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Sample records for staging chest ct

  1. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: chest CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Helena Ribeiro; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ranke, Felipe Mussi von [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Diagnostico por Imagem; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Souza, Carolina Althoff [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the findings on chest CTs in 16 patients (8 men and 8 women) with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients ranging from 2 to 72 years of age. The evaluation of the CT scans was independently performed by two observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. The inclusion criteria were presence of abnormalities on the CT scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathological examination of the papillomatous lesions. Results: The most common symptoms were hoarseness, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections. The major CT findings were nodular formations in the trachea, solid or cavitated nodules in the lung parenchyma, air trapping, masses, and consolidation. Nodular formations in the trachea were observed in 14 patients (87.5%). Only 2 patients had lesions in lung parenchyma without tracheal involvement. Only 1 patient had no pulmonary dissemination of the disease, showing airway involvement only. Solid and cavitated lung nodules were observed in 14 patients (87.5%) and 13 (81.2%), respectively. Masses were observed in 6 patients (37.5%); air trapping, in 3 (18.7%); consolidation in 3 (18.7%); and pleural effusion, in 1 (6.3%). Pulmonary involvement was bilateral in all cases. Conclusions: The most common tomography findings were nodular formations in the trachea, as well as solid or cavitated nodules and masses in the lung parenchyma. Malignant transformation of the lesions was observed in 5 cases. (author)

  2. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  3. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  4. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  5. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  6. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  7. Screening for traumatic aortic tear with chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptopoulos, V.; Sheiman, R.G.; Phillips, D.A.; Davidoff, A.; Silva, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if chest CT can be used in the screening of traumatic aortic tear, using CT evidence of mediastinal fluid (presumably blood) as a criterion for aortography. Dynamic CT limited to the region of the aortic arch was performed in all patients undergoing abdominal CT because of blunt trauma. Over a period of 2 years, 131 such patients also had thoracic aortograms performed within 123 hours of CT. Traumatic tear of the aorta was identified in 10 patients; all had abnormal CT scans (evidence of fluid), but only eight had abnormal chest radiographs. Of the 121 patients with normal aortograms, 86 had normal and 35 had abnormal CT scans. The chest radiographs were normal in 18 and abnormal in 103. Comparing chest radiography with CT, there was no significant difference in sensitivity (80% vs 100%), but the specificity and accuracy of CT were significantly higher (71% vs 15% and 74% vs 20%, respectively)

  8. Generalities of anomalous CT chest non tumoral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibarboure, L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about the generalities of multidetector CT in the pulmonary, the diaphragmatic, the pleural and the mediastinum pathology.These techniques as well as the virtual endoscopy allow visualize volumetric thorax reconstructions, brain diseases, opacities, radiolucent images, respiratory and vascular diseases, pneumonia, embolism, AIDS stage, tuberculosis, tumors, etc

  9. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17

  10. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  11. The role of CT in assessing chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsa, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Thoracic pain represents the common feature of a wide range of diseases of different causes. Usually, chest pain requires a fast workup, in order to eliminate potentially hazardous underlying conditions. The objective of the paper consists of presenting the role of computerized tomography (CT) in assessing the different causes and conditions related to chest pain. Materials and methods: The educational presentation relies on current literature data and mostly on images obtained from patients admitted in the various clinics and departments of our hospital, suffering from chest pain as admittance condition or as a symptom appeared during the hospital stay. Results: There are various radiological and imaging options for assessing a patient with chest pain, with reference to the underlying condition, type of pain onset (acute or chronic), specific indications and contraindications. From all these, CT is considered one of the most useful imaging options, in terms of diagnosis accuracy, fast workup, cost and availability. This paper focuses on the role of CT, presenting the most important diseases and conditions related to potential occurrence of chest pain and the most specific CT signs and findings usually reported in this setting. Furthermore, the presentation separates acute and chronic conditions, presenting the actual imaging protocols employed in this circumstances. Finally, there are considerations regarding CT rule-out protocols used in patients with acute chest pain in emergency conditions. Conclusions: Fast and accurate diagnosis is crucial for patient outcome, often life-saving, but currently there is no single algorithm in the imaging assessment of chest pain, while choosing the best imaging option relies mainly on history, clinical and laboratory data. CT is one of the most important imaging options available in patients with both acute and chronic chest pain. CT rule-out techniques have still to establish their clear role in a

  12. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015.

  13. Intracavitary pulmonary aspergilloma: comparison of CT with plain chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chun Hwan; Im, Jung Gi; Yu, Eun Ju; Han, Man Chung

    1991-01-01

    Saprophytic intracavitary fungus ball is the most common form of pulmonary involvement of aspergillosis. Crescent-shaped air shadow surrounded by a creativity wall is known to be a characteristic of pulmonary aspergilloma on plain chest radiograph. However, in case of early lesion in which intracavitary aspergilloma is overlapped with adjacent destroyed lung or mediastinal and hilar density, the air meniscus can not be demonstrated on plain radiograph. In such a case, CT scan might provide additional information that suggests fungus ball. The aim of this study is to describe the variable CT appearances of pulmonary aspergilloma in addition to air meniscus sign and to correlate the findings on CT with those of plain radiograph and pathology. The diagnosis of intracavitary aspergilloma was suggested on both CT and plain radiograph in case that air-meniscus sign was visible. CT scans could add more diagnostic information over chest radiographs such as small peripheral air density or sponge-like air shadow

  14. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

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    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  15. Sedation versus general anaesthesia in paediatric patients undergoing chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, W.W.M.; So, N.M.C.; Metreweli, C.; Chen, P.P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: CT of the chest in paediatric patients often requires sedation or general anaesthesia to minimize motion artefacts. Both sedation and general anaesthesia are associated with atelectasis which obscures the underlying pulmonary pathology. We conducted a prospective study to compare these two methods with respect to degree of motion artefacts and extent of atelectasis. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients undergoing 22 chest CT examinations were randomly selected for either sedation or general anaesthesia. The total area of atelectasis and the degree of motion artefacts were measured. Results: The mean percentage of atelectasis was 6.67% for general anaesthesia and 0.01% for sedation (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the quality of the images between the sedation patients and the general anaesthesia patients. Conclusion: Whenever the clinical condition permits it, sedation rather than general anaesthesia should be given to paediatric patients undergoing chest CT. (orig.)

  16. Chest CT findings in pediatric Wegener's granulomatosis

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    Levine, Daniel [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Akikusa, Jonathan [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Rheumatology, Melbourne (Australia); Manson, David [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Silverman, Earl; Schneider, Rayfel [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rheumatology, Toronto (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Although pulmonary involvement occurs in the majority of children and adolescents with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), relatively little has been published regarding the CT imaging manifestations in this group of patients. To determine the frequency and types of chest CT abnormalities in active pediatric WG (pWG). The study was a retrospective examination of 29 chest CT examinations performed at diagnosis (n=14) and during disease flares (n=15) in 18 children. The most common abnormalities were nodules (seen in 90% of examinations), ground-glass opacification (52%), and air-space opacification (45%). Of examinations with nodules, 73% demonstrated nodules >5 mm in diameter and 69% demonstrated more than five nodules; 17% had cavitary lesions. The only abnormality with a significant difference in prevalence between diagnosis and disease flares was air-space opacification, present in 71% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.01). In accordance with the findings of published adult studies and at variance with those of prior pediatric studies, our findings indicate that chest CT abnormalities in active pWG are frequent, most commonly comprising nodules and ground-glass opacification, which may be difficult to detect on plain radiography. We therefore advocate the routine use of chest CT for all affected patients, both at the time of presentation and during disease flares. (orig.)

  17. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Becker, A.; Knez, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [de

  18. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  19. Early experiences with crowdsourcing airway annotations in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheplygina, Veronika; Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying

    2016-01-01

    Measuring airways in chest computed tomography (CT) images is important for characterizing diseases such as cystic fibrosis, yet very time-consuming to perform manually. Machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, but need large sets of annotated data to perform well. We investigate whether...

  20. CT and MR findings of chest wall masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Eun Suk; Kwon, Sun Young; Ko, Eun Ju; Lee, Sang Young; Kang, Hye Jeong

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic radiological findings of various diseases forming chest wall masses by CT and MR. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MR findings of the chest wall masses in 31 patients. Morphology, density, features of contrast enhancement, and location of the mass within the bony thorax or soft tissue were analyzed. Benign lesions of bony thorax were osteochondritis (n = 2), tuberculosis (n = 1), and osteochon droma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of bony thorax were Ewing's sarcoma (n = 1) and metastasis (n = 3). Benign lesions of soft tissue were abscess (n = 1), tuberculosis (n = 7), lipoma (n = 1), cavernous hemangioma (n = 2), cavernous lymphangioma (n = 1), and neurofibroma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of soft tissue were lymphoma (n = 1), spindle cell sarcoma (n = 1), metastasis (n = 8). Tuberculosis of the chest wall (n = 8) were ill-defined hypodense (n = 7) or isodense (n = 1) mass than surrounding muscle on pre-enhanced CT scan. All massess showed peripheral rim enhancement after contrast enhancement. Five cases were associated with pulmonary or pleural tuberculosis. All malignant lesions of bony thorax showed bone destruction, but inflammatory processes also showed bone destruction. MR showed characteristic signal intensity in the case of lipoma (n = 1) and hemangioma (n = 1). We conclude that CT and MR are helpful for differential diagnosis of chest wall masses

  1. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Towe, Christopher; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  2. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  3. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul; Kim, Dong Woo; Juhng, Seon Kwan

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  4. CT heads diagnosing chest pathology? Whatever next?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdsworth, Gary, E-mail: gary.holdsworth@midyorks.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Midyorks Hospitals NHS Trust, Pinderfields General Hospital Aberford Road Wakefield, West Yorkshire, WF1 4DG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.clarke@midyorks.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Midyorks Hospitals NHS Trust, Pinderfields General Hospital Aberford Road Wakefield, West Yorkshire, WF1 4DG (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    This case report presents two cases where subcutaneous emphysema visualised on computerised tomography examinations of the head subsequently led to the diagnoses of pathology within the thorax. The pathophysiology of traumatic subcutaneous emphysema within the head and neck is briefly discussed, along with examples of other causes of this condition within this anatomical region. The primary aim of this report is to draw attention to the necessity for a thorough review of any CT head examination, including both intra- and extra-cranial structures, undertaken at a variety of window settings.

  5. Atelectasis on pediatric chest CT: comparison of sedation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, M.A.; McEachern, A.M.; Jamieson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Background. A change in practice at our institution resulted in increased use of anesthesia for CT scan of the chest in children who required sedation. Objective. To determine whether there is a difference in the frequency or severity of pulmonary atelectasis on CT scan in children sedated by anesthesiologists compared with children sedated by radiologists using intravenous pentobarbital. Materials and methods. Retrospective blinded review of 60 CT scans of the chest performed in 41 children. Forty-one studies in children sedated by radiologists (median age 29 months) were compared with 19 studies in children sedated by anesthesiologists (median age 25 months). Results. Atelectasis sufficient to obscure pulmonary metastases was shown in 5 of 41 (12 %) radiology sedations and 13 of 19 (68 %) anesthesiology sedations (P < 0.01). Higher grades of atelectasis were recorded in children under anesthesia (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children undergoing general anesthesia compared with intravenous pentobarbital sedation. Consideration should be given to the use of forced inspiration in children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  6. Atelectasis on pediatric chest CT: comparison of sedation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, M.A.; McEachern, A.M.; Jamieson, D.H. [Department of Radiology, Children`s and Women`s Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada).; Kahwaji, R. [Department of Anaesthesia, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Background. A change in practice at our institution resulted in increased use of anesthesia for CT scan of the chest in children who required sedation. Objective. To determine whether there is a difference in the frequency or severity of pulmonary atelectasis on CT scan in children sedated by anesthesiologists compared with children sedated by radiologists using intravenous pentobarbital. Materials and methods. Retrospective blinded review of 60 CT scans of the chest performed in 41 children. Forty-one studies in children sedated by radiologists (median age 29 months) were compared with 19 studies in children sedated by anesthesiologists (median age 25 months). Results. Atelectasis sufficient to obscure pulmonary metastases was shown in 5 of 41 (12 %) radiology sedations and 13 of 19 (68 %) anesthesiology sedations (P < 0.01). Higher grades of atelectasis were recorded in children under anesthesia (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children undergoing general anesthesia compared with intravenous pentobarbital sedation. Consideration should be given to the use of forced inspiration in children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  7. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin.

  8. Staging in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; PET-CT versus Standard Staging Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Yalçın

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important factor for accurate treatment of patients with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is accuracy of the initial staging. The aim of this study was to determine how often patients, staged as local or local-advanced disease by standard staging procedures (SSPs, would be staged to have a metastatic disease based on the findings of the positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT scan. Methods: Patients with SCLC who were staged as I, II, or III disease by SSPs (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging, 7th edition formed the study population. SSPs included computed tomography of chest, abdomen, brain (or magnetic resonance imaging of brain, and bone scintigraphy. These patients were re-staged with 18F-FDG PET-CT scan. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, 27 patients were prospectively studied. Of these patients, 92.5% were male and the median age was 61. Among 27 patients, distant metastasis was detected by PET-CT in 7 (25.9% patients. Two of 7 patients were determined as stage IIIA by SSPs and 5 of 17 patients that were determined as stage IIIB by SSPs were upstaged to metastatic disease by PET-CT. All of the 7 patients had bone metastasis by PET-CT. But bone metastasis could not be detected with bone scintigraphy. Conclusion: PET-CT detected distant metastasis in one quarter of SCLC stage III patients by SSPs. Patients who staged local-advanced SCLC with CT of the chest have to be assessed by PET-CT for extracranial distant metastasis.

  9. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A.; Bustos F, M.

    2017-10-01

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI vol ). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  10. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Božović Predrag; Ciraj-Bjelac Olivera; Aranđić Danijela; Hadnađev Darka; Stojanović Sanja

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE) models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manu...

  11. Evaluation of the radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  12. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ

  13. The diagnostic value of indeterminate lung lesions on staging chest computed tomographies in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette Williaume; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Selection of pulmonary staging modality in colorectal cancer surgery is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) clearly outperforms x-ray in terms of sensitivity, but findings of indeterminate lung lesions remain a problem. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance...... of such indeterminate lung findings in staging CT scans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprises a retrospective analysis of 131 consecutive patients who underwent colorectal cancer surgery in 2004. A preoperative staging CT scan of the chest and abdomen was performed in all patients. Twenty-six patients (20%) had...

  14. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Yeon; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Beon Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Oh, Yu Whan

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  15. Clinical utility of coronary CT angiography with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Jin; Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won

    2008-01-01

    To determine the clinical utility of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. Ninety-six patients (mean age 60.2 years; age range, 41-68 years; 70 males) were referred for CCTA with low-dose chest CT (16-slice MDCT, Siemens) for an evaluation of atypical chest pain. When significant stenoses (lumen diameter reduction > 50%) were detected on CCTA, invasive coronary angiography (CA) was performed as the standard of reference. In all patients, medical chart review or telephone contact with patients was used to evaluate the contribution of CCTA with low-dose chest CT to the final clinical diagnosis, at least 6 months after performing CCTA. Among 96 patients, seven patients (7%) had significant stenoses as detected on CCTA, whereas two patients (2%) had significant stenoses and five patients had insignificant stenoses or no stenosis, as detected on conventional catheter angiography. In 18 (19%) of the 89 patients without significant stenosis detected on CCTA, this protocol provided additional information that suggested or confirmed an alternate clinical diagnosis. In patients with atypical chest pain, CCTA with low-dose chest CT could help to exclude ischemic heart disease and could provide important ancillary information for the final diagnosis

  16. Abnormal chest shadow on CT in immunosuppressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    An abnormal chest shadow was observed on CT scans in 25 cases of 23 immunosuppressed patients. Pulmonary disease was pathologically confirmed to be pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PC pneumonia) in four patients, cytomegalovirus pneumonia (CMV pneumonia) in one, bacterial pneumonia in seven, fungal infection in three, miliary tuberculosis in one, leukemic infiltration in two, lymphangitis carcinomatosa in three, drug-induced pneumonitis in three, and ARDS in one. In almost all patients, especially those with infectious diseases such as PC pneumonia, CMV pneumonia, and bacterial pneumonia, the abnormal shadow was wide and visible in the bilateral lung fields. We presumed that such findings as lobular shadow, centrilobular shadow, and mosaic pattern reflected the extension of disease via the respiratory tract, and that those findings are typical of infectious diseases. Because such findings as abnormal linear shadow and swelling of a broncho-vascular bundle were very frequently recognized in patients with lymphangitis carcinomatosa and frequently recognized in those with drug-induced pneumonitis, these diseases may be distinguished from other diseases. An area of slightly increased density was frequently recognized in patients with PC pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Such lesions were pathologically confirmed to be located in the interstitium and/or alveolus. CT was extremely useful in comprehending the character and extension of particular diseases among various diseases. As the number of patients studied was small, the utility of CT in immunosuppressed patients requires further investigation in a larger number of patients. (author)

  17. Detection of breast abnormalities on enhanced chest CT: Correlation with breast composition on mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Mi; Kang, Hee; Shin, Young Gyung; Yun, Jong Hyouk; Oh, Kyung Seung [Dept. of Radiology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate the capability of enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) for detecting breast abnormalities and to assess the influence of breast composition on this detectability. From 2000 to 2013, 75 patients who underwent mammography, breast sonography, and enhanced chest CT within one month and had abnormalities on sonography were included. Detection rate of breast abnormality on enhanced chest CT was compared among 4 types of breast composition by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. Contribution of breast composition, size and enhancement of target lesions to detectability of enhanced chest CT was assessed using logistic regression and chi-square test. Of the 75 target lesions, 34 (45.3%) were detected on enhanced chest CT, corresponding with those on breast sonography; there were no significantly different detection rates among the 4 types of breast composition (p = 0.078). Breast composition [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, p = 0.206] and enhancement (OR = 21.49, p = 0.998) had no significant effect, but size (OR = 1.23, p = 0.004) was a significant contributing factor influencing the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions. About half of the cases (45.3%) demonstrated breast lesions on chest CT corresponding with target lesions on sonography. Breast composition defined on mammography did not affect the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions.

  18. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rina P.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Yu, Chang; Ray, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  19. CT coronary angiographic evaluation of suspected anginal chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Newby, David E

    2016-02-15

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in the assessment of patients presenting with suspected angina chest pain. However, wide variations in practice across Europe and North America highlight the lack of consensus in selecting the appropriate first-line test for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). CT coronary angiography (CTCA) has a high negative predictive value for excluding the presence of CAD. As such, it serves as a potential 'gatekeeper' to downstream testing by reducing the rate of inappropriate invasive coronary angiography. Two recent large multicentre randomised control trials have provided insights into whether CTCA can be incorporated into chest pain care pathways to improve risk stratification of CAD. They demonstrate that using CTCA enhances diagnostic certainty and improves the targeting of appropriate invasive investigations and therapeutic interventions. Importantly, reductions in cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction appear to be attained through the more appropriate use of preventative therapy and coronary revascularisation when guided by CTCA. With this increasing portfolio of evidence, CTCA should be considered the non-invasive investigation of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease. NCT01149590, post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Dual energy CT of the chest: how about the dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenzle, Jan C; Sommer, Wieland H; Neumaier, Klement; Michalski, Gisela; Lechel, Ursula; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph R; Reiser, Maximilian F; Johnson, Thorsten R C

    2010-06-01

    New generation Dual Source computed tomography (CT) scanners offer different x-ray spectra for Dual Energy imaging. Yet, an objective, manufacturer independent verification of the dose required for the different spectral combinations is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess dose and image noise of 2 different Dual Energy CT settings with reference to a standard chest scan and to compare image noise and contrast to noise ratios (CNR). Also, exact effective dose length products (E/DLP) conversion factors were to be established based on the objectively measured dose. An anthropomorphic Alderson phantom was assembled with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and its chest was scanned on a Dual Source CT (Siemens Somatom Definition) in dual energy mode at 140 and 80 kVp with 14 x 1.2 mm collimation. The same was performed on another Dual Source CT (Siemens Somatom Definition Flash) at 140 kVp with 0.8 mm tin filter (Sn) and 100 kVp at 128 x 0.6 mm collimation. Reference scans were obtained at 120 kVp with 64 x 0.6 mm collimation at equivalent CT dose index of 5.4 mGy*cm. Syringes filled with water and 17.5 mg iodine/mL were scanned with the same settings. Dose was calculated from the TLD measurements and the dose length products of the scanner. Image noise was measured in the phantom scans and CNR and spectral contrast were determined in the iodine and water samples. E/DLP conversion factors were calculated as ratio between the measured dose form the TLDs and the dose length product given in the patient protocol. The effective dose measured with TLDs was 2.61, 2.69, and 2.70 mSv, respectively, for the 140/80 kVp, the 140 Sn/100 kVp, and the standard 120 kVp scans. Image noise measured in the average images of the phantom scans was 11.0, 10.7, and 9.9 HU (P > 0.05). The CNR of iodine with optimized image blending was 33.4 at 140/80 kVp, 30.7 at 140Sn/100 kVp and 14.6 at 120 kVp. E/DLP conversion factors were 0.0161 mSv/mGy*cm for the 140/80 kVp protocol, 0.0181 m

  1. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  2. Multi-Detector CT Findings of Palpable Chest Wall Masses in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Young Tong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A wide variety of diseases manifest as palpable chest wall masses in children. These include normal variation, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, axillary lymphadenopathies, soft tissue tumors and bone tumors. Given that most of these diseases are associated with chest wall deformity, diagnosis is difficult by physical examination or ultrasonography alone. However, multi-detector CT with three dimensional reconstruction is useful in the characterization and differential diagnosis of palpable chest wall lesions. In this article, we review the spectrum of palpable chest wall diseases and illustrate their multi-detector CT presentation.

  3. The significance of collateral vessels, as seen on chest CT, in predicting SVC obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeouk, Young Soo; Kim, Sung Jin; Bae, Il Hun; Kim, Jae Youn; Hwang, Seung Min; Han, Gi Seok; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Dae Young

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of collateral veins, as seen on chest CT, in the diagnosis of superior vena cava obstruction. We retrospectively the records of 81 patients in whom collateral veins were seen on chest CT. On spiral CT(n=49), contrast material was infused via power injector, and on conventional CT(n=32), 50 ml bolus infusion was followed by 50 ml drip infusion. Obstruction of the SVC was evaluated on chest CT; if, however, evaluation of the SVC of its major tributaries was difficult, as in five cases, the patient underwent SVC phlebography. Collateral vessels were assigned to one of ten categories. On conventional CT, the jugular venous arch in the only collateral vessel to predict SVC obstruction; on spiral CT, however, collateral vessels are not helpful in the diagnosis of SVC obstruction, but are a nonspecific finding. (author). 12 refs., 2 tab., 2 figs

  4. Chest computed tomography-based scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis: Inter-rater reliability of CT abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, D.A.V. den; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, J.P. van; Spee, M.; Jong, P.A. de; Zanen, P.; Grutters, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To determine inter-rater reliability of sarcoidosis-related computed tomography (CT) findings that can be used for scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis. CT images of 51 patients with sarcoidosis were scored by five chest radiologists for various abnormal CT findings (22 in total) encountered in thoracic sarcoidosis. Using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis, inter-rater reliability was analysed and reported according to the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) criteria. A pre-specified sub-analysis was performed to investigate the effect of training. Scoring was trained in a distinct set of 15 scans in which all abnormal CT findings were represented. Median age of the 51 patients (36 men, 70 %) was 43 years (range 26 - 64 years). All radiographic stages were present in this group. ICC ranged from 0.91 for honeycombing to 0.11 for nodular margin (sharp versus ill-defined). The ICC was above 0.60 in 13 of the 22 abnormal findings. Sub-analysis for the best-trained observers demonstrated an ICC improvement for all abnormal findings and values above 0.60 for 16 of the 22 abnormalities. In our cohort, reliability between raters was acceptable for 16 thoracic sarcoidosis-related abnormal CT findings. (orig.)

  5. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Lee, Justin S.; Coulter, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  6. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  7. Usefulness of 3D-CT for the evaluation of chest diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yuji; Ike, Kazuhide; Watabe, Hideki; Ikeda, Sadao [Kyoto Katsura Hospital Chest Disease Center (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) was evaluated in 256 patients with chest disease. The results showed that 3D-CT is clinically useful for the evaluation of tracheobronchial diseases, tumors in the posterior mediastinum, bone diseases involving the chest wall, and vascular diseases. Consequently, 3D-CT was found to be more useful than conventional CT for surgical simulation. However, 3D-CT is inferior to conventional CT with regard to the amount of information obtainable for pulmonary tumors or tumors in the anterior or mid mediastinum. In the future, 3D-CT is expected to prove useful for volume measurement of tumors or internal organs and for evaluating pulmonary function. (author)

  8. CT staging of oesophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelsson, L.; Hambraeus, G.M.; Mercke, C.E.; Tylen, U.

    1984-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the normal oesophagus, usually in its entire length, is surrounded by fat which facilitates assessment of tumour extension at CT examination in patients with carcinoma. As this contradicts the clinical experience at the hospital, 25 normal subjects and 36 patients with carcinoma of the oesophagus were investigated with computed tomography. In the middle part, where most tumours arise, the oesophagus as a rule was poorly delineated against important structures such as the left main bronchus and the pericardium (left atrium). In the upper and lower oesophagus the delineation was usually better, but none of the normal subjects had a good or at least discernible fat plane in every slice. The typical tumour appeared as a concentric thickening of the wall with broad contact surfaces without interposed fat with adjacent structures such as the trachea, left main bronchus, left atrium, aorta or vertebrae. Most patients received 24 Gy MV treatment followed by surgery and then 40 Gy of radiation. Ten tumours with broad contact surfaces were easily excised while of the five lesions which were relatively well demarcated two needed sharp dissection. These facts make it very difficult to anticipate the surgical findings at CT. The only reliable sign of inoperability was big bulky tumours encroaching on neighbouring organs. (Auth.)

  9. Low-dosage helical CT applications for chest medical checkup and lung cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Cui Fa; Liang Huanqing; Zheng Minfei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A discussion on low-dosage helical CT applications on chest medical checkup and lung cancer screening. Methods: On the 100 chest medical check up with three different of protocols, including standard-dosage (the tube current was 230 mAs) were compared with low-dose (tube current was 50 mAs or 30 mAs). Results: Low-dosage helical CT scan provides excellent images. In 100 chest medical checkup, 39 nodules or masses were revealed, enlarged lymph node was noted in 1 case; emphysema or bullae was demonstrated in 3 segments; thickening of bronchial wall was shown in 2 cases; and localized pleural thickening was found in 1 case. Conclusion: In chest checkup or lung cancer screening low-dosage helical CT (tube current 30 mAs) will not only guarantee image quality but also reduce the radiation dose during the examination. (authors)

  10. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  11. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  12. Chest Fat Quantification via CT Based on Standardized Anatomy Space in Adult Lung Transplant Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Tong

    Full Text Available Overweight and underweight conditions are considered relative contraindications to lung transplantation due to their association with excess mortality. Yet, recent work suggests that body mass index (BMI does not accurately reflect adipose tissue mass in adults with advanced lung diseases. Alternative and more accurate measures of adiposity are needed. Chest fat estimation by routine computed tomography (CT imaging may therefore be important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification and quality assessment based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS is presented. The goal of the paper is to seek answers to several key questions related to chest fat quantity and quality assessment based on a single slice CT (whether in the chest, abdomen, or thigh versus a volumetric CT, which have not been addressed in the literature.Unenhanced chest CT image data sets from 40 adult lung transplant candidates (age 58 ± 12 yrs and BMI 26.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2, 16 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and the remainder with other conditions were analyzed together with a single slice acquired for each patient at the L5 vertebral level and mid-thigh level. The thoracic body region and the interface between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT in the chest were consistently defined in all patients and delineated using Live Wire tools. The SAT and VAT components of chest were then segmented guided by this interface. The SAS approach was used to identify the corresponding anatomic slices in each chest CT study, and SAT and VAT areas in each slice as well as their whole volumes were quantified. Similarly, the SAT and VAT components were segmented in the abdomen and thigh slices. Key parameters of the attenuation (Hounsfield unit (HU distributions were determined from each chest slice and from the

  13. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  14. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: Quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers’ lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Methods: Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than −950 HU in the lung (%LAA −950 ) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs −950 was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Results: Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p −950 and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs −950 (r = 0.98, p < 0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland–Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Conclusions: Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma.

  15. Individual bone structure segmentation and labeling from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    The segmentation and labeling of the individual bones serve as the first step to the fully automated measurement of skeletal characteristics and the detection of abnormalities such as skeletal deformities, osteoporosis, and vertebral fractures. Moreover, the identified landmarks on the segmented bone structures can potentially provide relatively reliable location reference to other non-rigid human organs, such as breast, heart and lung, thereby facilitating the corresponding image analysis and registration. A fully automated anatomy-directed framework for the segmentation and labeling of the individual bone structures from low-dose chest CT is presented in this paper. The proposed system consists of four main stages: First, both clavicles are segmented and labeled by fitting a piecewise cylindrical envelope. Second, the sternum is segmented under the spatial constraints provided by the segmented clavicles. Third, all ribs are segmented and labeled based on 3D region growing within the volume of interest defined with reference to the spinal canal centerline and lungs. Fourth, the individual thoracic vertebrae are segmented and labeled by image intensity based analysis in the spatial region constrained by the previously segmented bone structures. The system performance was validated with 1270 lowdose chest CT scans through visual evaluation. Satisfactory performance was obtained respectively in 97.1% cases for the clavicle segmentation and labeling, in 97.3% cases for the sternum segmentation, in 97.2% cases for the rib segmentation, in 94.2% cases for the rib labeling, in 92.4% cases for vertebra segmentation and in 89.9% cases for the vertebra labeling.

  16. Role of computed tomography (CT scan in staging of cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Staging of cervical carcinoma is done clinically using International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO guidelines. It is based on physical examination findings and also includes results of biopsy, endoscopy and conventional radiological tests like chest radiograph, intravenous urography and barium enema. These conventional radiological investigations have largely been replaced by computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at present. FIGO staging system does not consider CT and MRI mandatory; however, use of these modalities are encouraged. This prospective study was conducted to determine the role of CT in staging work up in women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty three women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma were evaluated with contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. CT scan images were especially evaluated to determine tumour size, invasion of parmetrium, pelvic walls, rectum, urinary bladder and ureters, pelvic or retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and distant metastases. CT findings were associated with clinical findings and staging, including findings from cystoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. Results: There was a poor agreement between clinical and CT staging of cervical carcinoma. Primary tumour was demonstrated on CT in 36 (70% of 53 patients. CT underestimated the parametrial, vaginal and pelvic wall invasion when compared with physical examination. CT overestimated the urinary bladder and rectal invasion when compared with cysto-sigmoidoscopy, however, CT had 100 per cent negative predictive value (NPV to exclude bladder and rectal involvement. CT detection of lymph node enlargement and lung metastases influenced the management. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that CT scan does not reliably correlate with clinical FIGO staging of cervical cancer. However, it can detect urinary obstruction as well as nodal or distant metastases and thus improves the

  17. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis; Dual-source-CT in der Diagnostik des Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Becker, A.; Knez, A. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung Kardiologie, Medizinische Klinik I, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [German] Die EKG-getriggerte CT-Angiographie kann mit der Darstellung von Koronar-, Lungenarterien und Aorta eine umfassende Abklaerung des unklaren Thoraxschmerzes leisten. Ziel unserer Untersuchungen war es, die diagnostische Wertigkeit des Dual-source-CT in diesem Patientenkollektiv festzustellen. 47 Patienten mit unklarem Thoraxschmerz wurden an einem Siemens Somatom Definition untersucht. Menge und Injektionsgeschwindigkeit des Kontrastmittels (Ultravist, Schering) wurden auf das Koerpergewicht adaptiert. Die Untersuchungen wurden hinsichtlich der Bildqualitaet und Kontrastierung sowie der diagnostischen Genauigkeit im Vergleich zur endgueltigen klinischen Diagnose beurteilt. Bei allen Untersuchungen wurde eine ausreichende Kontrastierung erzielt. Die Darstellung der Koronararterien war in allen Faellen diagnostisch

  18. Aortic valve calcification - a commonly observed but frequently ignored finding during CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Prashanth; Sallomi, David; George, Bindu; Patel, Hitesh; Patel, Nikhil; Lloyd, Guy

    2012-06-01

    To describe the frequency and severity of Aortic valve calcification (AVC) in an unselected cohort of patients undergoing chest CT scanning and to assess the frequency with which AVC was being reported in the radiology reports. Consecutive CT scan images of the chest and the radiological reports (December 2009 to May 2010) were reviewed at the district general hospital (DGH). AVC on CT scan was visually graded on a scale ranging from 0 to IV (0 = no calcification, IV = severe calcification). Total of 416 (232 male; 184 female) CT chest scans [Contrast enhanced 302 (72%), unenhanced 114 (28%)] were reviewed. Mean age was 70.55 ± 11.48 years. AVC in CT scans was identified in 95 of the 416 patients (22.83%). AVC classification was as follows: Grade I: 60 (63.15%), Grade II: 22 (23.15%), Grade III: 9 (9.47%), Grade IV: 4 (4.21%). Only one CT report mentioned AVC. Only 31 of 95 AVC had Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The interval time between CT scan and TTE was variable.   Aortic valve calcification in CT chest scans is a common finding and studies have shown that it is strongly related to the presence and severity of aortic valve disease. As CT scans are considered as a valuable additional screening tool for detection of aortic stenosis, AVC should always be commented upon in the radiology reports. Furthermore, patients with at least Grade III and IV AVC should be sent for TTE. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo [Cantonal Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens [University of Basel Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  20. Organ and effective dose reduction in adult chest CT using abdominal lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, G R; Brettle, D S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare organ and effective dose savings that could be achieved using conventional lead aprons and a new, custom-designed shield as out-of-plane shielding devices during chest CT scans. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure doses throughout the abdomen and pelvis during CT scans of the chest of a RANDO phantom. Dose measurements were made with no shielding, with lead aprons and with the new shield around the abdomen and pelvis in order to quantify the achievable organ and effective dose reductions. Average dose savings in the 10 phantom sections ranged from 5% to 78% with the highest point dose saving of 93% being found in the mid-pelvis. When shielding was used, the maximum measured organ dose reduction was a 72% dose saving to the testes. Significant dose savings were found throughout the abdomen and pelvis, which contributed to an effective dose saving of 4% that was achieved over and above the dose savings obtained through conventional optimisation strategies. This could yield significant population dose savings and reductions in collective radiation risk. In this study significant organ and effective dose reductions have been achieved through the use of abdominal shielding during chest CT examinations and it is therefore recommended that out-of-plane patient shielding devices should be used for all chest CT scans and potentially for every CT scan, irrespective of body part.

  1. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, Tilo; Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  2. CT in the staging of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.; Kosiuk, J.P.; Templeton, P.A.; Shepard, J.O.; Moore, E.H.; Mathisen, D.J.; Wain, J.C.; Grillo, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors previously presented a study of the accuracy of CT in the staging of bronchogenic carcinoma by means of correlative lymph node mapping and sampling in 85 patients. This study has now been extended to include 143 patients. Abnormal nodes (greater than or equal to 1 cm) were localized according to the ATS classification of regional lymph node mapping. One hundred thirty-eight patients underwent mediastinoscopy and 116, thoracotomy. In each case, lymph node groups 2R, 4R, 2L, 4L (paratracheal), 7 (subcarinal), and 5 (aorticopulmonary) underwent biopsy on the appropriate sides. Hilar nodes were resected with the surgical specimen. A total of 554 nodes were sampled. Overall sensitivity of CT for all the lymph node groups was similar to the previous study and was 40.5% with a specificity of 84.2%. Sensitivity was highest for group 5 (83%), and lowest for the subcarinal area (25%) (group 7). Specificity ranged from 71% for 10R hilar nodes to 90% for the subcarinal nodes. The positive predictive value was 34% and the negative predictive value was 87%. This study corroborates the authors' previous results and shows that when careful correlation of individual lymph nodes groups identified on CT is done with those sampled at surgery, the accuracy of CT in staging bronchogenic carcinoma is limited

  3. Chest ultrasound in the evaluation of complicated pneumonia in the ICU patients: Can be viable alternative to CT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham El Sheikh

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Chest US provides an accurate evaluation of the pleural and parenchymal abnormalities associated with complicated pneumonia in the ICU patients. Considering that chest US is a bedside and avoids transportation of the patient outside ICU, free of radiation exposure and easily repeatable, chest US appears to be an attractive alternative to CT.

  4. Has PET/CT a role in the characterization of indeterminate lung lesions on staging CT in colorectal cancer? A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P.; Seiersen, M.; Ovesen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose CT has been found superior to chest x-ray to detect lung malignances. However, indeterminate lung lesions (ILL) are found in 4-42% by using CT in staging colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Our aim was to examine the frequency of ILL on staging CT and the rate of the ILL being malignant.......12). Conclusions Even though a relative low number of ILL turn out to be malignant it seems advisable to use PET/CT scan in the follow-up to detect lung metastases as early as possible to better the prognosis. For the same reason all CRC patients should have chest CT included in their follow-up 6-12 months...

  5. Treatment of a Recurrent Chest Wall Desmoid Tumor Using a CT-Guided Steroid Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Sung Jung; Paik, Sang Hyun; Shin, Hwa Kyoon; Paik, Jai Soung; Lee, Eun Hye [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We report on a 41-year-old woman with a chest wall desmoid tumour who was successfully treated with a computed tomography (CT)-guided steroid injection. She presented with a palpable mass in the right upper chest wall and was treated by surgical excision and postoperative radiation therapy due to recurrence of the mass at the surgical site. At 20 months after the second operation, a recurrent mass was again detected in the anterosuperior portion of the previous surgical site on CT. We performed a CT-guided steroid injection weekly for 4 weeks by applying a mixture of 3 mL of triamcinolone acetonide (40 mg/mL) and 3 mL of 1% Lidocaine, administering 4-6 mL of the mixture, to the lesion. Six months later, CT showed a marked decrease in the size of the mass.

  6. Estimation of breast dose and cancer risk in chest and abdomen CT procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltahir, Suha Abubaker Ali

    2013-05-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patents that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lack of optimized protocols be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. The aims of this study are first, to measure patient doses during CT chest and abdomen procedures, second, to estimate the radiation dose to the breast, and third to quantify the radiation risks during the procedures. Patient doses from two common CT examinations were obtained from four hospitals in Khartoum.The patient doses were estimated using measurement of CT dose indexes (CTDI), exposure-related parameters, and the IMPACT spreadsheet based on NRPB conversion factors. A large variation of mean organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scanner type. The largest range was found for CT of the chest, for which the dose varied from 2.3 to 47 (average 24.7) mSv and for abdomen CT, it was 1.6 to 18.8 (average 10.2) mSv. Radiation dose to the breast ranged from 1.6 to 32.9 mSv for the chest and 1.1 to 13.2 mSv for the abdomen. The radiation risk per procedure was high. The obtained values were mostly higher than the values of organ doses reported from the other studies. It was concluded that current clinical chest and abdomen protocols result in variable radiation doses to the breast. The magnitude of exposure may have implications for imaging strategies.(Author)

  7. Application of Super-Resolution Convolutional Neural Network for Enhancing Image Resolution in Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-10-18

    In this study, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN) scheme, which is the emerging deep-learning-based super-resolution method for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images, was applied and evaluated using the post-processing approach. For evaluation, 89 chest CT cases were sampled from The Cancer Imaging Archive. The 89 CT cases were divided randomly into 45 training cases and 44 external test cases. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, a high-resolution image was reconstructed from a low-resolution image, which was down-sampled from an original test image. For quantitative evaluation, two image quality metrics were measured and compared to those of the conventional linear interpolation methods. The image restoration quality of the SRCNN scheme was significantly higher than that of the linear interpolation methods (p resolution image reconstructed by the SRCNN scheme was highly restored and comparable to the original reference image, in particular, for a ×2 magnification. These results indicate that the SRCNN scheme significantly outperforms the linear interpolation methods for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images. The results also suggest that SRCNN may become a potential solution for generating high-resolution CT images from standard CT images.

