleaning. N+-ion bombardment by a 200 eV ion beam changes the surface stoichiometry, enriches it with nitrogen, and disorders it. Such modified surface layer inverts its semiconducting character from p- into n-type. The electron affinity for the already cleaned p-GaN surface and that just after bombardment shows a shift from 2.2 eV to 3.2 eV, as well as an increase of band bending at the vacuum/surface interface from 1.4 eV to 2.5 eV. Proper post-bombardment heating of the sample restores the initial atomic order of the modified layer, leaving its n-type semiconducting character unchanged. The results of the measurements are discussed based on two types of surface states concepts.

  10. Impact and relationship of anterior commissure and time-dose factor on the local control of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by 6 MV photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yiu-Tung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate prognostic factors that may influence local control (LC of T1N0 glottic cancer treated by primary radiotherapy (RT with 6 MV photons. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 433 consecutive patients with T1N0 glottic cancer treated between 1983 and 2005 by RT in our institution. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons. One hundred and seventy seven (41% patients received 52.5 Gy in 23 fractions with 2.5 Gy/fraction, and 256 (59% patients received 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 2 Gy/fraction. Results The median follow-up time was 10.5 years. The 10-year LC rates were 91% and 87% for T1a and T1b respectively. Multivariate analysis showed LC rate was adversely affected by poorly differentiated histology (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 7.5, p = 0.035; involvement of anterior commissure (HR: 2.34, p = 0.011; fraction size of 2.0 Gy (HR: 2.17, p = 0.035 and tumor biologically effective dose (BED 15 (HR: 3.38, p = 0.017. Conclusions The negative impact of anterior commissure involvement could be overcome by delivering a higher tumor BED through using fraction size of > 2.0 Gy. We recommend that fraction size > 2.0 Gy should be utilized, for radiation schedules with five daily fractions each week.

  11. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT to evaluate tumor, nodal disease, and gross tumor volume of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer: comparison with MR imaging and validation with surgical specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Oliver; Chambron-Pinho, Nicole; Sader, Rober [JW Goethe University, Department of Oromaxillofacial Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Middendorp, Markus [JW Goethe University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Frankfurt (Germany); Mack, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J. [JW Goethe University, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Bisdas, Sotirios [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of adding combined {sup 18}F-PET/CT to MRI for T and N staging of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer and calculation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) having histopathology as reference standard. PET/CT and MRI were performed in 66 patients with suspected oral and oropharyngeal cancer (41 primary tumors/25 recurrent tumors) and nodal disease (114 nodes). Statistical analysis included the McNemar test, sensitivity, specificity for the diagnostic modalities as well as regression analysis, and Bland-Altman graphs for calculated tumor volumes. There was no statistically significant difference between the two modalities compared to pathological findings regarding detection of disease (P{>=}0.72). The sensitivity/specificity for tumor detection were 100/80% and 96.72/60% for MRI and PET/CT, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity for nodal metastases were 88.46/75% and 83.81/73.91% for MRI and PET/CT, respectively. In 18% of cases, the MRI-based T staging resulted in an overestimation of the pathologic tumor stage. The corresponding rate for PET/CT was 22%. Regarding the treated necks, both modalities showed 100% sensitivity for detection of the recurrent lesions. In necks with histologically N0 staging, MRI and PET/CT gave 22% and 26% false positive findings, respectively. The mean tumor volume in the pathologic specimen was 16.6{+-}18.6 ml, the mean volume derived by the MR imaging was 17.6{+-}19.1 ml while the estimated by PET/CT volume was 18.8{+-}18.1 ml (P{<=}0.007 between the three methods). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a better agreement between PET/CT and MRI. The diagnostic performance of FDG-PET/CT in the local staging of oral cancer is not superior to MRI. (orig.)

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT to evaluate tumor, nodal disease, and gross tumor volume of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer: comparison with MR imaging and validation with surgical specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Chambron-Pinho, Nicole; Sader, Rober; Middendorp, Markus; Mack, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of adding combined 18 F-PET/CT to MRI for T and N staging of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer and calculation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) having histopathology as reference standard. PET/CT and MRI were performed in 66 patients with suspected oral and oropharyngeal cancer (41 primary tumors/25 recurrent tumors) and nodal disease (114 nodes). Statistical analysis included the McNemar test, sensitivity, specificity for the diagnostic modalities as well as regression analysis, and Bland-Altman graphs for calculated tumor volumes. There was no statistically significant difference between the two modalities compared to pathological findings regarding detection of disease (P≥0.72). The sensitivity/specificity for tumor detection were 100/80% and 96.72/60% for MRI and PET/CT, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity for nodal metastases were 88.46/75% and 83.81/73.91% for MRI and PET/CT, respectively. In 18% of cases, the MRI-based T staging resulted in an overestimation of the pathologic tumor stage. The corresponding rate for PET/CT was 22%. Regarding the treated necks, both modalities showed 100% sensitivity for detection of the recurrent lesions. In necks with histologically N0 staging, MRI and PET/CT gave 22% and 26% false positive findings, respectively. The mean tumor volume in the pathologic specimen was 16.6±18.6 ml, the mean volume derived by the MR imaging was 17.6±19.1 ml while the estimated by PET/CT volume was 18.8±18.1 ml (P≤0.007 between the three methods). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a better agreement between PET/CT and MRI. The diagnostic performance of FDG-PET/CT in the local staging of oral cancer is not superior to MRI. (orig.)

  13. Estadios precoces de cancer oral: pronóstico en relación con gradación histológica, linfagiogénesis intratumoral y expresión de factor de crecimiento endotelial vascular Tipo-C (VEGF-C Early stage oral cancer: prognosis with regard to histological grading, intratumoral lymphangiogenesis, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Muñoz-Guerra

    2006-02-01

    relación estadísticamente significativa entre los sistemas de Broders y Anneroth (pObjectives. Histological grading systems have been classically used as a prognostic factor and clinical behavior markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. However, their prognostic usefulness remains controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of intratumoral lymphangiogenesis (IL, a new morphological finding, in a retrospective analysis of paraffin embedded tissue samples that corresponded to a group of early stage oral squamous cell carcinoma cases, and to relate this with histological grading systems while keeping in mind their prognostic significance. We also wanted to determine if the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C is correlated with the evolution of the disease. Design. We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 patients with OSCC. All cases were T1-T2 neoplasms and were treated primarily by local resection and elective neck dissection that showed no neck involvement. In the group of 96 specimens, we analyzed IL using the specific marker PA2.26 for lymphatic endothelium. Also, we studied the expression of (VEGF-C. All cases were classified according to the histological grading systems described by Broders, Anneroth and Bryne. The statistical analysis was based on the univariate analysis of cause-specific survival and disease recurrence free-survival according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results. The group of patients without intratumoral lymphangiogenesis showed a better prognosis with regard to survival and disease- free period, but the difference was not statistically significant. The study showed no relationship between VEGF-C expression and the presence of intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. However, no recurrences were observed in the group without VEGF-C expression. The comparative analysis of the histological grading system showed a statistical relationship between the Broders and Anneroth systems (p<0.01 and between the Broders and

  14. Detection of cervical lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer patients with clinically N0 neck—a meta-analysis comparing different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Li-Jen; Lo, Wu-Chia; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Wang, Chi-Te; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2012-01-01

    How to properly manage clinically negative neck of head and neck cancer patients is a controversial topic. Research is now directed toward finding a method sensitive enough to bring the risk of occult metastases below 20%. The aim of this review was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalities, including CT, MRI, PET and US, in clinically N0 head and neck cancer patients. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, PubMed and the Cochrane Database were searched for relevant original articles published up to May 2011. Inclusion criteria were as follows: articles were reported in English; CT, MRI, PET or US were performed to identify cervical metastases in clinically N0 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; and data were sufficient for the calculation of true-positive or false-negative values. A bivariate random effect model was used to obtain pooled sensitivity and specificity. The positive and negative test probability of neck metastasis was generated based on Bayesian theory and collected data for different pre-test possibilities. Of the 168 identified relevant articles, 7 studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria for CT, 6 studies for MRI, 11 studies for PET and 8 studies for US. There was no difference in sensitivity and specificity among these imaging modalities, except CT was superior to US in specificity. The pooled estimates for sensitivity were 52% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39% ~ 65%), 65% (34 ~ 87%) 66% (47 ~ 80%), and 66% (45 ~ 77%), on a per-neck basis for CT, MRI, PET and US, respectively. The pooled estimates for specificity were 93% (87% ~ 97%), 81% (64 ~ 91%), 87% (77 ~ 93%), and 78% (71 ~ 83%) for CT, MRI, PET and US, respectively. With pre-examination nodal metastasis probabilities set at 10%, 20% and 30%, the post-exam probabilities of positive nodal metastasis rates were 47%, 66% and 77% for CT; 27%, 46% and 59% for MRI; 36%, 56% and 69% for PET; and 25%, 42% and 56% for US, respectively. Negative nodal metastasis

  15. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  16. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P 2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice

  17. Oral contraceptives induced hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Akshaya Srikanth; V. Manisree

    2013-01-01

    Oral Contraceptives are the pharmacological agents used to prevent pregnancy. These are divided as the combined and progestogen methods and are administered orally, transdermally, systemically and via vaginal route. All these methods contain both oestrogen and progestogen. Vigorous usage of oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids as associated with cholestasis, vascular lesions and hepatic neoplasm. Benign hepatic neoplasms are clearly associated with oral contraceptives. In this article we...

  18. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  19. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  20. Tunnel magnetoresistance in trilayer junctions from first principles: Cr δ-layer doped GaN/AlN/GaN (0 0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, X.Y.; Delley, B.; Freeman, A.J.; Stampfl, C.

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in Cr-doped GaN/AlN/GaN (0 0 0 1) trilayer junctions is studied based on density functional theory calculations. For enhanced performance, we propose δ-Cr-layer doping in GaN, close to the GaN/AlN interfaces. Depending on the doping concentration, Cr dopants produce local metallic (1 ML) or half-metallic (1/2 and 1/4 ML) states surrounded by the host semiconductor materials. Very thin AlN barriers are predicted to yield a low TMR effect. These results help explain existing experimental results and are expected to be valuable with regard to the practical fabrication of improved pure semiconductor spintronic devices.

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer ... oral cancer self-exam each month. An oral examination is performed using a bright light and a ...

  2. Recommendations for neoadjuvant pathologic staging (ypTNM) of cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction for the 8th edition AJCC/UICC staging manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Ishwaran, Hemant; Kelsen, David P; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2016-11-01

    We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups (ypTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration provided data for 22,654 patients with epithelial esophageal cancers; 7,773 had pathologic assessment after neoadjuvant therapy. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed. Random forest analysis identified data-driven neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups wherein survival decreased monotonically with increasing group, was distinctive between groups, and homogeneous within groups. An additional analysis produced data-driven anatomic neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups based only on ypT, ypN, and ypM categories. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced consensus neoadjuvant pathologic stage groups. Grade and location were much less discriminating for stage grouping ypTNM than pTNM. Data-driven stage grouping without grade and location produced nearly identical groups for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. However, ypTNM groups and their associated survival differed from pTNM. The need for consensus process was minimal. The consensus groups, identical for both cell types were as follows: ypStage I comprised ypT0-2N0M0; ypStage II ypT3N0M0; ypStage IIIA ypT0-2N1M0; ypStage IIIB ypT3N1M0, ypT0-3N2, and ypT4aN0M0; ypStage IVA ypT4aN1-2, ypT4bN0-2, and ypTanyN3M0; and ypStage IVB ypTanyNanyM1. Absence of equivalent pathologic (pTNM) categories for the peculiar neoadjuvant pathologic categories ypTisN0-3M0 and ypT0N0-3M0, dissimilar stage group compositions, and markedly different early- and intermediate-stage survival necessitated a unified, unique set of stage grouping for patients of either cell type who receive neoadjuvant therapy. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Delays in Referral of Oral Cancer Patients, A10 yr Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In conclusion, a public enlightenment programme to increase awareness of oral cancer is stressed. In addition, a 3 monthly review of suspicious lesions such as oral leukoplakia, candidiasis, erythroplakia by practitioners is suggested. A yearly oral screen for the over 40's with papaconilau 2- stage staining procedure is ...