  8. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI of pediatric chest tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, R.; Vock, P.; Tschaeppeler, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the spectrum of pediatric chest masses, to present the results of cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI, and to define diagnostic criteria to limit differential diagnosis. Seventy-eight children with thoracic mass lesions were retrospectively evaluated using CT (72 patients) and/or MR imaging (12 patients). All masses were evaluated for tissue characteristics (attenuation values or signal intensity, enhancement, and calcification) and were differentiated according to age, gender, location, and etiology. Twenty-eight of 38 (74 %) mediastinal masses were malignant (neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma). Thirty of 38 (79 %) pulmonary masses were metastatic in origin, all with an already known primary tumor (osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor). With one exception, all remaining pulmonary lesions were benign. Seventeen of 21 (81 %) chest wall lesions were malignant (Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The majority of mediastinal and chest wall tumors in children is malignant. Lung lesions are usually benign, unless a known extrapulmonary tumor suggests pulmonary metastases. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI allows narrowing of the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest masses substantially by defining the origin and tissue characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for posterior mediastinal lesions, whereas CT should be used for pulmonary lesions. For the residual locations both modalities are complementary. (orig.)

  9. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI of pediatric chest tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyttenbach, R.; Vock, P.; Tschaeppeler, H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Children`s Radiology, University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the spectrum of pediatric chest masses, to present the results of cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI, and to define diagnostic criteria to limit differential diagnosis. Seventy-eight children with thoracic mass lesions were retrospectively evaluated using CT (72 patients) and/or MR imaging (12 patients). All masses were evaluated for tissue characteristics (attenuation values or signal intensity, enhancement, and calcification) and were differentiated according to age, gender, location, and etiology. Twenty-eight of 38 (74 %) mediastinal masses were malignant (neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma). Thirty of 38 (79 %) pulmonary masses were metastatic in origin, all with an already known primary tumor (osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor). With one exception, all remaining pulmonary lesions were benign. Seventeen of 21 (81 %) chest wall lesions were malignant (Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The majority of mediastinal and chest wall tumors in children is malignant. Lung lesions are usually benign, unless a known extrapulmonary tumor suggests pulmonary metastases. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI allows narrowing of the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest masses substantially by defining the origin and tissue characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for posterior mediastinal lesions, whereas CT should be used for pulmonary lesions. For the residual locations both modalities are complementary. (orig.) With 5 figs., 3 tabs., 20 refs.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT--review of available options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Significance of coronary artery calcification detected incidentally with chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.H.; Greenberg, R.; Miller, S.W.; Shepard, J.O.; Bourgouin, P.M.; McLoud, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronary artery calcifications are well seen on CT scans because of high contrast resolution. Individual vessels were scored 0-3+ based on degree of calcification in over 40 patients who also underwent cardiac catheterization. Though relatively insensitive, the presence of dense calcifications had a specificity of roughly 60% to 70% for the presence of severe stenosis. In addition, 30 patients with calcification on CT scans and 30 age-matched controls, all of whom underwent thoracotomy, were compared with respect to prior cardiac history, estimated anesthetic risk, and postoperative cardiac complications. Patients with calcifications were more likely to have evidence of coronary disease and/or encounter postoperative cardiac complications

  12. Lung nodule detection on chest CT: evaluation of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Gamsu, Gordon; Czum, Julianna; Johnson, Rebecca; Chakrapani, Sanjay; Wu, Ning

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the capacity of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to detect lung nodules in clinical chest CT. A total of 210 consecutive clinical chest CT scans and their reports were reviewed by two chest radiologists and 70 were selected (33 without nodules and 37 with 1-6 nodules, 4-15.4 mm in diameter). The CAD system (ImageChecker CT LN-1000) developed by R2 Technology, Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA) was used. Its algorithm was designed to detect nodules with a diameter of 4-20 mm. The two chest radiologists working with the CAD system detected a total of 78 nodules. These 78 nodules form the database for this study. Four independent observers interpreted the studies with and without the CAD system. The detection rates of the four independent observers without CAD were 81% (63/78), 85% (66/78), 83% (65/78), and 83% (65/78), respectively. With CAD their rates were 87% (68/78), 85% (66/78), 86% (67/78), and 85% (66/78), respectively. The differences between these two sets of detection rates did not reach statistical significance. In addition, CAD detected eight nodules that were not mentioned in the original clinical radiology reports. The CAD system produced 1.56 false-positive nodules per CT study. The four test observers had 0, 0.1, 0.17, and 0.26 false-positive results per study without CAD and 0.07, 0.2, 0.23, and 0.39 with CAD, respectively. The CAD system can assist radiologists in detecting pulmonary nodules in chest CT, but with a potential increase in their false positive rates. Technological improvements to the system could increase the sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and reduce these false-positive results

  13. Doses in pediatric patients undergoing chest and abdomen CT examinations. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jornada, Tiago S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive method of image production that imparts significant doses to a patient, it is expected that pediatric CT examinations will increase the risk of induced cancer in children. In this study the effective doses in a five year-old child submitted to chest or abdomen CT scans were assessed for comparison purposes. The CTEXPO computed program was used with data from routine protocols of a 0 to 13 year-old children in two public hospitals in Belo Horizonte. Hospital A used a Siemens Dual-Slice unit with 80 kV, 41 mA and pitch 2 for chest or abdomen; hospital B used a Multislice GE unit with 120 kV, 45 mA and pitch 1 for chest and 120 kV, 55 mA. and pitch 1 for abdomen. Results of effective doses in a five year-old child were 1.7 and 1.0 mSv in hospital A and 9.1 and 7.2 mSv in hospital B, for chest and abdomen, respectively. Results were compared to the reference effective doses of 7.2 and 5.0 mSv for chest and abdomen respectively that were derived from the air kerma length product values given in ICRP publication 87. Results of hospital A showed that low dose exposures also can be achieved in CT scans of children. Results showed that even a hospital with a modern facility (hospital B) can provided doses higher than reference values if protocols are not adjusted for children. Preliminary results suggested that there is a room for optimizing children exposure submitted to CT scans. (author)

  14. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier General de Tourcoing, Department of Radiology, Tourcoing (France)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  15. Utility of chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound for stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, M. T. W.; Holm, J.; Rødgaard, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current Danish Melanoma Guidelines suggest that stage III cutaneous malignant melanoma receive chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound to exclude lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of chest X-ray and...

  16. Lung morphology in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): comparison of chest X-ray and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keske, U.; Pappert, D.; Lewandowski, K.; Gerlach, H.; Hierholzer, J.; Hosten, N.; Schneider, M.; Paust, E.; Falke, K.J.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    Lung morphology of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was analyzed in chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT). 81 patients with ARDS were examined (409 chest X-rays, 95 of those were compared with CTs). CT showed increased lung densities mostly in the dependent posterior, paravertebral lungs. In chest X-rays, these areas superimpose to the perihilar lung and thus cause the chest X-ray finding of a 'central', perihilar oedema. Bronchopneumograms, which are a frequent finding in ARDS, are mostly caused by the increased lung density in the dependent parts of the lungs. Systematic comparison of chest X-ray and CT-findings enables a better understanding of the chest X-ray morphology of ARDS. (orig.) [de

  17. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  18. Staging of untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma with PET/CT: comparison with conventional imaging work-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Molecular Imaging Center and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kueishan (China)]|[Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Feng-Yuan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kueishan (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kueishan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kueishan (China); Ko, Sheung-Fat; Chin, Shu-Chyn [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Molecular Imaging Center and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kueishan (China); Hsu, Cheng-Lung [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Kueishan (China)

    2009-01-15

    We prospectively compared PET/CT and conventional imaging for initial staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 111 patients with histologically proven NPC were investigated with PET/CT and conventional imaging (head-and-neck MRI, chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan) before treatment. The respective findings were reviewed independently and then compared with each other. With regard to T staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 36 (32.4%) of the study subjects. With regard to N staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 15 (13.5%) patients. Among the discordant cases, MRI was superior in demonstrating tumor involvement in the parapharyngeal space, skull base, intracranial area, sphenoid sinus, and retropharyngeal nodes while PET/CT was superior in demonstrating neck nodal metastasis. PET/CT disclosed 13 of 16 patients with distant malignancy compared with four patients disclosed by conventional imaging work-up. The false-positive rate of PET/CT was 18.8%. PET/CT correctly modified M staging in eight patients (7.2%) and disclosed a second primary lung malignancy in one patient (0.9%). In NPC patients, MRI appears to be superior to PET/CT for the assessment of locoregional invasion and retropharyngeal nodal metastasis. PET/CT is more accurate than MRI for determining cervical nodal metastasis and should be the better reference for the neck status. PET/CT has an acceptable diagnostic yield and a low false-positive rate for the detection of distant malignancy and can replace conventional work-up to this aim. PET/CT and head-and-neck MRI are suggested for the initial staging of NPC patients. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  20. Effect of Third-generation Dual-source CT Technology on Image Quality of Low-dose Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xin; Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Lan; DU, Qianni; Wang, Xiao; Jing, Zhengyu; Song, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT with tin filtration for spectral shaping and iterative reconstructions.Methods Thirty-five patients underwent low-dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening on second-generation dual-source CT and follow-ups on third-generation dual-source CT. Image quality and radiation dose were compared between the two examinations.ResultsThe radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT [dose-length product (DLP)(49.7±18.2)mGy·cm, effective dose (ED)(0.73±0.26)mSv] was lower than second-generation dual-source CT [DLP (86.37±13.44) mGy·cm, ED(1.20±0.42)mSv](t=6.01, P=0.000;t=6.57, P=0.000). The objective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(25.7±2.9)HU] was higher than that of third-generation dual-soure CT[(18.6±4.2)HU](t=5.24,P=0.000).The subjective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(4.60±0.49)scores] was significantly lower than that of third-generation dual-source CT [(4.80±0.40)scores] (t=4.15, P=0.000). Conclusion Chest CT for the detection of pulmonary nodules can be performed with third-generation dual-source CT that produces high image quality and low radiation dose when using a stellar infinity detector with spectral shaping.

  1. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV 1 /FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV 1 /FVC and the dyspnea score.

  2. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV{sub 1}/FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV{sub 1}/FVC and the dyspnea score.

  3. Performance of a single lookup table (LUT) for displaying chest CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ajo; Huda, Walter; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Ogden, Kent M; Roskopf, Marsha L

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the ability to view mediastinal and lung information on one window setting by processing images with a bilinear lookup table (LUT). Chest computed tomography (CT) studies were obtained from 32 consecutive adult patient studies, which included 7 iodine contrast studies. From each CT examination, four sections were selected containing the suprasternal notch, carina, right inferior pulmonary vein, and the dome of the lower hemidiaphragm. Each image was processed with a bilinear LUT in addition to the lung setting (window width 1500 and window level -500) and mediastinal setting (window width 450 and window level 50) normally used. Seven radiologists compared the quality of the bilinear LUT with the corresponding lung and mediastinum display settings. A five-point scale was used to assess image quality, with a score of 5 being equivalent to the corresponding lung (or mediastinum) display, 3 being acceptable, and 1 being unacceptable. The average score of the bilinear LUT for all images and readers was 3.90 +/- 0.93 for lung information and 3.17 +/- 1.00 for mediastinum information. Use of the bilinear LUT resulted in unacceptable images in 0.3% cases for lung information and 5.9% for mediastinum information. Chest CT images that contained iodinated contrast resulted in a higher score than those obtained without contrast, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance. Use of a bilinear LUT has the potential to significantly improve operational efficiency with acceptable image quality for most chest CT images.

  4. Dose reduction for chest CT: comparison of two iterative reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kulkarni, Naveen; Muse, Victorine; Digumarthy, Subba R; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2015-06-01

    Lowering radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) scan results in low quality noisy images. Iterative reconstruction techniques are used currently to lower image noise and improve the quality of images. To evaluate lesion detection and diagnostic acceptability of chest CT images acquired at CTDIvol of 1.8 mGy and processed with two different iterative reconstruction techniques. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 60 ± 14 years; men, 13; women, 9; body mass index, 27.4 ± 6.5 kg/m(2)) gave informed consent for acquisition of low dose (LD) series in addition to the standard dose (SD) chest CT on a 128 - multidetector CT (MDCT). LD images were reconstructed with SafeCT C4, L1, and L2 settings, and Safire S1, S2, and S3 settings. Three thoracic radiologists assessed LD image series (S1, S2, S3, C4, L1, and L2) for lesion detection and comparison of lesion margin, visibility of normal structures, and diagnostic confidence with SD chest CT. Inter-observer agreement (kappa) was calculated. Average CTDIvol was 6.4 ± 2.7 mGy and 1.8 ± 0.2 mGy for SD and LD series, respectively. No additional lesion was found in SD as compared to LD images. Visibility of ground-glass opacities and lesion margins, as well as normal structures visibility were not affected on LD. CT image visibility of major fissure and pericardium was not optimal in some cases (n = 5). Objective image noise in some low dose images processed with SafeCT and Safire was similar to SD images (P value > 0.5). Routine LD chest CT reconstructed with iterative reconstruction technique can provide similar diagnostic information in terms of lesion detection, margin, and diagnostic confidence as compared to SD, regardless of the iterative reconstruction settings. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Phantom and cadaver measurements of dose and dose distribution in micro-CT of the chest in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodt, Thomas; Luepke, Matthias; Boehm, Claudia; von Falck, Christian; Stamm, Georg; Borlak, Jürgen; Seifert, Hermann; Galanski, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Micro-computed tomography (CT) allows high-resolution imaging of the chest in mice for small animal research with a significant radiation dose applied. To report on measurement of the applied radiation dose using different scan protocols in micro-CT of the chest in mice. Repetitive dose measurements were performed for four different micro-CT protocols (with/without respiratory gating) and for micro-CT fluoroscopy used for chest imaging. Measurements were carried out using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in mouse cadavers and in a PMMA phantom allowing measurement of the radiation dose in the direct path of rays and assessment of scattered radiation. The dose measured inside and outside the chests of the cadavers varied between 190 und 210 mGy, respectively. The expected mean doses in mice in the direct path of rays for the four examined micro-CT protocols varied between 170 and 280 mGy. The mean values for 1 and 5 minutes of fluoroscopy were 17 mGy and 105 mGy, respectively. The measured dose values are similar to the dose values for micro-CT of the chest reported so far. A relevant dose can be delivered by micro-CT of the chest, which could possibly interact with small animal studies. Therefore, the applied dose for a specific protocol should be known and adverse radiation effects be considered.

  6. Pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of oncologic PET/CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Capobianco, Julia; Oliveira, Marco Antonio Conde de, E-mail: gustavo.meirelles@grupofleury.com.br [Grupo Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    PET/CT is widely used for the evaluation of patients with thoracic malignancies. Although the levels of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are usually high in neoplastic diseases, they can also be physiological, due to artifacts. In addition, FDG uptake can occur in benign conditions such as infectious, inflammatory, and iatrogenic lesions. Furthermore, some malignant tumors, such as adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly known as bronchoalveolar carcinoma) and carcinoid tumors, may not show FDG uptake. Here, we illustrate the main pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of the results of oncologic PET/CT of the chest, outlining strategies for avoiding misinterpretation. (author)

  7. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer patients. Is there a relevant impact on treatment planning compared to conventional staging modalities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, J.; Schnitzer, A.; Kaiser, C.G.; Buesing, K.A.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Wasser, K. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Sperk, E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Brade, J. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Medical Statistics, Biomathematics and Data Processing, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Wasgindt, S.; Suetterlin, M. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Sutton, E.J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the impact of whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging of breast cancer in comparison to conventional staging modalities. This study included 102 breast cancer patients, 101 patients were eligible for evaluation. Preoperative whole-body staging with PET/CT was performed in patients with clinical stage ≥ T2 tumours or positive local lymph nodes (n = 91). Postoperative PET/CT was performed in patients without these criteria but positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (n = 10). All patients underwent PET/CT and a conventional staging algorithm, which included bone scan, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound. PET/CT findings were compared to conventional staging and the impact on therapeutic management was evaluated. PET/CT led to an upgrade of the N or M stage in overall 19 patients (19 %) and newly identified manifestation of breast cancer in two patients (2 %). PET/CT findings caused a change in treatment of 11 patients (11 %). This is within the range of recent studies, all applying conventional inclusion criteria based on the initial T and N status. PET/CT has a relevant impact on initial staging and treatment of breast cancer when compared to conventional modalities. Further studies should assess inclusion criteria beyond the conventional T and N status, e.g. tumour grading and receptor status. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray dose-equivalent CT for assessing calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Leschka, Sebastian; Warschkow, René; Wildermuth, Simon; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Bauer, Ralf W

    2017-12-01

    To determine the value of ultralow-dose chest CT for estimating the calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta using tin-filter CT and compare its diagnostic accuracy with chest direct radiography. A total of 106 patients from a prospective, IRB-approved single-centre study were included and underwent standard dose chest CT (1.7 ± 0.7 mSv) by clinical indication followed by ultralow-dose CT with 100 kV and spectral shaping by a tin filter (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) to achieve chest X-ray equivalent dose in the same session. Two independent radiologists reviewed the CT images, rated image quality and estimated presence and extent of calcification of aortic valve, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Conventional radiographs were also reviewed for presence of aortic calcifications. The sensitivity of ultralow-dose CT for the detection of calcifications of the aortic valve, ascending aorta and aortic arch was 93.5, 96.2 and 96.2%, respectively, compared with standard dose CT. The sensitivity for the detection of thoracic aortic calcification was significantly lower on chest X-ray (52.3%) compared with ultralow-dose CT (p < 0.001). A reliable estimation of calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta can be achieved with modern tin-filter CT at dose values comparable to chest direct radiography. Advances in knowledge: Our findings suggest that ultralow-dose CT is an excellent tool for assessing the calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta with higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional chest radiography and importantly without the additional cost of increased radiation dose.

  9. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Heung-Woo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon [Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P < 0.05). Of the airway parameters, the airway inner area (IA) significantly increased after salbutamol inhalation in all airways (P < 0.01) in asthmatics. Airway IA, wall thickness and wall area percentage did not significantly decrease after methacholine inhalation (P > 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV{sub 1} and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  10. Air trapping on chest CT is associated with worse ventilation distribution in infants with cystic fibrosis diagnosed following newborn screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham L Hall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In school-aged children with cystic fibrosis (CF structural lung damage assessed using chest CT is associated with abnormal ventilation distribution. The primary objective of this analysis was to determine the relationships between ventilation distribution outcomes and the presence and extent of structural damage as assessed by chest CT in infants and young children with CF. METHODS: Data of infants and young children with CF diagnosed following newborn screening consecutively reviewed between August 2005 and December 2009 were analysed. Ventilation distribution (lung clearance index and the first and second moment ratios [LCI, M(1/M(0 and M(2/M(0, respectively], chest CT and airway pathology from bronchoalveolar lavage were determined at diagnosis and then annually. The chest CT scans were evaluated for the presence or absence of bronchiectasis and air trapping. RESULTS: Matched lung function, chest CT and pathology outcomes were available in 49 infants (31 male with bronchiectasis and air trapping present in 13 (27% and 24 (49% infants, respectively. The presence of bronchiectasis or air trapping was associated with increased M(2/M(0 but not LCI or M(1/M(0. There was a weak, but statistically significant association between the extent of air trapping and all ventilation distribution outcomes. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that in early CF lung disease there are weak associations between ventilation distribution and lung damage from chest CT. These finding are in contrast to those reported in older children. These findings suggest that assessments of LCI could not be used to replace a chest CT scan for the assessment of structural lung disease in the first two years of life. Further research in which both MBW and chest CT outcomes are obtained is required to assess the role of ventilation distribution in tracking the progression of lung damage in infants with CF.

  11. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju

    2015-01-01

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  12. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  13. CT of the chest in the evaluation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; MacDonald, Cathy; Gundogan, Munire; Manson, David; Adatia, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a rare disease in children. By definition it is a diagnosis of exclusion, and CT of the chest is primarily performed to exclude other causes. Previous studies have defined CT features suggestive of the diagnosis of IPAH, but these have all been limited to the adult population. Contrast-enhanced chest CT and high-resolution CT findings in IPAH were evaluated in an attempt to define features consistently seen in children with this condition. The chest CT scans performed at initial presentation were reviewed in 17 children with echocardiographic or angiographic evidence of IPAH. There were nine boys and eight girls, ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years. The extrapulmonary findings included cardiomegaly with right-sided cardiac enlargement, which was seen in 13 children. The central pulmonary arteries were enlarged in 15 children, with peripheral enlargement in two. In six children this resulted in bronchial compression. In addition, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in three children. Prominent intrapulmonary features included a peripheral vasculopathy, with enlarged tortuous vessels, seen in eight children. Ill-defined ground-glass centrilobular opacities were also noted in eight children, representing the most common parenchymal abnormality. Other findings included septal lines in five, diffuse ground-glass opacification in four and focal hyperlucent zones in three. Mosaic attenuation was seen in one child. A variety of imaging findings are identified in IPAH. Features particularly consistent with the diagnosis include peripheral vasculopathy and centrilobular opacities in the setting of cardiomegaly and central pulmonary arterial enlargement. (orig.)

  14. CT of the chest in the evaluation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); MacDonald, Cathy; Gundogan, Munire; Manson, David [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Adatia, Ian [UCSF Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a rare disease in children. By definition it is a diagnosis of exclusion, and CT of the chest is primarily performed to exclude other causes. Previous studies have defined CT features suggestive of the diagnosis of IPAH, but these have all been limited to the adult population. Contrast-enhanced chest CT and high-resolution CT findings in IPAH were evaluated in an attempt to define features consistently seen in children with this condition. The chest CT scans performed at initial presentation were reviewed in 17 children with echocardiographic or angiographic evidence of IPAH. There were nine boys and eight girls, ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years. The extrapulmonary findings included cardiomegaly with right-sided cardiac enlargement, which was seen in 13 children. The central pulmonary arteries were enlarged in 15 children, with peripheral enlargement in two. In six children this resulted in bronchial compression. In addition, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in three children. Prominent intrapulmonary features included a peripheral vasculopathy, with enlarged tortuous vessels, seen in eight children. Ill-defined ground-glass centrilobular opacities were also noted in eight children, representing the most common parenchymal abnormality. Other findings included septal lines in five, diffuse ground-glass opacification in four and focal hyperlucent zones in three. Mosaic attenuation was seen in one child. A variety of imaging findings are identified in IPAH. Features particularly consistent with the diagnosis include peripheral vasculopathy and centrilobular opacities in the setting of cardiomegaly and central pulmonary arterial enlargement. (orig.)

  15. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  16. Iterative metal artefact reduction (MAR) in postsurgical chest CT: comparison of three iMAR-algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Joel; Boos, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino Morris; Heinzler, Niklas; Krzymyk, Karl; Sedlmair, Martin; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of three novel iterative metal artefact (iMAR) algorithms on image quality and artefact degree in chest CT of patients with a variety of thoracic metallic implants. 27 postsurgical patients with thoracic implants who underwent clinical chest CT between March and May 2015 in clinical routine were retrospectively included. Images were retrospectively reconstructed with standard weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) and with three iMAR algorithms (iMAR-Algo1 = Cardiac algorithm, iMAR-Algo2 = Pacemaker algorithm and iMAR-Algo3 = ThoracicCoils algorithm). The subjective and objective image quality was assessed. Averaged over all artefacts, artefact degree was significantly lower for the iMAR-Algo1 (58.9 ± 48.5 HU), iMAR-Algo2 (52.7 ± 46.8 HU) and the iMAR-Algo3 (51.9 ± 46.1 HU) compared with WFBP (91.6 ± 81.6 HU, p algorithms, respectively. iMAR-Algo2 and iMAR-Algo3 reconstructions decreased mild and moderate artefacts compared with WFBP and iMAR-Algo1 (p algorithms led to a significant reduction of metal artefacts and increase in overall image quality compared with WFBP in chest CT of patients with metallic implants in subjective and objective analysis. The iMARAlgo2 and iMARAlgo3 were best for mild artefacts. IMARAlgo1 was superior for severe artefacts. Advances in knowledge: Iterative MAR led to significant artefact reduction and increase image-quality compared with WFBP in CT after implementation of thoracic devices. Adjusting iMAR-algorithms to patients' metallic implants can help to improve image quality in CT.

  17. The development of bronchiectasis on chest computed tomography in children with cystic fibrosis: can pre-stages be identified?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepper, Leonie A. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Caudri, Daan [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perez Rovira, Adria [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bruijne, Marleen de [Erasmus MC, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-12-15

    Bronchiectasis is an important component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease but little is known about its development. We aimed to study the development of bronchiectasis and identify determinants for rapid progression of bronchiectasis on chest CT. Forty-three patients with CF with at least four consecutive biennial volumetric CTs were included. Areas with bronchiectasis on the most recent CT were marked as regions of interest (ROIs). These ROIs were generated on all preceding CTs using deformable image registration. Observers indicated whether: bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, airway wall thickening, atelectasis/consolidation or normal airways were present in the ROIs. We identified 362 ROIs on the most recent CT. In 187 (51.7 %) ROIs bronchiectasis was present on all preceding CTs, while 175 ROIs showed development of bronchiectasis. In 139/175 (79.4 %) no pre-stages of bronchiectasis were identified. In 36/175 (20.6 %) bronchiectatic airways the following pre-stages were identified: mucus plugging (17.7 %), airway wall thickening (1.7 %) or atelectasis/consolidation (1.1 %). Pancreatic insufficiency was more prevalent in the rapid progressors compared to the slow progressors (p = 0.05). Most bronchiectatic airways developed within 2 years without visible pre-stages, underlining the treacherous nature of CF lung disease. Mucus plugging was the most frequent pre-stage. (orig.)

  18. The development of bronchiectasis on chest computed tomography in children with cystic fibrosis: can pre-stages be identified?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepper, Leonie A.; Caudri, Daan; Perez Rovira, Adria; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.; Bruijne, Marleen de

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is an important component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease but little is known about its development. We aimed to study the development of bronchiectasis and identify determinants for rapid progression of bronchiectasis on chest CT. Forty-three patients with CF with at least four consecutive biennial volumetric CTs were included. Areas with bronchiectasis on the most recent CT were marked as regions of interest (ROIs). These ROIs were generated on all preceding CTs using deformable image registration. Observers indicated whether: bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, airway wall thickening, atelectasis/consolidation or normal airways were present in the ROIs. We identified 362 ROIs on the most recent CT. In 187 (51.7 %) ROIs bronchiectasis was present on all preceding CTs, while 175 ROIs showed development of bronchiectasis. In 139/175 (79.4 %) no pre-stages of bronchiectasis were identified. In 36/175 (20.6 %) bronchiectatic airways the following pre-stages were identified: mucus plugging (17.7 %), airway wall thickening (1.7 %) or atelectasis/consolidation (1.1 %). Pancreatic insufficiency was more prevalent in the rapid progressors compared to the slow progressors (p = 0.05). Most bronchiectatic airways developed within 2 years without visible pre-stages, underlining the treacherous nature of CF lung disease. Mucus plugging was the most frequent pre-stage. (orig.)

  19. A randomized trial of chest irradiation alone versus chest irradiation plus Lentinan in squamous cell lung cancer in limited stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Ikuro; Ohnoshi, Taisuke; Konno, Kiyoshi

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the effect of Lentinan, polysaccharides from Lentinusedodes, in combination with chest irradiation for limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer, we conducted a randomized trial between January 1987 and July 1989. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either a definitive chest irradiation of 60 Gy alone (RT) or the chest irradiation plus Lentinan (RT+L). Patients allocated to the RT+L group received iv infusion of Lentinan, 1 mg twice a week or 2 mg once a week, as long as possible. Of 201 patients enrolled, 183 (94 for RT, and 89 for RT+L) were eligible for analysis of survival time, and 169 (86 for RT, and 83 for RT+L) were evaluated for tumor response, survival time and quality of life. The response rate to the treatments showed a trend favoring the RT+L group (65% vs. 51%, p=0.142). The median survival time was 455 days for the RT+L group and 371 days for the RT group. The difference was not statistically significant. In the subset of patients with cancer of hilar origin, however, RT+L group patients lived significantly longer than RT group patients: Progression-free interval from symptoms and quality of life were evaluated for the both groups based on manual records of an individual patient. RT+L group patients had a significantly longer progression-free interval from dyspneic feeling than the RT group patients. The RT+L group tended to have a feeling of well-being. We conclude that Lentinan in combination with chest irradiation is useful for patients with limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer in terms of prolongation of life and maintenance of a favorable quality of life as well. (author)

  20. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis; Senologische Befunde bei CT-Untersuchungen des Thorax. Eine retrospektive Auswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Breast Center and Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Hellmich, Martin [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2017-10-15

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  1. Incremental Role of Mammography in the Evaluation of Gynecomastia in Men Who Have Undergone Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenblick, Emily B; Salvatore, Mary; Szabo, Janet; Lee, Karen A; Margolies, Laurie R

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether additional breast imaging is clinically valuable in the evaluation of patients with gynecomastia incidentally observed on CT of the chest. In a retrospective analysis, 62 men were identified who had a mammographic diagnosis of gynecomastia and had also undergone CT within 8 months (median, 2 months). We compared the imaging findings of both modalities and correlated them with the clinical outcome. Gynecomastia was statistically significantly larger on mammograms than on CT images; however, there was a high level of concordance in morphologic features and distribution of gynecomastia between mammography and CT. In only one case was gynecomastia evident on mammographic but not CT images, owing to cachexia. Two of the 62 men had ductal carcinoma, which was obscured by gynecomastia. Both of these patients had symptoms suggesting malignancy. The appearance of gynecomastia on CT scans and mammograms was highly correlated. Mammography performed within 8 months of CT is unlikely to reveal cancer unless there is a suspicious clinical finding or a breast mass eccentric to the nipple. Men with clinical symptoms of gynecomastia do not need additional imaging with mammography to confirm the diagnosis if they have undergone recent cross-sectional imaging.

  2. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B; Mortensen, Jann

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost......-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional workup for preoperative staging of NSCLC. METHODS: The study was conducted alongside an RCT in which 189 patients were allocated to conventional staging (n = 91) or conventional staging + PET/CT (n = 98...... perspective, the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT for staging NSCLC seems to depend on the willingness to pay in order to avoid a futile thoracotomy. However, given that four outliers in terms of extreme comorbidity were all randomized to the PET/CT arm, there is uncertainty about the conclusion. When hospital...

  3. The oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle: chest radiographic-CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Choo, In Wook

    1996-01-01

    An oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle, extending superomedially from right retrocardiac or supradiaphragmatic region inferolaterally to peridiaphragmatic region, is occasionally observed on posteroanterior chest radiograph. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of visualization of the interface on chest radiographs and to elucidate its nature on radiographic-CT correlation. Posteroanterior chest radiographs from 300 consecutive subjects were analyzed to evaluate the frequency and demographic data about an oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle. Thin-section CT scans(1-mm collimation and 5-mm intervals) were obtained from the subjects with positive interface on chest radiograph for assessment of the nature of the interface. The demographic data in the subjects with and without the interface were tested statistically to note any difference between two groups. Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle was present in 29 subjects(9.7%) on chest radiograph. The age of the subjects with positive interface(13 men and 16 women) ranged from 19 to 70 years(mean±SD, 47±12.7 years) whereas the age of the subjects without the interface from 16 to 82 years (mean±SD, 50±9.1 years)(p>0.1). The body weight of the subjects with the interface ranged from 41 to 72 Kg(mean±SD, 60±8.0Kg) whereas the body weight of the subjects without the interface from 41 to 85Kg(mean±SD, 63±10.1Kg)(p>0.1). On CT scan, it was formed due to contact between the epipericardial fat and the right middle lobe of the lung in 27 subjects(93%) and between the inferior vena cava and the medial basal segment of the right lower lobe of the lung in two(7%). Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle is occasionally visualized on chest radiograph. It is formed due to contact between the right middle lobe of the lung and pericardial fat in most cases. The frequency of visualization of the interface has no relationship to age and body weight of the

  4. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Wielenga, V T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  5. Evaluation of automatic image quality assessment in chest CT - A human cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Caro; De Crop, An; De Roo, Bieke; Smeets, Peter; Vergauwen, Merel; Dewaele, Tom; Van Borsel, Mathias; Achten, Eric; Van Hoof, Tom; Bacher, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of clinical image quality (IQ) is important to optimize CT protocols and to keep patient doses as low as reasonably achievable. Considering the significant amount of effort needed for human observer studies, automatic IQ tools are a promising alternative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate automatic IQ assessment in chest CT using Thiel embalmed cadavers. Chest CT's of Thiel embalmed cadavers were acquired at different exposures. Clinical IQ was determined by performing a visual grading analysis. Physical-technical IQ (noise, contrast-to-noise and contrast-detail) was assessed in a Catphan phantom. Soft and sharp reconstructions were made with filtered back projection and two strengths of iterative reconstruction. In addition to the classical IQ metrics, an automatic algorithm was used to calculate image quality scores (IQs). To be able to compare datasets reconstructed with different kernels, the IQs values were normalized. Good correlations were found between IQs and the measured physical-technical image quality: noise (ρ=-1.00), contrast-to-noise (ρ=1.00) and contrast-detail (ρ=0.96). The correlation coefficients between IQs and the observed clinical image quality of soft and sharp reconstructions were 0.88 and 0.93, respectively. The automatic scoring algorithm is a promising tool for the evaluation of thoracic CT scans in daily clinical practice. It allows monitoring of the image quality of a chest protocol over time, without human intervention. Different reconstruction kernels can be compared after normalization of the IQs. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping on chest CT using spatial priors and random forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Hoffman, Joanne; Zhao, Jocelyn; Yao, Jianhua; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated system for mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping for chest CT. Methods: The contextual organs, trachea, lungs, and spine are first automatically identified to locate the region of interest (ROI) (mediastinum). The authors employ shape features derived from Hessian analysis, local object scale, and circular transformation that are computed per voxel in the ROI. Eight more anatomical structures are simultaneously segmented by multiatlas label fusion. Spatial priors are defined as the relative multidimensional distance vectors corresponding to each structure. Intensity, shape, and spatial prior features are integrated and parsed by a random forest classifier for lymph node detection. The detected candidates are then segmented by the following curve evolution process. Texture features are computed on the segmented lymph nodes and a support vector machine committee is used for final classification. For lymph node station labeling, based on the segmentation results of the above anatomical structures, the textual definitions of mediastinal lymph node map according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer are converted into patient-specific color-coded CT image, where the lymph node station can be automatically assigned for each detected node. Results: The chest CT volumes from 70 patients with 316 enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes are used for validation. For lymph node detection, their system achieves 88% sensitivity at eight false positives per patient. For lymph node station labeling, 84.5% of lymph nodes are correctly assigned to their stations. Conclusions: Multiple-channel shape, intensity, and spatial prior features aggregated by a random forest classifier improve mediastinal lymph node detection on chest CT. Using the location information of segmented anatomic structures from the multiatlas formulation enables accurate identification of lymph node stations.

  7. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zarb, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milliampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r(2) = 0.269, p-value < or =0.001; DLP: r(2) = 0.260, p-value < or =0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended.

  8. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, F.; Rainford, L.; McEntee, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milli-ampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r 2 = 0.269, p-value ≤0.001; DLP: r 2 = 0.260, p-value ≤0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended. (authors)

  9. Interstitial shadow on chest CT is associated with the onset of interstitial lung disease caused by chemotherapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niho, Seiji; Goto, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Kim, Y.H.; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kubota, Kaoru; Saijo, Nagahiro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) films of the chest was studied to clarify the influence of interstitial shadow on developing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Eligible patients were those lung cancer patients who started to receive first-line chemotherapy between October 2001 and March 2004. Patients who received thoracic radiotherapy to the primary lesion, mediastinum, spinal or rib metastases were excluded. We reviewed pretreatment conventional CT and plain X-ray films of the chest. Ground-glass opacity, consolidation or reticular shadow without segmental distribution was defined as interstitial shadow, with this event being graded as mild, moderate or severe. If interstitial shadow was detected on CT films of the chest, but not via plain chest X-ray, it was graded as mild. Patients developing ILD were identified from medial records. A total of 502 patients were eligible. Mild, moderate and severe interstitial shadow was identified in 7, 8 and 5% of patients, respectively. A total of 188 patients (37%) received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, namely gefitinib or erlotinib. Twenty-six patients (5.2%) developed ILD either during or after chemotherapy. Multivariate analyses revealed that interstitial shadow on CT films of the chest and treatment history with TKI were associated with the onset of ILD. It is recommended that patients with interstitial shadow on chest CT are excluded from future clinical trials until this issue is further clarified, as it is anticipated that use of chemotherapeutic agents frequently mediate onset of ILD in this context. (author)

  10. Correlation of B-Lines on Ultrasonography With Interstitial Lung Disease on Chest Radiography and CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Theodore J; Shah, Hardik; Sonneborn, Rachelle; Hippe, Daniel S

    2017-11-01

    We prospectively identified B-lines in patients undergoing ultrasonographic (US) examinations following liver transplantation who also had chest radiography (CXR) or chest CT imaging, or both, on the same day to determine if an association between the presence of B-lines from the thorax on US images correlates with the presence of lung abnormalities on CXR. Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, patients who received liver transplants and underwent routine US examinations and chest radiography or CT imaging, or both, on the same day between January 1, 2015 through July 1, 2016 were prospectively identified. Two readers who were blinded to chest films and CT images and reports independently reviewed the US interreader agreement for the presence or absence of B-lines and performed an evaluation for the presence or absence of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) on chest films and CT images as well as from clinical evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. There was good agreement between the two readers on the presence of absence of B-lines (kappa = 0.94). The area under the ROC curve for discriminating between positive DPLD and negative DPLD for both readers was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.71-0.87). There is an association between the presence of extensive B-lines to the point of confluence and "dirty shadowing" on US examinations of the chest and associated findings on chest radiographs and CT scans of DPLD. Conversely, isolated B-lines do not always correlate with abnormalities on chest films and in fact sometimes appear to be a normal variant. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI vol and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose metrics

  12. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-01

    Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDIvol and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose metrics only increased slightly for

  13. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  14. Clinical evaluation of automatic tube voltage selection in chest CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo; Henry, Simon; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Yasunaga, Kanna; Bendaoud, Sofiane; Simeone, Ariana; Remy, Jacques [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Medical Systems, Department of Research and Development, Forchheim (Germany); Remy-Jardin, Martine [Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical impact of automatic tube voltage selection on chest CT angiography (CTA). Ninety-three patients were prospectively evaluated with a CT protocol aimed at comparing two successive CTAs acquired under similar technical conditions except for the kV selection: (1) the initial CTA was systematically obtained at 120 kVp and 90 ref mAs; (2) the follow-up CTA was obtained with an automatic selection of the kilovoltage (Care KV; Siemens Healthcare) for optimised CTA. At follow-up, 90 patients (97 %) underwent CTA with reduced tube voltage, 100 kV (n = 26; 28 %) and 80 kV (n = 64; 69 %), resulting in a significant dose-length-product reduction (follow-up: 87.27; initial: 141.88 mGy.cm; P < 0.0001; mean dose reduction: 38.5 %) and a significant increase in the CNR at follow-up (follow-up: 11.5 {+-} 3.5 HU; initial: 10.9 {+-} 3.7 HU; P = 0.03). The increase in objective image noise at follow-up (follow-up: 23.2 {+-} 6.7 HU vs. 17.8 {+-} 5.1 HU; P < 0.0001) did not alter the diagnostic value of images. Automatic tube voltage selection reduced the radiation dose delivered during chest CT angiograms by 38.5 % while improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the examinations. (orig.)

  15. Cardiovascular disease prediction: do pulmonary disease-related chest CT features have added value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jairam, Pushpa M.; Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Isgum, Ivana; Graaf, Yolanda van der

    2015-01-01

    Certain pulmonary diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore we investigated the incremental predictive value of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features over cardiovascular imaging findings. A total of 10,410 patients underwent diagnostic chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications. Using a case-cohort approach, we visually graded CTs from the cases and from an approximately 10 % random sample of the baseline cohort (n = 1,203) for cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural findings. The incremental value of pulmonary disease-related CT findings above cardiovascular imaging findings in cardiovascular event risk prediction was quantified by comparing discrimination and reclassification. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years (max. 7.0 years), 1,148 CVD events (cases) were identified. Addition of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features to a cardiovascular imaging findings-based prediction model led to marginal improvement of discrimination (increase in c-index from 0.72 (95 % CI 0.71-0.74) to 0.74 (95 % CI 0.72-0.75)) and reclassification measures (net reclassification index 6.5 % (p < 0.01)). Pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features have limited predictive value in the identification of subjects at high risk of CVD events beyond cardiovascular findings on diagnostic chest CT scans. (orig.)

  16. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Little, Brent P.; Forssen, Anna V.; Yong, Jin; Nambu, Atsushi; Kazlouski, Demitry; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Lynch, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes

  17. Comparison between plain chest film and CT in estimating the size of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Yuichi

    1995-01-01

    Regarding the patients diagnosed as having traumatic and spontaneous pneumothorax at our emergency center within the past 6 years we examined the distribution of pneumothorax shown by plain chest film and CT, and compared the pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method with plain chest film and that by one slice method with CT, which was based on full slice integration method with CT. Occult pneumothorax was found in 47.6% of traumatic cases and 11.1% of spontaneous cases. The distribution of pneumothoraces showed no significant differences. However, as compared with classical pneumothorax, the ratio of pneumothoraces in the apicolateral recess in the occult pneumothoraces tended to be lower, whereas the ratio of the ones in the anteromedial recess and in the subpulmonic recess tended to be comparatively high. The plain chest film of occult pneumothorax had been taken on supine position in most cases of traumatic pneumothorax and in more than half the cases of spontaneous pneumothorax. This was considered to be the cause of the unique distribution of pneumothorax. The pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method tended to be underestimated in comparison with the basic rate, where the correlation coefficient was R=0.84 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.14 for spontaneous pneumothorax. Especially in the cases of low pneumothorax rate the correlation was poor. The pneumothorax rate calculated by one slice method produced better figures with the correlation coefficient of R=0.92 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.85 for spontaneous pneumothorax. The one slice method was considered to be effective in evaluation of the degree of serious cases, and also for the choice of treatment modality for pneumothorax. (author)

  18. Which Iodine concentration in chest CT? - A prospective study in 300 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenbruch, Georg; Behrendt, Florian F.; Eddahabi, Mohammed A.; Das, Marco; Guenther, Rolf W.; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Knackstedt, Christian; Stanzel, Sven; Seidensticker, Peter; Wildberger, Joachim E.

    2008-01-01

    In computed tomography(CT) several contrast media with different iodine concentrations are available. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare contrast media with iodine concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml for chest- CT. 300 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled, under a waiver of the local ethics committee. The first (second, third) 100 patients, received contrast medium with 300(370, 400)mg iodine/ml. Injection protocols were adapted for an identical iodine delivery rate(1.3 mg/s) and total iodine load(33 g) for all three groups. Standardized MDCT of the chest (16 x 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 100 mAseff.) was performed. Intravascular attenuation values were measured in the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta; subjective image quality was rated on a 3-point-scale. Discomfort during and after injection was evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement comparing the three contrast media at the pulmonary trunk(p = 0.3198) and at the ascending aorta(p = 0.0840). Image quality(p = 0.0176) and discomfort during injection(p 0.7034) were comparable for all groups. General discomfort after injection of contrast media with 300 mg iodine/ml was statistically significant higher compared to 370 mg iodine/ml(p = 0.00019). Given identical iodine delivery rates of 1.3 g/s and iodine loads of 33 g, contrast media with concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml do not result in different intravascular enhancement in chest-CT. (orig.)

  19. Incremental value of CT angiography over chest x-rays in suspected pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, W.B.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: CT pulmonary angiography (CT) may detect nonembolic diagnoses in up to 25% of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). In a prospective study of 104 patients at Sir Charles Gairdner and Royal Perth Hospitals, chest x-ray (CXR), VQ scan and CT angiography were all performed within a period of 24-hours. CT angiograms were positive in 21/26 cases of PE (81%), but the CXR was positive for PE in only 2 (7%). The initial CXR was normal in 42 patients (39%). Nonspecific or unrelated abnormalities were detected in 64 patients, including basal atelectasis and/or small effusion(s) in 40 patients (62% abnormal CXRs), confluent consolidation (12 patients), malignancy (11) and interstitial oedema (11). The most common abnormality detected only by CT was mild-moderate enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes, in 22 patients (21%). No cause for this was found at follow up in 12 patients. In the remaining 10 patients, mediastinal adenopathy was due to cancer but affected immediate management in only three.In a further 5 patients, nonembolic lesions were detected on CT angiography but did not affect management. In 7 patients, abnormalities were reported only on plain CXR, including interstitial oedema, lower lobe consolidation and a small pneumothorax. In patients with suspected PE, CT angiography was useful to detect PE in those with abnormal CXRs. The incremental diagnostic yield in terms of nonembolic diagnoses was relatively low in this series and confined largely to detection of mild-moderate mediastinal lymphadenopathy, which remained undiagnosed in more than 50% of patients. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. Evaluation of variation of voltage (kV) absorbed dose in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Bruna G.A.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important diagnostic techniques images today. The increasing utilization of CT implies a significant increase of population exposure to ionizing radiation. Optimization of practice aims to reduce doses to patients because the image quality is directly related to the diagnosis. You can decrease the amount of dose to the patient, and maintain the quality of the image. There are several parameters that can be manipulated in a CT scan and these parameters can be used to reduce the energy deposited in the patient. Based on this, we analyzed the variation of dose deposited in the lungs, breasts and thyroid, by varying the supply voltage of the tube. Scans of the thorax were performed following the protocol of routine chest with constant and variable current for the same applied voltage. Moreover, a female phantom was used and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), model bat, were used to record the specific organ doses. Scans were performed on a GE CT scanner, model 64 Discovery channels. Higher doses were recorded for the voltage of 120 kV with 200 mAs in the lungs (22.46 mGy) and thyroid (32.22 mGy). For scans with automatic mAs, variable between 100 and 440, this same tension contributed to the higher doses. The best examination in terms of the dose that was used with automatic 80 kV mAs, whose lungs and thyroid received lower dose. For the best breast exam was 100 kV. Since the increase in the 80 kV to 100 kV no impact so much the dose deposited in the lungs, it can be concluded that lowering the applied voltage to 100 kV resulted in a reduction in the dose absorbed by the patient. These results can contribute to optimizing scans of the chest computed tomography

  1. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T J P; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Brown, Matthew S; de Jong, Pim A; Viergever, Max A; van Ginneken, Bram

    2014-08-01

    Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors' aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in challenging chest CT images. Both systems do

  2. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P., E-mail: thessa@isi.uu.nl; Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M. [Department of Radiology, Meander Medical Centre, 3813 TZ Amersfoort, The Netherlands and Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bozovic, Gracijela [Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate [Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, ES-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Rikxoort, Eva M. van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brown, Matthew S. [Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  3. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P.; Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  4. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques; Santangelo, Teresa; Duhamel, Alain; Deschildre, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol 32 ) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP 32 was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP 32 , CTDI vol32 and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP 32 , 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI vol32 and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  5. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Santangelo, Teresa [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Biostatistics, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Deschildre, Antoine [CHU Lille - University of Lille, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Lille (France)

    2017-02-15

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol{sub 32}) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP{sub 32} was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP{sub 32}, CTDI{sub vol32} and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP{sub 32}, 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI{sub vol32} and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  6. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno, E-mail: betinascheeren@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil); Gomes, Erissandra [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  7. Common and uncommon manifestations of Wegener granulomatosis at chest CT: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Felipe; Chung, Jonathan H; Digumarthy, Subba R; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Abbott, Gerald F; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Mark, Eugene J; Sharma, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is an uncommon necrotizing vasculitis that classically manifests as a clinical triad consisting of upper and lower airway involvement and glomerulonephritis. Other less frequently involved organ systems include the central and peripheral nervous system and large joints. The diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical and laboratory findings. Because thoracic involvement often predominates, chest radiographic findings are often the first to suggest the diagnosis. However, chest computed tomography (CT) has superior sensitivity and specificity for evaluation of the airways, lung parenchyma, and mediastinum, particularly with the use of multiplanar reformatted and three-dimensional images. Common pulmonary radiologic findings include waxing and waning nodules, masses, ground-glass opacities, and consolidation. Airway involvement is usually characterized by circumferential tracheobronchial thickening, which can be smooth or nodular. Pleural effusions are the most common manifestation of pleural disease and can result from primary involvement or be secondary to renal failure. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy is a nonspecific finding and is usually reactive. Uncommon thoracic radiologic manifestations include involvement of the heart and great vessels. CT is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis, surveillance, and follow-up in patients with Wegener granulomatosis. © RSNA, 2012.

  8. Three-dimensional automatic computer-aided evaluation of pleural effusions on chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Mark; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2011-03-01

    The ability to estimate the volume of pleural effusions is desirable as it can provide information about the severity of the condition and the need for thoracentesis. We present here an improved version of an automated program to measure the volume of pleural effusions using regular chest CT images. First, the lungs are segmented using region growing, mathematical morphology, and anatomical knowledge. The visceral and parietal layers of the pleura are then extracted based on anatomical landmarks, curve fitting and active contour models. The liver and compressed tissues are segmented out using thresholding. The pleural space is then fitted to a Bezier surface which is subsequently projected onto the individual two-dimensional slices. Finally, the volume of the pleural effusion is quantified. Our method was tested on 15 chest CT studies and validated against three separate manual tracings. The Dice coefficients were 0.74+/-0.07, 0.74+/-0.08, and 0.75+/-0.07 respectively, comparable to the variation between two different manual tracings.

  9. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gomes, Erissandra; Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  11. An Evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements on chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotani, Taichi; Ohama, Kazunori; Shimotake, Takashi; Ishikawa, Nobuki; Watanabe, Reiji

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether the body surface index replaces the Haller index in order to evaluate the severity of pectus excavatum. Sixty-nine cases with a diagnosis of pectus excavatum between August 2001 and January 2008 were prospectively enrolled in the study. The anterior-posterior chest dimension, lateral chest dimension and depth of the most profound depressed area were measured. The body surface index was expressed as an equation A/(B-C), where A was the transverse diameter, B was the anterior-posterior diameter and C was the depth of the depressed area. This index was compared to the Haller index in each patient. In this study, each value was measured on a chest CT scan. The body surface index significantly correlated with the Haller index, in which the coefficient of correlation was 0.879 (p<0.01). The body surface index corresponding to Haller index 3.25 seems to be 1.67. We could find the body surface index corresponding to each Haller index. We propose that an evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements is clinically useful, and may replace the Haller index. The body surface index may allow us to assess the severity of pectus excavatum without a CT scan, resulting in a reduction of radiation exposure for children with pectus excavatum. It's possible to evaluate the body surface index by using a relational table between this index and the Hailer index. We'll evaluate the body surface index by using values measured on a real body. (author)

  12. Chest radiographic staging in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: relationship with immunological findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, J L

    2012-02-03

    The question of whether a chest radiographic severity staging system could be correlated with standard blood\\/serum diagnostic indices in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was addressed in 41 patients. Asthma and positive Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) serology were considered essential diagnostic inclusion criteria. Eosinophil count, serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and immediate skin hypersensitivity were also tested to grade patients as "definite" or "likely" ABPA. Definite cases had all five of these factors present, whereas likely cases had three or more. Chest radiographs were examined by experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The six-stage radiographic score (0-5) was based on the severity and duration of changes seen: stage 0: normal; stage 1: transient hyperinflation; stage 2: transient minor changes; stage 3: transient major changes; stage 4: permanent minor changes; and stage 5: permanent major changes. Significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were observed between peak AF titres (expressed as an index), peak eosinophil count and radiographic severity stage. When considered as subgroups, these correlations approached, but did not reach, significance for the group with "likely" ABPA (n=28), but in the group with definite ABPA (n=13), there was a high correlation between radiographic score and peak AF index (r=0.59), as well as peak eosinophil count (r=0.62). This study suggests that the peak Aspergillus fumigatus index and eosinophil counts correlate best with the severity of radiographic stages in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. This chest radiographic staging system may be useful in the clinical assessment and management of patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, particularly in those patients with more severe radiographic stages.

  13. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria, E-mail: mknorst@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Guerra, Vinicius Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Pneumologicas; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results: On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. (author)

  14. One-stage reconstruction of chest wall defects with greater omentum transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Takao; Oshiro, Toshio; Sato, Koji.

    1976-01-01

    Reconstructive operation by greater omentum transplantation in two cases of chest wall ulcer due to radiation therapy following an operation of breast cancer was introduced. The exposed dose of one case was not clarified, but that of another case was 5000 rad. This operation method is an excellent one, because operation is completed at one-stage and reconstruction of tissue is great owing to good blood circulation. It was thought that this method must be used more positively in the treatment of chest wall ulcer due to irradiation which is difficult to be treated. (Tsunoda, M.)

  15. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Franziska M; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. • Fast dual-source CT provides chest/abdomen/pelvis staging examinations within 2 seconds scan time. • The sevenfold scan time reduction eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. • Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can now be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. • The coverage of the peripheral soft tissues is comparable to single-source CT. • Fast and large-volume oncologic DSCT can be performed with 9 mSv effective dose.

  16. Detection of non-aggressive stage IA lung cancer using chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Satoshi; Yanagawa, Naoki; Abiko, Masami; Sato, Toru

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to lung cancer with ground-glass opacity, the radiological investigation of solid lung cancer has not been well examined. The aim of this study was to explore chest computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings with regard to outcomes after lung cancer surgery in order to radiologically classify clinical stage IA lung cancers by tumour aggressiveness. Three hundred and fifteen clinical stage IA patients were analysed. Four groups were defined by tumour solidity on CT and by the standardized uptake value (SUV) index on PET-CT (tumour maximum SUV/mean right liver lobe SUV). We analysed the association between radiological findings and both pathological invasiveness and postoperative outcome. Group A (n = 84) had an SUV index <1.0 and non-solid tumours, Group B (n = 24) had an SUV index <1.0 and solid tumours, Group C (n = 54) had an SUV index ≥1.0 and non-solid tumours, while Group D (n = 153) had an SUV index ≥1.0 and solid tumours. Invasive lung cancer was found in 2/84 (2.4%) patients in Group A, 1/24 (4.2%) in Group B, 13/54 (24.1%) in Group C and 58/153 (37.9%) in Group D (P < 0.01). The 5-year recurrence-free rate was 100% in Groups A and B, 90.3% in C and 65.7% in D (P < 0.01). The cancer-specific survival rate was 100% in A and B, 94.6% in C and 81.7% in D (P < 0.01). The present results suggest that preoperative PET/CT and thin-section CT findings provide important information for a selection of surgical procedures for clinical stage IA lung cancers. In clinical stage IA lung cancers displaying solid or non-solid density in thin-section findings, an SUV index <1.0 may be a better criterion for detecting non-aggressive lung cancer even in solid lung cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative evaluation of organ and effective doses for paediatric patients with those for adults in chest and abdominal CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Koyama, S; Kawaura, C

    2007-08-01

    Patient doses in paediatric and adult CT examinations were investigated for modern multislice CT scanners by using specially constructed in-phantom dose measuring systems. The systems were composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within anthropomorphic phantoms representing the bodies of 6-year-old children and adults. Organ and the effective doses were evaluated from dose values measured at these sites. In chest CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 2-21 mGy for children and 7-26 mGy for adults. Thyroid doses for children were frequently the highest with a maximum of 21 mGy. In abdominal CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 3-16 mGy for children and 10-34 mGy for adults. Effective doses evaluated for children and adults were found to be proportional to the effective mAs of CT scanners, where linear coefficients were specific to the types of CT examinations and to the manufacturers of CT scanners. Effective doses in paediatric chest CT and abdominal CT examinations were lower than those in adult examinations by a factor of two or greater on average for the same CT scanners because of the lower effective mAs adopted in paediatric examinations.

  18. Chest wall sarcoma: 18F-FDG PET/CT in a patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadaz, Tyson; Hobbs, Susan K; Son, Hongju

    2013-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder also known as the SBLA cancer syndrome (sarcoma, breast, leukemia, and adrenal). A 39-year-old female patient with a history of bilateral breast cancer treated with bilateral mastectomies and radiation treatment 4 years ago and left chest wall pleomorphic sarcoma 1 year ago presented with a small hypermetabolic right chest wall mass on 18F-FDG PET/CT. This mass was found to be a spindle cell sarcoma. FDG PET/CT plays an important role in following up oncology patients, particularly in group of high-risk malignancy, for detecting small hypermetabolic lesions.

  19. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC....... METHODS: We randomly assigned patients who were referred for preoperative staging of NSCLC to either conventional staging plus PET-CT or conventional staging alone. Patients were followed until death or for at least 12 months. The primary end point was the number of futile thoracotomies, defined as any...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  20. TRIAGE OF PATIENTS TO ANGIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF AORTIC RUPTURE AFTER BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA - COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF USING CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUNINK, MGM; BOS, JJ

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dynamic chest CT, compared with plain chest radiography and immediate angiography, in deciding when angiography should be performed in hemodynamically stable patients with suspected aortic rupture after blunt chest

  1. CT chest abdomen pelvis doses in Scotland: has the DRL had its day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, D G; McVey, S; Gentle, D; Hince, A J; MacDonald, N; McCallum, S

    2014-09-01

    This article reports on a pilot study designed to collect dose data representative of current CT chest abdomen pelvis (CAP) practice in Scotland, make any immediately obvious interventions and to identify if the current UK diagnostic reference level (DRL) of 940 mGy cm is still appropriate. The aims are to identify if a Scotland-wide picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-based dose audit of a number of CT examinations is likely to have value in terms of optimization of patient doses and to comment on the significance of the results in terms of future optimization strategies. Dose audit of CT CAP examinations at 32 different scanner sites across Scotland using accepted data collection and analysis methods. The minimum sample size was 30. RESULTS indicate that CT CAP doses are lower than those previously reported (median, 800 mGy cm, 75th percentile 840 mGy cm) but follow a distribution that is not in keeping with the concept of DRLs as presently understood or implemented. There is value in a PACS-based dose audit project to provide serial snapshots of patient doses as optimization efforts take place and to revise current knowledge about CT doses. In our opinion, the results call into question whether DRLs or the concept of "achievable dose" are suitable for devising optimization strategies once a certain degree of optimization has taken place. The results reported here suggest that it may be time to take a different approach to optimization, concentrating on tools that are more refined than the DRL, which may have become more of a compliance tool than an aid to optimization.

  2. Coronary CT angiography for acute chest pain triage: techniques for radiation exposure reduction; 128 vs. 64 multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitein, Orly; Matetzky, Shlomi; Eshet, Yael; Goitein, David; Hamdan, Ashraf; Segni, Elio Di; Konen, Eli

    2011-10-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used daily in acute chest pain triage, although exposing patients to significant radiation dosage. CCTA using prospective ECG gating (PG CCTA) enables significant radiation reduction. To determine whether the routine use of 128 vs. 64 multidetector CT (MDCT) can increase the proportion of patients scanned using PG CCTA technique, lowering radiation exposure, without decreasing image quality. The study comprised 232 patients, 116 consecutive patients scanned using 128 MDCT (mean age 49 years, 79 men, BMI 28) and 116 consecutive patients (mean age 50 years, 75 men, BMI 28) which were scanned using 64 MDCT. PG CCTA was performed whenever technically permissible by each type of scanner: 64 MDCT = stable heart rate (HR) exposure was 6.2 ± 4.8 mSv and 10.4 ± 7.5 mSv for the 128 and 64 MDCT, respectively (P = 0.008). The 128 MDCT scanner enables utilization of PG CCTA technique in a greater proportion of patients, thereby decreasing the related radiation significantly, without hampering image quality.

  3. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  4. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterson, Leslie C.; Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A.; Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen; Lim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  5. Consequence of Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease judging from the change of the chest CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kiyohiro

    2008-01-01

    The long term consequence of the disease in Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease (MACPD) is scarcely reported. This paper describes consequences of CT images and clinical symptoms in MACPD patients with rather poorer prognosis than usual during chemotherapy for one or more years in authors' hospital until May 2007. Subjects are 17 patients (average age 65.3 y, M 6/F 11) diagnosed as MACPD by the criteria by Jap. Soc. Tuberculosis (2003), whose follow up period is 14-105 (av. 58.1) months, and are classified in tuberculoid type (tt, 2 cases), bronchiectasis post surgery (2) and bronchia type (bt, 13, mostly primary MACPD). Chemotherapy is done with clarithromycin (CAM)+ethambutol (EB)+rifampicin (RHP) (+streptomycin (SM) for progression). Consequences of typical chest CT images are presented for each classification in this paper. Cavitation is seen even in bt as well as in tt and, if observed, the disease tends to deteriorate. In the secondary MACPD post surgery, the exacerbation of clinical symptom is often more severe despite slow changes in CT finding than in bt. Thus, careful follow up is necessary for the two cases above. (R.T.)

  6. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a chest phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Da Silva, T. A. [Development Center of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mourao F, A. P., E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Nuclear Energy Department, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRL) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (15,99 ± 2,80) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL. (Author)

  7. Mosaic Pattern of Lung Attenuation on Chest CT in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpun Ussavarungsi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A mosaic pattern of lung attenuation on chest computed tomography (CT may be due to various etiologies. There is limited published data on CT results when used to evaluate pulmonary hypertension (PH. We retrospectively studied the frequency of mosaic pattern in patients with PH and the cause of the PH by diagnostic group, as well as the correlation between the mosaic pattern and the following: demographics, severity of the PH, main pulmonary artery (PA size, PA/aorta (PA/Ao ratio, pulmonary function tests (PFT, and ventilation perfusion scan results. Overall, 18% of the cohort had CT mosaic pattern (34/189. Mosaic pattern was present in 17/113 (15% in Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension, 5/13 (28% in Group 2 pulmonary venous hypertension and 8/50 (16% in Group 3 PH. Conversely, Group 4 chronic thromboembolic PH was more prevalent in 4/8 (50%. Main PA size, PA/Ao ratio, and segmental perfusion defect were positively associated with mosaic pattern. In contrast, factors such as age, gender, body mass index, functional class, hemodynamic data, and PFT values were not associated with mosaic pattern. Mosaic pattern is not specific as an isolated finding for distinguishing the subtype of PH.

  8. Radiologist compliance with California CT dose reporting requirements: a single-center review of pediatric chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Evan J; Larson, David B; Newman, Beverley; Barth, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Effective July 1, 2012, CT dose reporting became mandatory in California. We sought to assess radiologist compliance with this legislation and to determine areas for improvement. We retrospectively reviewed reports from all chest CT examinations performed at our institution from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2013, for errors in documentation of volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and phantom size. Reports were considered as legally compliant if both CTDIvol and DLP were documented accurately and as institutionally compliant if phantom size was also documented accurately. Additionally, we tracked reports that did not document dose in our standard format (phantom size, CTDIvol for each series, and total DLP). Radiologists omitted CTDIvol, DLP, or both in nine of 664 examinations (1.4%) and inaccurately reported one or both of them in 56 of the remaining 655 examinations (8.5%). Radiologists omitted phantom size in 11 of 664 examinations (1.7%) and inaccurately documented it in 20 of the remaining 653 examinations (3.1%). Of 664 examinations, 599 (90.2%) met legal reporting requirements, and 583 (87.8%) met institutional requirements. In reporting dose, radiologists variably used less decimal precision than available, summed CTDIvol, included only series-level DLP, and specified dose information from the scout topogram or a nonchest series for combination examinations. Our institutional processes, which primarily rely on correct human performance, do not ensure accurate dose reporting and are prone to variation in dose reporting format. In view of this finding, we are exploring higher-reliability processes, including better-defined standards and automated dose reporting systems, to improve compliance.

  9. Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Tsuji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early stage of SAP.

  10. ESTIMATION OF FEMALE RADIATION DOSES AND BREAST CANCER RISK FROM CHEST CT EXAMINATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahham, Adnan; ALMasri, Hussein; Kameel, Saleh

    2017-12-11

    Breast organ doses, effective doses and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of breast cancer from chest CT scans are presented for 200 female patients surveyed from 10 hospitals in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Palestine. Patient data were collected and organized in a database from May to November 2016. Data include age (15-80 years), weight, height, and calculated body mass index. Exposure data were also recorded for every examination. Exposure data includes milliampere-second (mAs), X-ray tube kilovoltage (kVp), computed tomography dose index, dose length product, manufacturer, name and type of operated CT scanner. Organ and effective doses were evaluated using a web-based commercially available Monte Carlo software: VirtualDose™CT, a product of Virtual Phantoms, Inc. The software utilizes male and female tissue equivalent phantoms of all ages and sizes including pregnant patients. The corresponding phantom was selected for every patient according to patient's tomographic parameters. Calculated organ doses were used to estimate the LAR of breast cancer according to BEIR VII Phase 2 report. It was found that radiation doses resulting from the same exam vary widely between different hospitals, depending on the parameters used and the type of scanner. For all patients, the breast organ dose ranged from 6.5 to 28 mGy per examination, with an average breast organ dose of 15 mGy. The effective dose from chest CT scan per examination ranged from 3 to 14.7 mSv with an average of 7 mSv. For younger females (15-29 years), the LAR of breast cancer risk was estimated to be around 0.05%. For older female patients (60-79 years), the risk was ~0.001%. It was found that LAR decreases remarkably with patient's age. Values obtained in this study vary between hospitals, they are generally low and consistent with other studies reported worldwide. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Double reading of current chest CT examinations: Clinical importance of changes to radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter M; Stavem, Knut; Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Bjerke, Gisle; Hurlen, Petter; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Dahl, Fredrik A; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Double reading reduces interpretation errors and increases sensitivity. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals submit 39% of computed tomography (CT) reports for quality assurance by double reading. Our objective was to estimate the proportion of radiology reports that were changed during double reading and to assess the potential clinical impact of these changes. In this retrospective cross-sectional study we acquired preliminary and final reports from 1023 consecutive double read chest CT examinations conducted at five public hospitals. The preliminary and final reports were compared for changes in content. Three experienced pulmonologists independently rated the clinical importance of these changes. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged, or decreased. Changes were classified as clinically important in 91 (9%) of 1023 reports. Of these: 3 were critical (demanding immediate action), 15 were major (implying a change in treatment) and 73 were intermediate (affecting subsequent investigations). More clinically important changes were made to urgent examinations and less to female first readers. Chest radiologist made more clinically important changes than other second readers. The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 73 (80%) of the clinically important changes. A 9% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and targeting a selection of urgent cases prospectively may increase the yield of discrepant cases and reduce harm to patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, T.E.; Siegel, M.J.; McAlister, W.H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1992-06-01

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.).

  13. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in pediatric chest CT: a study in 30 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dosereporting system that provides radiation dose and cancer risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. Recently, we reported a method for estimating patientspecific dose from pediatric chest CT. The purpose of this study is to extend that effort to patient-specific risk estimation and to a population of pediatric CT patients. Our study included thirty pediatric CT patients (16 males and 14 females; 0-16 years old), for whom full-body computer models were recently created based on the patients' clinical CT data. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose received by the thirty patients from a chest scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT, 120 kVp, 1.375 pitch, 40-mm collimation, pediatric body scan field-of-view) was simulated and used to estimate patient-specific effective dose. Risks of cancer incidence were calculated for radiosensitive organs using gender-, age-, and tissue-specific risk coefficients and were used to derive patientspecific effective risk. The thirty patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-10.4 mSv/100 mAs and normalized effective risk of 0.5-5.8 cases/1000 exposed persons/100 mAs. Normalized lung dose and risk of lung cancer correlated strongly with average chest diameter (correlation coefficient: r = -0.98 to -0.99). Normalized effective risk also correlated strongly with average chest diameter (r = -0.97 to -0.98). These strong correlations can be used to estimate patient-specific dose and risk prior to or after an imaging study to potentially guide healthcare providers in justifying CT examinations and to guide individualized protocol design and optimization.

  14. 3D convolutional neural network for automatic detection of lung nodules in chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Sardar; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas; Pezeshk, Aria

    2017-03-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) form the backbone of many state-of-the-art computer vision systems for classification and segmentation of 2D images. The same principles and architectures can be extended to three dimensions to obtain 3D CNNs that are suitable for volumetric data such as CT scans. In this work, we train a 3D CNN for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in chest CT images using volumes of interest extracted from the LIDC dataset. We then convert the 3D CNN which has a fixed field of view to a 3D fully convolutional network (FCN) which can generate the score map for the entire volume efficiently in a single pass. Compared to the sliding window approach for applying a CNN across the entire input volume, the FCN leads to a nearly 800-fold speed-up, and thereby fast generation of output scores for a single case. This screening FCN is used to generate difficult negative examples that are used to train a new discriminant CNN. The overall system consists of the screening FCN for fast generation of candidate regions of interest, followed by the discrimination CNN.

  15. Evaluating of the relation among emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT, the smoking history and the respiratory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayase, Taichiro; Higuchi, Tomoaki; Iwamoto, Tomohiro

    2008-01-01

    An influence of smoking on the respiratory function and pulmonary emphysema is well known. However, there are few reports evaluating the relation between smoking and emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT. In this study, we evaluated the relation among emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT, the smoking history and the respiratory function (%VC, FEV 1.0 %). Four hundred and sixty-six healthy members of Self-defense force (mean age; 50.1±5.32 years; all men) were recruited in this study. Emphysematous changes were confirmed by the chest CT in 26 subjects. (5.56%, group A) The remaining 440 subjects showed no emphysematous changes. (group B) On the other hand, 8 subjects (1.7%) were FEV 1.0 % 1.0 % was 76.7±4.7% in group A and 82.5±5.0% in group B (P<0.05). %VC was 117±11.3% in group A and 112±13.2% in group B (P<0.05). In addition, risk to show emphysematous changes in CT was high among the patients whose Brinkmann index (BI) value was over 600 (Odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.5 to 18.5). We conducted that it is possible to evaluate the influence of smoking on the respiratory function by the CT as well as respiratory function test. (author)

  16. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jiin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  17. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Choi, Jiin

    2015-01-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  18. Improved assessment of mediastinal and pulmonary pathologies in combined staging CT examinations using a fast-speed acquisition dual-source CT protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Holzner, Veronica; Meinel, Felix G.; Armbruster, Marco; Brandlhuber, Martina; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Sommer, Wieland H. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Dual-Source CT (DSCT) and to evaluate the clinical utility in chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT studies. 45 cancer patients with two follow-up combined chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations (maximally ±10 kV difference in tube potential) were included. The first scan had to be performed with our standard protocol (fixed pitch 0.6), the second one using a novel fast-speed DSCT protocol (fixed pitch 1.55). Effective doses (ED) were calculated, noise measurements performed. Scan times were compared, motion artefacts and the diagnostic confidence rated in consensus reading. ED for the standard and fast-speed scans was 9.1 (7.0-11.1) mSv and 9.2 (7.4-12.8) mSv, respectively (P = 0.075). Image noise was comparable (abdomen; all P > 0.05) or reduced for fast-speed CTs (trachea, P = 0.001; ascending aorta, P < 0.001). Motion artefacts of the heart/the ascending aorta (all P < 0.001) and breathing artefacts (P < 0.031) were reduced in fast DSCT. The diagnostic confidence for the evaluation of mediastinal (P < 0.001) and pulmonary (P = 0.008) pathologies was improved for fast DSCT. Fast DSCT for chest/abdomen/pelvis staging CT examinations is performed within 2 seconds scan time and eliminates relevant intrathoracic motion/breathing artefacts. Mediastinal/pulmonary pathologies can thus be assessed with high diagnostic confidence. Abdominal image quality remains excellent. (orig.)

  19. CT-guided lung biopsies: pleural blood patching reduces the rate of chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jason M; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G; Robbins, Jessica B; Kim, David H; Pickhardt, Perry J; Lee, Fred T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether pleural blood patching reduces the need for chest tube placement and hospital admission for pneumothorax complicating CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. We reviewed 463 CT-guided lung biopsies performed between August 2006 and March 2010 to determine whether intervention for pneumothorax was required and patient outcome. Intervention was categorized as simple aspiration, aspiration and intrapleural blood patching, or chest tube placement and hospital admission. The technique for pleural blood patching consisted of complete pneumothorax aspiration, immediate placement of up to 15 mL of peripheral autologous blood into the pleural space, and positioning the patient in the ipsilateral decubitus position for 1 hour after the procedure. Intervention for pneumothorax was necessary in 45 of 463 patients (9.7%) and 19 of 463 patients (4.1%) required chest tube placement. Pleural blood patching as a method to treat a postbiopsy pneumothorax and avoid further intervention was associated with a significantly higher success rate than simple aspiration: 19 of 22 (86.4%) vs seven of 15 (46.7%) (odds ratio = 7.2, p = 0.03), respectively. Aspiration with intrapleural blood patching is superior to simple aspiration to treat pneumothorax associated with CT-guided lung biopsy. Pleural blood patching reduces the need for chest tube placement and hospital admission in this patient population.

  20. Triple Rule Out versus CT Angiogram Plus Stress Test for Evaluation of Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. Sawyer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Undifferentiated chest pain in the emergency department (ED is a diagnostic challenge. One approach includes a dedicated chest computed tomography (CT for pulmonary embolism or dissection followed by a cardiac stress test (TRAD. An alternative strategy is a coronary CT angiogram with concurrent chest CT (Triple Rule Out, TRO. The objective of this study was to describe the ED patient course and short-term safety for these evaluation methods. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients presenting to a large, community ED for acute chest pain who had non-diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs and normal biomarkers. We collected demographics, ED length of stay, hospital costs, and estimated radiation exposures. We evaluated 30-day return visits for major adverse cardiac events. Results: A total of 829 patients underwent TRAD, and 642 patients had TRO. Patients undergoing TRO tended to be younger (mean 52.3 vs 56.5 years and were more likely to be male (42.4% vs. 30.4%. TRO patients tended to have a shorter ED length of stay (mean 14.45 vs. 21.86 hours, to incur less cost (median $449.83 vs. $1147.70, and to be exposed to less radiation (median 7.18 vs. 16.6mSv. No patient in either group had a related 30-day revisit. Conclusion: Use of TRO is feasible for assessment of chest pain in the ED. Both TRAD and TRO safely evaluated patients. Prospective studies investigating this diagnostic strategy are needed to further assess this approach to ED chest pain evaluation.

  1. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T.; Mueller, R.P.; Mueller, H.; Engert, A.; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  2. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, J; Mueller, R-P; Mueller, H; Kuhnert, G; Engert, A; Kobe, C; Haverkamp, U; Eich, H T

    2012-11-01

    The risk factor "large mediastinal tumor mass" is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision-large mediastinal mass or not-correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted.

  3. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  4. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  5. Improving nodule detection in chest CT images using a cylindrical filter based on the anatomical structure of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeya, Ai; Teramoto, Atsushi; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, we developed a cylindrical filter for the detection of lung nodules in chest CT images. However, the detection rate of this method is reduced when nodules are adjacent to or overlap blood vessels or bronchi. The main objective of the present study was to develop a novel technique for improving the nodule detection capabilities of our method based on the anatomical structure of the bronchi and blood vessels obtained from CT images. In the proposed method, chest CT images are divided into a region consisting of normal lung structures (bronchi and blood vessels) and another region. Then, cylindrical filters with different characteristics are applied to the two regions. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of this method, the proposed method and the conventional method were applied to chest CT images, and their nodule detection capabilities were compared. The results showed that the true positive rate of the conventional method was 0.72, whereas that of the proposed method was 0.79. The number of false positives per case was 4.19 for both methods. These results indicate that the proposed method may be useful for improving nodule detection performance. (author)

  6. Association between spirometry controlled chest CT scores using computer-animated biofeedback and clinical markers of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Thomas; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of the lungs is the gold standard for assessing the extent of structural changes in the lungs. Spirometry-controlled chest CT (SCCCT) has improved the usefulness of CT by standardising inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes during imaging. This was a single...

  7. FDG PET/CT in Initial Staging of Adult Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roberge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue sarcomas spread predominantly to the lung and it is unclear how often FDG-PET scans will detect metastases not already obvious by chest CT scan or clinical examination. Adult limb and body wall soft-tissue sarcoma cases were identified retrospectively. Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, GIST, desmoid tumors, visceral tumors, bone tumors, and retroperitoneal sarcomas were excluded as were patients imaged for followup, response assessment, or recurrence. All patients had a diagnostic chest CT scan. 109 patients met these criteria, 87% of which had intermediate or high-grade tumors. The most common pathological diagnoses were leiomyosarcoma (17%, liposarcoma (17%, and undifferentiated or pleomorphic sarcoma (16%. 98% of previously unresected primary tumors were FDG avid. PET scans were negative for distant disease in 91/109 cases. The negative predictive value was 89%. Fourteen PET scans were positive. Of these, 6 patients were already known to have metastases, 3 were false positives, and 5 represented new findings of metastasis (positive predictive value 79%. In total, 5 patients were upstaged by FDG-PET (4.5%. Although PET scans may be of use in specific circumstances, routine use of FDG PET imaging as part of the initial staging of soft-tissue sarcomas was unlikely to alter management in our series.

  8. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barras, Heloise; Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique

  9. Nodule detection methods using autocorrelation features on 3D chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, T.; Zhou, X.; Okura, S.; Fujita, H.; Kiryu, T.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer screening using low dose X-ray CT scan has been an acceptable examination to detect cancers at early stage. We have been developing an automated detection scheme for lung nodules on CT scan by using second-order autocorrelation features and the initial performance for small nodules (< 10 mm) shows a high true-positive rate with less than four false-positive marks per case. In this study, an open database of lung images, LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium), was employed to evaluate our detection scheme as an consistency test. The detection performance for solid and solitary nodules in LIDC, included in the first data set opened by the consortium, was 83% (10/12) true-positive rate with 3.3 false-positive marks per case. (orig.)