  4. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palussiere, Jean; Lagarde, Philippe; Aupérin, Anne; Deschamps, Frédéric; Chomy, François; Baere, Thierry de

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression

  5. Ferroelectricity, Piezoelectricity, and Dielectricity of 0.06PMnN-0.94PZT(45/55 Thin Film on Silicon Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high piezoelectricity and high quality factor ferroelectric thin films are important for electromechanical applications especially the micro electromechanical system (MEMS. The ternary compound ferroelectric thin films 0.06Pb(Mn1/3, Nb2/3O3 + 0.94Pb(Zr0.45, Ti0.55O3 (0.06PMnN-0.94PZT(45/55 were deposited on silicon(100 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering method considering that Mn and Nb doping will improve PZT properties in this research. For comparison, nondoped PZT(45/55 films were also deposited. The results show that both of thin films show polycrystal structures with the main (111 and (101 orientations. The transverse piezoelectric coefficients are e31,eff=−4.03 C/m2 and e31,eff=-3.5 C/m2, respectively. These thin films exhibit classical ferroelectricity, in which the coercive electric field intensities are 2Ec=147.31 kV/cm and 2Ec=135.44 kV/cm, and the saturation polarization Ps=30.86 μC/cm2 and Ps=17.74 μC/cm2, and the remnant polarization Pr=20.44 μC/cm2 and Pr=9.87 μC/cm2, respectively. Moreover, the dielectric constants and loss are εr=681 and D=5% and εr=537 and D=4.3%, respectively. In conclusion, 0.06PMnN-0.94PZT(45/55 thin films act better than nondoped films, even though their dielectric constants are higher. Their excellent ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, and high power and energy storage property, especially the easy fabrication, integration realizable, and potentially high quality factor, make this kind of thin films available for the realistic applications.

  6. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: J.Palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Lagarde, Philippe, E-mail: P.Lagarde@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology Department (France); Aupérin, Anne, E-mail: auperin@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (France); Deschamps, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.deschamps@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Chomy, François, E-mail: F.Chomy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of medical oncology (France); Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression.

  7. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2011-08-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of \\'field cancerisation\\'\\/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  8. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  9. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  10. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  11. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  12. Screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitender, Solanki; Sarika, Gupta; Varada, Hiremath R; Omprakash, Yadav; Mohsin, Khan

    2016-11-01

    Oral cancer is considered as a serious health problem resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Early detection and prevention play a key role in controlling the burden of oral cancer worldwide. The five-year survival rate of oral cancer still remains low and delayed diagnosis is considered as one of the major reasons. This increases the demand for oral screening. Currently, screening of oral cancer is largely based on visual examination. Various evidence strongly suggest the validity of visual inspection in reducing mortality in patients at risk for oral cancer. Simple visual examination is accompanied with adjunctive techniques for subjective interpretation of dysplastic changes. These include toluidine blue staining, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. This review highlights the efficacy of various diagnostic methods in screening of oral cancer. © 2016 Old City Publishing, Inc.

  13. Patterns and Predictors of Early Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Men With pT3N0 Prostate Cancer: Implications for Multimodal Therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briganti, Alberto; Joniau, Steven; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Sun, Maxine; Tombal, Bertrand; Haustermans, Karin; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Montorsi, Francesco; Van Poppel, Hein; Wiegel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to evaluate patterns and predictors of early biochemical recurrence (eBCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP) and adjuvant radiation therapy (aRT) in order to identify which individuals might benefit from additional treatments. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 390 patients with pT 3 N 0 prostate cancer (PCa) receiving RP and aRT at 6 European centers between 1993 and 2006. Patients who were free from BCR at 0.2 ng/mL within 2 or 3 years after aRT. Uni- and multivariable Cox regression analyses predicting overall and eBCR after aRT were fitted. Covariates consisted of preoperative PSA results, surgical margins, pathological stage, Gleason score, and aRT dose. Results: Overall, 5- and 8-year BCR-free survival rates were 77.1% and 70.8%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 86 months after aRT, 33 (8.8%) and 55 (14.6%) men experienced BCR within 2 or 3 years after aRT, respectively. In multivariable analyses, Gleason scores of 8 to 10 represented the only independent predictor of eBCR after aRT (all, P≤.01). The risk of BCR was significantly higher in patients with a Gleason score of 8 to 10 disease than in those with Gleason 2 to 6 within 24 months after treatment, after adjusting for all covariates (all, P≤.04). However, given a 24-month BCR free period, the risk of subsequent BCR for men with poorly differentiated disease was equal to that of men with less aggressive disease (all, P≥.3). Conclusions: High Gleason score represents the only predictor of eBCR after RP and aRT in patients affected by pT 3 N 0 PCa. Given the association between early PSA recurrence, clinical progression, and mortality, these patients might be considered candidates for adjuvant medical therapy and/or prophylactic whole-pelvis radiation therapy in addition to aRT, delivered to the prostatic bed

  14. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  15. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  17. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Braojos, Ines; Diaz Gestoso, Yadira; Franco Odio, Sonia; Samuel Gonzalez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  18. Ipsilateral irradiation for well lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx: results on tumor control and xerostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marín Alicia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In head and neck cancer, bilateral neck irradiation is the standard approach for many tumor locations and stages. Increasing knowledge on the pattern of nodal invasion leads to more precise targeting and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morbidity and tumor control for patients with well lateralized squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx were treated with a prospective management approach using ipsilateral irradiation between 2000 and 2007. This included 8 radical oropharyngeal and 12 postoperative oral cavity carcinomas, with Stage T1-T2, N0-N2b disease. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence was determined. Late xerostomia was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 3. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, five-year overall survival and loco-regional control rates were 82.5% and 100%, respectively. No local or contralateral nodal recurrences were observed. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland was 4.72 Gy and to the contralateral submandibular gland was 15.30 Gy. Mean score for dry mouth was 28.1 on the 0-100 QLQ-H&N35 scale. According to CTCAE v3 scale, 87.5% of patients had grade 0-1 and 12.5% grade 2 subjective xerostomia. The unstimulated salivary flow was > 0.2 ml/min in 81.2% of patients and 0.1-0.2 ml/min in 19%. None of the patients showed grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusion In selected patients with early and moderate stages, well lateralized oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas, ipsilateral irradiation treatment of the primary site and ipsilateral neck spares salivary gland function without compromising loco-regional control.

  19. Ipsilateral irradiation for well lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx: results on tumor control and xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Laura; Martín, Margarita; López, Mario; Marín, Alicia; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background In head and neck cancer, bilateral neck irradiation is the standard approach for many tumor locations and stages. Increasing knowledge on the pattern of nodal invasion leads to more precise targeting and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morbidity and tumor control for patients with well lateralized squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx were treated with a prospective management approach using ipsilateral irradiation between 2000 and 2007. This included 8 radical oropharyngeal and 12 postoperative oral cavity carcinomas, with Stage T1-T2, N0-N2b disease. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence was determined. Late xerostomia was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, five-year overall survival and loco-regional control rates were 82.5% and 100%, respectively. No local or contralateral nodal recurrences were observed. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland was 4.72 Gy and to the contralateral submandibular gland was 15.30 Gy. Mean score for dry mouth was 28.1 on the 0-100 QLQ-H&N35 scale. According to CTCAE v3 scale, 87.5% of patients had grade 0-1 and 12.5% grade 2 subjective xerostomia. The unstimulated salivary flow was > 0.2 ml/min in 81.2% of patients and 0.1-0.2 ml/min in 19%. None of the patients showed grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusion In selected patients with early and moderate stages, well lateralized oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas, ipsilateral irradiation treatment of the primary site and ipsilateral neck spares salivary gland function without compromising loco-regional control. PMID:19723329

  20. Reactions of BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) at fluorinated and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer surfaces: observations of chemical selectivity in ion--surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Shen, J; Koskinen, J; Cooks, R G

    2001-07-01

    Ion-surface reactions involving BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface were investigated using a multi-sector scattering mass spectrometer. Collisions of the B(+) ion yield BF(2)(+) at threshold energy with the simpler product ion BF(+)* appearing at higher collision energies and remaining of lower abundance than BF(2)(+) at all energies examined. In addition, the reactively sputtered ion CF(+) accompanies the formation of BF(2)(+) at low collision energies. These results stand in contrast with previous data on the ion-surface reactions of atomic ions with the F-SAM surface in that the threshold and most abundant reaction products in those cases involved the abstraction of a single fluorine atom. Gas-phase enthalpy data are consistent with BF(2)(+) being the thermodynamically favored product. The fact that the abundance of BF(2)(+) is relatively low and relatively insensitive to changes in collision energy suggests that this reaction proceeds through an entropically demanding intermediate at the vacuum--surface interface, one which involves interaction of the B(+) ion simultaneously with two fluorine atoms. By contrast with the reaction of B(+), the odd-electron species BBr(+)* reacts with the F-SAM surface to yield an abundant single-fluorine abstraction product, BBrF(+). Corresponding gas-phase ion--molecule experiments involving B(+) and BBr(+)* with C(6)F(14) also yield the products BF(+)* and BF(2)(+), but only in extremely low abundances and with no preference for double fluorine abstraction. Ion--surface reactions were also investigated for BBr(n)(+) (n = 0-2) with a hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) surface. Reaction of the B(+) ion and dissociative reactions of BBr(+)* result in the formation of BH(2)(+), while the thermodynamically less favorable product BH(+)* is not observed. Collisions of BBr(2)(+) with the H-SAM surface yield the dissociative ion-surface reaction products, BBrH(+) and BBrCH(3

  1. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  2. Detection of survivin mRNA in healthy oral mucosa, oral leucoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, G; Franchini, R; Bez, C; Sardella, A; Moneghini, L; Pellegrini, C; Bosari, S; Manfredi, M; Vescovi, P; Carrassi, A

    2010-01-01

    Survivin is involved in modulation of cell death and cell division processes. Survivin expression in normal adult tissues has not been fully understood, although it is markedly lower than in cancer, where it is over-expressed. To investigate survivin expression in normal, potentially malignant and cancerous oral mucosa. We measured survivin mRNA levels by real-time RT-PCR in specimens of oral mucosa (15 from normal mucosa, 17 from potentially malignant lesions, 17 from neoplasms). Scores were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc according to Conover. Chi-squared test was used for dichotomous data. The median relative levels of survivin mRNA resulted six for normal mucosa, eight for potentially malignant lesions, 13 for cancers: differences among these three groups were statistically significant, as between cancer and potentially malignant lesions. Expression in normal mucosa and potentially lesions group showed no significant difference. Low, but not marginal expression of survivin in normal mucosa is a new finding, and it could be explained with the higher sensibility of our methods. Survivin expression in oral potentially malignant lesions might indicate a progressive deregulation of expression paralleling oncogenesis, particularly during the first stages of process, suggesting a putative predictive role for survivin.