  10. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Scadeng, M.; Flower, C.D.R.; Dennis, C.; Stewart, S.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  11. How to choose PET-CT or CT in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Practical experience in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, T.; Tao, X.; Liu, H.; Liu, S. [Dept. of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China); Zheng, X. [Dept. of Nutrition, ChangHai Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China)

    2010-07-01

    How to use CT and PET-CT rationally to raise diagnosis, staging and prognostic assessment of lung cancer to a higher level at the best cost-effect ratio is a subject that Chinese clinicians and radiologists should face conscientiously. We review the rational application of CT and PET-CT in four aspects of lung cancer, including screening and detection, morphologic evaluation, haemodynamic or metabolic feature evaluation, and follow-up, staging and prognostic evaluation. As PET-CT is only available in class III-A hospitals today, CT is the most popular equipment in China. PET-CT is more valuable only in cases where CT presentation of lung cancer is atypical or difficult to determine, or in cases where the diagnosis of lung cancer has been initially confirmed, for which clinical staging and decision concerning on therapeutic regimens are needed. We also recommend the current strategies of CT and PET-CT managing of SPN in China. (orig.)

  12. The usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT-mammography for preoperative staging of breast cancer: comparison with conventional PET/CT and MR-mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Eun-Ha; Lim, Seok Tae; Han, Yeon-Hee; Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Yun-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of an integrated Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) PET/CT-mammography (mammo-PET/CT) with conventional torso PET/CT (supine-PET/CT) and MR-mammography for initial assessment of breast cancer patients. Forty women (52.0 ± 12.0 years) with breast cancer who underwent supine-PET/CT, mammo-PET/CT, and MR-mammography from April 2009 to August 2009 were enrolled in the study. We compared the size of the tumour, tumour to chest wall distance, tumour to skin distance, volume of axillary fossa, and number of meta-static axillary lymph nodes between supine-PET/CT and mammo-PET/CT. Next, we assessed the difference of focality of primary breast tumour and tumour size in mammo-PET/CT and MR-mammography. Histopathologic findings served as the standard of reference. In the comparison between supine-PET/CT and mammo-PET/CT, significant differences were found in the tumour size (supine-PET/CT: 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, mammo-PET/CT: 1.5 ± 0.6 cm, p < 0.001), tumour to thoracic wall distance (1.8 ± 0.9 cm, 2.2 ± 2.1 cm, p < 0.001), and tumour to skin distance (1.5 ± 0.8 cm, 2.1 ± 1.4 cm, p < 0.001). The volume of axillary fossa was significantly wider in mammo-PET/CT than supine-PET/CT (21.7 ± 8.7 cm 3 vs. 23.4 ± 10.4 cm 3 , p = 0.03). Mammo-PET/CT provided more correct definition of the T-stage of the primary tumour than did supine-PET/CT (72.5% vs. 67.5%). No significant difference was found in the number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes. Compared with MR-mammography, mammo-PET/CT provided more correct classification of the focality of lesion than did MR-mammography (95% vs. 90%). In the T-stage, 72.5% of cases with mammo-PET/CT and 70% of cases with MR-mammography showed correspondence with pathologic results. Mammo-PET/CT provided more correct definition of the T-stage and evaluation of axillary fossa may also be delineated more clearly than with supine-PET/CT. The initial assessment of mammo-PET/CT would

  13. Emphysema quantification and lung volumetry in chest X-ray equivalent ultralow dose CT - Intra-individual comparison with standard dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Ottilinger, Thorsten; Warschkow, René; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether ultralow dose chest CT with tin filtration can be used for emphysema quantification and lung volumetry and to assess differences in emphysema measurements and lung volume between standard dose and ultralow dose CT scans using advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE). 84 consecutive patients from a prospective, IRB-approved single-center study were included and underwent clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.7±0.6mSv) and additional single-energy ultralow dose CT (0.14±0.01mSv) at 100kV and fixed tube current at 70mAs with tin filtration in the same session. Forty of the 84 patients (48%) had no emphysema, 44 (52%) had emphysema. One radiologist performed fully automated software-based pulmonary emphysema quantification and lung volumetry of standard and ultralow dose CT with different levels of ADMIRE. Friedman test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for multiple comparison of emphysema and lung volume. Lung volumes were compared using the concordance correlation coefficient. The median low-attenuation areas (LAA) using filtered back projection (FBP) in standard dose was 4.4% and decreased to 2.6%, 2.1% and 1.8% using ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The median values of LAA in ultralow dose CT were 5.7%, 4.1% and 2.4% for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between LAA in standard dose CT using FBP and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 4 (p=0.358) as well as in standard dose CT using ADMIRE 3 and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 5 (p=0.966). In comparison with standard dose FBP the concordance correlation coefficients of lung volumetry were 1.000, 0.999, and 0.999 for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5 in standard dose, and 0.972 for ADMIRE 3, 4 and 5 in ultralow dose CT. Ultralow dose CT at chest X-ray equivalent dose levels allows for lung volumetry as well as detection and quantification of emphysema. However, longitudinal emphysema analyses should be performed with the same scan protocol and

  14. Computerized Classification of Pneumoconiosis on Digital Chest Radiography Artificial Neural Network with Three Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-08-01

    It is difficult for radiologists to classify pneumoconiosis from category 0 to category 3 on chest radiographs. Therefore, we have developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on a three-stage artificial neural network (ANN) method for classification based on four texture features. The image database consists of 36 chest radiographs classified as category 0 to category 3. Regions of interest (ROIs) with a matrix size of 32 × 32 were selected from chest radiographs. We obtained a gray-level histogram, histogram of gray-level difference, gray-level run-length matrix (GLRLM) feature image, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) feature image in each ROI. For ROI-based classification, the first ANN was trained with each texture feature. Next, the second ANN was trained with output patterns obtained from the first ANN. Finally, we obtained a case-based classification for distinguishing among four categories with the third ANN method. We determined the performance of the third ANN by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of the highest category (severe pneumoconiosis) case and the lowest category (early pneumoconiosis) case were 0.89 ± 0.09 and 0.84 ± 0.12, respectively. The three-stage ANN with four texture features showed the highest performance for classification among the four categories. Our CAD system would be useful for assisting radiologists in classification of pneumoconiosis from category 0 to category 3.

  15. Routine X-ray of the chest is not justified in staging of cutaneous melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline Asirvatham; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Pilegaard, Rita Kaae

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of cutaneous melanoma is increasing in Denmark and worldwide. However, the prevalence of distant metastases at the time of diagnosis has decreased to 1%. We therefore questioned the value of routine preoperative chest X-ray (CXR) for staging asymptomatic melanoma...... patients and hypothesised that routine CXR is not justified. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on patients undergoing wide local excision and sentinel lymph node biopsy for cutaneous melanoma in the period from 2010 to 2014. RESULTS: A total of 603 patients were included. The mean time of follow...... value was 8%, and the negative predictive value was 100%. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CXR cannot be justified in the initial staging of cutaneous melanoma patients. The guideline for the treatment of melanoma in Denmark is under revision: The use of CXR has been omitted. FUNDING: This study...

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Daun; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Daun; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Gwangju, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Ook; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  18. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  19. Prevalence and Severity of Off-Centering During Diagnostic CT: Observations From 57,621 CT scans of the Chest, Abdomen, and/or Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Akintayo, Oladunni O; Alexander, Lauren F; Neill, Rebecca; Krupinksi, Elizabeth A; Tang, Xiangyang; Mittal, Pardeep K; Small, William C; Moreno, Courtney C

    2018-02-23

    To determine distances between patient centroid and gantry isocenter during CT imaging of the chest, abdomen, and/or pelvis, and to evaluate differences based on patient gender, scan region, patient position, and gantry aperture. A water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom were imaged in the centered position in the CT gantry and at several off-centered positions. Additionally, data from 57,621 adult chest, abdomen, and/or pelvic CT acquisitions were evaluated. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance using the centroid-to-isocenter data as the dependent variable and the other parameters as independent variables. The majority of patient acquisitions (83.7% (48271/57621)) were performed with the patient's centroid positioned below isocenter (mean 1.7 cm below isocenter (SD 1.8 cm); range 12.1 cm below to 7.8 cm above isocenter). Off-centering in the x-axis was less severe (mean 0.01 cm left of isocenter (SD 1.6 cm)). Distance between centroid and isocenter in the y-axis did not differ as a function of sex but did differ based on scan region, patient position, and gantry aperture. Off-centering is common during CT imaging and has been previously demonstrated to impact dose and image quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric chest CT at 70 kVp: a feasibility study in 129 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo; Henry, Simon; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques [Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [Univ. Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Deschildre, Antoine [Hospital Jeanne de Flandre, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2014-11-15

    Before introducing 70-kVp settings in the low-kilovoltage strategies for pediatric examinations, it was mandatory to demonstrate, at similar dose levels, an equivalence of image quality at 70 kVp and 80 kVp. To assess image quality of chest CT examinations acquired at 70 kVp in comparison with standard scanning at 80 kVp. We prospectively evaluated 129 children with a 70-kVp scanning protocol (group 1). All scanning parameters were kept similar to those usually selected for pediatric standard 80-kVp protocols, except the milliamperage increased by a factor of 1.6 to maintain comparable radiation dose. Image quality of group 1 examinations was compared to that of a paired population scanned at 80 kVp (group 2). The noninferiority hypothesis was fixed at 10% of the mean level of image noise. There was no significant difference in the mean dose length product (DLP) and the volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) between the groups (DLP: 20.5 ± 5.8 mGy.cm [group 1] vs. 19.7 ± 7.6 mGy.cm [group 2]; P = 0.06) (CTDI{sub vol}: 0.8 ± 0.1 mGy [group 1] vs. 0.8 ± 0.18 mGy [group 2]; P = 0.94). The mean of differences in image noise between group 1 and group 2 examinations was -1.38 (-2.59; -0.18), verifying the noninferiority hypothesis. Subjective image quality did not significantly differ between group 1 and group 2 examinations (P = 0.18). At equivalent radiation dose levels, 70-kVp protocols provide similar image quality to that achievable at 80 kVp. (orig.)

  1. Fully automated breast density assessment from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Margolies, Laurie R.; Xie, Yiting; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among US women and the second leading cause of cancer death 1 . Breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer and more than 25 states mandate its reporting to patients as part of the lay mammogram report 2 . Recent publications have demonstrated that breast density measured from low-dose chest CT (LDCT) correlates well with that measured from mammograms and MRIs 3-4 , thereby providing valuable information for many women who have undergone LDCT but not recent mammograms. A fully automated framework for breast density assessment from LDCT is presented in this paper. The whole breast region is first segmented using an anatomy-orientated novel approach based on the propagation of muscle fronts for separating the fibroglandular tissue from the underlying muscles. The fibroglandular tissue regions are then identified from the segmented whole breast and the percentage density is calculated based on the volume ratio of the fibroglandular tissue to the local whole breast region. The breast region segmentation framework was validated with 1270 LDCT scans, with 96.1% satisfactory outcomes based on visual inspection. The density assessment was evaluated by comparing with BI-RADS density grades established by an experienced radiologist in 100 randomly selected LDCT scans of female subjects. The continuous breast density measurement was shown to be consistent with the reference subjective grading, with the Spearman's rank correlation 0.91 (p-value < 0.001). After converting the continuous density to categorical grades, the automated density assessment was congruous with the radiologist's reading in 91% cases.

  2. Image quality and age-specific dose estimation in head and chest CT examinations with organ-based tube-current modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Yamauchi, M; Imai, K; Ikeda, M; Aoyama, T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an organ-based tube-current modulation (OBTCM) system on image quality and age-specific dose in head and chest CT examinations. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image entropy were assessed using statistical and entropy analyses. Radiation doses for newborn, 6-y-old child and adult phantoms were measured with in-phantom dosimetry systems. The quality of CT images obtained with OBTCM was not different from that obtained without OBTCM. In head CT scans, the eye lens dose decreased by 20-33 % using OBTCM. In chest CT scans, breast dose decreased by 5-32 % using OBTCM. Posterior skin dose, however, increased by 11-20 % using OBTCM in head and chest CT scans. The reduction of effective dose using OBTCM was negligibly small. Detailed image quality and dose information provided in this study can be effectively used for OBTCM application.

  3. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules on chest CT: issues to be solved before clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jin Mo

    2005-01-01

    Given the increasing resolution of modern CT scanners, and the requirements for large-scale lung-screening examinations and diagnostic studies, there is an increased need for the accurate and reproducible analysis of the large number of images. Nodule detection is one of the main challenges of CT imaging, as they can be missed due to their small size, low relative contrast, or because they are located in an area with complex anatomy. Recent developments in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes are expected to aid radiologists in various tasks of chest imaging. In this era of multidetector row CT, the thoracic applications of greatest interest include the detection and volume measurement of lung nodules (1-7). Technology for CAD as applied to lung nodule detection on chest CT has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is currently commercially available. The article by Lee et al. (5) in this issue of the Korean Journal of Radiology is one of the few studies to examine the influence of a commercially available CAD system on the detection of lung nodules. In this study, some additional nodules were detected with the help of a CAD system, but at the expense of increased false positivity. The nodule detection rate of the CAD system in this study was lower than that achieved by radiologist, and the authors insist that the CAD system should be improved further. Compared to the use of CAD on mammograms, CAD evaluations of chest CTs remain limited to the laboratory setting. In this field, apart from the issues of detection rate and false positive detections, many obstacles must be overcome before CAD can be used in a true clinical reading environment. In this editorial, I will list some of these issues, but I emphasize now that I believe these issues will be solved by improved CAD versions in the near future

  4. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerli, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Messerli@usz.ch [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Rengier, Fabian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Warschkow, René [Department of Surgery, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W. [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  5. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerli, Michael; Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard; Rengier, Fabian; Warschkow, René; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  6. Additional value of PET-CT in the staging of lung cancer: comparison with CT alone, PET alone and visual correlation of PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wever, W. de; Marchal, G.; Bogaert, J.; Verschakelen, J.A.; Ceyssens, S.; Mortelmans, L.; Stroobants, S.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) is a new imaging modality offering anatomic and metabolic information. The purpose was to evaluate retrospectively the accuracy of integrated PET-CT in the staging of a suggestive lung lesion, comparing this with the accuracy of CT alone, PET alone and visually correlated PET-CT. Fifty patients undergoing integrated PET-CT for staging of a suggestive lung lesion were studied. Their tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) statuses were determined with CT, PET, visually correlated PET-CT and integrated PET-CT. These TNM stages were compared with the surgical TNM status. Integrated PET-CT was the most accurate imaging technique in the assessment of the TNM status. Integrated PET-CT predicted correctly the T status, N status, M status and TNM status in, respectively, 86%, 80%, 98%, 70% versus 68%, 66%,88%, 46% with CT, 46%, 70%, 96%, 30% with PET and 72%, 68%, 96%, 54% with visually correlated PET-CT. T status and N status were overstaged, respectively, in 8% and 16% with integrated PET-CT, in 20% and 28% with CT, in 16% and 20% with PET, in 12% and 20% with visually correlated PET-CT and understaged in 6% and 4% with integrated PET-CT, versus 12% and 6% with CT, 38% and 10% with PET and 12% with visually correlated PET-CT. Integrated PET-CT improves the staging of lung cancer through a better anatomic localization and characterization of lesions and is superior to CT alone and PET alone. If this technique is not available, visual correlation of PET and CT can be a valuable alternative. (orig.)

  7. Regulatory manual for staging of cancer by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solorzano Marin, Jose Reinaldo

    2008-01-01

    The exact level for staging and making decisions about therapy that will be applied to cancer patients at the Servicio de Radiologia e Imagenes Medicas has been important for the Hospital Calderon Guardia. A template of report or manual has been suggested, with the information necessary for staging a particular type of cancer by analyzing the tomography of the patient. The TNM International System has been used to design the template of report, with a specific technical language and terminology unified theme for the oncologist and radiologist. This system is abstracted in the sixth edition of oncological staging manual of the American Joint Committee and its atlas; resources already acquired, and the helical CT scanner. The experience of the radiologist is critical, because he will be responsible to fill the document. [es

  8. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  9. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, S.S., E-mail: sinisim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Y.J. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical care medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients {>=}18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal

  10. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.S.; Kim, Y.; Ryu, Y.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients ≥18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal or

  11. Automated coronary artery calcification scoring in non-gated chest CT: agreement and reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A P Takx

    Full Text Available To determine the agreement and reliability of fully automated coronary artery calcium (CAC scoring in a lung cancer screening population.1793 low-dose chest CT scans were analyzed (non-contrast-enhanced, non-gated. To establish the reference standard for CAC, first automated calcium scoring was performed using a preliminary version of a method employing coronary calcium atlas and machine learning approach. Thereafter, each scan was inspected by one of four trained raters. When needed, the raters corrected initially automaticity-identified results. In addition, an independent observer subsequently inspected manually corrected results and discarded scans with gross segmentation errors. Subsequently, fully automatic coronary calcium scoring was performed. Agatston score, CAC volume and number of calcifications were computed. Agreement was determined by calculating proportion of agreement and examining Bland-Altman plots. Reliability was determined by calculating linearly weighted kappa (κ for Agatston strata and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for continuous values.44 (2.5% scans were excluded due to metal artifacts or gross segmentation errors. In the remaining 1749 scans, median Agatston score was 39.6 (P25-P75∶0-345.9, median volume score was 60.4 mm3 (P25-P75∶0-361.4 and median number of calcifications was 2 (P25-P75∶0-4 for the automated scores. The κ demonstrated very good reliability (0.85 for Agatston risk categories between the automated and reference scores. The Bland-Altman plots showed underestimation of calcium score values by automated quantification. Median difference was 2.5 (p25-p75∶0.0-53.2 for Agatston score, 7.6 (p25-p75∶0.0-94.4 for CAC volume and 1 (p25-p75∶0-5 for number of calcifications. The ICC was very good for Agatston score (0.90, very good for calcium volume (0.88 and good for number of calcifications (0.64.Fully automated coronary calcium scoring in a lung cancer screening setting is feasible

  12. Pulmonary lobe separation in expiration chest CT scans based on subject-specific priors derived from inspiration scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Eberlein, Michael; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2018-01-01

    Segmentation of pulmonary lobes in inspiration and expiration chest CT scan pairs is an important prerequisite for lobe-based quantitative disease assessment. Conventional methods process each CT scan independently, resulting typically in lower segmentation performance at expiration compared to inspiration. To address this issue, we present an approach, which utilizes CT scans at both respiratory states. It consists of two main parts: a base method that processes a single CT scan and an extended method that utilizes the segmentation result obtained on the inspiration scan as a subject-specific prior for segmentation of the expiration scan. We evaluated the methods on a diverse set of 40 CT scan pairs. In addition, we compare the performance of our method to a registration-based approach. On inspiration scans, the base method achieved an average distance error of 0.59, 0.64, and 0.91 mm for the left oblique, right oblique, and right horizontal fissures, respectively, when compared with expert-based reference tracings. On expiration scans, the base method's errors were 1.54, 3.24, and 3.34 mm, respectively. In comparison, utilizing proposed subject-specific priors for segmentation of expiration scans allowed decreasing average distance errors to 0.82, 0.79, and 1.04 mm, which represents a significant improvement ([Formula: see text]) compared with all other methods investigated.

  13. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multi-helical CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2006-03-01

    Multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information.

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT provides powerful prognostic stratification in the primary staging of large breast cancer when compared with conventional explorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Alexandre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); Dygai-Cochet, Inna; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Toubeau, Michel [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Humbert, Olivier; Brunotte, Francois [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); CHU Dijon, MRI and Spectroscopy Unit, Dijon (France); Guiu, Severine; Coudert, Bruno [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Oncology, Dijon (France); Coutant, Charles; Fumoleau, Pierre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Surgery, Dijon (France)

    2014-03-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact on management and the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for initial staging of newly diagnosed large breast cancer (BC) when compared with conventional staging. We prospectively included 142 patients with newly diagnosed BC and at least grade T2 tumour. All patients were evaluated with complete conventional imaging (CI) procedures (mammogram and/or breast ultrasound, bone scan, abdominal ultrasound and/or CT, X-rays and/or CT of the chest), followed by FDG PET/CT exploration, prior to treatment. The treatment plan based on CI staging was compared with that based on PET/CT findings. CI and PET/CT findings were confirmed by imaging and clinical follow-up and/or pathology when assessable. Progression-free survival (PFS) was analysed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. According to CI staging, 79 patients (56 %) were stage II, 46 (32 %) stage III and 17 (12 %) stage IV (distant metastases). Of the patients, 30 (21 %) were upstaged by PET/CT, including 12 (8 %) from stage II or III to stage IV. On the other hand, 23 patients (16 %) were downstaged by PET/CT, including 4 (3 %) from stage IV to stage II or III. PET/CT had a high or medium impact on management planning for 18 patients (13 %). Median follow-up was 30 months (range 9-59 months); 37 patients (26 %) experienced recurrence or progression of disease during follow-up and 17 patients (12 %) died. The Cox model indicated that CI staging was significantly associated with PFS (p = 0.01), but PET/CT staging provided stronger prognostic stratification (p < 0.0001). Moreover, Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that only PET/CT staging remained associated with PFS (p < 0.0001). FDG PET/CT provides staging information that more accurately stratifies prognostic risk in newly diagnosed large BC when compared with conventional explorations alone. (orig.)

  15. Automatic segmentation of airway tree based on local intensity filter and machine learning technique in 3D chest CT volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qier; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Ueno, Junji; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-02-01

    Airway segmentation plays an important role in analyzing chest computed tomography (CT) volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite a challenging task. Several researchers have proposed automated airway segmentation algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However, these methods fail to detect the peripheral bronchial branches, which results in a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach for more accurate extraction of the complex airway tree. This proposed segmentation method is composed of three steps. First, Hessian analysis is utilized to enhance the tube-like structure in CT volumes; then, an adaptive multiscale cavity enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure with different radii. In the second step, support vector machine learning will be utilized to remove the false positive (FP) regions from the result obtained in the previous step. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is used to refine the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. A test dataset including 50 standard-dose chest CT volumes was used for evaluating our proposed method. The average extraction rate was about 79.1 % with the significantly decreased FP rate. A new method of airway segmentation based on local intensity structure and machine learning technique was developed. The method was shown to be feasible for airway segmentation in a computer-aided diagnosis system for a lung and bronchoscope guidance system.

  16. Ultralow dose CT for pulmonary nodule detection with chest X-ray equivalent dose - a prospective intra-individual comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerli, Michael [University Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard; Desbiolles, Lotus; Bauer, Ralf W.; Wildermuth, Simon [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Waelti, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rengier, Fabian [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Warschkow, Rene [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Surgery, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); University Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of ultralow radiation dose CT of the chest with tin filtration at 100 kV for pulmonary nodule detection. 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated chest CT (standard dose, 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and additionally scanned with an ultralow dose protocol (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv). Standard dose CT was read in consensus by two board-certified radiologists to determine the presence of lung nodules and served as standard of reference (SOR). Two radiologists assessed the presence of lung nodules and their locations on ultralow dose CT. Sensitivity and specificity of the ultralow dose protocol was compared against the SOR, including subgroup analyses of different nodule sizes and types. A mixed effects logistic regression was used to test for independent predictors for sensitivity of pulmonary nodule detection. 425 nodules (mean diameter 3.7 ± 2.9 mm) were found on SOR. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection by ultralow dose CT was 91%. In multivariate analysis, nodule type, size and patients BMI were independent predictors for sensitivity (p < 0.001). Ultralow dose chest CT at 100 kV with spectral shaping enables a high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules at exposure levels comparable to plain film chest X-ray. (orig.)

  17. CT Chest and pulmonary functional changes in patients with HTLV-associated myelopathy in the Eastern Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fábio Magno Falcão

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare computed tomography (CT scans of chest and lung function among patients with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV with and without HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. In this cross-sectional study performed between January 2013 and June 2016, we included 48 patients with HAM/TSP (19 women and 11 men and without HAM/TSP (12 women and 6 men. We compared CT findings and lung functions of these groups. Patients who had HAM/TSP had abnormal CT findings (P = 0.000, including more frequent bronchiectasis (P = 0.049, parenchymal bands (P = 0.007, interlobular septal thickening (P = 0.035, and pleural thickening (P = 0.009. In addition, neither patients with HAM/TSP (9/30; 30% nor the controls (0/18; 0% had obstructive or restrictive lung disease (P = 0.009. HTLV diagnosis should be considered in all patients with abnormal CT findings in whom no other cause is apparent. It is important to remember that lung disease increases the rates of morbidity and mortality in developing countries.

  18. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  19. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  20. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Markus; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ramachandra, Ashok; Fink, Christian; Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip; Henzler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  1. The Yield from Routine Chest X-Rays in Stage 3 Breast Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cancer of the breast is a common malignancy in Nigerian women and various imaging examinations, including the chest radiograph are routinely requested in all patients with this disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the positive yield from routine chest radiographs in Nigerian patients ...

  2. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  3. Thoracic CT-scans in ICU patients - Additional diagnostic information supplementing chest radiographs; Thorakale Computertomographie am Intensivpatienten - Zusatzinformation zum Thorax-Roentgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsjaeger, M.; Hoermann, M.; Lechner, G.; Herold, C. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik; Germann, P. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Anaesthesiologie und Allgemeine Intensivmedizin

    2000-07-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of thoracic CT-scans in comparison with conventional chest radiographs in ICU-patients. Methods: Chest radiographs and corresponding thoracic CT-scans of 25 consecutive surgical ICU-patients were reviewed and interpreted independently by two radiologists. We analyzed the additional information provided by CT-scans and the diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of these findings. Results: In 22 patients (88%), thoracic CT revealed 35 single additional findings, in comparison with the corresponding bedside radiographs. In 7 cases (28%), these findings (tubemalpositioning, mediastinitis, mediastinal abscess and pneumothorax) required modification of patient management. Of 7 patients with tube thoracostomy, 3 tubes were malpositioned, which was only depicted on CT-scans. In 10 of 21 cases (48%), pleural effusions could only be visualized by CT. 3 of 5 (60%) pneumothoraces were detected by CT-scans only. There were no significant complications during transport or CT-examination. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war die Definition des diagnostischen Zugewinns durch die thorakale Computertomographie (CT) gegenueber der Thoraxbettaufnahme am Intensivpatienten. Methodik: In einer vergleichenden Analyse wurden retrospektiv radiologische Aufnahmen und Daten von 25 konsekutiven Patienten einer chirurgischen Intensivstation ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: In 22 Faellen (88%) wurden durch die CT 35 zusaetzliche Befunde erhoben, wobei die haeufigsten Zusatzinformationen Pleura- und Perikarderguesse, Buelaudrainagefehllagen und Pneumothoraces betrafen. In 7 Faellen (28%) waren diese zusaetzlichen Informationen von intensivmedizinischer Relevanz, d.h., sie verlangten nach einer Intervention oder Aenderung der laufenden Therapie. Es kam zu keinerlei kardiovaskulaeren Komplikationen waehrend des Transportes oder der computertomographischen Untersuchung. (orig.)

  4. Accuracy of preoperative CT T staging of renal cell carcinoma: which features predict advanced stage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, A.J.; MacDonald, L.; Whiteside, S.; Johnson, R.J.; Ramani, V.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To characterise CT findings in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and establish which features are associated with higher clinical T stage disease, and to evaluate patterns of discrepancy between radiological and pathological staging of RCC. Materials and methods: Preoperative CT studies of 92 patients with 94 pathologically proven RCCs were retrospectively reviewed. CT stage was compared with pathological stage using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), 7 th edition (2010). The presence or absence of tumour necrosis, perinephric fat standing, thickening of Gerota's fascia, collateral vessels were noted, and correlated with pT stage. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for predicting pT stage ≥pT3a were derived separately for different predictors using cross-tabulations. Results: Twenty-four lesions were pathological stage T1a, 21 were T1b, seven were T2a, 25 were T3a, 11 were T3b, four were T3c, and two were T4. There were no stage T2b. Sixty-three (67%) patients had necrosis, 27 (29%) thickening of Gerota's fascia (1 T1a), 25 had collateral vessels (0 T1a), 28 (30%) had fat stranding of <2 mm, 20 (21%) of 2–5mm and one (1%) of >5 mm. For pT stage ≥pT3a, the presence of perinephric fat stranding had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 74%, 65%, 63%, and 76%, respectively. Presence of tumour necrosis had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 81%, 44%, 54%, and 72%, respectively. Thickening of Gerota's fascia had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 52%, 90%, 81% and 70%, respectively; and enlarged collateral vessels had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV value of 52%, 94%, 88%, and 71% respectively. Conclusion: The presence of perinephric stranding and tumour necrosis were not reliable signs for pT stage >T3a. Thickening of Gerota's fascia and the presence of collateral vessels in the peri- or paranephric fat had 90% and 94% specificity, with 82% and 88

  5. Ancillary lung parenchymal findings at spiral CT scanning in pulmonary embolism. Relationship to chest sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissig, Angelika; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Kroegel, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Introduction/objective: The aim of the study was to compare findings of transthoracic sonography (TS) and of spiral computed tomography (sCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and patients: Peripheral parenchymal and pleural findings of TS and sCT were compared in 62 patients (25 females, 37 males; mean age 62.2 years) with suspected PE. Results: In 39 patients PE was established, of whose pleura-based lesions could be detected by TS in 30 patients and by sCT in 31 patients. Whilst in three of the patients parenchymal lesions were exclusively detected by sonography, no peripheral abnormalities could be discovered with either technique in five patients. Among the nine patients lacking peripheral abnormalities on sonography, four revealed peripheral lesions in sCT. In 23 patients without PE, peripheral consolidations at CT were detected in six patients whereas two showed lesions on TS. With respect to the appearance, pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidations were the main parenchymal alterations (82.4% at TS, 66.1% at sCT) as compared with non-wedge-shaped consolidations (17.6% at TS, 33.9% at sCT). Peripheral lesions were located preferentially within the lower lobes. In addition, both localised and basal pleural effusion associated with PE could be demonstrated in 58.9% at TS and in 23.1% by sCT. Discussions and conclusion: The study shows that in PE parenchymal and pleural changes are detectable by TS and sCT. If parenchymal findings are present at sCT, peripheral PE should be considered, even in the absence of directly visible emboli

  6. Reporting of coronary artery calcification on chest CT studies in breast cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Phillips

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The identification of coronary artery calcification (CAC detected coincidentally on chest CT exams could assist in cardiovascular risk assessment but may not be reported consistently on clinical studies. Cardiovascular risk factor stratification is important to predict short term cardiac events during cancer therapy and long term cardiac event free survival in cancer patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of CAC and clinical reporting rates in a cohort of cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events. Methods: 408 Breast cancer patients who were referred to a cardiac oncology clinic were screened. Inclusion criteria included having had a CT chest and the absence of known coronary disease. Among those screened 263 patients were included in the study. Results: CAC was identified in 70 patients (26%. CAC was reported in 18% of studies. The reporting rates of CAC increased with the extent of coronary calcification (p < 0.01 and increased during the period of the study (p < 0.05. Conclusions: CAC was commonly detected on chest CT studies in this observational study of breast cancer patients at high risk of cardiac oncology events. The presence of CAC was often not reported clinically but reporting rates have increased over time. Recent SCCT/STR guidelines recommend reporting the presence of CAC on routine chest CT scans in recognition of the importance of CAC as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Reporting of CAC on chest CTs may help to further risk stratify breast cancer patients and improve cardiovascular outcomes in this vulnerable population. Keywords: Cardiac oncology, Coronary calcification and chest CT

  7. Airway tree reconstruction in expiration chest CT scans facilitated by information transfer from corresponding inspiration scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Eberlein, Michael; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-03-01

    Analysis and comparison of airways imaged in pairs of inspiration and expiration lung CT scans provides important information for quantitative assessment of lung diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, airway tree reconstruction in expiration CT scans is a challenging problem. Typically, only a low number of airway branches are found in expiration scans, compared to inspiration scans. To detect more airways in expiration CT scans, the authors introduce a novel airway reconstruction approach and assess its performance. The method requires a pair of inspiration and expiration CT scans and utilizes information from the inspiration scan to facilitate reconstructing the airway tree in the expiration lung CT scan. First, an initial airway tree (high confidence) and airway candidates (limited confidence) are reconstructed in the expiration scan by utilizing a 3D graph-based reconstruction method. Then, the 3D airway tree is reconstructed in the inspiration scan. Second, correspondences between expiration and inspiration tree structures are identified by utilizing a novel hierarchical tree matching algorithm that utilizes a local CT image-based similarity criterion. Third, the tree information from the inspiration airway tree is used to select expiration candidates, resulting in the final expiration tree structure. The approach was evaluated on a diverse set of 40 scan pairs and compared to the baseline method, which utilizes only the expiration CT scan. The proposed method produced a significant (p inspiration and expiration airway trees, which can facilitate label transfer between airway trees and quantitative assessment of change in airways. The approach can be adapted to facilitate airway reconstruction in several longitudinal lung CT scans by means of mutual information transfer.

  8. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Eberli, Daniel; Knuth, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI vol ) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P vol was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  9. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  10. Diagnosis of vertebral deformities on chest CT and DXA compared to routine lateral thoracic spine X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dort, M J; Romme, E A P M; Smeenk, F W J M; Geusens, P P P M; Wouters, E F M; van den Bergh, J P

    2018-02-12

    X-ray, CT and DXA enable diagnosis of vertebral deformities. For this study, level of agreement of vertebral deformity diagnosis was analysed. We showed that especially on subject level, these imaging techniques could be used for opportunistic screening of vertebral deformities in COPD patients. X-ray and CT are frequently used for pulmonary evaluation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and also enable to diagnose vertebral deformities together with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) imaging. The aim of this research was to study the level of agreement of these imaging modalities for diagnosis of vertebral deformities from T4 to L1. Eighty-seven subjects (mean age of 65; 50 males; 57 COPD patients) who had X-ray, chest CT (CCT) and DXA were included. Evaluable vertebrae were scored twice using SpineAnalyzer™ software. ICCs and kappas were calculated to examine intra-observer variability. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) were calculated to compare vertebral deformities diagnosed on the different imaging modalities. ICCs for height measurements were excellent (> 0.94). Kappas were good to excellent (0.64-0.77). At vertebral level, the AUROC was 0.85 for CCT vs. X-ray, 0.74 for DXA vs. X-ray and 0.77 for DXA vs. CCT. Sensitivity (51%-73%) and PPV (57%-70%) were fair to good; specificity and NPV were excellent (≥ 96%). At subject level, the AUROC values were comparable. Reproducibility of height measurements of vertebrae is excellent with all three imaging modalities. On subject level, diagnostic performance of CT (PPV 79-82%; NPV 90-93%), and to a slightly lesser extend of DXA (PPV 73-77%; NPV 80-89%), indicates that these imaging techniques could be used for opportunistic screening of vertebral deformities in COPD patients.

  11. Patient-specific dose calculations for pediatric CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Nicholas D.; Carver, Diana E.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Stabin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organ dose is essential for accurate estimates of patient dose from CT. Objective To determine organ doses from a broad range of pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic chest–abdomen–pelvis CT and investigate how these relate to patient size. Materials and methods We used a previously validated Monte Carlo simulation model of a Philips Brilliance 64 multi-detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) to calculate organ doses for 40 pediatric patients (M:F=21:19; range 0.6–17 years). Organ volumes and positions were determined from the images using standard segmentation techniques. Non-linear regression was performed to determine the relationship between volume CT dose index (CTDIvol)-normalized organ doses and abdominopelvic diameter. We then compared results with values obtained from independent studies. Results We found that CTDIvol-normalized organ dose correlated strongly with exponentially decreasing abdominopelvic diameter (R2>0.8 for most organs). A similar relationship was determined for effective dose when normalized by dose-length product (R2=0.95). Our results agreed with previous studies within 12% using similar scan parameters (i.e. bowtie filter size, beam collimation); however results varied up to 25% when compared to studies using different bowtie filters. Conclusion Our study determined that organ doses can be estimated from measurements of patient size, namely body diameter, and CTDIvol prior to CT examination. This information provides an improved method for patient dose estimation. PMID:26142256

  12. Prediction of treatment outcomes in patients with chest wall sarcoma: evaluation with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yuji; Tateishi, Ukihide; Kawai, Akira; Chuman, Hirokazu; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Miyake, Mototaka; Terauchi, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio; Kim, Edmund E

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic implications of (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with chest wall sarcoma. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of 42 patients (mean age: 46 years) with chest wall sarcomas were analyzed. Pathologic confirmation was obtained by surgical specimens in all patients. Tumor grade assessed by Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemical analysis and expression of glucose transporter protein 1 were compared with a maximum standardized uptake value. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted for estimates of overall and event-free survivals. The median maximum standardized uptake value of the tumor was 10.2 and the median MIB-1 index of the tumor was 32.5%. Glucose transporter protein 1 expression was found in 29 patients (69%). Univariate analyses revealed that surgery, chemotherapy, MIB-1 labeling index (cut-off 32.5%), MIB-1 grade, glucose transporter protein 1 expression and maximum standardized uptake value were possible predictors for overall and event-free survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that surgery (hazard ratio, 4.852; P = 0.017), maximum standardized uptake value (hazard ratio, 3.077; P = 0.037) and MIB-1 labeling index (hazard ratio, 6.549; P = 0.003) were independent predictors of event-free survival. In addition, surgery (hazard ratio, 4.092; P = 0.021) and maximum standardized uptake value (hazard ratio, 2.968; P = 0.027) were independent predictors of overall survival. (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography allows the prediction of prognosis after treatment in patients with chest wall sarcoma and may be useful in selecting high-risk patients for more risk-adapted treatments.

  13. Staging PET-CT Scanning Provides Superior Detection of Lymph Nodes and Distant Metastases than Traditional Imaging in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Deo, Suryanarayana V S; Kumar, Rakesh; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay; Gogia, Ajay; Sharma, Daya Nand; Mathur, Sandeep R

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of a single 18-FDG positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) scan in comparison to multiple organ-directed conventional investigations (CI) as a staging tool in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) to detect regional and distant metastasis. All eligible patients were subjected to CI (chest X-ray, abdominal sonography, and bone scintigraphy) followed by a single 18-FDG PET-CT scan. Standard imaging criteria were used for diagnosis of metastasis. Histopathological confirmation was undertaken for suspicious lesions. An exploratory analysis was done to assess the impact of PET-CT on the staging of LABC and how it resulted in a change in management. The study included 79 patients of LABC. PET-CT detected distant metastasis in 36 (45.5 %) patients while CI could identify distant metastasis in 20 (25.3 %) patients. Two of the 36 patients in whom PET-CT detected distant metastasis were false positive. Overall PET-CT upstaged the disease in 38 (48.1 %) patients as compared to CI: stage III to stage IV migration in 14 (17.7 %) patients due to identification of additional sites of distant metastasis, and within stage III upstaging in 24 (30.3 %) patients due to identification of additional regional lymphadenopathy. PET-CT led to a change in management plan in 14 (17.7 %) patients. PET-CT has a role in identifying additional sites of regional lymphadenopathy and distant metastasis to upstage the disease in a significant number of LABC patients in comparison to CI; this would help in accurate staging, selecting optimal treatment, and better prognostication of disease.

  14. Association of aortic wall thickness on contrast-enhanced chest CT with major cerebro-cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Silvia; Di Leo, Giovanni; Zoffoli, Elena; Munari, Alice; Primolevo, Alessandra; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    There is a significant association between aortic atherosclerosis and previous major cardiovascular events. Particularly, thoracic aortic atherosclerosis is closely related to the degree of coronary and carotid artery disease. Thus, there is a rationale for screening the thoracic aorta in patients who undergo a chest computed tomography (CT) for any clinical question, in order to detect patients at increased risk of cerebro-cardiovascular (CCV) events. To estimate the association between either thoracic aortic wall thickness (AWT) or aortic total calcium score (ATCS) and CCV events. One hundred and forty-eight non-cardiac patients (78 men; 67 ± 12 years) underwent chest contrast-enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT). The AWT was measured at the level of the left atrium (AWTref) and at the maximum AWT (AWTmax). Correlation with clinical CCV patients' history was estimated. The value of AWTmax and of a semi-quantitative ATCS as a marker for CCV events was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis and multivariate regression analysis. Out of 148 patients, 59% reported sedentary lifestyle, 44% hypertension, 32% smoking, 23% hypercholesterolemia, 13% family history of cardiac disease, 12% diabetes, and 10% BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2); 9% reported myocardial infarction, 8% aortic aneurism, 8% myocardial revascularization, and 2% ischemic stroke. Twenty-six percent of patients had a medium-to-high ATCS. Both AWTmax and AWTref correlated with hypertension and age (P < 0.002). At the ROC analysis, a 4.8 mm threshold was associated to a 90% specificity and an odds ratio of 6.3 (AUC = 0.735). Assuming as threshold the AWTmax median value (4.3 mm) of patients who suffered from at least one CCV event in their history, a negative predictive value of 90%, a RR of 3.6 and an OR of 6.3 were found. At the multivariate regression analysis, AWTmax was the only independent variable associated to the frequency of CCV events. Patients with increased thoracic

  15. Initial staging of Hodgkin's disease: role of contrast-enhanced 18F FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin's disease (HD).Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard.No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor).Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients.

  16. Detection and preoperative staging of carcinoma of the cervix: Comparison between MR imaging and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, B.; Schmidt, H.; Baieri, P.; Scheidel, P.; Meier, W.; Schramm, T.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with carcinoma of the cervix were examined preoperatively by MR imaging and CT. In all patients histopathologic confirmation was available for specimens obtained either by radical hysterectomy or at staging laparotomy. MR imaging was equivalent to contrast CT in the detection and evaluation of tumor extension in the cervix. Tumor extension to the parametria and pelvic wall was difficult to evaluate on both modalities, as neither had a higher accuracy than pelvic examination conducted under anesthesia. Nodal staging was nearly equivalent on MR imaging and CT. In the detection and staging of carcinoma of the cervix, MR imaged proved to be as good as CT with contrast agent enhancement

  17. Automated quantification of bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening and lumen tapering in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    Purpose: To automatically quantify airway structural properties visualised on CT in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and controls, including: bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, and lumen tapering. Methods and materials: The 3D surface of the airway lumen, outer wall, and bronchial arteries...

  18. Chest CT features of cystic fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with non-cystic fibrosis diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, So Yeon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung [Dept. of Radiology, and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Min Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features.

  19. Chest CT features of cystic fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with non-cystic fibrosis diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, So Yeon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Cha, Min Jae; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2008-03-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The function to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and security improvement of medical information.

  1. Crackle analysis for chest auscultation and comparison with high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Kido, Shoji; Jiang Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the correlation between respiratory sounds and the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of lung diseases. Respiratory sounds were recorded using a stethoscope in 41 patients with crackles. All had undergone inspiratory and expiratory CT. Subjects included 18 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 23 without interstitial pneumonia. Two parameters, two-cycle duration (2CD) and initial deflection width (IDW) of the ''crackle,'' were induced by time-expanded waveform analysis. Two radiologists independently assessed 11 HRCT findings. An evaluation was carried out to determine whether there was a significant difference in the two parameters between the presence and absence of each HRCT finding. The two parameters of crackles were significantly shorter in the interstitial pneumonia group than the non-interstitial pneumonia group. Ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, lung volume reduction, traction bronchiectasis, centrilobular nodules, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were correlated with one or two parameters in all patients, whereas the other three findings were not. Among the interstitial pneumonia group, traction bronchiectasis, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were significantly correlated with one or two parameters. Abnormal respiratory sounds were correlated with some HRCT findings. (author)

  2. Indications for surgery in acute pancreatitis on the basis of abdominal CT in the early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Keishoku; Nakasaku, Osamu; Kim, Jung-hyo; Hatakeyama, Gen

    1986-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis clinically manifests various degrees of severity. In the present study, we performed a retrospective study on 39 cases of acute pancreatitis and examined the indications for surgery and infection as an aggravating factor in acute pancreatitis on the basis of CT in the early stage (about 48 hours after onset). CT in the early stage of acute pancreatitis permits objective determination of the extent of lesion enlargement. The cases could be classified into three grades: severe (CT score ≥ 6; surgical therapy), moderate (CT score = 5, 4; medical therapy possible), and mild (CT score ≤ 3; medical therapy) as determined by CT. Emergency surgery was performed in seven of 10 patients in whom pancreatitis was judged to be severe on the basis of CT and clinical findings. Of the seven, four had infection in the early stage (within 48 hours after onset). Three of the four had MOF complications and died. Two of the three patients without infection were relieved. The extent of inflammatory lesions of severe pancreatitis was severe by CT, and the CT scores were especially high in cases with infection. Infection in the early stage of acute pancreatitis was thus thought to be an serious aggravating factor. It was concluded, therefore, that, in the early stage, CT was very useful as a helpful guide to early judgement and an indicator for emergency surgery. (author)

  3. Diagnosis of clinical staging of bladder cancer by CT and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Isao; Igawa, Mikio; Ohnishi, Yoshio; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nihira, Hiromi; Mori, Masaki; Okada, Mitsuo.

    1984-01-01

    The preoperative staging of bladder cancer is of fundamental importance for prognostic evaluation and surgical indication. We studied the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and angiography in defining the extent of local invasion in 16 patients with surgically proven carcinoma of the bladder. The overall accuracy of CT and angiographic staging in these cases was 75 % and 50 % respectively. In low stage, the accuracy was 90 % in CT and 70 % in angiography. In high stage, the accuracy was 50 % in CT and 16.7 % in angiography. Our results seems to indicate lower accuracy in high stage bladder cancer compared with other research. Data from a much larger series are required to ascertain whether the additional information provided by CT and angiography will produce any improvement in patient management. (author)

  4. Performance evaluation of 3-D enhancement filters for detection of lung cancer from 3-D chest X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Akinobu; Hagai, Makoto; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of several three dimensional enhancement filters used in procedures for detecting lung cancer shadows from three dimensional (3D) chest X-ray CT images. Two dimensional enhancement filters such as Min-DD filter, Contrast filter and N-Quoit filter have been proposed for enhancing cancer shadows in conventional 2D X-ray images. In this paper, we extend each of these 2D filters to a 3D filter and evaluate its performance experimentally by using CT images with artificial and true lung cancer shadows. As a result, we find that these 3D filters are effective for determining the position of a lung cancer shadow in a 3D chest CT image, as compared with the simple procedure such as smoothing filter, and that the performance of these filters become lower in the hilar area due to the influence of the vessel shadows. (author)

  5. Longitudinal tube modulation for chest and abdominal CT examinations: impact on effective patient doses calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Depuydt, M.; Jacobs, J.; Nens, J.; Lemmens, K.; Oyen, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: In multi-slice CT, manufacturers have implemented automatic tube current modulation (TCM) algorithms. These adjust tube current in the x-y plane (angular modulation) and/or along the z-axis (z-axis modulation) according to the size and attenuation of the scanned body part. Current methods for estimating effective dose (ED) values in CT do not account for such new developments. This study investigated the need to take TCM into account when calculating ED values, using clinical data. Methods: The effect of TCM algorithms as implemented on a GE BrightSpeed 16, a Philips Brilliance 64 and a Siemens Sensation 64 CT scanners was investigated. Here, only z-axis modulation was addressed, considering thorax and abdomen CT examinations collected from 534 adult patients. Commercially available CT dosimetry software (CT expo v.1.7) was used to compute EDTCM (ED accounting for TCM) as the sum of ED of successive slices. A two-step approach was chosen: first we estimated the relative contribution of each slice assuming a constant tube current. Next a weighted average was taken based upon the slice specific tube current value. EDTCM was than compared to patient ED estimated using average mA of all slices. Results and Conclusions: The proposed method is relatively simple and uses as input: the parameters of each protocol, a fitted polynomial function of weighting factors for each slice along the scan length and mA values of the individual patient examination. Results show that z-axis modulation does not have a strong impact on ED for the Siemens and the GE scanner (difference ranges from -4.1 to 3.3 percent); for the Philips scanner the effect was more important, (difference ranges from -8.5 to 6.9 percent), but still all median values approached zero (except for one case, where the median reached -5.6%), suggesting that ED calculation using average mA is in general a good approximation for EDTCM. Higher difference values for the Philips scanner are due to a stronger

  6. A meta-analysis of the Timing of Chest Radiotherapy in Patients with Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui ZHAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although evidence for a significant survival benefit of chest radiotherapy has been proven, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the optimal timing of chest radiation. The aim of this study is to explore whether the timing of chest radiation may influence the survival of the patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSSCLC by performing a literature-based meta-analysis. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, CBM, and CNKI, et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents about randomized trials comparing different timing chest radiotherapy in patients with LS-SCLC. Early chest radiation was regarded as beginning within 30 days after the start of chemotherapy. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct meta-analysis on the trials. The combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated to estimate the mortality in 2 or 3 years and toxicity of the two treatments. The statistical heterogeneity was determined by cochran’s Chi-square test (Q test. The Begg’ test was used to determine the publication bias. Results Six trials that included a total of 1 189 patients were analyzed in the meta-analysis 587 patients were in the early radiation group and 602 patients were in the late radiation group. Considering all 6 eligible trials, the overall survival at 2/3 years was not significantly different between early and late chest radiation (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.55-1.05, Z=1.68, P=0.093. For the toxicity, no obvious difference was observed for early chest radiotherapy compared with late irradiation in pneumonitis (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 0.97-3.86, P=0.797, esophagitis (OR=1.43, 95%CI: 0.95-2.13, P=0.572 and thrombocytopenia (OR=1.23, 95%CI: 0.88-1.77, P=0.746, respectively. Conclusion No statistical difference was observed in 2/3 years survival and toxicity, including pneumonitis, esophagitis and thrombocytopenia, between

  7. Radiotherapy and the importance of CT for the nasopharyngeal squammous cell carcinoma, 1. Diagnosis of staging and location of the tumor by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Dokiya, Takushi

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-five patients with nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (NPC) were examined with computed tomography (CT) before definitive radiotherapy. CT clearly delineated the extent of the primary tumors. CT frequently showed subtle destruction of the paranasal sinuses and pterygoid plate, which was not usually detected by conventional X-ray examinations. T-staging was made according to the UICC TNM classification system (1978), depending on the clinical findings and the conventional X-ray examinations (non-CT T-stage). Then the non-CT T-stage of each patient was compared with T-stage diagnosed with CT findings alone (CT T-stage). CT upstaged non-CT T-stage in 14 of the 35 patients. Only one patient was downstaged by CT ; this patient had cranial nerve palsy but no detectable bone destruction as shown by CT. Since CT can reveal both bones and abnormal soft tissues well, it is a very useful diagnostic tool for the staging of the tumor assessment of treatment planning. Before radiotherapy, we should use CT to confirm that whether the tumor was located within the radiation field. CT is also useful to see the tumor regression after definitive radiotherapy. We conclude that CT is the single, most reliable imaging method for primary tumors of the NPC patients.

  8. Chest Tube Thoracostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the space around the lungs (called a pleural effusion) . A chest tube may also be needed when a patient has ... or chest CT are also done to evaluate pleural fluid. If the X-ray shows a need for a chest tube to drain fluid or air, the procedure is ...

  9. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis for osteoporosis using chest 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, K.; Matsuhiro, M.; Suzuki, H.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2016-03-01

    The patients of osteoporosis comprised of about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems the aging society has. In order to prevent the osteoporosis, it is necessary to do early detection and treatment. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3-D) image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. The 3-D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used as a support to diagnose osteoporosis and at the same time can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis diagnosis support system obtained high extraction rate of the thoracic vertebral in both normal and low doses.

  11. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Joung Taek; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Han, Heon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p 0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  12. Admission Chest CT Complements Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy in Prediction of Adverse Outcomes in Thermally Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    other CT scoring systems exist for conditions including cystic fibrosis and ARDS, these are not in widespread clinical use and have not been... diagnosis of inhalation injury.10,11 However, degree and depth of damage to main airway mucosa cannot at present be accurately distinguished by eye...injury can result in progressive pulmonary dysfunction, infection, and death. Although bronchoscopy is the standard for diagnosis , it only assesses

  13. CT saber-sheath trachea. Correlation with clinical, chest radiographic and functional findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigaux, J.P.; Hermes, G.; Dubois, P.; Beers, B. van; Delaunois, L.; Jamart, J.

    1994-01-01

    The diagnosis of saber-sheath trachea is easy at CT due to its cross-sectional imaging, but the significance of this CT sign has not been evaluated in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Various signs of COPD were compared between a series of 20 patients with a saber-sheath trachea at CT (tracheal index ≤66%) and a group of 20 pneumologic control patients without saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index ≥70%). These signs include clinical and standard radiographic indices of COPD, sternum-spine distance and 3 functional tests of COPD: forced expiratory volume in one second, carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity, and funtional residual capacity (FRC). A significant difference was found between the 2 groups, concerning the values of FRC and of sternum-spine distance (p -2 ). The tracheal index was significantly correlated with the FRC values and with the sternum-spine distance. No other significant difference was observed. It is concluded that saber-sheath trachea is basically a sign of hyperinflation. (orig./MG)

  14. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, H.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  15. Usefulness of CT in diagnosing and staging of kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batycka-Ugorska, I.

    1993-01-01

    Article presents 170 patients with suspected kidney cancer and applicability of CT in the diagnosis. According to author CT imaging is better than others (ultrasonography, urography) in assessment of the tumor development and detection of metastases to lymphatic nodes of abdomen and other organs. The method is compared with angiography in diagnosis of metastases of kidney cancer to veins

  16. Vertebral bone attenuation on low-dose chest CT: quantitative volumetric analysis for bone fragility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y W; Kim, J H; Yoon, S H; Lee, J H; Lee, C-H; Shin, C S; Park, Y S

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) for detecting bone fragility. LDCT-measured vertebral bone attenuation by volumetric methods showed good correlation with bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA, and good diagnostic performance for identifying osteoporosis and compression fractures. The results of this study suggest the feasibility of obtaining comprehensive information on bone health in subjects undergoing LDCT. Osteoporosis is a prevalent but underdiagnosed disease that increases fracture risk. This study evaluated the utility of vertebral attenuation derived from low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) compared to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for detecting bone fragility. A total of 232 subjects (78 men and 154 women) aged above 50 years who underwent both LDCT and DXA within 30 days were evaluated. LDCT-measured bone attenuation in Hounsfield units (HU) of four vertebrae (T4, T7, T10, and L1) was evaluated using volumetric methods for correlation with DXA-measured bone mineral density (BMD) and for the diagnosis of compression fractures, osteoporosis, and low BMD (osteoporosis or osteopenia) in men and women, with DXA measurements as the reference standard. The average attenuation of the four vertebrae showed strong correlation with DXA-measured BMD of the lumbar spine (r = 0.726, p < 0.05). In receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, the area under the curve (AUC) across LDCT-measured thresholds of the average attenuation to distinguish compression fractures was 0.827, and a threshold of 129.5 HU yielded 90.9 % sensitivity and 64.4 % specificity. Similarly, average attenuation showed high AUCs and good diagnostic performance for detecting osteoporosis and low BMD in both men and women. Among 44 subjects with compression fractures, the average bone attenuation showed strong negative correlation with both the worst fracture grade (r = -0.525, p

  17. Serial chest CT findings in interstitial lung disease associated with polymyositis-dermatomyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefoy, Olivier; Ferretti, Gilbert; Calaque, Olivier; Coulomb, Max; Begueret, Hugues; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Laurent, Francois E-mail: francois.laurent@chu-bordeaux.fr

    2004-03-01

    Objective: A retrospective study was carried out in two institutions to determine serial changes in the pattern, distribution, and extent of interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with polymyositis (PM)-dermatomyositis (DM) using HRCT. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with PM-DM and clinical suspicion of ILD who underwent at least two serial HRCT examinations were retrospectively evaluated by two readers. Patients were classified according to the dominant CT pattern which was correlated with clinical evolution and underlying histology when available (n=6). Results: Patients were classified into four groups according to the dominant pattern: ground-glass attenuation and reticulation (group 1, n=9); honeycombing (group 2, n=4); airspace consolidation (group 3, n=4), and normal or almost normal lung (group 4, n=3). Under medical treatment, serial HRCT showed that the extent of areas of ground-glass opacities (group 1) decreased in five patients, stabilized in two, and increased in two. Pathologic findings demonstrated usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in two cases and unspecified interstitial pneumonia in one. In group 2, extent of honeycombing increased in three cases and stabilized in one. In group 3, dramatic resolution of airspace consolidation occurred in three cases. Clinical deterioration with extensive consolidation at CT and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) at histology occurred in one patient of each of the three previous groups. Lesions stayed invisible or progressed slightly in the fourth group. Conclusion: In ILD associated with PM-DM, clinical deterioration and DAD in the follow-up can be observed whatever the HRCT pattern. However, unfavorable evolution is constant when honeycombing is present at the initial CT.

  18. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  19. Use of multislice CT for the evaluation of emergency room patients with chest pain: the so-called "triple rule-out".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael J; Raff, Gilbert L

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have made high resolution noninvasive coronary angiograms possible. Multiple studies involving over 2,000 patients have established that coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is highly accurate for delineation of the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. The high negative predictive value (>95%) found in these studies suggests that CCTA is an attractive option for exclusion of coronary artery disease in properly selected emergency department patients with acute chest pain. CT is also a well established and accurate tool for the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism. Recent technical developments now permit acquisition of well-opacified images of the coronary arteries, thoracic aorta and pulmonary arteries from a single CT scan. While this so called "triple-rule out" scan protocol can potentially exclude fatal causes of chest pain in all three vascular beds, the attendant higher radiation dose of this method precludes its routine use except when there is sufficient support for the diagnosis of either aortic dissection or pulmonary embolism. This article provides an overview of CCTA, and reviews the clinical evidence supporting the use of this technique for triage of patients with acute chest pain. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. High Attenuation Areas on Chest CT in Community-Dwelling Adults: The MESA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolanczuk, Anna J.; Oelsner, Elizabeth C.; Barr, R. Graham; Hoffman, Eric A.; Armstrong, Hilary F.; Austin, John H.M.; Basner, Robert C.; Bartels, Matthew N.; Christie, Jason D.; Enright, Paul L.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Stukovsky, Karen Hinckley; Kaufman, Joel D.; Nath, P. Hrudaya; Newell, John D.; Palmer, Scott M.; Rabinowitz, Dan; Raghu, Ganesh; Sell, Jessica L.; Sieren, Jered; Sonavane, Sushil K.; Tracy, Russell P.; Watts, Jubal R.; Williams, Kayleen; Kawut, Steven M.; Lederer, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lung injury, inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling precede lung fibrosis in interstitial lung disease (ILD). We examined whether a quantitative measure of increased lung attenuation on computed tomography (CT) detects lung injury, inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling in community-dwelling adults sampled without regard to respiratory symptoms or smoking. We measured high attenuation areas (HAA; percentage of lung voxels between -600 and -250 Hounsfield Units) on cardiac CT scans of adults enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. HAA was associated with higher serum matrix metalloproteinase-7 (mean adjusted difference 6.3% per HAA doubling, 95% CI 1.3 to 11.5), higher interleukin-6 (mean adjusted difference 8.8%, 95% CI 4.8 to 13.0), lower forced vital capacity (mean adjusted difference -82 mL, 95% CI -119 to -44), lower 6-minute walk distance (mean adjusted difference -40 m, 95% CI -1 to -80), higher odds of interstitial lung abnormalities at 9.5 years (adjusted OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.65), and higher all cause-mortality rate over 12.2 years (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.39 to 1.79). High attenuation areas are associated with biomarkers of inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling, reduced lung function, interstitial lung abnormalities, and a higher risk of death among community-dwelling adults. PMID:27471206

  1. Correlation of ultra-low dose chest CT findings with physiologic measures of asbestosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manners, David [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Wong, Patrick; Murray, Conor; Teh, Joelin [Royal Perth Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Perth (Australia); Kwok, Yi Jin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Nedlands, WA (Australia); De Klerk, Nick; Franklin, Peter [University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Alfonso, Helman; Reid, Alison [Curtin University, School of Public Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Musk, A.W.B. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Perth, WA (Australia); Brims, Fraser J.H. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Curtin University, Curtin Medical School, Perth (Australia)

    2017-08-15

    The correlation between ultra low dose computed tomography (ULDCT)-detected parenchymal lung changes and pulmonary function abnormalities is not well described. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ULDCT-detected interstitial lung disease (ILD) and measures of pulmonary function in an asbestos-exposed population. Two thoracic radiologists independently categorised prone ULDCT scans from 143 participants for ILD appearances as absent (score 0), probable (1) or definite (2) without knowledge of asbestos exposure or lung function. Pulmonary function measures included spirometry and diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO). Participants were 92% male with a median age of 73.0 years. CT dose index volume was between 0.6 and 1.8 mGy. Probable or definite ILD was reported in 63 (44.1%) participants. Inter-observer agreement was good (k = 0.613, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant correlation between the ILD score and both forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04 and r = -0.20, p = 0.02). There was a strong correlation between ILD score and DLCO (r = -0.34, p < 0.0001). Changes consistent with ILD on ULDCT correlate well with corresponding reductions in gas transfer, similar to standard CT. In asbestos-exposed populations, ULDCT may be adequate to detect radiological changes consistent with asbestosis. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of ultra-low dose chest CT findings with physiologic measures of asbestosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manners, David; Wong, Patrick; Murray, Conor; Teh, Joelin; Kwok, Yi Jin; De Klerk, Nick; Franklin, Peter; Alfonso, Helman; Reid, Alison; Musk, A.W.B.; Brims, Fraser J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The correlation between ultra low dose computed tomography (ULDCT)-detected parenchymal lung changes and pulmonary function abnormalities is not well described. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ULDCT-detected interstitial lung disease (ILD) and measures of pulmonary function in an asbestos-exposed population. Two thoracic radiologists independently categorised prone ULDCT scans from 143 participants for ILD appearances as absent (score 0), probable (1) or definite (2) without knowledge of asbestos exposure or lung function. Pulmonary function measures included spirometry and diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO). Participants were 92% male with a median age of 73.0 years. CT dose index volume was between 0.6 and 1.8 mGy. Probable or definite ILD was reported in 63 (44.1%) participants. Inter-observer agreement was good (k = 0.613, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant correlation between the ILD score and both forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04 and r = -0.20, p = 0.02). There was a strong correlation between ILD score and DLCO (r = -0.34, p < 0.0001). Changes consistent with ILD on ULDCT correlate well with corresponding reductions in gas transfer, similar to standard CT. In asbestos-exposed populations, ULDCT may be adequate to detect radiological changes consistent with asbestosis. (orig.)

  3. Thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome: A comparison with systemic lupus erythematosus without antiphospholipid syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Hodaka; Aoki, Takatoshi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Hanamiya, Mai; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in comparison with SLE without APS. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and thin-section CT findings of 17 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SLE with APS, comparing with 37 consecutive SLE patients without APS, between 2004 and 2008, and patients who had other autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren syndrome, were excluded. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in age, gender, smoking habits, or history of steroid pulse and biological therapy. CT images of 2 mm thickness obtained with a 16- or 64-detector row CT were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on ultra high-resolution gray-scale monitors. Results: The frequency of thin-section CT abnormalities was higher in SLE with APS group (82%) than in SLE without APS group (43%). Ground-glass opacity (59%), architectural distortion (47%), reticulation (41%), enlarged peripheral pulmonary artery (29%), and mosaic attenuation (29%) were significantly more common in the SLE with APS group than in the SLE without APS group (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.01). Conclusion: SLE patients with APS have increased prevalence of thin-section chest CT abnormalities than those without APS.

  4. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Forler, S.; Gatidis, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology and Epidemiology of Viral Diseases, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Straße 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Spira, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  5. Role of prophylactic brain irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer: clinical, neuropsychologic, and CT sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukkanen, E.; Klonoff, H.; Allan, B.; Graeb, D.; Murray, N.

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer treated between 1981 and 1985 with a regimen including prophylactic brain irradiation (PBI) after combination chemotherapy were assessed for compliance with PBI, brain relapse, and neurologic morbidity. Seventy-seven percent of patients had PBI and of these, 22% developed brain metastases after a median time of 11 months post treatment. The brain was the apparent unique initial site of relapse in 10% of PBI cases but more commonly brain relapse was preceded or accompanied by failure at other sites, especially the chest. Brain metastases were the greatest cause of morbidity in 50% of PBI failures. Twelve of 14 PBI patients alive 2 years after treatment had oncologic, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, and brain CT. All long-term survivors were capable of self care and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dementia, with three borderline cases. One third had pretreatment neurologic dysfunction and two thirds post treatment neurologic symptoms, most commonly recent memory loss. Fifty percent had subtle motor findings. Intellectual functioning was at the 38th percentile with most patients having an unskilled occupational history. Neuropsychologic impairment ratings were borderline in three cases and definitely impaired in seven cases. CT scans showed brain atrophy in all cases with mild progression in those having a pre-treatment baseline. Periventricular and subcortical low density lesions identical to the CT appearance of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy were seen in 82% of posttreatment CT studies, and lacunar infarcts in 54%. Neuropsychologic impairment scores and the extent of CT periventricular low density lesions were strongly associated

  6. Three Dimensional Volumetric Analysis of Solid Pulmonary Nodules on Chest CT: 
Cancer Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqi LI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The management of pulmonary nodules relies on cancer risk assessment, in which the only widely accepted criterion is diameter. The development of volumetric computed tomography (CT and three-dimensional (3D software enhances the clarity in displaying the nodules’ characteristics. This study evaluated the values of the nodules’ volume and 3D morphological characteristics (edge, shape and location in cancer risk assessment. Methods The CT data of 200 pulmonary nodules were retrospectively evaluated using 3D volumetric software. The malignancy or benignity of all the nodules was confirmed by pathology, histology or follow up (>2 years. Logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios (ORs of the 3D margin (smooth, lobulated or spiculated/irregular, shape (spherical or non-spherical, location (purely intraparenchymal, juxtavascular or pleural-attached, and nodule volume in cancer risk assessment for total and sub-centimeter nodules. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was employed to determine the optimal threshold for the nodule volume. Results Out of 200 pulmonary nodules, 78 were malignant, whereas 122 were benign. The Logistic regression analysis showed that the volume (OR=3.3; P0.05. ROC analysis showed that the optimal threshold for malignancy was 666 mm³. For sub-centimeter nodules, the 3D margin was the only valuable predictive factor of malignancy (OR=60.5, 75.0; P=0.003, 0.007. Conclusion The volume and 3D margin are important factors considered to assess the cancer risk of pulmonary nodules. Volumes larger than 666 mm³ can be determined as high risk for pulmonary nodules; by contrast, nodules with lobulated, spiculated, or irregular margin present a high malignancy probability.

  7. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT for N staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Hadžihasanović, Besima

    2017-08-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities of non-invasive diagnostic imaging methods, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT, in clinical N staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Retrospective clinical study included 50 patients with diagnosed NSCLC who have undergone PET/CT for the purpose of disease staging. The International association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) nodal mapping system was used for analysis of nodal disease. Data regarding CT N-staging and PET/CT Nstaging were recorded. Two methods were compared using χ2 test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Statistical analysis showed that although there were some differences in determining the N stage between CT and PET/CT, these methods were in significant correlation. CT and PET/CT findings established the same N stage in 74% of the patients. In five patients based on PET/CT findings the staging was changed from operable to inoperable, while in four patients staging was changed from inoperable to operable. Conclusion PET/CT and CT are noninvasive methods that can be reliably used for N staging of NSCLC. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  8. Evaluation of a Chest Circumference-Adapted Protocol for Low-Dose 128-Slice Coronary CT Angiography with Prospective Electrocardiogram Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chenying; Wang, Zufei; Ji, Jiansong; Wang, Hailin; Hu, Xianghua; Chen, Chunmiao [Department of Radiology, Lishui Central Hospital, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000 (China)

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol on radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered coronary CT angiography (CCTA). One hundred-eighty-five consecutive patients, who had undergone prospective ECG triggering CCTA with a 128-slice CT, were included in the present study. Nipple-level chest circumference, body weight and height were measured before CT examinations. Patients were divided into four groups based on kV/ref·mAs = 100/200, 100/250, 120/200, and 120/250, when patient's chest circumference was ≤ 85.0 (n = 56), 85.0-90.0 (n = 53), 90.0-95.0 (n = 44), and > 95.0 (n = 32), respectively. Image quality per-segment was independently assessed by two experienced observers. Image noise and attenuation were also measured. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The effective radiation dose was calculated using CT dose volume index and the dose-length product. A significant correlation was observed between patients' chest circumference and body mass index (r = 0.762, p < 0.001). Chest circumference ranged from 74 to 105 cm, and the mean effective radiation dose was 1.9-3.8 mSv. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 98.5% (2440/2478) of all evaluated coronary segments without any significant differences among the four groups (p = 0.650). No significant difference in image noise was observed among the four groups (p = 0.439), thus supporting the validity of the chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol. However, vessel attenuation, SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the 100 kV groups than in the 120 kV groups (p < 0.05). A measure of chest circumference can be used to adapt tube voltage and current for individualized radiation dose control, with resultant similar image noise and sustained diagnostic image quality.

  9. Contribution of18F-FDG PET/CT to Staging of Head and Neck Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Yeşim; Ömür, Özgür; Hatipoğlu, Filiz

    2018-02-01

    Accurate staging of head and neck cancer (HNC) plays an important role in patient management as well as protection of functional characteristics of the head and neck region. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as part of HNC staging to clinical evaluation and treatment planning. Clinical records of 138 HNC cases who has undergone 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-five cases who had accessible clinical follow-up data were included in the study group, and their PET/CT and conventional imaging findings were evaluated. In the case group with a PET/CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of primary lesion the sensitivity rates for PET/CT and MRI were calculated as 91.3% and 82.6%, the positive predictive values (PPV) as 91.3% and 82.6%, specificity as 71.4% and 42.8%, and the negative predictive value (NPV) as 71.4% and 42.8%, respectively. In terms of metastatic lymph node evaluation, the sensitivity was calculated as 100% and 88.8%, the NPV as 100% and 83.3%, respectively. The PPV and specificity was 100% for both modalities. In the case group with CT for primary lesion evaluation, the sensitivity and PPV were found as 95.2% and 100% for PET/CT, and as 85.7% and 94.7% for CT, respectively. in metastatic lymph node evaluation, the sensitivity was found as 100% for PET/CT and 50% for CT, and the PPV, specificity and NPV were determined as 100% for both methods. PET/CT findings resulted in a change in 'tumor, node, metastasis' staging in 5 cases. PET/CT in HNC contributes to staging, thus playing a role in treatment planning, especially in patients with locally advanced disease.

  10. The Effect of Needle Gauge on the Risk of Pneumothorax and Chest Tube Placement After Percutaneous Computed Tomographic (CT)-Guided Lung Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Joshua D; Tam, Alda L; Huang, Steven Y; Ensor, Joe E; Philip, Asher S; Chen, Geraldine J; Ahrar, Judy; Murthy, Ravi; Avritscher, Rony; Madoff, David C; Mahvash, Armeen; Ahrar, Kamran; Wallace, Michael J; Nachiappan, Arun C; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of coaxial guide needle gauge (18 vs. 19 gauge) on the risk of pneumothorax and chest tube placement after CT-guided lung biopsy. Imaging records of all patients who had undergone CT-guided lung biopsies at our institution from March 1, 2006 to December 9, 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of various patient-, lesion-, and procedure-related variables on subsequent pneumothorax and chest tube placement rates. The study included 4262 biopsies (2304 with 18-gauge and 1958 with 19-gauge coaxial guide needles) in 3917 patients. The rates of pneumothorax and chest tube placement were 30.2 and 15%, respectively. Pneumothorax occurred in 35% of procedures performed with 18-gauge needles and in 24.5% of procedures performed with 19-gauge needles (p gauge needles and in 13.1% of procedures performed with 19-gauge needles (p = 0.0011). Multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated that the use of an 18-gauge needle was associated with a higher rate of pneumothorax (p gauge coaxial guide needle significantly decreases the risk of pneumothorax and chest tube placement compared with an 18-guage needle.

  11. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  12. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heon; Kim, Seok Yeon; Lee, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jae Kyun; Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 ± 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV V /LV V ) were calculated. RV V /LV V was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 ± 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV V /LV V and PASP (R = 0.82, p V /LV V were 0.990 and 0.892. RV V /LV V was 1.01 ± 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 ± 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P V /LV V , sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  13. A prospective study of PET/CT in initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Langer, S W

    2007-01-01

    : The results from this first study on PET/CT in SCLC indicates that PET/CT can simplify and perhaps even improve the accuracy of the current staging procedure in SCLC. A larger clinical trial, preferably with consequent histological confirmation in case of discordance, however, is warranted....

  14. [Comparison study of CT indicators and pathological N staging in lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-peng; Sun, Ying-shi; Li, Jie; Wang, Ning; Cao, Kun; Ji, Jia-fu; Li, Zi-yu

    2008-11-01

    To explore the CT criteria for evaluating lymph node (LN) metastasis and preoperative N-staging of gastric cancer through the comparison of CT signs and surgical pathology. Eighty-nine patients with gastric cancer underwent CT examinations before radical resections. A soft-reading method on PACS workstation was employed to evaluate the detection of LNs. The size and number of LNs were registered, and the accumulated size of LNs was calculated in every case. The pathological N-staging (pN(0-3)) was considered on the basis of pathological examination of excised specimens according to UICC TNM-staging system (6th edition, 2002). The relationships between LN metastases and CT findings were analyzed by SPSS using t test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The distribution of maximal size, CT detection number and accumulated size were significantly different among different pN stages (P0.05), while significant difference could be found in CT detection number between pN1 and pN3 (P<0.01), pN2 and pN3 (P<0.01), and in accumulated size between pN1 and pN3 (P<0.01), pN1 and pN2 (P<0.01). The involvement of LNs in gastric cancer and pN staging are associated with size, number, and accumulated size of CT detection. CT detection number is more valuable in the evaluation of N staging than LNs size. CT detection number combined with accumulated size of LNs can provide meaningful information for preoperative N-staging.

  15. ECG-gated chest CT angiography with 64-MDCT and tri-phasic IV contrast administration regimen in patients with acute non-specific chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litmanovitch, Diana; Zamboni, Giulia A.; Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Clouse, Melvin E.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Hauser, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate chest CTA protocol using retrospective ECG-gating and triphasic IV contrast regimen for comprehensive evaluation of patients with acute non-specific chest pain. ECG-triggered dose modulation was used with a 64-MDCT scanner in 56 non-critically ill patients with acute nonspecific chest pain using triphasic IV regimen: 50 ml contrast followed by 50 ml 60% contrast/saline and 30 ml normal saline. Lungs, aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries were graded on a 5-point scale (5, best). Aorta and pulmonary artery attenuation was measured and three coronary artery groups were evaluated. Comparison with invasive coronary angiography was obtained in nine patients on a per segment (16 total) basis. Dosimetry values were obtained. Studies were satisfactory in all patients (score >3). Aorta and pulmonary artery attenuation was >200 HU in 90.5%. Lung or pleura, non-cardiac vascular and coronary arteries disease were detected in 20, 11 and 16 patients, respectively. Median coronary angiography (grade 5) was significantly higher than acceptable for diagnosis grade 4 (p < 0.001). Per segment, weighted kappa statistic was 0.79 indicating substantial agreement with catheter angiography (p<0.001). Average DLP was 1,490 ± 412 mGy-cm. Gated 64-MDCT angiography with triphasic IV contrast is a robust multipurpose technique for patients with acute non-specific chest pain. (orig.)

  16. Chest radiotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: facts, questions, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, D.; Vansteenkiste, J.

    2000-01-01

    Limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) is initially very sensitive to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the 5-year survival is generally only 10-15%, with most patients failing with therapy refractory relapses, both locally and in distant sites. The addition of chest irradiation to chemotherapy increases the absolute survival by approximately 5%. We reviewed the many controversies regarding optimal timing and irradiation technique. No strong data support total radiation doses over 50 Gy. According to one phase III trial and several retrospective studies, increasing the volume of the radiation fields to the pre-chemotherapy turnout volume instead of the post-chemotherapy volume does not improve local control. The total time in which the entire combined-modality treatment is delivered may be important. From seven randomized trials, it can be concluded that the timing of the radiotherapy as such is not very important. Some phase III trials support the use of accelerated chest radiation together with cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy, delivered from the first day of treatment, although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the available data. The best results are reported in studies in which the time from the start of treatment to the end of the radiotherapy was less than 30 days. This has to be taken into consideration when treatment modalities incorporating new chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy are considered. (author)

  17. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  18. Diagnosis of preoperative staging of bladder cancer by CT and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munechika, Hirotsugu; Saito, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Osamu; Tomiie, Fumitaka; Aihara, Toshinori

    1982-01-01

    The accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and angiography in defining the extent of local invasion was studied retrospectively in 19 patients with surgically proven carcinoma of the bladder. The overall accuracy of CT and angiographic staging in these cases was 54 percent and 47 percent respectively. The diagnosis of carcinoma of the bladder by CT tended to do overstaging rather than understaging. A tangential view of the tumor-bearing area by the selective internal iliac arteriography allows an accurate estimation of the perivesical tumor extension. The topographic diagnosis should be made by CT prior to the angiographic study. (author)

  19. PET/CT for staging and follow-up of pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheuk, Daniel K.L. [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Hong Kong, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Pokfulam (China); Sabin, Noah D.; Hossain, Moinul; Krasin, Matthew J.; Shulkin, Barry L. [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Wozniak, Amy [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Naik, Mihir [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Hematology/Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    While FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in adult patients has documented advantages and disadvantages compared with conventional imaging, to our knowledge, no studies of FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of NPC in pediatric patients have been performed. In this investigation, we studied the utility of FDG PET/CT in children with NPC. The study group comprised 18 children with biopsy-proven NPC who underwent FDG PET/CT and MRI (total 38 pairs of images). All baseline and follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI studies were independently reviewed for restaging of disease. The concordance between FDG PET/CT and MRI in T, N, and overall staging was 29%, 64%, and 43%, respectively. Compared with MRI, FDG PET/CT yielded lower T and overall staging and showed less cervical and retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy. The concordance between follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI was 79% overall and 100% 9 months after therapy. In patients who achieved complete remission, FDG PET/CT showed disease clearance 3-6 months earlier than MRI. There were no false-positive or false-negative FDG PET/CT scans during follow-up. FDG PET/CT may underestimate tumor extent and regional lymphadenopathy compared with MRI at the time of diagnosis, but it helps to detect metastases and clarify ambiguous findings. FDG PET/CT is sensitive and specific for follow-up and enables earlier determination of disease remission. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging modality for the evaluation and monitoring of NPC in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  20. PET/CT for staging and follow-up of pediatric nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheuk, Daniel K.L.; Sabin, Noah D.; Hossain, Moinul; Krasin, Matthew J.; Shulkin, Barry L.; Wozniak, Amy; Naik, Mihir; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    While FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in adult patients has documented advantages and disadvantages compared with conventional imaging, to our knowledge, no studies of FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of NPC in pediatric patients have been performed. In this investigation, we studied the utility of FDG PET/CT in children with NPC. The study group comprised 18 children with biopsy-proven NPC who underwent FDG PET/CT and MRI (total 38 pairs of images). All baseline and follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI studies were independently reviewed for restaging of disease. The concordance between FDG PET/CT and MRI in T, N, and overall staging was 29%, 64%, and 43%, respectively. Compared with MRI, FDG PET/CT yielded lower T and overall staging and showed less cervical and retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy. The concordance between follow-up FDG PET/CT and MRI was 79% overall and 100% 9 months after therapy. In patients who achieved complete remission, FDG PET/CT showed disease clearance 3-6 months earlier than MRI. There were no false-positive or false-negative FDG PET/CT scans during follow-up. FDG PET/CT may underestimate tumor extent and regional lymphadenopathy compared with MRI at the time of diagnosis, but it helps to detect metastases and clarify ambiguous findings. FDG PET/CT is sensitive and specific for follow-up and enables earlier determination of disease remission. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging modality for the evaluation and monitoring of NPC in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  1. Refined staging in hilar bronchial neoplasms with ECG-gated multislice-CT. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlmann, S.; Daliri, A.; Froelich, J.J.; Nowak, R.; Michulla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Equivocal initial CT-based staging in 2 patients with hilar bronchial neoplasms was reassessed with retrospective ECG-gated Multislice-CT and optimized examination parameters prior to definition of treatment. An initially suspected irresectable T 4 tumor with mediastinal infiltration was downstaged to T 2 in one case, while tumor infiltration into the left atrium could be confirmed in the other case. In doubtful conditions, ECG-gated multislice CT with optimized examination parameters may be helpful for refined staging in patients with hilar bronchial neoplasma, thus possibly influencing treatment strategies. (orig.)