  3. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. A clinical case of single-stage correction of penetration combined orofacial defect with two microsurgical autografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After surgical treatment for locally advanced oral tumors with resection of soft tissues, mucosal membrane, and facial skeletal structures, there are penetration combined defects, removal of which is a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Mandibular repair is one of the problems in the correction of combined oral defects. Surgeons use different grafts to remove mandibular defects. One-flap transplantation does not always solve all reconstruction problems and ensure the repair of the mucosal membrane, a soft-tissue component, skin integuments, and facial skeleton.The authors describe a clinical case of successful single-stage correction of penetration combined orofacial defect after resection of the tongue, mouth floor, en bloc resection of the lower jaw and mental soft tissues, bilateral cervical supramyochoroidal lymphadenectomy, stage LCL CM mandibular defect formation after J. Boyd, by using two microsurgical autografts (a peroneal skin-muscle-skin autograft and a radial skin-fascia one in a 39-year-old female patient clinically diagnosed with carcinoma of the left mandibular alveolar ridge mucosa, Stage IVA (T4аN0M0.The Department of Microsurgery, P.A. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute, Ministry of Health of Russia, has gained experience in comprehensively correcting extensive combined maxillofacial defects with two or more grafts in 27 patients who underwent autografting with a total of 73 flaps. The most functionally incapacitating and life-incompatible defect was removed at Stage 1 of reconstructive treatment. Delayed reconstruction was made after a complex of specialized antitumor therapy and assessment of treatment results in the absence of progressive growth. A great problem during multi-stage defect correction is presented by the lack of recipient vessels after cervical lymphadenectomy, the presence of soft tissue scar changes, trismus, temporomandibular joint ankylosis, contractures and displacement of the edges of the

  5. Cost-effectiveness of early intervention: comparison between intraluminal bronchoscopic treatment and surgical resection for T1N0 lung cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasic, A.; Brokx, HA; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Paul, RM; Postmus, P.E.; Sutedja, G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with early-stage lung cancer (ESLC) and severe comorbidities, the cost-effectiveness of early intervention may be reduced by screening and treatment-related morbidity and mortality in addition to the risk for non-cancer-related deaths. OBJECTIVES: The use of bronchoscopic

  6. Stability and Unimolecular Reactivity of Palladate(II) Complexes [Ln PdR3 ]- (L=Phosphine, R=Organyl, n=0 and 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Marlene; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2016-10-24

    The reduction of Pd II precatalysts to catalytically active Pd 0 species is a key step in many palladium-mediated cross-coupling reactions. Besides phosphines, the stoichiometrically used organometallic reagents can afford this reduction, but do so in a poorly understood way. To elucidate the mechanism of this reaction, we have treated solutions of Pd(OAc) 2 and a phosphine ligand L in tetrahydrofuran with RMgCl (R=Ph, Bn, Bu) as well as other organometallic reagents. Analysis of these model systems by electrospray- ionization mass spectrometry found palladate(II) complexes [L n PdR 3 ] - (n=0 and 1), thus pointing to the occurrence of transmetallation reactions. Upon gas-phase fragmentation, the [L n PdR 3 ] - anions preferentially underwent a reductive elimination to yield Pd 0 species. The sequence of the transmetallation and reductive elimination, thus, constitutes a feasible mechanism for the reduction of the Pd(OAc) 2 precatalyst. Other species of interest observed include the Pd IV complex [PdBn 5 ] - , which did not fragment via a reductive elimination but lost BnH instead. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effects of Cr Substitution on Negative Thermal Expansion and Magnetic Properties of Antiperovskite Ga1−xCrxN0.83Mn3 Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinge; Tong, Peng; Lin, Jianchao; Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Shuai; Song, Wenhai; Sun, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) and magnetic properties were investigated for antiperovskite Ga1−xCrxN0.83Mn3 compounds. As x increases, the temperature span (ΔT) of NTE related with Γ5g antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is expanded and shifted to lower temperatures. At x = 0.1, NTE happens between 256 and 318 K (ΔT = 62 K) with an average linear coefficient of thermal expansion, αL = −46 ppm/K. The ΔT is expanded to 81 K (151–232 K) in x = 0.2 with αL = −22.6 ppm/K. Finally, NTE is no longer visible for x ≥ 0.3. Ferromagnetic order is introduced by Cr doping and continuously strengthened with increasing x, which may impede the AFM ordering and thus account for the broadening of NTE temperature window. Moreover, our specific heat measurement suggests the electronic density of states at the Fermi level is enhanced upon Cr doping, which favors the FM order rather than the AFM one. PMID:29619367

  8. Effects of Cr Substitution on Negative Thermal Expansion and Magnetic Properties of Antiperovskite Ga1-x Cr x N0.83Mn3 Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinge; Tong, Peng; Lin, Jianchao; Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Shuai; Song, Wenhai; Sun, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) and magnetic properties were investigated for antiperovskite Ga 1- x Cr x N 0.83 Mn 3 compounds. As x increases, the temperature span (Δ T ) of NTE related with Γ 5g antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is expanded and shifted to lower temperatures. At x = 0.1, NTE happens between 256 and 318 K (Δ T = 62 K) with an average linear coefficient of thermal expansion, α L = -46 ppm/K. The Δ T is expanded to 81 K (151-232 K) in x = 0.2 with α L = -22.6 ppm/K. Finally, NTE is no longer visible for x ≥ 0.3. Ferromagnetic order is introduced by Cr doping and continuously strengthened with increasing x , which may impede the AFM ordering and thus account for the broadening of NTE temperature window. Moreover, our specific heat measurement suggests the electronic density of states at the Fermi level is enhanced upon Cr doping, which favors the FM order rather than the AFM one.

  9. First principles study of structural, electronic and magnetic properties of SnGe n (0, ±1) ( n = 1–17) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaadi, Soumaia; Eddine Aiadi, Kamal; Mahtout, Sofiane

    2018-04-01

    The structures, relative stability and magnetic properties of pure Ge n +1, neutral cationic and anionic SnGe n (n = 1–17) clusters have been investigated by using the first principles density functional theory implemented in SIESTA packages. We find that with the increasing of cluster size, the Ge n +1 and SnGe n (0, ±1) clusters tend to adopt compact structures. It has been also found that the Sn atom occupied a peripheral position for SnGe n clusters when n 12. The structural and electronic properties such as optimized geometries, fragmentation energy, binding energy per atom, HOMO–LUMO gaps and second-order differences in energy of the pure Ge n +1 and SnGe n clusters in their ground state are calculated and analyzed. All isomers of neutral SnGe n clusters are generally nonmagnetic except for n = 1 and 4, where the total spin magnetic moments is 2μ b. The total (DOS) and partial density of states of these clusters have been calculated to understand the origin of peculiar magnetic properties. The cluster size dependence of vertical ionization potentials, vertical electronic affinities, chemical hardness, adiabatic electron affinities and adiabatic ionization potentials have been calculated and discussed.

  10. A detailed study of the dehydration process in synthetic strelkinite, Na[(UO2)(VO4)] . nH2O (n = 0, 1, 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleimanov, Evgeny V.; Somov, Nikolay V.; Chuprunov, Evgeny V.; Mayatskikh, Ekaterina F.; Depmeier, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic strelkinite Na[(UO 2 )(VO 4 )] . nH 2 O (n = 0, 1, 2) was systematically investigated by single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermoanalytical methods. The anhydrous form and two hydrates were isolated as single crystals and the structures of these phases solved: Na[(UO 2 )(VO 4 )], monoclinic, P2 1 /c, a = 6.0205(1) Aa, b = 8.3365(1) Aa, c = 10.4164(2) Aa, β = 100.466(2) , V = 514.10(1) Aa 3 , R 1 = 0.0337; Na[(UO 2 )(VO 4 )] . H 2 O, monoclinic, P2 1 /c, a = 7.722(2) Aa, b = 8.512(1) Aa, c = 10.480(4) Aa, β = 113.18(3) , V = 633.3(3) Aa 3 , R 1 = 0.1658; Na[(UO 2 )(VO 4 )] . 2 H 2 O, monoclinic, P2 1 /n, a = 16.2399(5) Aa, b = 8.2844(2) Aa, c = 10.5011(2) Aa, β = 97.644(2) , V = 1400.24(6) Aa 3 , R 1 = 0.0776. A possible mechanism of the structural transformation processes during dehydration is proposed based on the structures of the anhydrous phase and the hydrates. (orig.)

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 7−n}Pt{sub n} with n = 0, 1, 2, . . . 7, bimetallic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce-Tadeo, A. P.; Morán-López, J. L., E-mail: joseluis.moran@ipicyt.edu.mx [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tenológica, División de Materiales Avanzados (Mexico); Ricardo-Chavez, J. L. [Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Laboratorio Nacional de Supercómputo (Mexico)

    2016-11-15

    An exhaustive study of the structural and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 7−n}Pt{sub n} with n = 0, 1, 2, …7, bimetallic clusters is presented. Based on ab initio density functional theory that includes spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and graph theory, the ground state geometry, the local chemical order, and the orbital and spin magnetic moments are calculated. We show how the systems evolves from the 3-d Fe to the quasi-planar Pt clusters. These calculations show that SOC are necessary to describe correctly the composition dependence of the binding energy of these nanoalloys. We observe that the ground state geometries on the Fe rich side resemble the fcc structure adopted by bulk samples. Furthermore, we observe how the spin and orbital magnetic moments depend on the chemical concentration and chemical order. Based on these results, we estimated the magnetic anisotropy energy and found that the largest values correspond to some of the most symmetric structures, Fe{sub 5}Pt{sub 2} and FePt{sub 6}. To determine the degree of non-collinearity, we define an index that shows that in FePt{sub 6} the total magnetic moments, on each atom, are the less collinear.

  12. Dummy run for a phase II study of stereotactic body radiotherapy of T1-T2 N0M0 medical inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djärv, Emma; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia

    2006-01-01

    of       SBRT of T1-T2N0M0 inoperable NSCLC in a dummy run oriented on volumes and       doses. Six Scandinavian centres participated. Each centre received       CT-scans covering the whole lung volumes of two patients with instructions       to follow the study protocol when outlining tumour and target volumes......In forthcoming multicentre studies on stereotactic body radiotherapy       (SBRT) compliance with volume and dose prescriptions will be mandatory to       avoid unnecessary heterogeneity bias. To evaluate compliance in a       multicentre setting we used two cases from an ongoing phase II study......,       prescribing doses and creating dose plans. Volumes and doses of the 12       dose plans were evaluated according to the study protocol. For the two       patients the GTV volume range was 24 to 39 cm3 and 26 to 41 cm3,       respectively. The PTV volume range was 90 to 116 cm3, and 112 to 155 cm3...

  13. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  14. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio

  15. Summary Stage 2018 - SEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access this manual of codes and coding instructions for the summary stage field for cases diagnosed January 1, 2018 and forward. 2018 version applies to every site and/or histology combination, including lymphomas and leukemias. Historically, also called General Staging, California Staging, and SEER Staging.

  16. Oral microbiota and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the...

  17. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  19. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  20. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  1. Oral candidosis in relation to oral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Chandran, R; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2014-09-01

    Symptomatic oral infection with Candida albicans is characterized by invasion of the oral epithelium by virulent hyphae that cause tissue damage releasing the inflammatory mediators that initiate and sustain local inflammation. Candida albicans triggers pattern-recognition receptors of keratinocytes, macrophages, monocytes and dendritic cells, stimulating the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23. These cytokines induce the differentiation of Th17 cells and the generation of IL-17- and/or IL-22-mediated antifungal protective immuno-inflammatory responses in infected mucosa. Some immune cells including NKT cells, γδ T cells and lymphoid cells that are innate to the oral mucosa have the capacity to produce large quantities of IL-17 in response to C. albicans, sufficient to mediate effective protective immunity against C. albicans. On the other hand, molecular structures of commensal C. albicans blastoconidia, although detected by pattern-recognition receptors, are avirulent, do not invade the oral epithelium, do not elicit inflammatory responses in a healthy host, but induce regulatory immune responses that maintain tissue tolerance to the commensal fungi. The type, specificity and sensitivity of the protective immune response towards C. albicans is determined by the outcome of the integrated interactions between the intracellular signalling pathways of specific combinations of activated pattern-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, Dectin-1 and Dectin-2). IL-17-mediated protective immune response is essential for oral mucosal immunity to C. albicans infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Synthesis of benzo-fused 1-azabicyclo[m.n.0]alkanes via the Schmidt reaction: a formal synthesis of gephyrotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, W H; Fang, W

    2000-10-20

    The intramolecular capture of benzocyclobutyl, benzocyclopentyl, and benzocyclohexyl carbocations 7 by azides produces spirocyclic aminodiazonium ions 8, which undergo 1,2-C-to-N rearrangement with loss of dinitrogen to produce benzo-fused iminium ions resulting from either aryl (9) or alkyl (10) migration to the electron-deficient nitrogen atom. Reduction of the iminium ions affords regioisomeric benzo-fused 1-azabicyclo[m.n.0]alkanes, e.g., benzopyrrolizidines, benzoindolizidines, benzoquinolizidines, or perhydrobenzo[f]pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepines in two regioisomeric versions, anilines (e.g., 11-14) and benzylic amines (e.g., 15-18), the result of aryl and alkyl migrations, respectively. Generally, aryl migration is preferred, despite modeling that shows that the lowest energy aminodiazonium ions are those where the departing dinitrogen is preferentially antiperiplanar to the migrating alkyl group rather than the aryl group. The utility of this methodology was illustrated by a formal synthesis of the alkaloid gephyrotoxin 4. A dependence on the efficiency and regioselectivity of the Schmidt reaction upon subtle changes in the structure of the cation precursor was observed, necessitating the exploration of a variety of substrates. Fortunately, these materials were easily made. Ultimately, the azido-alkene 81 bearing a 2-bromoethyl side-chain was useful for the Schmidt reaction, producing the known benzo-fused indolizidine 49, which had been transformed by Ito et al. into gephyrotoxin 4. The synthesis of 49 required nine steps (five purifications) from commercially available 4-methoxy-1-indanone 60 and proceeded in 22% overall yield.

  3. Radiotherapy of early stage glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Chai, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the role of curative radiotherapy and salvage surgery in patients with T1, T2 glottic cancer. Between June 1989 and December 1994, 23 patients with early glottic cancer, 18 with T1N0M0 and 5 with T2N0M0, were treated with radiotherapy at Gyeongsang University Hospital. All patients were male. Median follow-up period was 46 months, and 100% were observed for at least 3 years. Actuarial survival rates at 5 years were 84.3% for 23 patients. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 94.4% for T1 and 53.3% for T2 (P=0.05). The 5-year local control rates was 70.0% for T1 and 60.0% for T2 (P=0.44). Of 8 patients with treatment failure, 6 patients (75.0%) were salvaged with surgery. After surgical salvage, the 5-year local control rates were 87.2% for T1 and 80.0% for T2 (p=0.55). In early stage (Stage I and II) glottic cancer, curative radiotherapy can be a treatment of choice and surgery reserved for salvage of radiotherapy failure. (author)

  4. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  5. Recommendations for clinical staging (cTNM) of cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction for the 8th edition AJCC/UICC staging manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W.; Ishwaran, Hemant; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Kelsen, David P.; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for clinical stage groups (cTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC) provided data on 22,123 clinically staged patients with epithelial esophageal cancers. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed using random survival forest analysis from which (1) data-driven clinical stage groups were identified wherein survival decreased monotonically and was distinctive between and homogeneous within groups and (2) data-driven anatomic clinical stage groups based only on cTNM. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced (3) consensus clinical stage groups. Compared with pTNM, cTNM survival was “pinched,” with poorer survival for early cStage groups and better survival for advanced ones. Histologic grade was distinctive for data-driven grouping of cT2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cT1-2N0M0 adenocarcinoma, but consensus removed it. Grouping was different by histopathologic cell type. For SCC, cN0-1 was distinctive for cT3 but not cT1-2, and consensus removed cT4 subclassification and added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. For adenocarcinoma, N0-1 was distinctive for cT1-2 but not cT3-4a, cStage II subgrouping was necessary (T1N1M0 [IIA] and T2N0M0 [IIB]), advanced cancers cT3-4aN0-1M0 plus cT2N1M0 comprised cStage III, and consensus added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. Treatment decisions require accurate cStage, which differs from pStage. Understaging and overstaging are problematic, and additional factors, such as grade, may facilitate treatment decisions and prognostication until clinical staging techniques are uniformly applied and improved. PMID:27905171

  6. Recommendations for clinical staging (cTNM) of cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction for the 8th edition AJCC/UICC staging manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Ishwaran, Hemant; Blackstone, Eugene H; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Apperson-Hansen, Carolyn

    2016-11-01

    We report analytic and consensus processes that produced recommendations for clinical stage groups (cTNM) of esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer for the AJCC/UICC cancer staging manuals, 8th edition. The Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC) provided data on 22,123 clinically staged patients with epithelial esophageal cancers. Risk-adjusted survival for each patient was developed using random survival forest analysis from which (1) data-driven clinical stage groups were identified wherein survival decreased monotonically and was distinctive between and homogeneous within groups and (2) data-driven anatomic clinical stage groups based only on cTNM. The AJCC Upper GI Task Force, by smoothing, simplifying, expanding, and assessing clinical applicability, produced (3) consensus clinical stage groups. Compared with pTNM, cTNM survival was "pinched," with poorer survival for early cStage groups and better survival for advanced ones. Histologic grade was distinctive for data-driven grouping of cT2N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cT1-2N0M0 adenocarcinoma, but consensus removed it. Grouping was different by histopathologic cell type. For SCC, cN0-1 was distinctive for cT3 but not cT1-2, and consensus removed cT4 subclassification and added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. For adenocarcinoma, N0-1 was distinctive for cT1-2 but not cT3-4a, cStage II subgrouping was necessary (T1N1M0 [IIA] and T2N0M0 [IIB]), advanced cancers cT3-4aN0-1M0 plus cT2N1M0 comprised cStage III, and consensus added subgroups 0, IVA, and IVB. Treatment decisions require accurate cStage, which differs from pStage. Understaging and overstaging are problematic, and additional factors, such as grade, may facilitate treatment decisions and prognostication until clinical staging techniques are uniformly applied and improved. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. Oral cavity and jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solntsev, A.M.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatome of oral cavity and jaw is described. Diseases of the teeth, jaw, large salivary glands, temporo-mandibular articulation are considered. Roentgenograms of oral cacity and jaw of healthy people are presented and analyzed as well as roentgenograms in the above-mentioned diseases

  8. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  9. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  11. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  12. What Is an Oral Piercing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is an Oral Piercing? Article Chapters What Is an Oral Piercing? print full article print this chapter email this article Oral piercing can cause pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, ...

  13. Pentaatomic planar tetracoordinate carbon molecules [XCAl(3)](q) [(X,q) = (B,-2), (C,-1), (N,0)] with C-X multiple bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhong-Hua; Shao, Chang-Bin; Gao, Si-Meng; Ding, Yi-Hong

    2010-11-07

    Among the fascinating planar tetracoordinate carbon (ptC) species, pentaatomic molecules belong to the smallest class, well-known as "pptC". It has been generally accepted that the planarity of pptC structure is realized via the "delocalization" of the p(z) lone pair at the central carbon and the ligand-ligand bonding interaction. Although "localization" is as key driving force in organic chemistry as "delocalization", the "localization" concept has not been applied to the design of pptC molecules, to the best of our knowledge. In this paper, we apply the "localization" strategy to design computationally a series of new pptC. It is shown that the central carbon atom and one "electronegative" ligand atom X (compared to the Al ligand) effectively form a highly localized C-X multiple bond, converting the lone pair at the central carbon to a two-center two-electron π-bond. At the aug-cc-pVTZ-B3LYP, MP2 and CCSD(T) levels, the designed 18-valence-electron pptC species [XCAl(3)](q); [(X,q) = (B,-2), (C,-1), (N,0)] are found to each possess a stable ptC structure bearing a C-X double bond, indicated by the structural, molecular orbital, Wiberg bonding, potential energy surface and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) analysis. Moreover, our OVGF calculations showed that the presently disclosed (yet previously unconsidered) pptC structure of [C(2)Al(3)](-) could well account for the observed photoelectron spectrum (previously only ascribed to a close-energy fan-like structure). Therefore, [C(2)Al(3)](-) could be the first pptC that bears the highly localized C-X double bond that has been experimentally generated. Notably, the pptC structure is the respective global minimum point for [BCAl(3)](2-) and [NCAl(3)], and the counterion(s) would further stabilize [BCAl(3)](2-) and [C(2)Al(3)](-). Thus, these newly designed pptC species with interesting bonding structure should be viable for future experimental characterization. The presently applied "localization" approach

  14. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  15. The combination of Ki67, histological grade and estrogen receptor status identifies a low-risk group among 1,854 chemo-naïve women with N0/N1 primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Carina; Bak, Martin; Borgquist, Signe

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to confirm a previously defined prognostic index, combining a proliferation marker, histological grade, and estrogen receptor (ER) in different subsets of primary N0/N1 chemo-naïve breast cancer patients.......The aim was to confirm a previously defined prognostic index, combining a proliferation marker, histological grade, and estrogen receptor (ER) in different subsets of primary N0/N1 chemo-naïve breast cancer patients....

  16. Seven Stages of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease > Stages Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Myths Clinical Studies Research Brain Donation ...

  17. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  18. Late-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  19. Stages and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  20. Early-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  1. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the cancer. This blockage can cause the kidney to enlarge or stop working. Stage IIIB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  2. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  3. Oral insulin reloaded: a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Eric; Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-05-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion's share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  6. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the omentum. The cancer ... lymph nodes behind the peritoneum. In stage IIIC, cancer is found in one or both ovaries or fallopian tubes and has spread to the ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth ... involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  12. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  13. Cisplatin, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-18

    CDKN2A-p16 Negative; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  14. Role and models for compensation of tobacco use prevention and cessation by oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crail, Jon; Lahtinen, Aira; Beck-Mannagetta, Johann; Benzian, Habib; Enmarks, Birgitta; Jenner, Tony; Knevel, Ron; Lulic, Martina; Wickholm, Seppo

    2010-02-01

    Appropriate compensation of tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) would give oral health professionals better incentives to provide TUPAC, which is considered part of their professional and ethical responsibility and improves quality of care. Barriers for compensation are that tobacco addiction is not recognised as a chronic disease but rather as a behavioural disorder or merely as a risk factor for other diseases. TUPAC-related compensation should be available to oral health professionals, be in appropriate relation to other dental therapeutic interventions and should not be funded from existing oral health care budgets alone. We recommend modifying existing treatment and billing codes or creating new codes for TUPAC. Furthermore, we suggest a four-staged model for TUPAC compensation. Stages 1 and 2 are basic care, stage 3 is intermediate care and stage 4 is advanced care. Proceeding from stage 1 to other stages may happen immediately or over many years. Stage 1: Identification and documentation of tobacco use is part of each patient's medical history and included into oral examination with no extra compensation. Stage 2: Brief intervention consists of a motivational interview and providing information about existing support. This stage should be coded/reimbursed as a short preventive intervention similar to other advice for oral care. Stage 3: Intermediate care consists of a motivational interview, assessment of tobacco dependency, informing about possible support and pharmacotherapy, if appropriate. This stage should be coded as preventive intervention similar to an oral hygiene instruction. Stage 4: Advanced care. Treatment codes should be created for advanced interventions by oral health professionals with adequate qualification. Interventions should follow established guidelines and use the most cost-effective approaches.