  2. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...

  3. Characteristic of muscle involvement evaluated by CT scans in early stages of progressive muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yumi

    1993-01-01

    Muscle CT scans were performed in order to compare the characteristic distribution of progressive muscle involvement in the early stages of Duchenne type (DMD) and Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy (FCMD). Muscle images at the levels of the 3rd lumbar vertebra, thigh and calf were assessed by visual inspection, and mean CT numbers calculated for individual muscles were statistically analysed. On visual inspection, intramuscular low density areas and muscular atrophy were observed in the muscles of older patients with either disease. These changes were, however, more extensive at thigh level in DMD, and at calf level in FCMD. Nevertheless, the mean CT numbers of muscles in which only slight changes were grossly visible on CT scans displayed progressive decreases with increasing age. Moreover, a significant negative relationship was recognizable between age and mean CT number in almost all muscles examined. Comparison of the slopes of the regression lines revealed that the so-called selective pattern of muscle involvement characteristic of the symptomatic stage had already partially manifested in the preclinical or early stages of both diseases. In FCMD, the rates of decrease in CT numbers were extremely rapid for calf muscles as compared with those in DMD, indicating that this is one reason for FCMD patients never becoming ambulatory. However, for almost all of the other muscles, the CT numbers in FCMD decreased in parallel with the corresponding CT numbers in DMD; thus, these diseases displayed a similarity in the pattern of muscle involvement, despite their different pathogenetic mechanisms and inheritance patterns. (author)

  4. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  5. Role of FDG-PET/CT in stage 1–4 malignant melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldon, Mai; Kjerkegaard, Ulrik Knap; Ørndrup, Mette Heisz

    2017-01-01

    /CT scanned in 2012 at a department of plastic surgery and to analyze the pattern of referral and outcome of PET/CT scans of these patients all back from early diagnosis of the patient in the period 2008–2012. Methods: All patients with MM stages 1–4 (AJCC stages) and melanoma of unknown primary (MUP) who......Background: The number of patients diagnosed with malignant melanoma (MM) has increased over several years. Despite early diagnosis of MM and therefore better prognosis, the number of FDG-PET/CT scans (PET/CT) seems to be increasing. This study aimed to describe all MM patients who were PET...... were PET/CT scanned in 2012 were included. This resulted in a study group of 58 patients with 109 PET/CT scans during the study period 2008–2012. Results: Indications for referring stages 1 and 2 patients to PET/CT were usually based on subjective symptoms of disease, whilst patients in stages 3 and 4...

  6. Ultra low-dose chest CT using filtered back projection: Comparison of 80-, 100- and 120 kVp protocols in a prospective randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Madan, Rachna [Division of Thoracic Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Sharma, Amita; Padole, Atul; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Digumarthy, Subba; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Kalra, Mannudeep K. [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Filtered back projection technique enables acceptable image quality for chest CT examinations at 0.9 mGy (estimated effective dose of 0.5 mSv) for selected sizes of patients. • Lesion detection (such as solid non-calcified lung nodules) in lung parenchyma is optimal at 0.9 mGy, with limited visualization of thyroid nodules in FBP images. • Further dose reduction down to 0.4 mGy is possible for most patients undergoing follow-up chest CT for evaluation of larger lung nodules and GGOs. • Our results may help set the reference ALARA dose for chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection technique using the minimum possible radiation dose with acceptable image quality and lesion detection. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and diagnostic image quality of filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique in ultra low-dose chest CT examinations. Methods and materials: In this IRB-approved ongoing prospective clinical study, 116 CT-image-series at four different radiation-doses were performed for 29 patients (age, 57–87 years; F:M – 15:12; BMI 16–32 kg/m{sup 2}). All patients provided written-informed-consent for the acquisitions of additional ultra low-dose (ULD) series on a 256-slice MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). In-addition to their clinical standard-dose chest CT (SD, 120 kV mean CTDI{sub vol}, 6 ± 1 mGy), ULD-CT was subsequently performed at three-dose-levels (0.9 mGy [120 kV]; 0.5 mGy [100 kV] and 0.2 mGy [80 kV]). Images were reconstructed with FBP (2.5 mm * 1.25 mm) resulting into four-stacks: SD-FBP (reference-standard), FBP{sub 0.9}, FBP{sub 0.5}, and FBP{sub 0.2}. Four thoracic-radiologists from two-teaching-hospitals independently-evaluated data for lesion-detection and visibility-of-small-structures. Friedman's-non-parametric-test with post hoc Dunn's-test was used for data-analysis. Results: Interobserver-agreement was substantial between radiologists (k = 0.6–0.8). With

  7. [A comparison of chest radiographs between patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Eri; Senoo, Mami; Nagayama, Naohiro; Masuda, Kimihiko; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Nagai, Hideaki; Akagawa, Shinobu; Toyoda, Emiko; Oota, Ken

    2013-08-01

    To elucidate the differences in affected lung segments between patients with pulmonary M. kansasii infection and those with M. tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease, we examined chest radiography images and CT scans. The initial stage of disease was defined as the period when less than one-sixth of the total lung area was affected by the infection, as visualized on chest radiography and CT. One hundred eighty-four patients were diagnosed with M.kansasii infection between 1996 and 2010 and 835 patients, with M.tuberculosis infection between 2008 and 2009 at our hospital. The diagnosis was made on the basis of the results of sputum culture and/or bronchial washing. After excluding the patients with underlying lung diseases such as chronic pulmonary emphysema, interstitial pneumonia, and old pulmonary tuberculosis as well as those in advanced stages, 24 patients with M. kansasii infection and 62 patients with M. tuberculosis infection were included in this study. The affected segments of the lungs and the rates of cavity development were determined by using CT scans. In patients with M.kansasii, 17 had an infected right lung, while 7 had an infected left lung. Additionally, in patients with M.tuberculosis, 58 had an infected right lung, 3 had an infected left lung, and 1 had a bilateral infection. In patients infected with M. kansasii, the upper lobes were affected in 22 cases and the lower lobes in 3 cases. In patients infected with M. tuberculosis, the upper, middle, and lower lobes and the lingular segment were affected in 41, 8, 24, and 1 cases, respectively. Upper lobe lesions were seen more frequently in patients with M. kansasii infection than in those with M. tuberculosis infection (p formation was identified more frequently in patients infected with M. kansasii (91.7%) than in those infected with M. tuberculosis (32.3%) (p < 0.001). Cavitary lesions were more frequently localized to the apical, posterior, and apico-posterior regions (S1, S2

  8. Clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of the staging of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Orita, Kunzo

    1987-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative clinical staging of rectal cancer was prospectively studied in 28 patients with macroscopically proven cancer. The CT studies were based on the previously established CT diagnostic criteria for wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastases (N factor), and liver metastases (H factor). When macroscopic findings were used as the standard, the accuracy of CT was 61 % for S factor, 32 % for N factor, and 86 % for H factor. Using histological findings as the standard, the accuracy was 48 % for S factor and 16 % for N factor. Overall, CT had a high accuracy for H factor in all sites of cancer (75 % in the rectosigmoid, 86 % in the area above the peritoneal reflection, and 90 % in the area below the peritoneal reflection). For the other S and N factors, CT seemed to be of limited value in the preoperative diagnosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Comparative study on developmental stages of the clavicle by postmortem MRI and CT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara Tangmose; Lynnerup, Niels; Jensen, K.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The developmental stages of the clavicles are important for forensic age estimation purposes in adolescents. This study compares the 4-stage system to evaluate the ossification of the medial end of the clavicle as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography...... (CT). As several forensic institutes routinely perform CT scans, the large amount of available data may serve as reference sample for MRI in specific cases. Material and methods: This prospective study included an MRI and CT scan of 47 autopsy cases performed prior to medico-legal autopsy (age range...... 12.9-27.5 years). All images were scored in blind trials using a 4-stage system by a trained observer. Results: Intra-observer agreements were substantial within (MRI: K=0.685, CT: K=0.611) and between modalities (K=0.644, p...

  10. Preoperative CT staging of colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Rozanes, I.; Acunas, G.; Sayi, I.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1990-01-01

    28 Patients with colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region) underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography (CT). The CT had a sensitivity of 60 and 67 per cent for detection of extramural invasion, 75 per cent sensitivity and specificity for lymph node metastases and a sensitivity of 87 per cent and specificity of 95 per cent for liver metastases. Compared with the modified Dukes classification, CT correctly staged 50 per cent of the patients with Dukes A lesions; 40 per cent with Dukes B, 75 per cent with Dukes C and 85 per cent with Dukes D lesions. The data presented in this study showed that CT has limitations in the sensitivity and accuracy of staging local colonic carcinoma. However, the authors recommend its use for patients who are clinically suspected of having extensive disease. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. CT staging of renal cell carcinoma: Emphasis on perinephric tumor extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Mun Hwan; Bang, Duk Ja; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    A total of 47 preoperative CT scans in patients with renal cell carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed and compared with surgical findings to assess the accuracy of CT for determining the perinephric tumor extension. CT criteria for perinephric extension were hazy ill-defined tumor margin, perirenal nodule and fascial thickening. Regardless of the tumor stage, the accuracy of CT in detecting perinephric extension was 76.6% (36/47), with a sensitivity of 88.9% (16/18) and specificity of 68.9% (20/29). The cause of understaging (n=2) was microscopic infiltration of the perinephric space. The causes of overstaging were tumor infiltration to the renal capsule (n=5), partial adhesion with the perinephric fat (n=3) and renal vein thrombosis (n=1). A smooth clear tumor margin is highly reliable sign for stage I but infiltrative findings onto renal capsule and perirenal fat could be considered stage I.

  12. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobino, Kazunori, E-mail: tobino@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Gunji, Yoko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Kurumazuka 3-1, Itami, Hyogo 664-0872 (Japan); Kodama, Yuzo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Iwakami, Shin-ichiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni, Shizuoka 410-2295 (Japan); Kikkawa, Mika [Biochemical Research Center, Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Sciences, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the {kappa} statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  13. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobino, Kazunori; Gunji, Yoko; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kodama, Yuzo; Iwakami, Shin-ichiro; Kikkawa, Mika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the κ statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  14. Analysis of uncertainties in Monte Carlo simulated organ and effective dose in chest CT: scanner- and scan-related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muryn, John S.; Morgan, Ashraf G.; Liptak, Chris L.; Dong, Frank F.; Segars, W. Paul; Primak, Andrew N.; Li, Xiang

    2017-04-01

    In Monte Carlo simulation of CT dose, many input parameters are required (e.g. bowtie filter properties and scan start/end location). Our goal was to examine the uncertainties in patient dose when input parameters were inaccurate. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose from a chest CT scan was simulated for an average-size female phantom using a reference set of input parameter values (treated as the truth). Additional simulations were performed in which errors were purposely introduced into the input parameter values. The effects on four dose quantities were analyzed: organ dose (mGy/mAs), effective dose (mSv/mAs), CTDIvol-normalized organ dose (unitless), and DLP-normalized effective dose (mSv/mGy · cm). At 120 kVp, when spectral half value layer deviated from its true value by  ±1.0 mm Al, the four dose quantities had errors of 18%, 7%, 14% and 2%, respectively. None of the dose quantities were affected significantly by errors in photon path length through the graphite section of the bowtie filter; path length error as large as 5 mm produced dose errors of  ⩽2%. In contrast, error of this magnitude in the aluminum section produced dose errors of  ⩽14%. At a total collimation of 38.4 mm, when radiation beam width deviated from its true value by  ±  3 mm, dose errors were  ⩽7%. Errors in tube starting angle had little impact on effective dose (errors  ⩽  1%) however, they produced organ dose errors as high as 66%. When the assumed scan length was longer by 4 cm than the truth, organ dose errors were up to 137%. The corresponding error was 24% for effective dose, but only 3% for DLP-normalized effective dose. Lastly, when the scan isocenter deviated from the patient’s anatomical center by 5 cm, organ and effective dose errors were up 18% and 8%, respectively.

  15. Chest radiography and computed tomography in the evaluation of mediastinal adenopathy in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, O.; Kivisaari, L.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Oksanen, K.; Lappalainen, K.; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital

    1987-01-01

    Thoracic computed tomography (CT) in 232 patients with either primary staging of new or suggested relapsing lymphoma was compared with conventional chest radiography and both were correlated with clinical staging. Particular attention was given to the possibility of reducing routine thoracic CT, which is the current method used in this hospital in all patients with suggested lymphoma. Mediastinal lymphoma was detected by CT in 95 per cent of patients with clinically active mediastinal lymphoma, and by conventional chest radiography in 56 per cent. CT was found to be less reliable in evaluation of the hilar region than in that of other mediastinal areas. No areas of particular difficulty were found chest radiography. CT also provided additional information concerning extra-mediastinal lymph adenopathy and involvement of the thoracic wall and pericardium. Routine thoracic CT examination was considered justifiable in all patients with suggested lymphoma. (orig.)

  16. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieville, Frederic A.; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Berteloot, Laureline; Brunelle, Francis [Necker Children' s Hospital of Paris and University of Paris Descartes, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Grandjean, Albane; Ayestaran, Paul [General Electric Medical Systems Europe, Paris (France); Gudinchet, Francois; Schmidt, Sabine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDI{sub vol} 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  17. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  18. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2015-01-01

    , performance status, BMI, and histopathology. CONCLUSION: Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when...... designing and reporting on clinical trials....

  19. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: An intra-individual comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun, E-mail: circle1128@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Joon, E-mail: mjkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik, E-mail: yooncs58@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Jung, E-mail: mjl1213@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Twenty-six patients (M:F = 13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, P < 0.001), DLP (from 307.42 to 134.51 mGy × cm, P < 0.001), and effective dose (from 4.12 to 1.84 mSv, P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the Routine studies. The objective noise was higher in the paraspinal muscle of the ASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P = 0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P = 0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality.

  20. PET/CT for the staging and follow-up of patients with malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, T.D.; Krause, B.J.; Heusner, T.A.; Boy, C.; Bockisch, A.; Antoch, G.

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) complement each other's strengths in integrated PET/CT. PET is a highly sensitive modality to depict the whole-body distribution of positron-emitting biomarkers indicating tumour metabolic activity. However, conventional PET imaging is lacking detailed anatomical information to precisely localise pathologic findings. CT imaging can readily provide the required morphological data. Thus, integrated PET/CT represents an efficient tool for whole-body staging and functional assessment within one examination. Due to developments in system technology PET/CT devices are continually gaining spatial resolution and imaging speed. Whole-body imaging from the head to the upper thighs is accomplished in less than 20 min. Spatial resolution approaches 2-4 mm. Most PET/CT studies in oncology are performed with 18 F-labelled fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). FDG is a glucose analogue that is taken up and trapped within viable cells. An increased glycolytic activity is a characteristic in many types of cancers resulting in avid accumulation of FDG. These tumours excel as 'hot spots' in FDG-PET/CT imaging. FDG-PET/CT proved to be of high diagnostic value in staging and restaging of different malignant diseases, such as colorectal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, malignant lymphomas, and many more. The standard whole-body coverage simplifies staging and speeds up decision processes to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies. Further development and implementation of new PET-tracers in clinical routine will continually increase the number of PET/CT indications. This promotes PET/CT as the imaging modality of choice for working-up of the most common tumour entities as well as some of the rare malignancies.

  1. Diagnosing and staging of cystic echinococcosis: how do CT and MRI perform in comparison to ultrasound?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging plays the key role in diagnosing and staging of CE. The description of CE-specific imaging features and the WHO CE cyst classification is based on ultrasound. The reproducibility of the ultrasound-defined features of CE cysts is variable in MR- and CT-imaging. This is of particular importance for cysts that are not accessible by US and because of the increasing availability and overuse of CT and MR imaging. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Retrospective analysis of patients with abdominal CE cysts of an interdisciplinary CE clinic who had CT and/or MRI scans performed additionally to US imaging. All images were read and interpreted by the same senior radiologist experienced in the diagnosis of CE. US, CT and MR images were staged according to the WHO classification criteria. The agreement beyond chance was quantified by kappa coefficients (κ. 107 patients with 187 CE cysts met the inclusion criteria. All cysts were assessed by US, 138 by CT, and 125 by MRI. The level of agreement beyond chance of the individual CE stages 1-4 was clearly lower for CT, with κ ranging from 0.62 to 0.72, compared to MRI with values of κ between 0.83 and 1.0. For CE5 cysts CT (κ = 0.95 performed better than MRI (κ = 0.65. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound remains the corner stone of diagnosis, staging and follow up of CE cysts. MRI reproduces the ultrasound-defined features of CE better than CT. If US cannot be performed due to cyst location or patient-specific reasons MRI with heavily T2-weighted series is preferable to CT.

  2. Performance of integrated FDG-PET/contrast-enhanced CT in the staging and restaging of colorectal cancer: Comparison with PET and enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirisamer, Albert; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Floery, Daniel; Wolf, Florian; Beheshti, Mohsen; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Langsteger, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of PET/CT as a one step examination in patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore we proved whether diagnostic PET/CT adds information over PET or contrast-enhanced CT alone for staging or restaging of patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Seventy-three patients (46 males and 27 females; age range: 50-81 years; mean age: 67 years) with known colorectal cancer underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT for staging or restaging. Results: Of the 73 patients 26 patients underwent PET/CT for staging and 47 for restaging. 266 metastases could be detected in 60 patients. Contrast-enhanced PET/CT had a lesion-based sensitivity of 100%, contrast-enhanced CT of 91% and PET of 85%. PET/CT identified 2 lesions as false positive. PET/CT could also reach a patient-based sensitivity of 100%, which was superior to contrast-enhanced CT and PET. Conclusion: Our study clearly demonstrated the added value of contrast-enhanced PET/CT in staging and restaging patients with colorectal cancer over CT and PET alone.

  3. Advantages of 18F FDG-PET/CT over Conventional Staging for Sarcoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zsuzsanna; Boér, Katalin; Borbély, Katalin

    2017-10-09

    The effective management of patients with sarcomas requires accurate diagnosis and staging. Imaging, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most freqently used methods for the detection of the lesion location, size, morphology and structural changes to adjacent tissues; however, these modalities provide little information about tumour biology. MRI is a robust and useful modality in tumour staging of sarcomas, however metabolic-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computer tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) provides greater accuracy to overall staging in combination with MRI [1]. The advantages of 18 F-FDG PET/CT method compared with CT and MRI is that it provides a whole body imaging, maps the viability of the tumour or the metabolic activity of the tissue. Additionally, PET detects the most agressive part of the tumour, demonstrates the biological behaviour of the tumour and therefore has a predictive value. Little data ara available on the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the management of sarcomas. The present manuscript aims to provide a review of the major indications of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosis, staging, restaging and monitoring response to therapy and to compare its usefulness with the conventional imaging modalities in the management of patients with sarcomas.

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... for differentiating and characterizing soft tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  6. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Section for Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [University of Copenhagen, The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoegdall, Claus [University of Copenhagen, Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Engelholm, Svend Aage [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-11-15

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  7. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    . BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized......) in the standard care group (p = 0.04; HR: 0.36 [95% CI: 0.16 to 0.95]). Differences in cardiac death and MI (8 vs. 2) were insignificant (p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: A coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy appears to improve clinical outcome in patients with recent acute-onset chest pain and normal...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  9. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis

  10. Contribution of 18F-FDG PET/CT to Staging of Head and Neck Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Ceylan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Accurate staging of head and neck cancer (HNC plays an important role in patient management as well as protection of functional characteristics of the head and neck region. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT as part of HNC staging to clinical evaluation and treatment planning. Methods: Clinical records of 138 HNC cases who has undergone 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-five cases who had accessible clinical follow-up data were included in the study group, and their PET/CT and conventional imaging findings were evaluated. Results: In the case group with a PET/CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for evaluation of primary lesion the sensitivity rates for PET/CT and MRI were calculated as 91.3% and 82.6%, the positive predictive values (PPV as 91.3% and 82.6%, specificity as 71.4% and 42.8%, and the negative predictive value (NPV as 71.4% and 42.8%, respectively. In terms of metastatic lymph node evaluation, the sensitivity was calculated as 100% and 88.8%, the NPV as 100% and 83.3%, respectively. The PPV and specificity was 100% for both modalities. In the case group with CT for primary lesion evaluation, the sensitivity and PPV were found as 95.2% and 100% for PET/CT, and as 85.7% and 94.7% for CT, respectively. in metastatic lymph node evaluation, the sensitivity was found as 100% for PET/CT and 50% for CT, and the PPV, specificity and NPV were determined as 100% for both methods. PET/CT findings resulted in a change in ‘tumor, node, metastasis’ staging in 5 cases. Conclusions: PET/CT in HNC contributes to staging, thus playing a role in treatment planning, especially in patients with locally advanced disease.

  11. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  12. Integrated FDG PET-CT imaging improves staging in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, S. [Medical Clinic II, Univ. Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Medical Clinic I, Univ. Hospital RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Pauls, S. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, F.M.; Buck, A.K.; Reske, S.N. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Schelzig, H. [Dept. of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Hombach, V. [Medical Clinic II, Univ. Hospital, Ulm (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate, how often TNM staging is changed in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) by the application of integrated PET-CT compared to computed tomography alone and how often these changes are clinically relevant. Patients, methods: We studied 17 patients (68 {+-} 6 years, 8 women) with MPM. Integrated PET-CT scan and histological confirmation were performed in all patients. Results: Final histological diagnosis confirmed 9 epithelial type, 2 sarcomatoid type and 6 biphasic type MPM. Mean standardized uptake value (SUV) was 5.9 {+-} 1.9 in epithelial MPM and 15.1 {+-} 10.2 in sarcomatoid MPM. CT and PET-CT revealed discordances in 8/17 (47%) patients in TNM classification with 4/8 (50%) being clinically relevant. PET-CT led to downstaging in 5 (29%) and upstaging in 3 (18%) patients. Mean survival time tended to be higher in the subgroup of patients with lower mean SUV. Conclusions: PET-CT seems to be a valuable tool in staging of MPM and leads to discordant findings in almost every second patient compared to CT alone. In many cases these differences are clinically relevant and have therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  13. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompel, Oliver; Glöckler, Martin; Janka, Rolf; Dittrich, Sven; Cesnjevar, Robert; Lell, Michael M; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDIvol, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality.

  14. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...... to elucidate the potential value of FDG-PET/CT for staging of CRC. Data were retrieved from 67 consecutive patients (24-84 years) with histopathologically proven CRC who had undergone FDG-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for initial staging. Treatment plans before and after FDG-PET/CT were compared...

  15. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  16. Skeletal metastasis as detected by 18F-FDG PET with negative CT of the PET/CT: Frequency and impact on cancer staging and or management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study is to assess the frequency of detection of PET positive CT negative skeletal metastases (SM and determine the impact of such detection on staging and/or management in patients who had FDG PET/CT as part of the cancer work up.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 2000 18F-FDG PET/CT scans of known cancer patients. A log was kept to record cases of suspected SM with or without bone changes from the low-dose non-contrast CT. The presence or absence of SM was evaluated based on available pathological and clinical data. The impact of detection of such lesions on cancer staging and/or management was evaluated by a board certified oncologist.Results: Of the 2000 cases, 18F-FDG PET/CT suggested SM in 146/2000 (7.3%. Of those 146 cases, 105 (72% were positive on both PET and CT. The remaining 41 (28% had PET positive CT negative bone lesions. SM was confirmed in 36/41 (88% PET positive/CT negative cases. This was based on biopsy, imaging or clinical follow-up. The detection of PET positive CT negative SM did not change staging or management in 7/36 (19.4%. However, staging and/or management was affected in 29/36 (80.6%. Conclusions: SM is not uncommon in 18F-FDG PET/CT, as it accounts for 146/2000 (7.3% of cases. PET demonstrated FDG-avid SM without a CT abnormality in at least 36/146 (25%. Patients staging and or management changed in 29/36 (80.5%. We concluded that 18F-FDG PET is sensitive in detection of SM with significant impact on staging & or management. Key words18F-FDG PET/CT, Skeletal metastasis, PET positive, CT negative

  17. PET/CT in staging of the high risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergero, M.A.; David, C.; Dipatto, F.; Popeneciu, V.; Ríos, L.; Faccio, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the last decade multimodal management of the high risk prostate cancer (HRPC) is a therapeutic option in selected patients and the staging of these patients depends on the current diagnostic methods (DM) which have low diagnostic accuracy for detecting metastasis (MTS). The positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) would have a greater diagnostic accuracy and it is presented as a better DM for staging prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this article is present 2 patients in whom PET/CT modified the therapeutic decision and conduct a literature review. Materials and methods: 2 patients with HRPC who performed PET/CT and it modified the therapeutic behavior were described and a systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, Embase, SciELO and Cochrane answering the question: has PET/CT a place in HRPC staging? Results: TPET/CT has a sensitivity and specificity between 19% to 100% and 67% to 98,5 %, respectively, in assessing nodal involvement by PC and between 84% to 96% and 92.3% to 100%, respectively, in assessing bone involvement by PC. Besides PET/CT allowed to modify the therapeutic behavior between 20% to 40% of the patients with PC. Conclusions: PET/CT has good specificity and moderate sensitivity for detecting lymph node MTS and good sensitivity and specificity for detecting bone MTS. Besides PET/CT modified the therapeutic behavior in 1/3 of cases and it allowed us to modify the therapeutic behavior in our series. (authors) [es

  18. Can diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI replace contrast-enhanced CT for initial staging of Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regacini, Rodrigo; Puchnick, Andrea; Luisi, Flavio Augusto Vercillo; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2018-01-23

    Although positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT) has been recommended as the method of choice for lymphoma staging, it has limited availability in several countries, therefore, studies comparing whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to conventional staging methods or to FDG-PET/CT are an important tool to establish whole-body MRI as an alternative to these methods. To compare whole-body MRI versus conventional imaging methods for staging of Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents. The study included 22 patients ages 5 to 21 years. Staging was performed using conventional imaging methods and whole-body MRI. Conventional imaging methods were defined as computed tomography (CT) of the neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis and ultrasonography of the neck and/or abdomen. We calculated the sensitivity of these methods for Hodgkin lymphoma staging and their sensitivity and specificity for detecting sites of nodal and extranodal involvement. The sensitivity of whole-body MRI for Hodgkin lymphoma staging was superior to that of conventional imaging methods (95.5% vs. 86.4%, respectively), but both methods had similar sensitivity and specificity for detecting involvement of nodal sites (99.1% and 100% vs. 97.3% and 100%, respectively) and extranodal sites (90.5% and 98.7% vs. 90.5% and 99.4%, respectively). Whole-body MRI has excellent sensitivity for staging of Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents. It can thus be considered an alternative for this purpose, particularly because it does not expose patients to ionizing radiation.

  19. Modification of staging and treatment of head and neck cancer by FDG-PET/CT prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyuk, A.; University Hospital Dresden; Appold, S.; Zoephel, K.; Baumann, M.; University Hospital Dresden; Abolmaali, N.; University Hospital Dresden

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reliable tumor staging is a fundamental pre-requisite for efficient tumor therapy and further prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare head and neck cancer (HNC) staging before and after FDG-PET/CT, evaluating the stage modifications for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Patients and methods: A total of 102 patients with untreated primary HNC, who underwent conventional staging and staging including FDG-PET/CT before RT, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Blinded pre-FDG-PET/CT and post-FDG-PET/CT staging data were compared. The impact on patient management was tested by comparing the intention before and after FDG-PET/CT. Results: Significant modifications of T, N, and M stage as well as clinical stage were detected after inclusion of FDG-PET/CT data (p = 0.002, 0.0006, 0.001, 0.03, respectively). Overall, the implementation of FDG-PET/CT led to modification of RT intention decision in 14 patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT demonstrates essential influence on tumor staging in HNC patients scheduled for irradiation. Implementation of FDG-PET/CT in imaging protocol improves selection of candidates for curative and palliative RT and allows further optimization of treatment management and therapy intention. (orig.)

  20. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion Area-Detector CT: Preliminary Comparison of Diagnostic Performance for N Stage Assessment With FDG PET/CT in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sugihara, Naoki; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The objective of our study was to directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and FDG PET/CT for differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Seventy-seven consecutive patients, 45 men (mean age ± SD, 70.4 ± 5.9 years) and 32 women (71.2 ± 7.7 years), underwent dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT at two or three different positions for covering the entire thorax, FDG PET/CT, surgical treatment, and pathologic examination. From all ADCT data for each of the subjects, a whole-chest perfusion map was computationally generated using the dual- and single-input maximum slope and Patlak plot methods. For quantitative N stage assessment, perfusion parameters and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) for each lymph node were determined by measuring the relevant ROI. ROC curve analyses were performed for comparing the diagnostic capability of each of the methods on a per-node basis. N stages evaluated by each of the indexes were then statistically compared with the final pathologic diagnosis by means of chi-square and kappa statistics. The area under the ROC curve (A z ) values of systemic arterial perfusion (A z = 0.89), permeability surface (A z = 0.78), and SUV max (A z = 0.85) were significantly larger than the A z values of total perfusion (A z = 0.70, p perfusion calculated using the dual-input maximum slope model was substantial (κ = 0.70, p perfusion ADCT is as useful as FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with NSCLC.

  2. Projected Effects of Radiation-Induced Cancers on Life Expectancy in Patients Undergoing CT Surveillance for Limited-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Kathryn P; Turan, Ekin A; Eisenberg, Jonathan; Kong, Chung Y; Barnes, Jeffrey A; Pandharipande, Pari Vijay

    2015-06-01

    Patients with limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergo frequent posttreatment surveillance CT examinations, raising concerns about the cumulative magnitude of radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to project radiation-induced cancer risks relative to competing risks of HL and account for the differential timing of each. We adapted a previously developed Markov model to project lifetime mortality risks and life expectancy losses due to HL versus radiation-induced cancers in HL patients undergoing surveillance CT. In the base case, we modeled 35-year-old men and women undergoing seven CT examinations of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis over 5 years. Radiation-induced cancer risks and deaths for 17 organ systems were modeled using an organ-specific approach, accounting for specific anatomy exposed at CT. Cohorts of 20-, 50-, and 65-year-old men and women were evaluated in secondary analyses. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty of radiation risk projections. For 35-year-old adults, we projected 3324/100,000 (men) and 3345/100,000 (women) deaths from recurrent lymphoma and 245/100,000 (men, 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 121-369) and 317/100,000 (women, 95% UI: 202-432) radiation-induced cancer deaths. Discrepancies in life expectancy losses between HL (428 days in men, 482 days in women) and radiation-induced cancers (11.6 days in men, [95% UI: 5.7-17.5], 15.6 days in women [95% UI: 9.8-21.4]) were proportionately greater because of the delayed timing of radiation-induced cancers relative to recurrent HL. Deaths and life expectancy losses from radiation-induced cancers were highest in the youngest cohorts. Given the low rate of radiation-induced cancer deaths associated with CT surveillance, modest CT benefits would justify its use in patients with limited-stage HL.

  3. Application of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT in diagnosing and staging gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wenzhou; Yu Jieping; Li Jun; Liu Changsheng; Zheng Xiaohua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore helical CT characteristics of gastric cancer and evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT(HHCT)in staging gastric cancer. Methods: The CT images of S0 patients with gastric cancer were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic findings at surgery. All patients were preoperatively imaged by plain and contrast-enhanced HHCT 30 rain after drinking S00-1000 ml water. Peristalsis was minimized by intravenously administered spasmolytics. Results: The characteristic findings of gastric carcer on CT images were focal or diffuse mural thickening, soft tissue masses, cancerous ulcers, stenosis of stomach, infiltration to adjacent tissues, lymph node metastasis and distant metastases. Strong contrast enhancement of the gastric wall was firmly related to gastric carcer. The foci of gastric carcer mainly located at the gastric cardia and gastric antrum, and became more prominent in contrast-enhanced HHCT than in plain HHCT.The accurate rate of contrast-enhanced HHCT for staging gastric carcer was 86% (43/50), and the detection rate of lymph node metastases by CT was 60% (12/20). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced HHCT is a reliable method for diagnosing and staging gastric carcer. It is a useful guide for surgeons to plan the best treatment for patients with gastric cancer. (authors)

  4. Rare case of Primary Pulmonary Extranodal Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in a Patient with Sjogrens Syndrome: Role of FDG-PET/CT in the Initial Staging and Evaluating Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca G. Bural

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year old woman with a long standing Sjogren’s syndrome was undergoing evaluation for renal transplant surgery when two pulmonary opacities were detected on chest CT. Subsequent biopsy revealed extranodal marginal B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. An FDG-PET/CT scan was then performed which demonstrated isolated FDG avid pulmonary involvement. After therapy, FDG-PET/CT scans showed good response to treatment with near complete resolution of FDG avidity. This rare case illustrates the rare pulmonary manifestation of extranodal lymphoma in a patient with Sjogren’s syndrome and emphasizes the value of FDG PET/CT in the initial staging and evaluation of response to treatment, which has not previously been published. (MIRT 2012;21:117-120

  5. Positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose in the staging and follow-up of lymphoma in the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangerter, M.; Griesshammer, M.; Bergmann, L. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medicine 3; Kotzerke, J.; Reske, S.N. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin; Elsner, K. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in predicting lymphomatous involvement in the hilar and mediastinal regions in the staging and follow-up ofpatients with malignant lymphoma. One hundred forty-seven thoracic PET studies in 89 consecutive lymphoma patients were reviewed. Static FDG-PET imaging was performed following application of 270 MBq FDG (mean). Results of FDG-PET were compared with the findings of computed tomography (CT) in all patients and clinical follow-up examination. Eighty-nine of 147 (60%) PET studies showed no FDG uptake in the hilar or mediastinal regions, while 58 (40%) studied did detect FDG uptake in these regions. In 52 of 58 abnormal studies (90%), lymphomatous involvement of the hilar and/or mediastinal regions seen by CT was present. In the remaining six abnormal PET studies (10%), FDG uptake was considered as false-positive because of missing lesions on corresponding CT scans. In four patients false-positive FDG uptake was observed before treatment, in two patients after completion of therapy. In these two patients FDG uptake after therapy was caused by thymus hyperplasia. The remaining four cases before treatment remained unresolved. Sensitivity of FDG-PET was 96%, specificity 94%, positive predictive value 90%, and negative predictive value 98%, respectively. The present study suggests that FDG-PET has potential value in predicting lymphomatous involvement in the hilar and mediastinal regions. FDG-PET may obviate invasive diagnostic procedures in patients with lymphoma. (orig.)

  6. Positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose in the staging and follow-up of lymphoma in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, M.; Griesshammer, M.; Bergmann, L.; Kotzerke, J.; Reske, S.N.; Elsner, K.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in predicting lymphomatous involvement in the hilar and mediastinal regions in the staging and follow-up of patients with malignant lymphoma. One hundred forty-seven thoracic PET studies in 89 consecutive lymphoma patients were reviewed. Static FDG-PET imaging was performed following application of 270 MBq FDG (mean). Results of FDG-PET were compared with the findings of computed tomography (CT) in all patients and clinical follow-up examination. Eighty-nine of 147 (60%) PET studies showed no FDG uptake in the hilar or mediastinal regions, while 58 (40%) studied did detect FDG uptake in these regions. In 52 of 58 abnormal studies (90%), lymphomatous involvement of the hilar and/or mediastinal regions seen by CT was present. In the remaining six abnormal PET studies (10%), FDG uptake was considered as false-positive because of missing lesions on corresponding CT scans. In four patients false-positive FDG uptake was observed before treatment, in two patients after completion of therapy. In these two patients FDG uptake after therapy was caused by thymus hyperplasia. The remaining four cases before treatment remained unresolved. Sensitivity of FDG-PET was 96%, specificity 94%, positive predictive value 90%, and negative predictive value 98%, respectively. The present study suggests that FDG-PET has potential value in predicting lymphomatous involvement in the hilar and mediastinal regions. FDG-PET may obviate invasive diagnostic procedures in patients with lymphoma. (orig.)

  7. 18F FDG PET/CT for staging of colorectal carcinoma - literature review and case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilcheva, M.; Hadzhiyska, V.; Petrov, T.; Mladenov, K.; Malla, V.; Zlatareva, D.; Nedevska, M.; Neychev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. The role of PET/CT in initial diagnosis of primary colorectal cancer is limited. PET is used for restaging of colorectal carcinoma or for evaluating the hepatic and pulmonary metastasis. On the other hand, MRI is used for T- and N- staging and also in the evaluation of liver metastasis. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the capabilities of the imaging modalities (PET/CT and MRI) as well as to show the importance of collaborative work of the units to determine the correct therapeutic decision. In this case, we present a 63 years old patient with rectal carcinoma. Confirmation of the disease was proven using colonoscopy and biopsy. Then we perform FDG-PET/CT on a GE Discovery 16T according to a standard protocol, using diuretic stimulation and oral contrast intake, followed by 3Tesla MRI of the abdomen and pelvis with intravenous contrast. PET/CT: data on metabolic active tumor formation in the recto-sigmoid region, liver dissemination and lesion near the navel as well as the presence of two metabolically active peritoneal lesions of small size. MRI: Rectal tumor data with a suspected infiltration of the wall of the ileum and bladder as well as dissemination in the liver and abdominal wall. Additionally, there was a thrombosis of the left branch of the portal vein. By applying both methods it is possible to accurately stage the disease and choose the most appropriate therapeutic behavior. Our impressions of the application of the two imaging methods PET/CT and MRI matches the science publications that each one has a specific application, capabilities and advantages. For example, PET/CT provide sufficient functional and morphological information for the initial staging and also for the peritoneal lesions, which are identified as non-specific and non-definite in MRI. On the other hand, after MRI we receive detailed information for the anatomic and topographic characteristic of the major tumor formation

  8. The predictive value of CT signs in the early and subacute stages of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkowa, J.; Kowalewski, K.; Filarski, J.; Sasiadek, M.; Sokolowska, D.; Podemski, R.; Guranski, K.