  15. Improved clinical staging of esophageal cancer with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Yong Soo; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Han; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Byung Tae

    2004-01-01

    Since preoperative staging in esophageal cancer is important in both therapy and prognosis, there had been many efforts to improve its accuracy. Recent studies indicate that whole body FDG-PET has high sensitivity in detection of metastasis in esophageal cancer. Therefore, we added FDG-PET to other conventional methods in staging esophageal cancer to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Subjects were 142 esophageal cancer patients (average 62.3±8.3 yrs) who received CT and PET just before operation. First, we compared N stage and M stage of the CT or PET with those of the post-operative results. Then we compared the stage according to the EUS (T stage) and CT (N and M stage) or EUS (T stage) and CT and PET (N and M stage) to that according to the post-operative results. Among 142 patients, surgical staging of 69 were N0 and 73 were N1. In M staging, 128 were M0 and 14 were M1. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of N staging were 35.6%, 89.9%, 62.0% with CT and 58.9%, 71.0%, 64.7% with PET, respectively. In M staging, 14.3%, 96.9%, 88.7% with CT and 50.0%, 94.5%, 90.1% with PET, respectively. The concordances of [EUS+CT] and [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative results were 41.2% and 54.6%, respectively and there was significant improvement of staging with additional PET scan (p<0.005). The concordance of [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative result was significantly increased compared to that of [EUS+CT]. Thus, the addition of FDG-PET with other conventional methods may enable more accurate preoperative staging

  16. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  17. Regional nodal relapse in surgically staged Merkel cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeller, Ulrike; Mueller, Thomas; Schubert, Tina; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Brenner, Winfried [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kiecker, Felix [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Dermatology, Berlin (Germany); Schicke, Bernd [Tumor Center Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Oliver [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-10-08

    The nodal relapse pattern of surgically staged Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) with/without elective nodal radiotherapy (RT) was studied in a single institution. A total of 51 patients with MCC, 33 % UICC stage I, 14 % II, 53 % III (4 lymph node metastases of unknown primary) were eligible. All patients had surgical staging: 23 patients sentinel node biopsy (SNB), 22 patients SNB followed by lymphadenectomy (LAD) and 6 patients LAD. In all, 94 % of the primary tumors (PT) were completely resected; 57 % of patients received RT, 51 % of known PT sites, 33 % (8/24 patients) regional RT to snN0 nodes and 68 % (17/27 patients) to pN+ nodes, mean reference dose 51.5 and 50 Gy, respectively. Mean follow-up was 6 years (range 2-14 years). A total of 22 % (11/51) patients developed regional relapses (RR); the 5-year RR rate was 27 %. In snN0 sites (stage I/II), relapse occurred in 5 of 14 nonirradiated vs. none of 8 irradiated sites (p = 0.054), resulting in a 5-year RR rate of 33 % versus 0 % (p = 0.16). The crude RR rate was lower in stage I (12 %, 2/17 patients) than for stage II (43 %, 3/7 patients). In stage III (pN+), RR appeared to be less frequent in irradiated sites (18 %, 3/14 patients) compared with nonirradiated sites (33 %, 3/10 patients, p = 0.45) with 5-year RR rates of 23 % vs. 34 %, respectively. Our data suggest that adjuvant nodal RT plays a major role even if the sentinel nodes were negative. Adjuvant RT of the lymph nodes in patients with stage IIa tumors and RT after LAD in stage III tumors is proposed and should be evaluated prospectively. (orig.) [German] Untersucht wurde das regionaere Rezidivmuster des Merkelzell-Karzinoms (MCC) nach chirurgischem Staging und stadienadaptierter Therapie. Eingeschlossen wurden 51 Patienten mit lokalisiertem MCC: 33 % hatten UICC-Stadium-I-, 14 % -II-, 53 % -III-Tumoren (davon 4 Lymphknotenmetastasen eines unbekannten Primaertumors). Alle Patienten erhielten ein chirurgisches Staging: 23 Waechterlymphknotenbiopsien (SNB

  18. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  19. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  20. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  1. Oral Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get involved Understanding Dental Research People Resources About Understanding Events Get involved Dental Research Resources Contact Sitemap The Oral Cancer Foundation admin 2017-11-12T16:49:25+ ...

  2. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  3. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  4. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  5. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  6. Oral erythroplakia--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, Peter A; Philipsen, Hans Peter

    2005-07-01

    Oral erythroplakia (OE) is considered a rare potentially malignant lesion of the oral mucosa. Reports entirely devoted to OE are very few, and only two reviews none of which are of recent date have been published. Only the true, velvety, red homogeneous OE has been clearly defined while the terminology for mixed red and white lesions is complex, ill-defined and confusing. A recent case control study of OE from India reported a prevalence of 0.2%. A range of prevalences between 0.02% and 0.83% from different geographical areas has been documented. OE is predominantly seen in the middle aged and elderly. One study from India showed a female:male ratio of 1:1.04. The soft palate, the floor of the mouth and the buccal mucosa is commonly affected. A specific type of OE occurs in chutta smokers in India. Lesions of OE are typically less than 1.5 cm in diameter. The etiology of OE reveals a strong association with tobacco consumption and the use of alcohol. Histopathologically, it has been documented that in OE of the homogenous type, 51% showed invasive carcinoma, 40% carcinoma in situ and 9% mild or moderate dysplasia. Recently, genomic aberrations with DNA aneuploidy has been demonstrated. p53 mutations with different degrees of dysplasia may play a role in some cases of OE. Transformation rates are considered to be the highest among all precancerous oral lesions and conditions. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Data on laser excision are not available. Recurrence rates seem to be high, reliable data are, however, missing. More studies on OE are strongly needed to evaluate a number of so far unanswered questions. The natural history of OE is unknown. Do OEs develop de novo or are they developing from oral leukoplakia through several intermediate stages of white/red lesions? The possible role of fungal infection (Candida micro-organisms) is not clear as is the possible role of HPV co-infection in the development of OE. More data on incidence and prevalence

  7. Coal derivates for reduction of SO{sub 2} N0{sub x}; Derivados del Carbon para la Reduccion de SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The project was divided in two well-differentiated parts: SO{sub 2} removal and NO{sub x} reduction. In both cases, carbon materials play a unique role in the processes, either as calcium sorbent support (SO{sub 2} removal) or as catalyst support and reducing agent (NO{sub x} reduction). Removal of SO{sub 2}. This process was carried out by calcium sorbents at relatively low temperature (T<300 degree centigree), forming CaSO{sub 3} (instead of CaSO{sub 4}) that decomposes at lower temperatures, making regeneration easier. High dispersion of the active species, CaO, has been obtained using carbon materials (activated carbons, chars, etc) and other inorganic compounds as supports. The effect of oxygen, carbon dioxide and steam in the reaction atmosphere and the regeneration process have been also investigated. Thermal regeneration is possible for several cycles, however, carbon gasification also takes place. To control, and to void that effect the reaction and regeneration temperatures should be carefully controlled and carbons with low reactivity should be selected. The process was scaled (100-2000) using briquette samples obtained by physical mixture of char and Ca(OH){sub 2}. The SO{sub 2} removal levels were similar to those found in the laboratory scale. NO{sub x} reduction. The possibility of using potassium containing coal-briquettes for NO and NO{sub x} reduction has been investigated. The preparation method of briquettes presents the advantage of using a binder agent (humic acid) which contains the catalyst (potassium). The system catalyst-binder-coal stays intimately joined by a moulding stage and subsequent pyrolysis, providing proper mechanical resistance to the coal-briquettes. With the purpose to improve the briquettes activity, different variables of the preparation process have been investigated (potassium content-added with the binder and/or KOH-. rank and mineral matter content of the coal precursor, pyrolysis temperature and pressure of the

  8. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  9. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  10. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  11. Ethnicity and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Bedi, R

    2000-09-01

    Oral squamous-cell carcinoma, the main type of oral cancer, is among the ten most common cancers in the world. The aims of this paper were first, to consider whether there was evidence of marked ethnic variations in the incidence, management, and survival of oral cancer, and then, to review possible explanations for these variations. Evidence from the literature suggests that there is marked, inter-country variation in both the incidence and mortality from oral cancer. There is also growing evidence of intracountry ethnic differences, mostly reported in the UK and USA. These variations among ethnic groups have been attributed mainly to specific risk factors, such as alcohol and tobacco (smoking and smokeless), but dietary factors and the existence of genetic predispositions may also play a part. Variations in access to care services are also an apparent factor. The extent of ethnic differences in oral cancer is masked by the scarcity of information available. Where such data are accessible, there are clear disparities in both incidence and mortality of oral cancer between ethnic groups.

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  14. Multiple stage railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaland, K.; Hawke, R.S.; Scudder, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator for accelerating a projectile by movement of a plasma arc along the rails. The railgun is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources as the projectile moves through the bore of the railgun. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can be prevented by connection of the energy sources to the rails through isolation diodes. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails into electrically isolated rail sections. In such case means are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse or laser device is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage

  15. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work......Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...

  16. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Turbine stage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    A model of turbine stage for calculations of NPP turbine department dynamics in real time was developed. The simulation results were compared with manufacturer calculations for NPP low-speed and fast turbines. The comparison results have shown that the model is valid for real time simulation of all modes of turbines operation. The model allows calculating turbine stage parameters with 1% accuracy. It was shown that the developed turbine stage model meets the accuracy requirements if the data of turbine blades setting angles for all turbine stages are available [ru

  18. Oral Cancer: Awareness and Knowledge Among Dental Patients in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed; Dhaifullah, Esam; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Tarakji, Bassel

    2017-06-01

    More than 50 % of oral cancer cases are diagnosed at advanced stages. Public knowledge about oral cancer can help in prevention and early detection of the disease. The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of awareness and knowledge about signs and risk factors of oral cancer among dental patients in Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 1410 randomly selected patients attending dental departments within public hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. The significance level was set at P oral cancer. Some 68.2 and 56.5 %, respectively, were able to correctly identify tobacco and alcohol as risk factors. More than two thirds of subjects had no knowledge about any signs of oral cancer. Participants with lower than university education were significantly less aware, and had much less knowledge, of the signs and risk factors of oral cancer. The knowledge regarding oral cancer among Saudi dental patients is alarmingly low. Interventions to improve public knowledge about oral cancer and attitudes towards early diagnosis and treatment are urgently indicated.

  19. Clinical implications of epigenetic regulation in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Wendy; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2015-12-01

    Oral cancer is a high incidence cancer which is of major public health concern in India being the most common cancer in males and fifth most common cancer in females in India, contributing to 26% of the global oral cancer burden. The major risk factors of oral cancer are tobacco, alcohol and high risk Human Papilloma Virus type 16/18. However, only 3-12% of the high risk individuals with dysplasia develop oral cancer. Thus, individual genomic variants representing the genomic constitution and epigenetic alterations play a critical role in the development of oral cancer. Extensive epigenetic studies on the molecular lesions including oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genes associated with apoptosis, DNA damage repair have been reported. The current review highlights epigenetic regulation with a focus on molecular biomarkers and epidrug therapy in oral cancer. Epigenetic regulation by hypermethylation, histone modifications and specific microRNAs are often associated with early events and advanced stages in oral cancer, and thus indicate epidrug therapy for intervention. The presence of epigenetic marks in oral lesions, cancers and tumor associated mucosa emphasizes indications as biomarkers and epidrugs with therapeutic potential for better patient management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  1. O{sub 2} adsorption and dissociation on the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) tri-metallic nanoparticles: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sha; Yang, Yongpeng; Huang, Shiping, E-mail: huangsp@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • O{sub 2} adsorption and dissociation on Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} NPs are performed by DFT. • Adsorption energies of O{sub 2} and O are strongly affected by the coordination number. • Adsorption energy and d-band center displays the opposite change tendency. • Ni{sub 13}@Pt{sub 42} is the most active catalyst among Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) NPs. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate O{sub 2} adsorption and dissociation on the icosahedral Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) tri-metallic nanoparticles. The parallel adsorption of O{sub 2} on Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) is stronger than the vertical adsorption. The adsorption of O{sub 2} on the bridge site (B1) is favorable in the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) nanoparticles, while the adsorption of O atom on the hollow site (H1) is preferred. The adsorption energies of O{sub 2} and O are strongly affected by the coordination number. Low coordination site shows strong adsorption of O{sub 2} and O on the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) nanoparticles. The adsorption energies of O{sub 2} and O atoms are found to be correlated well with the d-band center of surface Pt. For the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and13) nanoparticles catalysts, the ORR activity follows the order of Ni{sub 13}@Pt{sub 42} > Pd{sub 13}@Pt{sub 42} > Pd{sub 12}Ni{sub 1}@Pt{sub 42} > Pd{sub 1}Ni{sub 12}@Pt{sub 42}, illustrating that the Ni{sub 13}@Pt{sub 42} is the strongest ORR activity among the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and13) nanoparticles catalysts. Our results have important significance to understand the mechanism of O{sub 2} dissociation on the Pd{sub 13-n}Ni{sub n}@Pt{sub 42} (n = 0, 1, 12, and 13) tri-metallic nanoparticles.