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), despite the development of new imaging methods like diffusion-weighted MR and perfusion MR, is usually the initial examination procedure in stroke patients. However, the predictive value of early CT signs in ischaemic stroke has not been established yet. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the clinical significance of CT findings in the early and subacute stages of the ischaemic stroke. Thirty-five patients with ischaemic stroke of middle cerebral artery territory had CT studies performed within 18 hours after ictus and on the 5th day. Following CT signs were analyzed: the extent of hypodensity and mass effect (both calculated using our own method), obscuring of the lentiform and caudate nuclei, as well as the insular ribbon, Sylvian fissure and lateral ventricle compression, ventricular displacement, and hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS). The results were compared statistically with clinical scorings at admission and on day 30. Among the early CT signs only lentiform nucleus obscuring was correlated with both early and the late clinical scales. Caudate nucleus obscuring, Sylvian fissure compression and mass effect extent were correlated with early clinical scoring only, while lateral ventricle compression with the late clinical scale. Other findings affected neither early nor late clinical scorings. Most of the follow-up CT symptoms showed a strong correlation with the late clinical scoring, with an exception of Sylvian fissure compression and HMCAS. Early CT has limited predictive value in assessing stroke patients. The only statistically significant signs are lentiform nucleus obscuring and ventricular compression. However, most subacute CT findings have high predictive value. (author)

  9. Diagnosis and staging of carcinoma localized in the antral part of the stomach with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Grudeva, V.; Mlachkova, D.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize CT images and stages of carcinomas localized in the antral part of the stomach obtained with spiral CT. Seven men aged from 54 years old to 81 years old inclusive, with subjective complaints and clinical suspicion of a neoplasm in the upper gastrointestinal tract were examine Examinations were performed following stomach wall re relaxation with Buscolysin.The stomach is distended by drinking 600 ml of water. Upper abdomen scans were performed with spiral CT/e General Electric with the following parameters: slice thickness 3-5 mm, spacing 3 mm, pitch 1,5, reconstruction index 3 mm. After the pre-contrast scans, 100 ml of non-ionic contrast media is administered intravenously with an injection rate of 30 ml/sec. Scan delay time - 30 seconds after start of injection. Exposition data-120 kV, 180 mAs. Carcinoma localized in the antral part of the stomach was demonstrated in 7 patients. The staging showed: I stage - one patient, II stage - 2, III stage - 1 and IV stage - three patients. According to the macro morphological characteristic: exophytic type - 4, endophytic tumor - 1, ulcerous tumor - 1 and early carcinoma - 1 patient. In our material only male patients were present. Early carcinoma was demonstrated in a male patient at an age of 80 years old. An enhancing nodular local thickness was visualized. Differential diagnosis between malignant and benign ulcer is necessary in certain cases. It is performed on the contrast scans, the malignant process enhances twice its density, When performing a purposive CT examination it is possible to diagnose neoplasms in the antral part of the stomach, from stage i to IV with different macro morphologic characteristic

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism: chest radiograph and CT evaluation before and after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.C.; Kauczor, H.U.; Schild, H.H.; Renner, C.; Kirchhoff, E.; Lang, P.; Iversen, S.; Thelen, M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of morphometric data on conventional radiography and CT predicting the presence and degree of pulmonary hypertension and to assess the reversibility after surgery. On preoperative X-ray films and CT scans of 50 patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic thromboembolism, we measured the cardiothoracic ratio, basal diameter, length of cardiac contact to sternum, pulmonary trunk, right and left descending pulmonary artery, and the septum angle. These data were correlated with pulmonary arterial pressure. In 14 X-ray patients and 18 CT patients, with follow-up after surgical thromboendarterectomy the reversibility of these changes was assessed. A dilated pulmonary trunk was the most common abnormality (96% each on X-ray and CT). Pulmonary arteries were dilated on X-ray in 40% (right) and 14% (left), and on CT in 92% (right) and 96% (left). The best correlation with mean arterial pressure was found measuring the pulmonary trunk on CT (r=0.43, p<0.01). After surgery, reversibility was most significant for the pulmonary trunk on CT (p<0.0001). In patients with chronic pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension can best be predicted by assessing the diameter of the pulmonary trunk both on X-ray and CT. No close correlation is present between the extent of any parameter and the level of the pulmonary pressure. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of spiral CT in staging of colon and rectum carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundt, W.; Braunschweig, R.; Reiser, M.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the capability of a subsecond spiral-CT scanner using two contrast medium phases in staging of colorectal cancer. In our study we included 37 patients with proven rectum or colon carcinoma. Spiral CT was performed following tap-water enema of the colon in the arterial and venous phases of contrast medium enhancement. Our results were compared with the findings of pathological examination after surgery. The tumor's size and extension were evaluated in the arterial and venous phases, the lymph nodes in the venous phase of the CT scan. The tumor was in the rectum (n = 14), sigma (n = 11), descending colon (n = 6), and cecum (n = 6). Two-phase spiral CT had a sensitivity of 97.2 % in the arterial phase and 89.1 % in the venous phase in detecting the carcinoma. The staging results were in the arterial phase in 30 of 37 cases (81.0 %) and in the venous phase in 24 of 37 cases (64.8 %) according to pathology. In 27 of 32 patients (84.3 %) lymph nodes were detected. The correct classification of the N-stage was possible in 23 of 34 cases (67.6 %). The combined use of arterial and venous phases in staging of colorectal cancer can improve the T- and N-stage classification in comparison with using only one contrast medium phase. The arterial phase is superior compared with the venous phase for local tumor staging and the venous phase is used for lymph node assessment. (orig.) (orig.)

  13. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wilson, Gareth A.; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Constantin, Tudor; Salari, Raheleh; Le Quesne, John; Moore, David A; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Rosenthal, Rachel; Marafioti, Teresa; Kirkizlar, Eser; Watkins, Thomas B K; McGranahan, Nicholas; Ward, Sophia

    2017-01-01

    Summary The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evol...

  14. The correlation of preoperative CT, MR imaging, and clinical staging (FIGO) with histopathology findings in primary cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepens, E.; Corthouts, B.; Beeck, B.O. de; Parizel, P.M.; De Schepper, A.M.; Tjalma, W.; Marck, E. van

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the preoperative findings of abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI with the preoperative clinical International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) staging and postoperative pathology report in patients with primary cancer of the cervix. Thirty-six patients with surgical-pathological proven primary cancer of the cervix were retrospectively studied for preoperative staging by clinical examination, CT, and MR imaging. Studied parameters for preoperative staging were the presence of tumor, tumor extension into the parametrial tissue, pelvic wall, adjacent organs, and lymph nodes. The CT was performed in 32 patients and MRI (T1- and T2-weighted images) in 29 patients. The CT and MR staging were based on the FIGO staging system. Results were compared with histological findings. The group is consisted of stage 0 (in situ):1, Ia:1, Ib:8, IIa:2, IIb:12, IIIa:4, IVa:6, and IVb:2 patients. The overall accuracy of staging for clinical examination, CT, and MRI was 47, 53, and 86%, respectively. The MRI incorrectly staged 2 patients and did not visualize only two tumors; one was an in situ (stage-0) and one stage-Ia (microscopic) disease. The MRI is more accurate than CT and they are both superior to clinical examination in evaluating the locoregional extension and preoperative staging of primary cancer of the cervix. (orig.)

  15. The role of CT and endoscopic ultrasound in pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kala, Zdenek [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 639 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zdkala@tiscali.cz; Valek, Vlastimil [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 639 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Hlavsa, Jan [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 639 00 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: hlavsjan@seznam.cz; Hana, Kyselova [Department of Radiology, St. Annas Faculty Hospital, Pekarska 53, 656 91 Brno (Czech Republic); Vanova, Anna [Pedagogical Faculty of Masaryk University, Porici 9, 603 00 (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to compare the accuracy of computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer. Methods: Comparative retrospective study of 86 patients with pancreatic cancer. CT was done in 55 patients, 41 patients were examined by EUS. Each patient underwent surgery and had proven pancreatic cancer by histology. CT and EUS results were correlated to per-operative and histological findings. The main attention was paid to the description of peri-pancreatic lymphadenopathy, para-aortic lymphadenopathy, peri-coeliac lymphadenopathy and tumor relationship to superior mesenteric vein, superior mesenteric artery, portal vein, inferior caval vein and common hepatic artery. A description rate was defined as number of pre-operative findings where the structures and relationships mentioned above were described. Results: The description rates of peri-pancreatic lymph nodes were 11 (20%) at CT and 36 (88.0%) at EUS. Para-aortic lymphadenopathy was described in 9 (16.0%) cases at CT and none at EUS. Peri-coeliac lymphadenopathy was mentioned only one time (2.0%) at CT contrary to 12 (29.0%) at EUS. Relationship of the tumor to the mesenteric vessels was well depicted in nine (16.0%) at CT versus nine (22.0%) at EUS. Portal vein relationship was well described in two (4.0%) at CT and seven (17%) cases at EUS. This description rate in vena cava inferior was one (2%) at CT and three (7.0%) at EUS, in hepatic artery it was one (2%) at CT and six (15%) at EUS. In the group of CT, resectability or non-resectability were well predicted in 33 (60%) patients and wrong predicted in 22 (40%) patients. In the group of EUS, resectability or non-resectability were well predicted in 34 (83%) patients and wrong predicted in 7 (17%) patients. Conclusion: According to our study, EUS is more accurate in prediction of local PC resectability than CT.

  16. Spontaneous obliteration of right ventricular pseudoaneurysm after blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and follow-up with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Kyung; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Right ventricular (RV) pseudoaneurysm caused by trauma is very rare. We report a case of RV pseudoaneurysm which resolved without surgical treatment in a patient who survived a falling accident. Echocardiography failed to identify the pseudoaneurysm. Electrocardiography-gated CT showed a 17-mm-sized saccular pseusoaneurysm arsing from the RV outflow tract with a narrow neck. Follow-up CT after two months showed spontaneous obliteration of the lesion.

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  18. Stage T3a renal cell carcinoma: staging accuracy of CT for sinus fat, perinephric fat or renal vein invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhi, H K; Mok, W Y; Patel, U

    2015-01-01

    To study the accuracy of CT for staging T3a (TNM 2009) renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Unenhanced and nephrographic phase CT studies of 117 patients (male:female = 82:35; age range, 21-86 years) with T1-T3a RCC were independently reviewed by 2 readers. The presence of sinus or perinephric fat, or renal vein invasion and tumour characteristics were noted. Median (range) tumour size was 5.5 (0.9-19.0) cm; and 46 (39%), 16 (14%) and 55 (47%) tumours were pT1, pT2 and pT3a RCC, respectively. The sensitivity/specificity for sinus fat, perinephric fat and renal vein invasion were 71/79%, 83/76% and 59/93% (Reader 1) and 88/71%, 68/72% and 69/91% (Reader 2) with κ = 0.41, 0.43 and 0.61, respectively. Sinus fat invasion was seen in 47/55 (85%) cases with T3a RCC vs 16/55 (29%) and 33/55 (60%) for perinephric fat and renal vein invasion. Tumour necrosis, irregularity of tumour edge and direct tumour contact with perirenal fascia or sinus fat increased the odds of local invasion [odds ratio (OR), 2.5-3.7; p fat invasion was the most common invasive feature. Centrally situated renal tumours with an irregular tumour edge, inseparable from sinus structures or the perirenal fascia and CT features of tumour necrosis should alert the reader to the possibility of Stage T3a RCC (OR, 2.5-3.9).

  19. Influence of 'optical illusion' on the detectability of pneumothorax in diagnosis for chest CT images. Substantiation by visual psychological simulation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    Some cases have been reported in which an optical illusion of lightness perception influences the detectability in diagnosis of low-density hematoma in head CT images in addition to the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain. Therefore, in this study, the author attempted to compare the detectability in diagnosis for chest images with pneumothorax using visual subjective evaluation, and investigated the influence of optical illusion on that detectability in diagnosis. Results indicated that in the window setting of lung, on such an occasion when the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax forms a crescent or the reduced lung borders on the chest-wall, an optical illusion in which the visual impression on the difference of the film contrast between the lung and the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax was psychologically emphasized when contrast was observed. In all cases the detectability in diagnosis for original images with the white thorax and mediastinum was superior to virtual images. Further, in case of the virtual double window setting of lung, thorax, and mediastinum, under the influence of the difference in the radiological anatomy of thorax and mediastinum as a result of the grouping theories of lightness computation, an optical illusion different from the original images was observed. (author)

  20. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Eunsol; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2015-01-01

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P 25-75% , RV and RV/TLC, and was comparable to Exp -856 and the E/I ratio of MLD. The ATI of emphysema and hyperinflated areas on CT showed better correlation than the normal lung area with PFT parameters. Detailed analysis of density change at inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. (orig.)

  1. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Eunsol; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2015-02-01

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. • COPD patients show significant air trapping in the lung. • The air trapping index is a comparable parameter to other CT indices. • Air trapping of emphysema and hyperinflated lung areas relates to functional loss. • The emphysema area changes more, with less air trapping than other areas.

  2. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Eunsol; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Jeon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-14

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P < 0.05). The ATI showed a higher correlation than EI with FEF{sub 25-75%}, RV and RV/TLC, and was comparable to Exp -856 and the E/I ratio of MLD. The ATI of emphysema and hyperinflated areas on CT showed better correlation than the normal lung area with PFT parameters. Detailed analysis of density change at inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. (orig.)

  3. Radiological staging of ovarian cancer: imaging findings and contribution of CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Universitaetsinstitut fuer Radiodiagnostik, Salzburg (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal among the gynecologic malignancies with approximately 70% of patients presenting with advanced tumor stage. The prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer is directly related to the tumor stage and residual tumor burden after cytoreductive surgery. Exploratory laparotomy has been the cornerstone in the management of ovarian cancer, as it offers staging and tumor debulking. Understaging at initial laparotomy, however, is a problem in up to 30%, mainly due to insufficient technique and unexpected peritoneal spread outside the pelvis. Sites difficult to assess intraoperatively including the posterior aspect of the liver and the dome of the diaphragm can be well demonstrated with multiplanar imaging. CT and alternatively MRI have been accepted as adjunct imaging modalities for preoperative staging ovarian cancer. Of these, multidetector CT is the imaging modality of choice for staging ovarian cancer. In a multidisciplinary team approach patient management may be guided towards an individualized treatment plan. The contribution of imaging includes (1) surgery planning including referral practice, (2) selection of candidates for primary chemotherapy by demonstration of non (optimally) resectable disease, and (3) tissue sampling in peritoneal carcinomatosis. (orig.)

  4. A novel supervised approach for segmentation of lung parenchyma from chest CT for computer-aided diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanayagam, Shiloah Elizabeth; Harichandran, Khanna Nehemiah; Cyril, Sunil Retmin Raj; Arputharaj, Kannan

    2013-06-01

    Segmentation of lung parenchyma from the chest computed tomography is an important task in analysis of chest computed tomography for diagnosis of lung disorders. It is a challenging task especially in the presence of peripherally placed pathology bearing regions. In this work, we propose a segmentation approach to segment lung parenchyma from chest. The first step is to segment the lungs using iterative thresholding followed by morphological operations. If the two lungs are not separated, the lung junction and its neighborhood are identified and local thresholding is applied. The second step is to extract shape features of the two lungs. The third step is to use a multilayer feed forward neural network to determine if the segmented lung parenchyma is complete, based on the extracted features. The final step is to reconstruct the two lungs in case of incomplete segmentation, by exploiting the fact that in majority of the cases, at least one of the two lungs would have been segmented correctly by the first step. Hence, the complete lung is determined based on the shape and region properties and the incomplete lung is reconstructed by applying graphical methods, namely, reflection and translation. The proposed approach has been tested in a computer-aided diagnosis system for diagnosis of lung disorders, namely, bronchiectasis, tuberculosis, and pneumonia. An accuracy of 97.37 % has been achieved by the proposed approach whereas the conventional thresholding approach was unable to detect peripheral pathology-bearing regions. The results obtained prove to be better than that achieved using conventional thresholding and morphological operations.

  5. The chest features of patients with the novel influenza type A H1N1 on high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yuxin; Li Shujuan; Zhou Su; Shi Suodi; Zhang Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the chest features of patients with the novel influenza type A H1N1 on HRCT. Methods: One hundred and seventy-two chest HRCT examinations on 163 cases with Influenza type A H1N1 (9 cases were reexamed) were retrospectively analyzed using standard pulmonary window and mediastinal window, respectively. HRCT imaging appearances were summarized. Results: Ninety-seven cases showed normal on chest HRCT, while the others showed abnormalities of parenchymal and interstitial. Among them, HRCT identified ground-glass opacity in 35 cases (53.0%), centrilobular nodules in 30 cases (45.5%), thickening of intralobular septa in 31 cases (47.0%), intralobular thin reticulation and micro-nodule in 8 cases (12.1%), single-lobular inflammation in 19 cases (28.8%), consolidation of lung (the large consolidation and multiple small consolidations) in 15 cases (22.7%), pulmonary atelectasis in 3 cases (4.5%), and irregular lines in 2 cases (3.0%). Pleurisy was also revealed including 8 cases with right pleurisy, 5 cases with left pleurisy, 5 cases with left pleurisy, and 19 cases with bilateral pleurisy. Mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy were found in 7 cases, who were spared of pleural effusion. All above abnormalities resolved quickly after anti-virus treatment. Conclusion: Parenchymal and interstitial abnormalities, mediastinum and axillary fossa lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion were the common findings on HRCT in patients with Influenza type A H1N1, which were similar to those of other viral pneumonia. (authors)

  6. Diagnosis and staging of pancreatic carcinoma: MRI versus multislice-CT - A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenacher, L.; Klauss, M.; Duex, M.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.; Dukic, L.; Delorme, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Knaebel, H.P.; Buechler, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice-CT versus MRI in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic carcinoma in a prospective multi-reader analysis. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma underwent both multislice-CT (4-Row, 'hydro-technique') and state-of-the-art MRI (two 1.5 T units). In correlation with histopathologic findings or in case of a non-lesion diagnosis by follow-up (6-month interval), we evaluated MRI versus CT in a multi-reader analysis (2 reader pairs) for: 1. diagnostic quality; 2. examination time; 3. accuracy of potential respectability; 4. kappa analysis of observer variations; and 5. overall diagnostic reliability. Results: A total of 28 lesions (n=22 malignant, n=6 benign) were present in the cohort group versus 22 patients without a focal lesion (n=10 pancreatitis, n=12 no tumor). For lesion detection, CT had a sensitivity of 100/89% (reader pair 1/2) and specificity of 77%, and MRI had a sensitivity of 75/89% and specificity of 77/73%. For the subgroup of adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (n=17), we found a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 61% for CT versus a sensitivity of 82/94% and a specificity of 67/61% for MRI. The accuracy for determining the resectability was 91/82% for CT and 90/82% for MRI. The kappa analysis showed a good correlation for CT (0.71) and a moderate correlation of both groups for MRI (0.49). Conclusion: CT and MRI showed comparable results in the detection of pancreatic carcinomas as well as in the determination of resectability. Chronic pancreatitis as a 'tumor-like-lesion' was the major factor of a missed diagnosis. The results of multi-reader analysis for both reading groups were almost identical with a moderate to good kappa correlation. There is no reason to prefer MRI (more expensive) over CT for patients with the presumptive diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (orig.)

  7. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  8. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  9. Use of spiral CT in demonstrating early carcinoma of the stomach - I stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this lecture is to provide practical information about the methodology and technique of spiral computed tomography, which provide maximum diagnostic efficiency in early gastric cancer - I stage, and to present the semiotics of CT images seen in early gastric cancer stage I - a own and literature data. Methodology of the study covers optimal drug muscle relaxation of the abdominal wall by injection of 2 sg buskolizin intravenous; maximum distension of the stomach lumen by ingestion of 3 effervescent disintegrated tablets Vit. C with 1-2 sips of water, necessarily using of non-ionic contrast media - 100 ml / 300 mg iodine / 1 ml liquid bolus introduced for 30 seconds. Start scanning - 30 seconds of the start of injection - to visualize the arterial phase, use of slices with a thickness of 3 mm and 2 mm interval; exponential data 120 kV, 160 mAc. Earlier form of gastric cancer have to be presented by 5 CT image: unequal unsmooth, scallop or polycyclic contours of the lining, thinning the complete disappearance of the lining; undulating thickening of the lining; nodal formation like a polyp on a broad basis with a 2-5 mm, double contour of the lining - like a wave. These amendments are localized only in a limited segment of the gastric mucosa. Spiral CT is an effective diagnostic performance in gastric cancer, including the early stage I of cancer development. This is realized only by using the specific methodology of the study as well as good knowledge of the CT images semiology for carcinoma, localized only within a certain perimeter of the stomach lining

  10. Diagnostic value of multidetector row CT in rectal cancer staging: comparison of multiplanar and axial images with histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.; Verma, R.; Rajesh, A.; Richards, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is widely used for rectal cancer staging, many centres in the UK perform computed tomography (CT) for staging rectal cancer at present. Furthermore in a small proportion of cases contraindications to MR imaging may lead to staging using CT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of current generation multidetector row CT (MDCT) in local staging of rectal cancer. In particular the accuracy of multiplanar (MPR) versus axial images in the staging of rectal cancer was assessed. Material and methods: Sixty-nine consecutive patients were identified who had undergone staging of rectal cancer on CT. The imaging data were reviewed as axial images and then as MPR images (coronal and sagittal) perpendicular and parallel to the tumour axis. CT staging on axial and MPR images was then compared to histopathological staging. Results: MPR images detected more T4 and T3 stage tumours than axial images alone. The overall accuracy of T-staging on MPR images was 87.1% versus 73.0% for axial images alone. The overall accuracy of N staging on MPR versus axial images was 84.8% versus 70.7%. There was a statistically significant difference in the staging of T3 tumours between MPR and axial images (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Multidetector row CT has high accuracy for local staging of rectal cancer. Addition of MPR images to standard axial images provides higher accuracy rates for T and N staging of rectal cancer than axial images alone

  11. FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and target volume delineation in conformal radiotherapy of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Milia, Maria E; Turri, Lucia; Mones, Eleonora; Bassi, Maria C; Cannillo, Barbara; Deantonio, Letizia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Brambilla, Marco

    2010-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT imaging has an emerging role in staging and treatment planning of various tumor locations and a number of literature studies show that also the carcinoma of the anal canal may benefit from this diagnostic approach. We analyzed the potential impact of FDG-PET/CT in stage definition and target volume delineation of patients affected by carcinoma of the anal canal and candidates for curative radiotherapy. Twenty seven patients with biopsy proven anal carcinoma were enrolled. Pathology was squamous cell carcinoma in 20 cases, cloacogenic carcinoma in 3, adenocarcinoma in 2, and basal cell carcinoma in 2. Simulation was performed by PET/CT imaging with patient in treatment position. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) were drawn on CT and on PET/CT fused images. PET-GTV and PET-CTV were respectively compared to CT-GTV and CT-CTV by Wilcoxon rank test for paired data. PET/CT fused images led to change the stage in 5/27 cases (18.5%): 3 cases from N0 to N2 and 2 from M0 to M1 leading to change the treatment intent from curative to palliative in a case. Based on PET/CT imaging, GTV and CTV contours changed in 15/27 (55.6%) and in 10/27 cases (37.0%) respectively. PET-GTV and PET-CTV resulted significantly smaller than CT-GTV (p = 1.2 × 10 -4 ) and CT-CTV (p = 2.9 × 10 -4 ). PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV, that were used for clinical purposes, were significantly greater than CT-GTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ) and CT-CTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ). FDG-PET/CT has a potential relevant impact in staging and target volume delineation of the carcinoma of the anal canal. Clinical stage variation occurred in 18.5% of cases with change of treatment intent in 3.7%. The GTV and the CTV changed in shape and in size based on PET/CT imaging

  12. Multiparametric PET/CT-perfusion does not add significant additional information for initial staging in lung cancer compared with standard PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of CT-perfusion (CTP), 18F-FDG-PET/CT and histological parameters, and the possible added value of CTP to FDG-PET/CT in the initial staging of lung cancer. Methods Fifty-four consecutive patients (median age 65 years, 15 females, 39 males) with suspected lung cancer were evaluated prospectively by CT-perfusion scan and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan. Overall, 46 tumors were identified. CTP parameters blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the tumor tissue were calculated. Intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed quantitatively. Differences in CTP parameters concerning tumor type, location, PET positivity of lymph nodes, TNM status, and UICC stage were analyzed. Spearman correlation analyses between CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, PETvol, and TLG), MVD, tumor size, and tumor stage were performed. Results The mean BF (mL/100 mL min-1), BV (mL/100 mL), and MTT (s) was 35.5, 8.4, and 14.2, respectively. The BF and BV were lower in tumors with PET-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.02). However, the CTP values were not significantly different among the N stages. The CTP values were not different, depending on tumor size and location. No significant correlation was found between CTP parameters and MVD. Conclusions Overall, the CTP information showed only little additional information for the initial staging compared with standard FDG-PET/CT. Low perfusion in lung tumors might possibly be associated with metabolically active regional lymph nodes. Apart from that, both CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameter sets may reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in lung cancer. PMID:24450990

  13. Quantitative Image Quality Comparison of Reduced- and Standard-Dose Dual-Energy Multiphase Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buty, Mario; Xu, Ziyue; Wu, Aaron; Gao, Mingchen; Nelson, Chelyse; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Teomete, Uygar; Celik, Haydar; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Mollura, Daniel J; Bagci, Ulas; Folio, Les R

    2017-06-01

    We present a new image quality assessment method for determining whether reducing radiation dose impairs the image quality of computed tomography (CT) in qualitative and quantitative clinical analyses tasks. In this Institutional Review Board-exempt study, we conducted a review of 50 patients (male, 22; female, 28) who underwent reduced-dose CT scanning on the first follow-up after standard-dose multiphase CT scanning. Scans were for surveillance of von Hippel-Lindau disease (N = 26) and renal cell carcinoma (N = 10). We investigated density, morphometric, and structural differences between scans both at tissue (fat, bone) and organ levels (liver, heart, spleen, lung). To quantify structural variations caused by image quality differences, we propose using the following metrics: dice similarity coefficient, structural similarity index, Hausdorff distance, gradient magnitude similarity deviation, and weighted spectral distance. Pearson correlation coefficient and Welch 2-sample t test were used for quantitative comparisons of organ morphometry and to compare density distribution of tissue, respectively. For qualitative evaluation, 2-sided Kendall Tau test was used to assess agreement among readers. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations were designed to examine significance of image differences for clinical tasks. Qualitative judgment served as an overall assessment, whereas detailed quantifications on structural consistency, intensity homogeneity, and texture similarity revealed more accurate and global difference estimations. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated no significant image quality degradation. Our study concludes that low(er)-dose CT scans can be routinely used because of no significant loss in quantitative image information compared with standard-dose CT scans.

  14. Breast dose reduction for chest CT by modifying the scanning parameters based on the pre-scan size-specific dose estimate (SSDE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Sakabe, Daisuke; Hatemura, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of modifying scanning parameters based on the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for a breast-dose reduction for chest CT. We scanned 26 women with a fixed volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (15 mGy) and another 26 with a fixed SSDE (15 mGy) protocol (protocol 1 and 2, respectively). In protocol 2, tube current was calculated based on the patient habitus obtained on scout images. We compared the mean breast dose and the inter-patient breast dose variability and performed linear regression analysis of the breast dose and the body mass index (BMI) of the two protocols. The mean breast dose was about 35 % lower under protocol 2 than protocol 1 (10.9 mGy vs. 16.8 mGy, p < 0.01). The inter-patient breast dose variability was significantly lower under protocol 2 than 1 (1.2 mGy vs. 2.5 mGy, p < 0.01). We observed a moderate negative correlation between the breast dose and the BMI under protocol 1 (r = 0.43, p < 0.01); there was no significant correlation (r = 0.06, p = 0.35) under protocol 2. The SSDE-based protocol achieved a reduction in breast dose and in inter-patient breast dose variability. (orig.)

  15. CT in the staging of bronchogenic carcinoma: Analysis by correlative lymph node mapping and sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.; Woldenberg, R.; Mathisen, D.J.; Grillo, H.C.; Bourgoulin, P.M.; Shepard, J.O.; Moore, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Although previous studies have evaluated the accuracy of CT in staging the mediastinum in bronchogenic carcinoma, none has determined the sensitivity and specificity of CT in the assessment of individual lymph node groups by correlative nodal sampling at surgery. CT scans were performed on 84 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. Abnormal nodes (≥ 1 cm) were localized according to the ATS classification of regional lymph node mapping. Seventy-nine patients had mediastinoscopy and 64 patients underwent thoracotomy. In each case, biopsies of lymph node groups 2R, 4R, 2L, 4L (paratracheal), 7 (subcarinal), and 5 (aorticopulmonary) were performed on the appropriate side. Hilar nodes (10R and 11R, 10L and 11L) were resected with the surgical specimen. A total of 292 nodes were sampled. Overall sensitivity for all lymph node groups was 40%, and specificity, 81%. Sensitivity was highest for the 4R (paratracheal) group (82%) and lowest for the subcarinal area (20%). Specificity ranged from 71% for 11R nodes (right hilar) to 94% for 10L (left peribronchial). The positive predictive value was 34%, and the negative predictive value, 84%. This study suggests that the more optimistic results previously reported may have resulted from lack of correlation of individual lymph node groups identified on CT with those sampled at surgery

  16. Radiochromic film use to record dose profile variations in chest CT scan; Utilizacao do filme radiocromico para registro da variacao do perfil de dose em varredura de TC de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Arnaldo P.; Santana, Priscila C., E-mail: aprata@des.cefetmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Alonso, Thessa C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    The CT scans generate higher doses in patients than those caused by other types of diagnostic radiology using the attenuation of X-ray beams. Technological advances have increased the clinical applications of computed tomography (CT) and consequently the demand for these exams. Dose reduction strategies are difficult to implement because of a lack of proper guidance on the CT scanning. However, CT offers the possibility of adjusting the image acquisition parameters according to the patient physical profile and the diagnostic application for which it is intended to scan. Knowledge of the dose distribution is important when thinking about varying the acquisition parameters to reduce the dose. In this work was used a PMMA chest phantom to observe the dose deposition in 5 areas. Radiochromic film strips were placed inside the chest phantom, in peripheral and in the central region. The phantom was placed in the scanner isocenter and it was performed the irradiation of its central region using a chest acquisition protocol. After the phantom CT scan the radiochromic film strips were processed for obtaining digital images. Digital images were reworked to obtain the dose variation profiles for each position. The results showed a wide variation in absorbed dose by the phantom, either within a same position along the length of the film strip, as in the comparison among the five regions which the strips are placed. In this second case the dose variations were even greater. (author)

  17. Low dose multi-detector CT of the chest (iLEAD Study): Visual ranking of different simulated mAs levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Krummenauer, Frank; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation of the lung parenchyma might be impaired by use of low dose CT as image noise increases and subsequently image quality decreases. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of visual perception of differences in image quality and noise at low dose chest CT. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients suffering from emphysema underwent CT (Aquilion-16, 120 kV, 150 mAs, 1 mm-collimation). Original raw data were used for simulation of 10 different mAs settings from 10 mAs to 100 mAs in 10 mAs increments. Three representative hard copy images (carina, 4 cm above, 5 cm below) were printed for evaluation of lung parenchyma (high-resolution kernel, lung window) and mediastinum (soft-kernel, soft tissue window). Ranking of expected low mAs level was performed for lung and soft tissue separately based on visual perception by three-blinded chest radiologist independently. Results were compared to the real simulated mAs. Results: The accuracy for correct ranking of the original 150 mAs scan was 89% for lung and 86% for soft tissue while it was 99% for the simulated 10 mAs for both windows. In comparison to the lowest mAs a significant error increase was found for the lung at 60-100 mAs (with error increase of 30-47%) for reader-I; 60-100 mAs for (33-64%) for reader-II and 70-100 mAs (38-57%) for reader-III. For the soft tissue: 60-150 mAs (with error increase of 28-63%) for reader-I; 50-100 mAs (35-56%) for reader-II and 50-90 mAs (35-40%) for reader-III. Conclusion: Simulated dose levels below 60 mAs (=42 mAs eff ) were clearly differentiated from higher dose levels by all readers. Therefore, imaging doses could be lowered down to 60 mAs without a diagnostically relevant increase in noise impairing image quality.

  18. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed triple-negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Castillo, Raychel; Riedl, Christopher C.; Jochelson, Maxine S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Goldman, Debra A.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Wills, Jonathan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Information Systems, New York, NY (United States); Pinker-Domenig, Katja [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-10-15

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT, in addition to standard staging procedures, for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer patients. However, factors in addition to stage may influence PET/CT utility. As breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (triple-negative breast cancer, or TNBC) are more aggressive and metastasize earlier than other breast cancers, we hypothesized that receptor expression may be one such factor. This study assesses {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed TNBC. In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, our Healthcare Information System was screened for patients with TNBC who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in 2007-2013 prior to systemic or radiation therapy. Initial stage was determined from mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or surgery, if performed prior to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT was evaluated to identify unsuspected extra-axillary regional nodal and distant metastases, as well as unsuspected synchronous malignancies. Kaplan Meier survival estimates were calculated for initial stage IIB patients stratified by whether or not stage 4 disease was detected by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT. A total of 232 patients with TNBC met inclusion criteria. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 30 (13 %): 0/23 initial stage I, 4/82 (5 %) stage IIA, 13/87 (15 %) stage IIB, 4/23 (17 %) stage IIIA, 8/14 (57 %) stage IIIB, and 1/3 (33 %) stage IIIC. Twenty-six of 30 patients upstaged to IV by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT were confirmed by pathology, with the remaining four patients confirmed by follow-up imaging. In addition, seven unsuspected synchronous malignancies were identified in six patients. Initial stage 2B patients who were upstaged to 4 by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT had significantly shorter survival compared to

  19. Is [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose FDG-PET/CT better than CT alone for the preoperative lymph node staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uttam, Mete; Pravin, Nayak; Anish, Bhattacharya; Nandita, Kakkar; Arup, Mandal, E-mail: uttam_mete@yahoo.com [PGIMER, Chandigarh, (India)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the use of [F-18]-FDG-PET/CT can accurately predict pelvic lymph node metastasis in patients with muscle invasive TCC of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer had undergone FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs after IV injection of 6.5MBq (Mega-Becquerel)/Kg of FDG. After intravenous hydration IV furosemide was given to overcome the difficulties posed by urinary excretion of {sup 18}F-FDG. PET/ CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/ CT images. The imaging findings were correlated with the histopathology of the nodes (gold standard). Results: CT and FDG-PET had demonstrated positive lymph nodes in 9 & 8 patients respectively. Among the 15 patients 3 had documented metastasis on histopathology. Both CT and PET could detect the nodes in all these 3 patients (100% sensitivity). Nodes were histologically negative amongst 6&5 patients who had node involvement by CT and PET respectively. Therefore, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) & negative predictive value (NPV) for CT and PET/CT were 50%, 33.3%, 100% and 58.3%, 37.5%, 100% respectively. Conclusion: The theoretical advantage of this cutting edge technology for whole body imaging has not been translated into clinical practice as we found minimal advantage of combined FDG-PET/CT over CT alone for nodal staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer. This may be due to substantial overlap between standardized uptake values (SUVs) from active inflammatory processes with those of malignant lesion. (author)

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and telemedicine network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaru; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. Moreover, the doctor who diagnoses a medical image is insufficient in Japan. To overcome these problems, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The functions to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and "Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. We can share the screen of Web medical image conference system from two or more web conference terminals at the same time. An opinion can be exchanged mutually by using a camera and a microphone that are connected with workstation. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and

  1. Body Size-Specific Organ and Effective Doses of Chest CT Screening Examinations of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cody, Dianna D; Bolch, Wesley E; Kruger, Randell L

    2017-05-01

    We calculated body size-specific organ and effective doses for 23,734 participants in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) using a CT dose calculator. We collected participant-specific technical parameters of 23,734 participants who underwent CT in the clinical trial. For each participant, we calculated two sets of organ doses using two methods. First, we computed body size-specific organ and effective doses using the National Cancer Institute CT (NCICT) dosimetry program, which is based on dose coefficients derived from a library of body size-dependent adult male and female computational phantoms. We then recalculated organ and effective doses using dose coefficients from reference size phantoms for all examinations to investigate potential errors caused by the lack of body size consideration in the dose calculations. The underweight participants (body mass index [BMI; weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] dose (median, 4.93 mGy) than the obese participants (BMI > 30) (3.90 mGy). Thyroid doses were approximately 1.3- to 1.6-fold greater than the lung doses (6.3-6.5 mGy). The reference phantom-based dose calculation underestimates the body size-specific lung dose by up to 50% for the underweight participants and overestimates that value by up to 200% for the overweight participants. The median effective dose ranges from 2.01 mSv in obese participants to 2.80 mSv in underweight participants. Body size-specific organ and effective doses were computed for 23,734 NLST participants who underwent low-dose CT screening. The use of reference size phantoms can lead to significant errors in organ dose estimates when body size is not considered in the dose assessment.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the chest x-ray, CT is the most commonly used imaging procedure for evaluating the chest. ... scanning, especially if the chest is being scanned. Most children older than six years are able to ...

  3. Structured reporting adds clinical value in primary CT staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppe, Franziska; Sommer, Wieland H; Nörenberg, Dominik; Verbeek, Mareike; Bogner, Christian; Westphalen, C Benedikt; Dreyling, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J; Fingerle, Alexander A

    2018-03-29

    To evaluate whether template-based structured reports (SRs) add clinical value to primary CT staging in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to free-text reports (FTRs). In this two-centre study SRs and FTRs were acquired for 16 CT examinations. Thirty-two reports were independently scored by four haematologists using a questionnaire addressing completeness of information, structure, guidance for patient management and overall quality. The questionnaire included yes-no, 10-point Likert scale and 5-point scale questions. Altogether 128 completed questionnaires were evaluated. Non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar's test were used for statistical analysis. SRs contained information on affected organs more often than FTRs (95 % vs. 66 %). More SRs commented on extranodal involvement (91 % vs. 62 %). Sufficient information for Ann-Arbor classification was included in more SRs (89 % vs. 64 %). Information extraction was quicker from SRs (median rating on 10-point Likert scale=9 vs. 6; 7-10 vs. 4-8 interquartile range). SRs had better comprehensibility (9 vs. 7; 8-10 vs. 5-8). Contribution of SRs to clinical decision-making was higher (9 vs. 6; 6-10 vs. 3-8). SRs were of higher quality (p < 0.001). All haematologists preferred SRs over FTRs. Structured reporting of CT examinations for primary staging in patients with DLBCL adds clinical value compared to FTRs by increasing completeness of reports, facilitating information extraction and improving patient management. • Structured reporting in CT helps clinicians to assess patients with lymphoma. • This two-centre study showed that structured reporting improves information content and extraction. • Patient management may be improved by structured reporting. • Clinicians preferred structured reports over free-text reports.