  2. Treatments of the oral leukoplakia by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocci, M.; Mohsen, M.; Lo Giudice, R.; Del Vecchio, A.; Gaimari, G.; Tribolati, L.; Palaia, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Oral leukoplakia is catalogued under the group of "potentially malignant disorders". In daily practice, the World Health Organization definition "white patch or plaque that cannot be characterized clinically or histologically as any other disease" is completed by including the observation that it cannot be removed by simple scraping, thereby distinguishing it from pseudo-membranous candidiasis. The aim of this study is to find a definitive treatment of oral leukoplakia, because of its recurrence and its potentiality to the malignant transformation. There are currently different approaches to oral leukoplakia: scalpel surgery, systemic therapy (carotenoids, vitamins, etc.), electro-cauterization, cryotherapy and the use of the laser. In every lesion, biopsy and histological analysis has been performed to identify the stage and classification of the oral leukoplakia. Laser can be used for the complete excision of the lesion (which is more effective, but also more invasive), for the photodynamic therapy (non-invasive procedure, which requires several applications) or for the vaporization of the lesion (very precise treatment and relatively easy to perform). Laser treatments have shown better healing, less soft tissues retraction and less post-operative pain, comparing with traditional surgery. The use of systemic therapies and smoking habit interruption (where present) has been also useful to reduce the lesions before the clinical treatments. The treatment has always to be supported by histological analysis to identify the risk and consequently planning the clinical approach.

  3. MODERN MEANS OF EXPRESSIVE ORAL SPEECH CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadehzda Yurevna Gutareva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The notion “an oral communicative test in the form of interview” is carried out from linguistics, methods of teaching foreign languages and physiology point of view in the article. The basic components of foreign communicative competence are indicated in the works of Russian and foreign scientists, and the new component parts are added that are actual for a specialist of nonlinguistic institute of higher education. The author of the work also dwells on the concept that there are two types of oral communicative tests in the form of interview and in the form of role playing game in the modern lingvo-didactic testing and the choice of this and that form always depends on purpose, objects and stage of testing and teaching. Purpose: to determine the basic advantages of using oral communicative tests in the form of interview. Methodology: studying and analysis of linguistic, psychological, pedagogical and methodological literature on the theme of investigation, questionnaire and testing of students. Results: the analysis of the purpose and functions of using oral communicative tests in the form of interview has shown importance of their application in practice.Practical implications: it is possible for us to use the results of this work in courses of theory of methodology of teaching foreign languages.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-16

  4. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... under a microscope . Stage II In stage II , cancer has spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ... spread to one lymph node in the groin . Cancer has also spread: to connective tissue just under the skin of the penis . Also, ...

  5. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  6. [Oral health in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Duska; Brkanić, Tatjana; Stojić, Sinisa

    2002-01-01

    Good oral health care during pregnancy is essential but often overlooked factor of dental growth as well as of other structures of oral cavity. Pregnancy is the time when conscious approach to preventive oral care should increase. Preventive measures during pregnancy mean usage of fluorides, special dietary measures and increased oral hygiene habits. Preventive measures in pregnant women have one goal: providing conditions for development of fetal teeth as well as preventing tooth decay in pregnant women. The optimal period for introducing preventive measures is the first trimester of pregnancy. Because of hormonal alterations there is an increased incidence of dental diseases: gingivitis and low salivary pH (inflammation and bleeding gums). Eating habits of pregnant women may lead to frequent snacking on candy or other decay-promoting foods, thereby increasing the risk of caries. However, very poor oral health, possible dental complications and their consequences to the health as well as emotional status represent very strong reasons for activation of dental health care in this period.

  7. The Oral Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  8. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  9. Evaluation of Oral Stereognostic Ability After Rehabilitating Patients with Complete Dentures: In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshi, S.; Gujjari, Anil Kumar; Thippeswamy, H. N.; Raghunath, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stereognosis has been defined as the appreciation of the form of objects by palpation. Whilst this definition holds good for the manual exploration of objects, it is possible for the shape of objects to be explored intra orally referred to as oral stereognosis. To better understand patients’ relative satisfaction with complete dentures, differences in oral stereognostic perception, based on the identification of 6 edible objects was analyzed in a group of 30 edentulous individuals at 3 stages...

  10. Larynx cancer in early stages: bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umana Herrera, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    A bibliographical analysis on the subject of early laryngeal cancer (neoplams staged as Tis, T1-T2 N0) was carried out through a bibliographic review of updated articles. The anatomy, epidemiology, generalities, clinical presentation and behavior of cancer were described. The biopsy, the clinical history, the physical examination and radiodiagnostic studies are used for a correct staging and according to the stage, to select the appropriate treatment. Treatment modalities and prescription dose for this type of cancer are compared and explained. The locoregional evaluation of glottic cancer is performed by Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Ultrasound (US) and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET/CT). CAT and NMR have shown to be more accurate in the evaluation of glottic larynx cancer compared with clinical endoscopic examination alone. CAT, NMR, US and PET/CT were clearly more sensitive and specific in the assessment of the neck that only palpation. The preservation of the voice is an important parameter in choosing a therapeutic modality. Radiotherapy has proven to be the most used and known treatment. Radiation therapy with Cobalt 60 is commonly used in Costa Rica for the treatment of early larynx cancer [es

  11. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  12. Combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy for advanced oral or oropharngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Kita, Midori; Tanaka, Makiko; Ishii, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    During the period 1982-1988, 34 patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with radical radiation therapy combined with intraarterial chemotherapy. Five patients were clinically staged as Stage II,15 as Stage III, and 14 as Stage IV. For intraarterial chemotherapy, ACNU (25mg/body) or CDDP (20 mg/m 2 ) plus MMC (6 mg/m 2 ) was used. Overall, the complete response rate was 56%: it was independent of the site of carcinoma, clinical stage, and the kind of drugs. The two-year cumulative survival rate was 80% for Stage II, 56% for Stage III, and 61% for Stage IV. Side effects were not so severe as to continue with the withdrawal of chemotherapy. In view of the efficacy and safety, combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy should be performed in the treatment of oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma. (N.K.)

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeloev, B.; Kirkegaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Copenhagen Univ. Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and four patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity were treated at the Finsen Institute in cooperation with the ENT-surgical departments between 1978 and 1982. The primary treatment consisted of radiotherapy alone in 74%, surgery alone in 4%, and a combination of radiotherapy and surgery in 15% of the patients. 2% received other treatment (cryotherapy), 5% did not complete the planned radiotherapy, and 1% were not treated at all. Of 203 patients with tumour remnant or first recurrence, 45% were operated, 2% received radiotherapy, and 2% combined treatment. This treatment strategy made 38% of the patients free of disease in the follow-up period (3 1/2 to 8 years) or until the patients died from other causes. Fifty-nine percent of the patients died from their oral carcinomas. Tumour size (T), lymph node status (N), and tumour stage were as expected important prognostic factors. (orig.)

  14. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...... ressourceanvendelse er muligt at skabe en betydeligt forbedret mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre Key words: Geriatric dentistry, nursing home, community health services, prevention, situated learning...

  15. Oral lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.; Katpar, S.; Ali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous dermatological disorder, with intraoral manifestation. Skin lesions prevail with oral mucosal lesions. Prevalence of lichen planus, as an oral pre-malignant lesion, is 1-2 % population. Lateral border, dorsal tongue, gingiva, hard palate and vermilion border are common sites and lesions appear as reticular, plaque-like and papular intraoral types. Skin presents with pururitic, polygonal papules. Atrophic and erosive are the known intraoral pre-malignant types. A case report is presented, which responded well to steroid therapy. (author)

  16. Screening for Oral Cavity Cancer: A 1-year Experience of a Regional Hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, T H; Yuan, C H; Chen, R F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the risk factors affecting precancerous lesions, and cancer of oral cavity, and to assess efficacy of visual screening for oral mucosal lesions. The medical records of patients older than 30 years of age with history of habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing that received screening for oral mucosal lesions between January 2012 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' age, gender, risk factors, screening findings, and histopathology results of biopsy were included for further analysis. A total of 1341 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 1080 males and 261 females ranging from 30 to 96 years of age, with a mean age of 53.9±13.6 years. After screening, 226 (16.9%) were found to be positive of oral lesions. Among these 226 patients, 69 (30.5%) underwent biopsy under local anesthesia, and the histopathology showed malignancy in 13 (5.8%). All of the confirmed malignant cases were squamous cell carcinoma. Among them, 12 received further staging examination and one was lost to follow-up resulting in unknown stage. The early stage oral cavity cancer (stage I and II) accounted for 84.6% (11/13). The detection rate of early stage oral cavity cancer in our study was reasonable. Therefore, visual screening for oral cavity cancer is recommended for patients with habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing.

  17. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Li-7((d)over-right-arrow, n(0))Be-8 and Li-7((d)over-right-arrow, n(1))Be-8 reactions below 160 keV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M. W.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Howell, C. R.; Joshi, K.; Nelson, S. O.; Perdue, B. A.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.; Braizinha, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2006-01-01

    The polarization observables have been determined for the Li-7(d,n(0))Be-8 and Li-7(d,n(1))Be-8 reactions at beam energies between 80 and 160 keV. A Transition Matrix Element (TME) analysis revealed unique, dominant p-wave solutions for both neutron channels. The polarization observables were

  19. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...... the second procedure, when operations were staged less than 3 weeks apart. A correlation between these hypertensive episodes and the occurrence of new neurologic symptoms could not be shown. However, as this correlation has been proved in several other reports, bilateral carotid endarterectomy is advised...... to be staged at least 3 weeks apart. In addition, a conservative attitude towards contralateral asymptomatic lesions is proposed....

  20. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Munde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female.

  2. Radiotherapy and verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidyasagar, M.S.; Fernandes, D.J.; Pai Kasturi, D.; Akhileshwaran, R.; Rao, K.; Rao, S.; Rao, R.V.; Solomon, J.G.R.

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and seven cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India between 1977 and 1987 were analysed concerning location within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy. The most common site was the buccal mucosa followed by the buccogingival sulcus. Only 13.2% of the patients presented with T1 or T2 tumours and 32.7% had clinically negative nodes. Biopsy had to be repeated more than once in 22 patients to get confirmation in invasive carcinoma. The 5-year survival rate was 35% for stage III and 26% for stage IV. The treatment results with radiotherapy were comparable with those for ordinary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. It is felt that the treatment policy for verrucous carcinoma can be the same as for ordinary squamous cell carcinoma. In order to prevent delay in diagnosis and treatment, proper cooperation between the treating oncologist and the pathologist is essential. (orig.)

  3. The Outcome for Patients With Pathologic Node-Positive Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Case-Matched Analysis of pN1 and pN0 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hemelryk, Annelies [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Meerleer, Gert; Ost, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Poelaert, Filip [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Gersem, Werner [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Decaestecker, Karel [Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); De Visschere, Pieter [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Improved outcome is reported after surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with lymph node (LN) positive (N1) prostate cancer (PC). Surgical series have shown that pathologic (p)N1 PC does not behave the same in all patients. The aim of this study was to perform a matched-case analysis to compare the outcome of pN1 and pN0 PC after high-dose EBRT plus ADT. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy up to 80 Gy was delivered to the prostate with a minimal dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis for pN1 patients. After matching, Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to compare the 5-year biochemical and clinical relapse-free survival (bRFS and cRFS), prostate cancer–specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS). Acute and late rectal and urinary toxicity was evaluated. Results: Sixty-nine pN1 PC patients were matched 1:1 with pN0 PC patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. The 5-year bRFS and cRFS for pN1 versus pN0 PC patients were 65% ± 7% versus 79% ± 5% (P=.08) and 70% ± 6% versus 83% ± 5% (P=.04) respectively. No significant difference was found in bRFS or cRFS rates between low volume pN1 (≤2 positive LNs) and pN0 patients. The 5-year PCSS and OS were comparable between pN1 and pN0 PC patients: PCSS: 92% ± 4% versus 93% ± 3% (P=.66); OS: 82% ± 5% versus 80% ± 5% (P=.58). Severe toxicity was rare for both groups, although pN1 patients experienced significantly more acute grade 2 rectal toxicity. Conclusion: Primary EBRT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT is a legitimate treatment option for pN1 PC patients, especially those with ≤2 positive LNs, and this with bRFS and cRFS rates comparable to those in pN0 PC patients. For pN1 PC patients with >2 positive LNs, bRFS and cRFS are worse than in pN0 patients, but even in this subgroup, long-term disease control is obtained.

  4. The Outcome for Patients With Pathologic Node-Positive Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Case-Matched Analysis of pN1 and pN0 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hemelryk, Annelies; De Meerleer, Gert; Ost, Piet; Poelaert, Filip; De Gersem, Werner; Decaestecker, Karel; De Visschere, Pieter; Fonteyne, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Improved outcome is reported after surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for patients with lymph node (LN) positive (N1) prostate cancer (PC). Surgical series have shown that pathologic (p)N1 PC does not behave the same in all patients. The aim of this study was to perform a matched-case analysis to compare the outcome of pN1 and pN0 PC after high-dose EBRT plus ADT. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy up to 80 Gy was delivered to the prostate with a minimal dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis for pN1 patients. After matching, Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to compare the 5-year biochemical and clinical relapse-free survival (bRFS and cRFS), prostate cancer–specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS). Acute and late rectal and urinary toxicity was evaluated. Results: Sixty-nine pN1 PC patients were matched 1:1 with pN0 PC patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. The 5-year bRFS and cRFS for pN1 versus pN0 PC patients were 65% ± 7% versus 79% ± 5% (P=.08) and 70% ± 6% versus 83% ± 5% (P=.04) respectively. No significant difference was found in bRFS or cRFS rates between low volume pN1 (≤2 positive LNs) and pN0 patients. The 5-year PCSS and OS were comparable between pN1 and pN0 PC patients: PCSS: 92% ± 4% versus 93% ± 3% (P=.66); OS: 82% ± 5% versus 80% ± 5% (P=.58). Severe toxicity was rare for both groups, although pN1 patients experienced significantly more acute grade 2 rectal toxicity. Conclusion: Primary EBRT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT is a legitimate treatment option for pN1 PC patients, especially those with ≤2 positive LNs, and this with bRFS and cRFS rates comparable to those in pN0 PC patients. For pN1 PC patients with >2 positive LNs, bRFS and cRFS are worse than in pN0 patients, but even in this subgroup, long-term disease control is obtained.

  5. Feasibility of Real-Time Near-Infrared Fluorescence Tracer Imaging in Sentinel Node Biopsy for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anders; Juhl, Karina; Charabi, Birgitte; Mortensen, Jann; Kiss, Katalin; Kjær, Andreas; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is an established method in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for staging the cN0 neck and to select patients who will benefit from a neck dissection. Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has the potential to improve the SNB procedure by facilitating intraoperative visual identification of the sentinel lymph node (SN). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of fluorescence tracer imaging for SN detection in conjunction with conventional radio-guided technique. Prospective study of patients with primary OSCC planned for tumor resection and SNB. Thirty patients were injected peritumorally with a bimodal tracer (ICG-99mTc-Nanocoll) followed by lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT to define the SNs and their anatomic allocation preoperatively. SNs were detected intraoperatively with a hand-held gamma-probe and a hand-held NIRF camera. In 29 of 30 subjects (97%), all preoperatively defined SNs could be identified intraoperatively using a combination of radioactive and fluorescence guidance. A total of 94 SNs (mean 3, range 1-5) that were both radioactive and fluorescent ex vivo were harvested. Eleven of 94 SNs (12%) could only be identified in vivo using NIRF imaging, and the majority of those were located in level 1 close to the primary tumor. A combined fluorescent and radioactive tracer for SNB is feasible, and the additional use of NIRF imaging may improve the accuracy of SN identification in oral cancer patients. Intraoperative fluorescence guidance seems of particular value when SNs are located in close proximity to the injection site.

  6. Clinicopathological parameters, recurrence, locoregional and distant metastasis in 115 T1-T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma remains high. Oral and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas are the sixth most common cancer in the world. Several clinicopathological parameters have been implicated in prognosis, recurrence and survival, following oral squamous cell carcinoma. In this retrospective analysis, clinicopathological parameters of 115 T1/T2 OSCC were studied and compared to recurrence and death from tumour-related causes. The study protocol was approved by the Joint UCL/UCLH committees of the ethics for human research. The patients' data was entered onto proformas, which were validated and checked by interval sampling. The fields included a range of clinical, operative and histopathological variables related to the status of the surgical margins. Data collection also included recurrence, cause of death, date of death and last clinic review. Causes of death were collated in 4 categories (1) death from locoregional spread, (2) death from distant metastasis, (3) death from bronchopulmonary pneumonia, and (4) death from any non-tumour event that lead to cardiorespiratory failure. The patients' population comprised 65 males and 50 females. Their mean age at the 1st diagnosis of OSCC was 61.7 years. Two-thirds of the patients were Caucasians. Primary sites were mainly identified in the tongue, floor of mouth (FOM), buccal mucosa and alveolus. Most of the identified OSCCs were low-risk (T1N0 and T2N0). All patients underwent primary resection ± neck dissection and reconstruction when necessary. Twenty-two patients needed adjuvant radiotherapy. Pathological analysis revealed that half of the patients had moderately differentiated OSCC. pTNM slightly differed from the cTNM and showed that 70.4% of the patients had low-risk OSCC. Tumour clearance was ultimately achieved in 107 patients. Follow-up resulted in a 3-year survival of 74.8% and a 5-year survival of 72.2%. Recurrence was identified in 23 males and 20 females. The mean age of 1st diagnosis of the

  7. Early diagnosis in primary oral cancer: is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.; de Bree, R.; Brakenhoff, R.; Coebergh, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this treatise oral carcinogenesis is briefly discussed, particularly with regard to the number of cell divisions that is required before cancer reaches a measurable size. At that stage, metastatic spread may have already taken place. Therefore, the term "early diagnosis" is somewhat misleading.

  8. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  9. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  10. Bladder Involvement in Stage I Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paula C; Missmer, Stacey A; Laufer, Marc R

    2017-08-01

    Endometriosis-the ectopic implantation of endometrial-like tissue-affects 10% of adolescent females and adults. Bladder involvement, causing dysuria and hematuria, occurs in a very small number of endometriosis patients. The patient presented at age 12 years with dysuria and pelvic pain. Laparoscopy revealed stage I endometriosis. Postoperatively, she reported persistent dysuria and passage of tissue in her urine. Cystoscopy showed diffuse erythema; urine cytology revealed glandular and spindle cells suggestive of endometriosis. She was transitioned from oral contraceptives to an intranasal gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, with symptom resolution. Intravesicular endometriosis coinciding with stage I disease supports a mechanism of endometriosis dissemination other than direct bladder infiltration. Patients with endometriosis who complain of urinary symptoms warrant assessment, because intravesicular bladder involvement cannot be excluded using pelviscopy. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stages of Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ultrasound monitor . The picture can be printed to be looked at later. MRI (magnetic resonance ... procedures may be used in the staging process: Bone scan : A procedure to check if there are ...

  12. Multiple Stages 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations...

  13. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the influence of oral hygiene habits and practices on the risk of developing oral leukoplakia. Design: Case control study. Setting: Githongo sublocation in Meru District. Subjects: Eighty five cases and 141 controls identified in a house-to-house screening. Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral ...

  14. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  15. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram‑negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  16. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  17. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  18. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  19. Normalization: A Preprocessing Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Patro, S. Gopal Krishna; Sahu, Kishore Kumar

    2015-01-01

    As we know that the normalization is a pre-processing stage of any type problem statement. Especially normalization takes important role in the field of soft computing, cloud computing etc. for manipulation of data like scale down or scale up the range of data before it becomes used for further stage. There are so many normalization techniques are there namely Min-Max normalization, Z-score normalization and Decimal scaling normalization. So by referring these normalization techniques we are ...

  20. Staging with spatial filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is known that small scale beam instabilities limit the focusable energy that can be achieved from a terawatt laser chain. Spatial filters are currently being used on CYCLOPS to ameliorate this problem. Realizing the full advantage of such a filter, however, may require certain staging modifications. A staging methodology is discussed that should be applicable to the CYCLOPS, 381, and SHIVA systems. Experiments are in progress on CYCLOPS that will address directly the utility of the proposed approach

  1. First Stage Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    This photograph shows the intense smoke and fire created by the five F-1 engines from a test firing of the Saturn V first stage (S-1C) in the S-1C test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  2. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  3. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  4. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  5. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  6. Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Daniela I; Setterfield, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a relatively common autoimmune T-cell-mediated disease of unknown aetiology affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. Its prevalence varies between 0.5 and 2.2% of the population in epidemiological studies with a peak incidence in the 30-60 years range and with a female predominance of 2:1. Mucosal lichen planus tends to follow a chronic course with acute exacerbations. Spontaneous remission of oral lichen planus (OLP) is uncommon, and indeed mucosal LP may become worse with time. In contrast, cutaneous lichen planus may follow a milder clinical course though some variants may be severe such as those affecting the palms and soles and the scalp and the genital tract in females (vulvovaginal gingival LP) where scarring leads to significant complications. It is important to identify those cases that may be drug induced or be associated with a contact allergic or irritant reaction (lichenoid reaction) or the rarer oral presentation of discoid lupus erythematosus. There is a very small risk of malignancy (approximately 1:200 patients/year) associated with oral lichen planus; thus patients should be informed that long term monitoring via their general dental practitioner is appropriate. This review will focus on the clinical presentation and management of oral lichen planus.

  7. Oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehalić Meliha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 29 - year Lichen planus is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune skin disease, that is often manifested, except on the skin, in the oral cavity in a variety of clinical forms. The prevalence of the disease in the general population is about 1-2%. Etiopathogenesis is not still well understood. Histopathology, in addition to the basic methods, anamnesis and physical examination, is vital for proper diagnosis of oral lichen planus (OLP. Very diverse and loaded histological findings are common for all forms of oral lichen planus. We reported the case of oral lichen planus in a 49 years old male patient, who presented to the Dentistry clinic of Medical faculty of Priština with burning and itching symptoms and changes in the buccal mucosa. Histopathological analysis of biopsy tissue conformed clinical diagnosis of lichen planus. Due to the possibility for malignant transformation of lesions, the long-term follow-up of patients with this disease is of great importance.

  8. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We ... surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating ... late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ...

  2. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  3. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  4. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  5. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  6. Correlation of serum biomarkers (TSA & LSA) and epithelial dysplasia in early diagnosis of oral precancer and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Hemant; Kumar, C Anand

    Oral cancer is currently the most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths, which is usually preceded by oral pre-cancerous lesions and conditions. Altered glycosylation of glycoconjugates, such as sialic acid, fucose, etc. are amongst the important molecular changes that accompany malignant transformation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate usefulness of serum Total Sialic Acid (TSA) and serum Lipid-Bound Sialic Acid (LSA) as markers of oral precancerous lesions and histopathologically correlating them with grades of epithelial dysplasia. Blood samples were collected from 50 patients with oral precancer (Leukoplakia & OSMF), 25 patients with untreated oral cancer and 25 healthy subjects. Serum sialic acid (total and lipid bound) levels were measured spectrophotometrically. Tissue samples from all the patients were evaluated for dysplasia. Serum levels of total and lipid bound sialic acid were significantly elevated in patients with oral precancer and cancer when compared with healthy subjects. Analysis of variance test documented that there is progressive rise in serum levels of sialic acid with the degree of dysplastic changes in oral precancer patients. We observed positive correlation between serum levels of the markers and the extent of malignant disease (TNM Clinical staging) as well as histopathological grades. The results suggested that serum levels of TSA and LSA progressively increases with grades of dysplasia in precancerous groups and cancer group, when compared with healthy controls. These glycoconjugates, especially LSA has the clinical utility in indicating a premalignant change.

  7. Oral Biopsy: A Dental Gawk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sir,. Dermatologists are often confronted with neoplasms and diseases of the oral cavity. Although many may be reluctant to perform oral surgical procedures, a biopsy is often needed to establish a definitive diagnosis, and biopsy of the oral cavity is a safe and useful technique that can be easily employed by dermatologists.

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ... OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk ...

  10. Clinical results of sentinel lymph node (SN) biopsy for oral cancer. Relationship between SN localization and metastasis in tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Hino, Satoshi; Terakado, Nagaaki; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    Attempts were made to detect micrometastasis in N0 neck of oral cancer patients using sentinel lymph node (SN) biopsy (SNB). We previously described our approach to identify SN using a radioisotope ( 99m Tc-Tin colloid)-guided and dye-guided method. Micrometastases were detected by means of serial sections and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen mRNA. In this study, we evaluated the radiolocalization of SN and identification of metastatic lymph node in N0 oral cancer patients. The positive rate of metastatic lymph node in N0 oral cancer was 35% and the diagnostic sensitivity of SNB was 95%. The SNB detected subclinical metastases in 4 of 10 N0 patients with tongue cancer. Moreover, in 3 of these 4 cases, all metastatic lymph nodes consisted with SNs. Postoperative cervical metastasis was observed in a patient whose SNB was negative. While more experience is needed, we believe the SN concept for tongue cancer is established, and practical application in clinical settings is anticipated. (author)

  11. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  12. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  13. Effect of Fixed Metallic Oral Appliances on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    There is a substantial proportion of the population using fixed metallic oral appliances, such as crowns and bridges, which are composed of various dental alloys. These restorations may be associated with a number of effects on oral health with variable degrees of severity, to review potential effects of using fixed metallic oral appliances, fabricated from various alloys. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched using certain combinations of keywords related to the topic. The search revealed that burning mouth syndrome, oral pigmentation, hypersensitivity and lichenoid reactions, and genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are the major potential oral health changes associated with fixed prosthodontic appliances. Certain oral disorders are associated with the use of fixed metallic oral appliances. Patch test is the most reliable method that can be applied for identifying metal allergy, and the simultaneous use of different alloys in the mouth is discouraged.

  14. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral doxifluridine plus low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Jin Sik; Suh, Chang Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The use of oral chemotherapeutic agents in chemoradiotherapy provides several advantages. Doxifluridine, an oral 5-FU prodrug, has been shown to be effective in colorectal cancer. We attempted a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine plus a low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer patients. In this study, toxicity and efficacy were evaluated. Methods and Materials: There were 23 patients with primary unresectable rectal cancer in this trial, 21 of whom were available for analysis. The patients were treated with oral doxifluridine (900 mg/day) plus oral leucovorin (30 mg/day) from days 1 to 35, and pelvic radiation of 45 Gy over 5 weeks. Surgical resection was performed 5-6 weeks after the treatment. Results: Acute toxicity involved thrombocytopenia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, and skin reaction. All were in Grade 1/2, except diarrhea, which was not only the most frequent (7 patients, 33.3%), but also the only toxicity of Grade 3 (2 patients). The clinical tumor response was shown in 5 patients (23.8%) as a complete response and 13 patients (61.9%) as a partial response. A complete resection with negative resection margin was done in 18 patients (85.7%), in 2 of whom a pathologic complete response was shown (9.5%). The overall downstaging rate in the T- and N-stage groupings was 71.4% (15 patients). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the efficacy and low toxicity of chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine. Currently, a Phase III randomized trial of chemoradiotherapy is ongoing at our institute to compare the therapeutic efficacy of oral 5-FU with respect to i.v. 5-FU in locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

  15. The role of diagnostic ultrasound as a new diagnostic aid in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Subramaniyam Venkataraman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Only very few studies have been done in the past to evaluate the usefulness and limitations of ultrasonography in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This study, though in an embryonic stage, has been done to bring this technique to limelight and to put forth the importance of its use and limitations in the branch of oral surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate and study the characteristic pattern of the oral tissues on gray scale ultrasonography and to assess the practical applicability of this new diagnostic technique in diagnosing various tissue pathologies in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  16. Efficacy of radiotherapy of oral mucosa cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, Yu.I.; Garbuzov, M.I.; Sarantseva, I.P.; Popov, N.V.; Pereslegin, O.I.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of 10-year experience of a radiological department (962 patients) indicated late admission of oral mucosa cancer patients for specialized treatment: 75-85% of the patients were admitted with Stage 2-4 disease. The assessment of the efficacy of radiotherapy according to the 3 ad 5-year survival rates showed that better results were obtained for buccal mucosa cancer and the worst for mouth fundus cancer. Regional metastates are a poor prognostic sign, particularly fixed metastases in patients with tongue and mouth fundus cancer. Combined therapy turned out be the most effective in tongue cancer. In different variants of dose delivery in time the most favorable results were obtained with small fractionation (a conventional course). However it should be noted that a split course was usually applied to weak elderly patients with advanced stages of disease

  17. Ethanol oxidation reactions catalyzed by water molecules: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Hisaoka, S.; Nitta, T.

    2002-09-01

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the catalytic role of water molecules in the oxidation reaction of ethanol: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2) . The results show that the potential energy barrier for the reaction is 88.0 kcal/mol in case of n=0, while it is reduced by ˜34 kcal/mol when two water molecules are involved ( n=2) in the reaction. As a result, the rate constant increases to 3.31×10 -4 s-1, which shows a significant catalytic role of water molecules in the ethanol oxidation reactions.

  18. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  19. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  20. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  1. Composers on stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    A trend on the scene of contemporary music is composers going on stage, performing their pieces themselves. Within a discourse of popular music, this is more the rule than exception, but when it comes to the context of contemporary scored music, the historical and aesthetic context differs......, and something quite different is undergoing. This paper intends to discuss three examples of performances in which the composer’s appearance on stage was an important part of the piece, - both when it came to the role as a performer and as an individual person – as representer and presenter. The paper intends...

  2. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  3. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures ...

  4. Fractal analysis in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Bhai Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractal analysis (FA quantifies complex geometric structures by generating a fractal dimension (FD, which can measure the complexity of mucosa. FA is a quantitative tool used to measure the complexity of self-similar or semi-self-similar structures. Aim and Objective: The study was done to perform the FA of oral mucosa with keratotic changes, as it is also made up of self-similar tissues, and thus, its FD can be calculated. Results: In oral leukoplakia, keratinization increases the complexity of mucosa, which denotes fractal geometry. We evaluated and compared pretreated and post-treated oral leukoplakia in 50 patients with clinically proven oral leukoplakia and analyzed the normal oral mucosa and lesional or keratinized mucosa in oral leukoplakia patients through FA using box counting method. Conclusion: FA using the fractal geometry is an efficient, noninvasive prediction tool for early detection of oral leukoplakia and other premalignant conditions in patients.

  5. Are stage IV vestibular schwannomas preoperatively different from other stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Stéphane; Dubreuil, Christian; Zaouche, Sandra; Ferber-Viart, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on the clinical and paraclinical symptoms of patients suffering from Stage IV vestibular schwannomas (VSs). In this prospective study, we included 734 patients who have VS and candidates for operation. Patients were classified as having Stage I, II, III, or IV tumors according to Tos criteria as evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. PREOPERATIVE CLINICAL EVALUATION: We recorded the occurrence of complaints (%) and duration (yr) of hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorder. Preoperative paraclinical evaluation included pure-tone (PTA) and speech audiometry, auditory brainstem response (ABR) patterns, and vestibular deficit at videonystamography (VNG). Continuous variables were compared between Stage IV and other stages using analysis of variance. Qualitative variables expressed as a percentage of presence were compared between Stage IV and other stages using percentage comparison. Quantitative Parameters. Patients with Stage IV VS were significantly younger as compared with patients with other stages. Stage IV hearing loss was greater compared with other stages at 250 and 500 Hz but smaller at 2,000 and 8,000 Hz. We found no difference in the loss of PTA between Stage IV and the other stages. Speech discriminancy score was smaller in Stage IV. The durations of hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders were similar whatever the tumor stage. Auditory brainstem response patterns showed no difference in Wave III latency between Stage IV VS and other stages, whereas Wave V latency and V-I interval were higher in Stage IV. Both ABR threshold and VNG caloric deficit were higher in Stage IV VS compared with other stages. Qualitative Parameters. The percentage of patients with Stage IV was lower than that with Stages II and III. The percentage of men and women was similar in all stages. The occurrence of hearing loss was similar in all stages, whereas that of tinnitus was lower in Stage IV compared with Stages I and II. In

  6. Invasive candidiasis and oral manifestations in premature newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco-Araujo, José Endrigo; Araújo, Diana Ferreira Gadelha; Barbosa, Patrícia Gomes; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Medeiros, Ana Myriam Costa de

    2013-01-01

    To investigate prevalence of invasive candidiasis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to evaluate oral diseases and Candida spp. colonization in low birth weight preterm newborns. A descriptive epidemiological study performed in two stages. First, prevalence of candidiasis was analyzed in a database of 295 preterm patients admitted to hospital for over 10 days and birth weight less than 2,000g. In the second stage, oral changes and Candida spp. colonization were assessed in 65 patients weighing less than 2,000g, up to 4 week-old, hospitalized for over 10 days and presenting oral abnormalities compatible with fungal lesions. Swab samples were collected in the mouth to identify fungi. Prevalence of candidiasis was 5.4% in the database analyzed. It correlated with prolonged hospital length of stay (poral mucosa and tongue. Intense oral colonization by Candida spp was observed (80%). The frequency of invasive candidiasis was low and correlated with low birth weight and prolonged hospital stay. The most common oral changes were white plaques compatible with pseudomembranous candidiasis and colonization by Candida spp. was above average.

  7. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  8. Development of a new disintegration method for orally disintegrating tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakutani, Ryo; Muro, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tadashi

    2010-07-01

    Recently, the focus has been on the importance of assessing the oral disintegrative properties of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs). In particular, in the development stages and the quality control field of ODT products, a physical assessment method which easily measures oral disintegrative properties is desired. For this reason, we developed a new disintegration test method (Kyoto-model disintegration method or KYO method), which is useful to predict the oral disintegrative properties of an ODT easily, and examined the availability of the method. In the KYO method, ODT samples were classified in terms of their water permeability, and a moderate water volume was decided. Subsequently, the disintegrative properties were assessed with the newly proposed method. For 25 commercial prescription ODTs used as samples, a good correlation was shown between the results of a human sensory test by five healthy male volunteers and the results using the KYO method. Furthermore, the KYO method could evaluate time-dependent changes in ODT samples. On the other hand, no correlation was observed between the Japanese Pharmacopeia disintegration test and the human sensory test. These results suggested that the KYO method reflected the disintegration nature of the ODTs in the oral cavity, and could easily be applied to development stages and the quality control field of ODT products.

  9. Oral cancer screening practices of oral health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)