  4. Preoperative staging of esophageal carcinoma with multidetector CT and virtual endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onbas, Omer; Eroglu, Atilla; Kantarci, Mecit; Polat, Pinar; Alper, Fatih; Karaoglanoglu, Nurettin; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), including virtual endoscopy (VE) for detection, precise localization, preoperative evaluation and staging of esophageal cancer (EC) by comparison with surgical and histopathological findings. Materials and methods: Between September 2003 and April 2005, 44 patients with histologically proven EC underwent MDCT and VE. Among 44 patients, the findings were confirmed in 24 at surgery. The accuracy of three-dimensional MDCT for detection, localization, and staging of EC was determined, and compared with surgical finding and histopathology. Results: The overall accuracy of three-dimensional multidetector row CT for detection of EC was 100% (24/24). MDCT staging was correct in 20 patients (83.3%). The T parameter was correctly assessed in 22 (91.7%) cases (understaged in 1 and overstaged in 1). The N parameter was correctly evaluated in 20 (83.4%) patients (understaged in 2 and overstaged in 2). The overall accuracy of VE for the morphologic classification of EC was 81.5%. Conclusions: Three-dimensional MDCT, along with VE is a promising method for preoperative evaluation and staging of EC. Although accuracy in N staging remains low in comparison to PET, it provides a larger amount of diagnostic and staging information

  5. 99mTc-MDP SPECT-CT and Ultrasound in the Diagnosis and Staging of Thyroid Metastasis From Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Wolfgang; Weckesser, Matthias; Pöppelmann, Monika; Schiborr, Manfred; Schäfers, Michael; Rahbar, Kambiz

    2018-04-01

    The classification of thyroid nodules in children is often difficult, especially in pretreated patients with metastatic disease. In osteosarcoma patients, Tc-MDP SPECT/CT is used for primary and follow-up staging. Bone and soft tissue metastases can be revealed because of Tc-MDP imaging of osteoid-producing metastases. We present Tc-MDP SPECT-CT, CT, and ultrasound images of a highly suspicious calcified thyroid lesion in a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma. High uptake in Tc-MDP SPECT-CT provides diagnosis of thyroid metastasis of osteosarcoma, which was proven by histopathology.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of interstitial pneumonia using 3D-curved high-resolution CT imaging parallel to the chest wall: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyasu Umakoshi

    Full Text Available To quantify the imaging findings of patients with interstitial pneumonia (IP and emphysema using three-dimensional curved high-resolution computed tomography (3D-cHRCT at a constant depth from the chest wall, and compare the results to visual assessment of IP and each patient's diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLco.We retrospectively reviewed the axial CT findings and pulmonary function test results of 95 patients with lung cancer (72 men and 23 women, aged 45-84 years with or without IP, as follows: non-IP (n = 47, mild IP (n = 31, and moderate IP (n = 17. The 3D-cHRCT images of the lung at a 1-cm depth from the chest wall were reconstructed automatically using original software; total area (TA, high-attenuation area (HAA >-500 HU, and low-attenuation area (LAA <-950 HU were calculated on a workstation. The %HAA and %LAA were calculated as follows: [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text].The %HAA and %LAA respective values were 3.2±0.9 and 27.7±8.2, 3.9±1.2 and 27.6±5.9, and 6.9±2.2 and 25.4±8.7 in non-IP, mild IP, and moderate IP patients, respectively. There were significant differences in %HAA between the 3 groups of patients (P<0.001, but no differences in %LAA (P = 0.558. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that %HAA and %LAA were negatively correlated with predicted DLco (standard partial regression coefficient [b*] = -0.453, P<0.001; b* = -0.447, P<0.001, respectively.The %HAA and %LAA values computed using 3D-cHRCT were significantly correlated with DLco and may be important quantitative parameters for both IP and emphysema.

  7. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staser, Jonathan A. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Alam, Tariq [Medical College of Ohio, Department of Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States); Applegate, Kimberly [Indiana University Medical Center, Sections of Pediatric Radiology and Health Services Research, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  8. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staser, Jonathan A.; Alam, Tariq; Applegate, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  9. Do we need 3D tube current modulation information for accurate organ dosimetry in chest CT? Protocols dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Develter, Wim [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Leuven (Belgium); Zhang, Guozhi; Coudyzer, Walter; Zanca, Federica [University Hospitals of the KU Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals of the KU Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    To compare the lung and breast dose associated with three chest protocols: standard, organ-based tube current modulation (OBTCM) and fast-speed scanning; and to estimate the error associated with organ dose when modelling the longitudinal (z-) TCM versus the 3D-TCM in Monte Carlo simulations (MC) for these three protocols. Five adult and three paediatric cadavers with different BMI were scanned. The CTDI{sub vol} of the OBTCM and the fast-speed protocols were matched to the patient-specific CTDI{sub vol} of the standard protocol. Lung and breast doses were estimated using MC with both z- and 3D-TCM simulated and compared between protocols. The fast-speed scanning protocol delivered the highest doses. A slight reduction for breast dose (up to 5.1%) was observed for two of the three female cadavers with the OBTCM in comparison to the standard. For both adult and paediatric, the implementation of the z-TCM data only for organ dose estimation resulted in 10.0% accuracy for the standard and fast-speed protocols, while relative dose differences were up to 15.3% for the OBTCM protocol. At identical CTDI{sub vol} values, the standard protocol delivered the lowest overall doses. Only for the OBTCM protocol is the 3D-TCM needed if an accurate (<10.0%) organ dosimetry is desired. (orig.)

  10. The utility of PET/CT in staging and assessment of treatment response of naso pharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Alastair; Peters, L.J.; Dutu, Gaelle; Rischin, Danny; Lau, Eddie; Drummond, Elizabeth; Corry, June

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (PET/CT) as an adjunct to conventional imaging (CI) in the management of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) both for initial staging and assessment of post-treatment response. Methods: All NPC cases referred to the Peter MacCallum Centre for Metabolic Imaging between January 2002 and December 2007 were identified, In patients undergoing initial staging, any differences between the pre PET/CT management plan based on CI and that following performance of the PET/CT scan were noted. Clinical impact was scored using the Centre's published criteria: 'high' if PET /CT changed the primary treatment modality or intent, 'medium' if treatment modality was unchanged but the radiotherapy technique or dose was altered, and 'low' if there was no change in treatment modality or intent. Patients undergoing PET/CT following definitive treatment were scored according to whether or not they achieved a complete metabolic response. Results: Forty-eight patients underwent a staging PET/CT. The clinical impact was high in 8%, medium in 25% and low in 66% of patients. Twenty-one patients were scanned for post-treatment response. PET/CT was less frequently equivocal than MRI (3 vs 8/21). A complete metabolic response on PET /CT was associated with a 93% negative predictive value for subsequent recurrence. Conclusion: PET /CT is a valuable staging tool for the detection of occult metastatic disease and defining the extent of neck nodal disease, Pos treatment, a complete metabolic response on PET /CT has a very high negative predictive value with fewer equivocal results than MRI.

  11. Detection of pulmonary nodules at multirow-detector CT: effectiveness of double reading to improve sensitivity at standard-dose and low-dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormanns, Dag; Beyer, Florian; Heindel, Walter; Ludwig, Karl; Diederich, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of double reading to increase the sensitivity of lung nodule detection at standard-dose (SDCT) and low-dose multirow-detector CT (LDCT). SDCT (100 mAs effective tube current) and LDCT (20 mAs) of nine patients with pulmonary metastases were obtained within 5 min using four-row detector CT. Softcopy images reconstructed with 5-mm slice thickness were read by three radiologists independently. Images with 1.25-mm slice thickness served as the gold standard. Sensitivity was assessed for single readers and combinations. The effectiveness of double reading was expressed as the increase of sensitivity. Average sensitivity for detection of 390 nodules (size 3.9±3.2 mm) for single readers was 0.63 (SDCT) and 0.64 (LDCT). Double reading significantly increased sensitivity to 0.74 and 0.79, respectively. No significant difference between sensitivity at SDCT and LDCT was observed. The percentage of nodules detected by all three readers concordantly was 52% for SDCT and 47% for LDCT. Although double reading increased the detection rate of pulmonary nodules from 63% to 74-79%, a considerable proportion of nodules remained undetected. No difference between sensitivities at LDCT and SDCT for detection of small nodules was observed. (orig.)

  12. Development of a computer-aided diagnosis system for chest x-ray helical CT images (in Japanese)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yongbum

    2001-01-01

    A computerized detection scheme of lung nodules in helical x-ray CT images was developed for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. We propose a novel template-matching technique based on a genetic algorithm (GA template matching) for detecting nodules existing within the lung area; the GA was used to determine the target position in the observed image efficiently and to select an adequate template image from several reference patterns for quick template matching. In addition, a conventional template matching was employed to detect nodules existing on the lung wall area (lung wall template matching), where semicircular models were used as reference patterns; the semicircular models were rotated according to the angle of the target point on the contour of the lung wall. After initial detection of candidates using the two template-matching methods, we extracted a total of 13 feature values and used them to eliminate false-positive findings. Twenty clinical cases involving a total of 557 sectional images were used in this study. Seventy-one nodules out of 98 were correctly detected by our scheme (i.e., a detection rate of about 72%), with the number of false positives at approximately 1.1 per sectional image. An application of the CAD system for helical CT images with graphic user interface was developed

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  16. Lung region extraction based on the model information and the inversed MIP method by using chest CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihiro; Miguchi, Ryosuke; Okumura, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shinji; Matsumoto, Mitsuomi; Tateno, Yukio; Iinuma, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Toru.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a lung region extraction method based on the model information and the inversed MIP method in the Lung Cancer Screening CT (LSCT). Original model is composed of typical 3-D lung contour lines, a body axis, an apical point, and a convex hull. First, the body axis. the apical point, and the convex hull are automatically extracted from the input image Next, the model is properly transformed to fit to those of input image by the affine transformation. Using the same affine transformation coefficients, typical lung contour lines are also transferred, which correspond to rough contour lines of input image. Experimental results applied for 68 samples showed this method quite promising. (author)

  17. Role of preoperative PET-CT in assessing mediastinal and hilar lymph node status in early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yang Lin

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: Integrated PET-CT is a useful tool for predicting the negativity of mediastinal LN status pre-operatively in clinically early stage (Stages I and II lung cancer but may be relatively inaccurate in predicting hilar LN status and largely confounded by false positives caused by inflammatory process.

  18. Feasibility of perfusion CT technique integrated into conventional 18FDG/PET-CT studies in lung cancer patients: clinical staging and functional information in a single study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Capraro, Cristina; Guerra, Luca; De Ponti, Elena; Messa, Cristina; Sironi, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    To assess the additional functional vascular information and the relationship between perfusion measurements and glucose metabolism (SUVmax) obtained by including a perfusion CT study in a whole-body contrast-enhanced PET/CT protocol in primary lung cancer lesions. Enrolled in this prospective study were 34 consecutive patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of lung cancer who were referred for contrast-enhanced PET/CT staging. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Perfusion CT was performed with the following parameters: 80 kV, 200 mAs, 30 scans during intravenous injection of 50 ml contrast agent, flow rate 5 ml/s. Another bolus of contrast medium (3.5 ml/s, 80 ml, 60-s delay) was administered to ensure a full diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT scan for clinical staging. The perfusion CT data were used to calculate a range of tumour vascularity parameters (blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time), and tumour FDG uptake (SUVmax) was used as a metabolic indicator. Quantitative and functional parameters were compared and in relation to location, histology and tumour size. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was used for statistical analysis. A cut-off value of 3 cm was used according to the TNM classification to discriminate between T1 and T2 tumours (i.e. T1b vs. T2a). There were significant perfusion differences (lower blood volumes and higher mean transit time) between tumours with diameter >30 mm and tumours with diameter 30 mm in diameter. Perfusion CT combined with PET/CT is feasible technique that may provide additional functional information about vascularity and tumour aggressiveness as a result of lower perfusion and higher metabolism shown by larger lesions.

  19. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis complicated by acute thromboembolic disease: chest X-ray, HRCT and multi-detector row CT angiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Luigi; Campanile, Francesco; Imbriaco, Massimo; Ippolito, Renato; Sirignano, Cesare; Santoro, Ciro; Galderisi, Maurizio; Salvatore, Marco

    2013-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic diffuse interstitial disease characterized by a predominant reticular pattern of involvement of the lung parenchyma which can be well documented by High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT). While almost half of the patients with IPF may develop pulmonary arterial hypertension, the occurrence of superimposed acute thrombo-embolic disease is rare.We describe a case of an 87 yrs old female who was found to have IPF complicated by acute pulmonary thrombo-embolism during the clinical and radiological investigation of a rapidly worsening dyspnea. While chest x-ray findings were initially considered consistent with a congestive heart failure, a bed side echocardiography revealed findings suggestive of pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular failure with enlargement of both right cavities and associated valvular regurgitations. An acute thrombo-embolic disease was initially ruled out by a perfusion lung scintigraphy and subsequently confirmed by contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT which showed an embolus at the emergency of the right inter-lobar artery with associated signs of chronic pulmonary hypertension. However, unenhanced scans performed with both conventional and high resolution techniques also depicted a reticular pattern of involvement of lung parenchyma considered suggestive of IPF despite a atypical upper lobe predominance. IPF was later confirmed by further clinical, serological and instrumental follow-up.

  20. Changes in Cross-Sectional Area and Transverse Diameter of the Heart on Inspiratory and Expiratory Chest CT: Correlation with Changes in Lung Size and Influence on Cardiothoracic Ratio Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Tomita

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate physiological changes in cardiac area and diameters between inspiratory and expiratory chest computed tomography (CT, and to assess their correlation with lung size change and influence on cardiothoracic ratio (CTR measurements.The institutional review board of our institution approved this study, and informed consent was waived. Forty-three subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest CT as part of routine clinical care. On both inspiratory and expiratory scans, lung volumes and maximum lung diameters (transverse and vertical directions were measured. The maximum cardiac cross-sectional area (CSA and the maximum transverse cardiac diameter were measured on both scans, and the CT-based CTR was calculated. Changes in the lung and cardiac measurements were expressed as the expiratory/inspiratory (E/I ratios. Comparisons between inspiratory and expiratory measurements were made by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Correlations between the E/I ratios of lung and heart measurements were evaluated by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Cardiac CSA and transverse cardiac diameter was significantly larger on expiratory than on inspiratory CT (p < 0.0001. Significant negative correlations were found between the E/I ratios of these cardiac measurements and the E/I ratios of lung volume and vertical lung diameter (p < 0.01. CT-based CTR was significantly larger on expiration than on inspiration (p < 0.0001.Heart size on chest CT depends on the phase of ventilation, and is correlated with changes in lung volume and craniocaudal lung diameter. The CTR is also significantly influenced by ventilation.

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  2. Multidetector-row cardiac CT: diagnostic value of calcium scoring and CT coronary angiography in patients with symptomatic, but atypical, chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, Christopher; Balzer, Joern O.; Mack, M.G.; Zangos, Stefan; Vogl, Thomas J.; Britten, Martina; Schaechinger, Volker; Ackermann, Hanns; Schaller, Stefan; Flohr, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of multidetector-row cardiac CT (MDCT), calcium scoring (Ca-Sc), and MDCT coronary angiography (MD CTA) in the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis. Thirty-eight patients underwent invasive coronary angiography (CA) and MDCT (collimation 4 x 1 mm, pitch 1.5 mm, TI 500 ms, 120 kV, 300 mAs, and retrospective ECG-gating). Calcium scoring was calculated for the total coronary artery territory and for RCA, LCA, and LCX separately. The MD CTA served to assess the degree and the localization of stenoses. All findings were compared to invasive coronary angiography. Approximately 68.4% (390 of 570) of all coronary segments could be visualized by MDCT. Correlation coefficient for MD CTA and CA amounted to r=0.58, showing distinct differences for the individual segments. Proximal segments generally showed better correlation (range 0.81-0.77) than medial segments (range 0.91-0.20), distal segments (range 0.55-0.04), or side branches (range 0.76-0.00). Patients with hemodynamically relevant (>75%) stenoses were detected by MD CTA with 72.2% sensitivity (13 of 18) and 100% specificity (20 of 20). For Ca-Sc sensitivity ranged between 94.7% (17 of 18) and 66.7% (12 of 18), specificity between 20% (4 of 20) and 80% (16 of 20) respectively, depending on the prevailing cutoff value. Combination of both methods led to 83.3% sensitivity (15 of 18) and 100% specificity (20 of 20), reaching no level of significance as compared with Ca-Sc (p=0.73) or MD CTA (p=0.23) alone. Calcium scoring as a single method showed highest sensitivity in the detection of coronary atherosclerosis but at the expense of low specificity. In patients with no or moderate calcifications, combination with MD CTA helped to distinctly increase specificity and NPV (orig.)

  3. MRI, PET/CT and ultrasound in the preoperative staging of endometrial cancer - A multicenter prospective comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie Leisby; Jensen, Lisa Neerup; Loft, Annika

    2013-01-01

    referred to three Danish tertiary gynecological centers for surgical treatment. Preoperatively they were PET/CT-, MRI-, and 2DUS scanned. The imaging results were compared to the final pathological findings. This study was approved by the National Committee on Health Research Ethics. RESULTS....../CT, MRI and 2DUS to be comparable in predicting myometrial invasion. For cervical invasion and lymph node metastases, however, PET/CT was the best. CONCLUSIONS: None of the modalities can yet replace surgical staging. However, they all contributed to important knowledge and were, furthermore, able...

  4. Can the localization of primary colonic tumors be improved by staging CT without specific bowel preparation compared to optical colonoscopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerlein, Sebastian; Grimm, Lars J.; Davenport, Matthew S.; Haystead, Clare M.; Miller, Chad M.; Neville, Amy M.; Jaffe, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the ability of staging computed tomography (CT) without bowel preparation to accurately localize colonic tumors compared to optical colonoscopy. Methods: The local institutional review board approved this retrospective and HIPAA-compliant study. Forty-six patients with colonic adenocarcinoma, preoperative colonoscopy, and staging CT within 60 days of resection were included. Patients underwent contrast enhanced CT imaging without bowel preparation or oral contrast. The colon was divided into four segments with the operative reports used as the standard. Rectal and cecal cancers were excluded. CT scans were reviewed by 5 readers in a segmental binary fashion using a 5-point confidence scale in two sessions blinded and unblinded to the colonoscopy report. Results: At surgery 49 tumors were found in 46 patients. Readers detected 86.1%, 74.3%, and 66.9% of lesions with 92.0%, 94.1%, and 95.4% accuracy for confidence scores of ≥3, ≥4, and 5. CT interobserver agreement was good (κ = 0.82) for the unblinded and moderate (κ = 0.60) for the blinded read. Colonoscopic localization was only 78.7% accurate with 2 tumors undiscovered. Colonoscopic accuracy was low in the descending colon (57.1%) and the transverse colon (55.6%). Conclusions: Preoperative staging CT is more accurate than colonoscopy in the localization of colonic tumors

  5. SPECT/CT for staging and treatment monitoring in oncology. Applications in differentiated thyroid cancer and liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, K.; Berger, F.; Reiser, M.F.; Mustafa, M.; Bartenstein, P.; Haug, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid imaging of function and morphology has gained significant importance for lesion detection and treatment monitoring in oncology. In patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) a planar whole body scan is carried out after radioiodine therapy (RIT) for staging. However, due to limited spatial resolution the diagnostic accuracy of this scintigraphy method is impaired. Radioembolization utilizing 90 Yttrium loaded micro-spheres by selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) allows a minor invasive therapy of primary and secondary liver tumors. In order to avoid side effects of the micro-spheres caused by an outflow into intestines, stomach or lungs, imaging the arteries supplying the liver has to be performed by means of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ( 99m Tc-MAA) and scintigraphy. The limited morphological information supplied by scintigraphy is again a challenge in treatment monitoring. 131 Iodine whole body scanning is used for staging in patients with DTC 3-4 days after ablation. Monitoring of the tumor marker thyroglobulin and selective radioiodine whole body scans are available for patients with a high risk profile in the further follow-up with imaging of the arteries supplying the liver by means of 99m Tc-MAA scintigraphy in preparation of SIRT. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) of the neck and thorax with a therapeutic activity of radioiodine for staging after ablation. Techniques include imaging of arteries supplying the liver by means of 99m Tc-MAA SPECT/CT before SIRT and evaluation and quantification of the uptake of liver tumors, especially in comparison to the uptake of liver parenchyma by means of SPECT/CT. Due to the integration of combined functional and morphological information SPECT/CT can be used to characterize the morphology and iodine uptake of lesions more accurately, resulting in optimized staging in patients with DTC in comparison to whole body iodine scans and SPECT/CT provides more

  6. Early-stage focal nodular hyperplasia: US/CT/MR features correlated with histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfieri, R.; Giampalma, E.; Berardi, R.; Caputo, M.; Lalli, A.; Grazi, G.; Mazziotti, A.; Gozzetti, G.; D'Errico, A.; Grigioni, W.; Gavelli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), in which ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) studies detected an atypical hemorrhagic pattern associated with an intrahepatic arterio venous malformation (AVM) around the growths, are presented. In both cases, histology demonstrated a very early regenerative stage and necrotic-hemorrhagic areas within the lesions. In these cases, the analysis of radiological findings, surgical specimens and histology seemed to confirm the pathogenetic hypothesis suggested by Wanless: in normal liver parenchyma, a ''blood steal'' phenomenon due to congenital or acquired intrahepatic AVM could cause ischemic damage, appearing as a hemorrhagic necrotic area, the extent of which depends on the degree of residual portal supply. (orig.)

  7. Effect of contrast material on image noise and radiation dose in adult chest computed tomography using automatic exposure control: A comparative study between 16-, 64- and 128-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo, E-mail: jijopaul1980@gmail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schell, Boris, E-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kerl, J. Matthias, E-mail: matthias.kerl@gmai.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Maentele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the difference in radiation dose between non-enhanced (NECT) and contrast-enhanced (CECT) chest CT examinations contributed by contrast material with different scanner generations with automatic exposure control (AEC). Methods and materials: Each 42 adult patients received a NECT and CECT of the chest in one session on a 16-, 64- or 128-slice CT scanner with the same scan protocol settings. However, AEC technology (Care Dose 4D, Siemens) underwent upgrades in each of the three scanner generations. DLP, CTDIvol and image noise were compared. Results: Although absolute differences in image noise were very small and ranged between 10 and 13 HU for NECT and CECT in median, the differences in image noise and dose (DLP: 16-slice:+2.8%; 64-slice:+3.9%; 128-slice:+5.6%) between NECT and CECT were statistically significant in all groups. Image noise and dose parameters were significantly lower in the most recent 128-slice CT generation for both NECT and CECT (DLP: 16-slice:+35.5-39.2%; 64-slice:+6.8-8.5%). Conclusion: The presence of contrast material lead to an increase in dose for chest examinations in three CT generations with AEC. Although image noise values were significantly higher for CECT, the absolute differences were in a range of 3 HU. This can be regarded as negligible, thus indicating that AEC is able to fulfill its purpose of maintaining image quality. However, technological developments lead to a significant reduction of dose and image noise with the latest CT generation.

  8. T-staging of gastric cancer of air-filling multidetector-row CT: Comparison with hydro-multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Seishi, E-mail: kumano@radiol.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro; Shimono, Taro; Kuwabara, Masatomo; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Imaoka, Izumi; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Ishii, Kazunari; Murakami, Takamichi [Department of Radiology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of T-staging of gastric cancer by air-filling multidetector-row CT (air-MDCT) compared with water-filling MDCT (hydro-MDCT). Materials and methods: One hundred fifteen patients with histologically diagnosed gastric cancer were included in this study. Fifty-eight patients underwent air-MDCT, and the remaining 57 had hydro-MDCT using a 64-channel scanner. Based on the volumetric data of contrast-enhanced MDCT obtained about 75 s after intravenously injecting 525 mg iodine per kilogram patients weight (525 mgI/kg) nonionic contrast material at the rate of 2 ml/s, oblique coronal and oblique sagittal multi-planar reformatted images perpendicular to the stomach wall, including the tumor, were reconstructed on a workstation. Mural invasion of gastric cancer into the gastric wall, as visualized by CT, was classified according to the TNM classification, and the results of T-staging by MDCT were compared with those by pathologic analysis after surgery. Results: Correct assessment of T-staging by air-CT was achieved in 48 of 58 patients (83%), and that by hydro-MDCT was 49 of 57 patients (86%). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the technique in determining the invasion of serosa were 88%, 93%, and 91% for air-CT and 83%, 95%, and 91% for hydro-CT. There were no significant differences between hydro-MDCT and air-MDCT in sensitivity (P = 0.73), specificity (P = 0.71) and accuracy (P = 0.98). Conclusion: Air-MDCT is a very valuable tool in T-staging of gastric cancer as well as hydro-MDCT.

  9. Whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence for staging of patients with suspected ovarian cancer: a clinical feasibility study in comparison to CT and FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michielsen, Katrijn; Op de beeck, Katya; Dymarkowski, Steven; Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Leunen, Karin [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven (Belgium); Moerman, Philippe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, Christophe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Souverijns, Geert [Jessa Ziekenhuis - Campus Virga Jessa, Department of Radiology, Hasselt (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence (WB-DWI/MRI) for staging and assessing operability compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer. Thirty-two patients underwent 3-T WB-DWI/MRI, {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and CT before diagnostic open laparoscopy (DOL). Imaging findings for tumour characterisation, peritoneal and retroperitoneal staging were correlated with histopathology after DOL and/or open surgery. For distant metastases, FDG-PET/CT or image-guided biopsies were the reference standards. For tumour characterisation and peritoneal staging, WB-DWI/MRI was compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT. Interobserver agreement for WB-DWI/MRI was determined. WB-DWI/MRI showed 94 % accuracy for primary tumour characterisation compared with 88 % for CT and 94 % for FDG-PET/CT. WB-DWI/MRI showed higher accuracy of 91 % for peritoneal staging compared with CT (75 %) and FDG-PET/CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI and FDG-PET/CT showed higher accuracy of 87 % for detecting retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies compared with CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI showed excellent correlation with FDG-PET/CT (κ = 1.00) for detecting distant metastases compared with CT (κ = 0.34). Interobserver agreement was moderate to almost perfect (κ = 0.58-0.91). WB-DWI/MRI shows high accuracy for characterising primary tumours, peritoneal and distant staging compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT and may be valuable for assessing operability in ovarian cancer patients. (orig.)

  10. Staging accuracy of pancreatic cancer: Comparison between non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Tomohiro [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Tateishi, Ukihide, E-mail: utateish@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Endo, Itaru [Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Our aim was to clarify the diagnostic impact of contrast-enhanced (CE) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)–positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for staging of pancreatic cancer compared to non-CE PET/CT. Method and materials: Between April 2006 and November 2009, a total of 95 patients (age range, 36–83 years [mean age, 67]) with primary pancreatic cancer underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT examinations. Diagnostic accuracy was compared between non-CE PET/CT and CE PET/CT. Images were analyzed visually and quantitatively by two blinded reviewers. Reference standard was histological examination in 48 patients (51%) and/or confirmation of an obvious progression in number and/or size of the lesions on follow-up CT examinations in 47 patients (49%). Results: For T-staging, invasion of duodenum (n = 20, 21%), mesentery (n = 12, 13%), and retroperitoneum (n = 13, 14%) was correctly diagnosed by both modalities. The ROC analyses revealed that the Az values of celiac artery (CA), common hepatic artery (CHA), splenic artery (SV), and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) invasion were significantly higher in the CE PET/CT group for both readers. Nodal metastasis was correctly diagnosed by CE PET/CT in 38 patients (88%) and by non-CE PET/CT in 45 patients (87%). Diagnostic accuracies of nodal metastasis in two modalities were similar. Using CE PET/CT, distant metastasis, scalene node metastasis, and peritoneal dissemination were correctly assigned in 39 patients (91%), while interpretation based on non-CE PET/CT revealed distant metastasis, scalene node metastasis, and peritoneal dissemination in 42 patients (81%). Diagnostic accuracy of distant metastasis, scalene node metastasis, and peritoneal dissemination with CE PET/CT was significantly higher than that of non-CE PET/CT (p < 0.05). Conclusion: CE PET/CT allows a more precise assessment of distant metastasis, scalene node metastasis, and peritoneal dissemination in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  11. Hydro-dynamic CT preoperative staging of gastric cancer: correlation with pathological findings. A prospective study of 107 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Elia, F.; Zingarelli, A.; Grani, M. [Dept. of Radiology, S. Donato Hospital, Arezzo (Italy); Palli, D. [Dept. of Epidemiology CSPO, Florence (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic CT in the preoperative staging of gastric cancer. One hundred seven patients affected by gastric cancer diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy were prospectively staged by dynamic CT prior to tumor resection. After an oral intake of 400-600 ml of tap water and an intravenous infusion of a hypotonic agent, 200 ml of non-ionic contrast agent were administered by power injector using a biphasic technique. The CT findings were prospectively analyzed and correlated with the pathological findings at surgery. The accuracy of dynamic CT for tumor detection was 80 and 99 % in early and advanced gastric cancer, respectively, with overall detection rate of 96 % (103 of 107). Three early (pT1) and one advanced (pT2) cancers were undetected. Tumor stage as determined by dynamic CT agreed with pathological findings in 83 of 107 patients with an overall accuracy of 78 %. The accuracy of CT in detecting increasing degrees of depth of tumor invasion when compared with pathological TNM staging was 20 % (3 of 15) and 87 % (80 of 92) in early and advanced cancer, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CT in the preoperative staging (pT3-pT4 vs pT1-pT2) was 93, 90, and 91.6 %, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CT in assessing metastasis to regional lymph nodes was 97.2, 65.7, and 87 %, respectively. Computed tomography correctly staged liver metastases in 105 of 107 patients with an overall sensitivity of 87.5 % and specificity of 99 %. The sensitivity of peritoneal involvement was 30 % when ascites or peritoneal nodules were absent. Our findings show that dynamic CT can play a role in the preoperative definition of gastric cancer stage. The results can be used to optimize the therapeutic strategy for each individual patient prior to surgery, thus avoiding unnecessary intervention and allowing careful planning of extended surgery in eligible patients. (orig.)

  12. The added value of SPECT-CT for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes in early stage oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toom, Inne J. den; Bree, Remco de [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center, Department of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Weert, Stijn van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karagozoglu, K.H. [VU University Medical Center/Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) Amsterdam, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bloemena, Elisabeth [VU University Medical Center/Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) Amsterdam, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    To assess the role of single-photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography (SPECT-CT) for the identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with early stage (T1-T2) oral cancer and a clinically negative neck (cN0). In addition to planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT-CT was performed in 66 consecutive patients with early stage oral cancer and a clinically negative neck. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar images was retrospectively analyzed for the number of additional SLNs, more precise localization of SLNs, and importance of anatomical information by a team consisting of a nuclear physician, surgeon, and investigator. Identification rate for both imaging modalities combined was 98% (65/66). SPECT-CT identified 15 additional SLNs in 14 patients (22%). In 2/15 (13%) of these additional SLNs, the only metastasis was found, resulting in an upstaging rate of 3% (2/65). In 20% of the patients with at least one positive SLN, the only positive SLN was detected due to the addition of SPECT-CT. SPECT-CT was considered to add important anatomical information in two patients (3%). In 5/65 (8%) of the patients initially scored SLNs on planar lymphoscintigrams were scored as non-SLNs when SPECT-CT was added. There were four false-negative SLN biopsy procedures in this cohort. The addition of SPECT-CT to planar lymphoscintigraphy is recommended for the identification of more (positive) SLNs and better topographical orientation for surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy for early stage oral cancer. (orig.)

  13. [18F]-fluorocholine PET/CT for preoperative lymph node staging of Prostate Cancer.study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    the histopathological examination of the lymph nodes (the gold standard) was compared with the result of the FCH PET/CT scan which had been blinded. The inclusion criteria were prostate cancer and PSA>10 and/or Gleason ≥ 7 and/or T-stage ≥ 3 and that the patient awaited lymphadenectomy prior to curative therapy...

  14. Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tightness in your chest Crushing or searing pain that radiates to your back, neck, jaw, shoulders, and one or both arms Pain that lasts ... com. Accessed Sept. 6, 2017. Yelland MJ. Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. ...

  15. FLAIL CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  16. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  17. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  18. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  19. Effect of reconstruction algorithm on image quality and identification of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT: Experimental study using chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Kono, Atsushi A.; Kusaka, Akiko; Konishi, Minoru; Yoshii, Masaru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of reconstruction algorithm on identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated GGOs and partly solid nodules was scanned with five different tube currents and reconstructed by using standard (A) and newly developed (B) high-resolution reconstruction algorithms, followed by visually assessment of identification and image quality of GGOs and partly solid nodules by two chest radiologists. Inter-observer agreement, ROC analysis and ANOVA were performed to compare identification and image quality of each data set with those of the standard reference. The standard reference used 120 mA s in conjunction with reconstruction algorithm A. Results: Kappa values (κ) of overall identification and image qualities were substantial or almost perfect (0.60 < κ). Assessment of identification showed that area under the curve of 25 mA reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A was significantly lower than that of standard reference (p < 0.05), while assessment of image quality indicated that 50 mA s reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A and 25 mA s reconstructed with both reconstruction algorithms were significantly lower than standard reference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Reconstruction algorithm may be an important factor for identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose CT examination.

  20. Comparison of image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT using filtered back projection, iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose{sup 4}™

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, Azien, E-mail: a.laqmani@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Avanesov, Maxim; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Kurfürst, Maximilian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Sehner, Susanne [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Derlin, Thorsten; Behzadi, Cyrus [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagel, Hans D. [Science & Technology for Radiology, Fritz-Reuter-Weg 5f, 21244 Buchholz, Germany, (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To compare both image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT (smSv-CT) using filtered back projection (FBP) and the two different iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose{sup 4}™. Materials and methods: This institutional review board approved study was based on retrospective interpretation of clinically indicated acquired data. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. 81 patients with suspected pneumonia underwent smSv-CT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare; mean effective dose: 0.86 ± 0.2 mSv). Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR techniques iDose{sup 4}™ and IMR (Philips Healthcare) at various iteration levels. Objective image noise (OIN) was measured. Two experienced readers independently assessed all images for image noise, image appearance and visibility of normal anatomic and abnormal findings. A random intercept model was used for statistical analysis. Results: Compared to FBP and iDose{sup 4}™, IMR reduced OIN up to 88% and 72%, respectively (p < 0.001). A mild blotchy image appearance was seen in IMR images, affecting diagnostic confidence. iDose{sup 4}™ images provided satisfactory to good image quality for visibility of normal and abnormal findings and were superior to FBP (p < 0.001). IMR images were significantly inferior for visibility of normal structures compared to iDose{sup 4}™, while being superior for visibility of abnormal findings except for reticular pattern (p < 0.001). Conclusion: IMR results for visibility of normal and abnormal lung findings are heterogeneous, indicating that IMR may not represent a priority technique for clinical routine. iDose{sup 4}™ represents a suitable method for evaluation of lung tissue at submillisievert chest CT.

  1. Comparison of image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT using filtered back projection, iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose4™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laqmani, Azien; Avanesov, Maxim; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Kurfürst, Maximilian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Derlin, Thorsten; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans D; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-11-01

    To compare both image quality and visibility of normal and abnormal findings at submillisievert chest CT (smSv-CT) using filtered back projection (FBP) and the two different iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques iterative model reconstruction (IMR) and iDose 4 ™. This institutional review board approved study was based on retrospective interpretation of clinically indicated acquired data. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. 81 patients with suspected pneumonia underwent smSv-CT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare; mean effective dose: 0.86±0.2mSv). Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR techniques iDose 4 ™ and IMR (Philips Healthcare) at various iteration levels. Objective image noise (OIN) was measured. Two experienced readers independently assessed all images for image noise, image appearance and visibility of normal anatomic and abnormal findings. A random intercept model was used for statistical analysis. Compared to FBP and iDose 4 ™, IMR reduced OIN up to 88% and 72%, respectively (p<0.001). A mild blotchy image appearance was seen in IMR images, affecting diagnostic confidence. iDose 4 ™ images provided satisfactory to good image quality for visibility of normal and abnormal findings and were superior to FBP (p<0.001). IMR images were significantly inferior for visibility of normal structures compared to iDose 4 ™, while being superior for visibility of abnormal findings except for reticular pattern (p<0.001). IMR results for visibility of normal and abnormal lung findings are heterogeneous, indicating that IMR may not represent a priority technique for clinical routine. iDose 4 ™ represents a suitable method for evaluation of lung tissue at submillisievert chest CT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Triple-rule-out dual-source CT angiography of patients with acute chest pain: Dose reduction potential of 100 kV scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krissak, Radko; Henzler, Thomas; Prechel, Anne; Reichert, Miriam; Gruettner, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Fink, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose reduction potential of low kV triple-rule-out dual-source CT angiography (TRO-CTA) in non-obese (BMI ≤ 25 kg/m 2 ) patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive patients were randomly assigned to two different retrospectively ECG-gated TRO-CTA protocols in this prospective trial: Thirty patients were examined with a 120-kV standard protocol (320 reference mAs with automatic tube current modulation, automatically adapted pitch and ECG-pulsing) and served as the control group (group 1), an otherwise identical 100 kV protocol was used in the other thirty patients (group 2) for a radiation dose reduction. Subjective image quality was assessed on a 5 point scale (1: excellent, 5: non-diagnostic) by two blinded observers. Quantitative image analysis assessed vascular attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in different vascular segments. The effective dose was calculated from the dose length product (DLP) using a conversion coefficient of 0.017 mSv mGy −1 cm −1 . Results: There was no significant difference of age, BMI, heart rate, pitch or scan length between both patient groups. Subjective image quality was rated similar in both groups (group 1: 1.2 ± 0.4, group 2: average score = 1.3 ± 0.5). Vessel attenuation was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (ascending aorta: 456 ± 83 HU vs. 370 ± 78 HU, p < 0.001; pulmonary artery: 468 ± 118 HU vs. 411 ± 91 HU, p = 0.03; left coronary artery: 437 ± 110 HU vs. 348 ± 89 HU, p < 0.001), however, there was no significant difference in SNR (13.2 ± 7.6 vs. 14.5 ± 7.5, p = 0.49) or CNR (13.8 ± 6.6 vs. 15.9 ± 7.7, p = 0.25). The effective radiation dose of the 100 kV protocol was significantly lower (9.6 ± 3.2 mSv vs. 18.1 ± 9.4 mSv, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: TRO-CTA with 100 kV is feasible in non-obese patients and results in diagnostic image quality and significantly reduced radiation dose.

  3. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  4. Individualized volume CT dose index determined by cross-sectional area and mean density of the body to achieve uniform image noise of contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT obtained at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    A practical body-size adaptive protocol providing uniform image noise at various kV levels is not available for pediatric CT. To develop a practical contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT protocol providing uniform image noise by using an individualized volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) determined by the cross-sectional area and density of the body at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. A total of 137 patients (mean age, 7.6 years) underwent contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT based on body weight. From the CTDIvol, image noise, and area and mean density of the cross-section at the lung base in the weight-based group, the best fit equation was estimated with a very high correlation coefficient ({gamma}{sup 2} = 0.86, P < 0.001). For the next study, 177 patients (mean age, 7.9 years; the CTDIvol group) underwent contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT with the CTDIvol determined individually by the best fit equation. CTDIvol values on the dose report after CT scanning, noise differences from the target noise, areas, and mean densities were compared between these two groups. The CTDIvol values (mean{+-}standard deviation, 1.6 {+-} 0.7 mGy) and the noise differences from the target noise (1.1 {+-} 0.9 HU) of the CTDIvol group were significantly lower than those of the weight-based group (2.0 {+-} 1.0 mGy, 1.8 {+-} 1.4 HU) (P < 0.001). In contrast, no statistically significant difference was found in area (317.0 {+-} 136.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 326.3 {+-} 124.8 cm{sup 2}), mean density (-212.9 {+-} 53.1 HU vs. -221.1 {+-} 56.3 HU), and image noise (13.8 {+-} 2.3 vs. 13.6 {+-} 1.7 HU) between the weight-based and the CTDIvol groups (P > 0.05). Contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT with the CTDIvol determined individually by the cross-sectional area and density of the body provides more uniform noise and better dose adaptation to body habitus than does weight-based CT at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. (orig.)

  5. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Michiaki; Kameoka, Shingo; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Izumi, Kiminari; Miyazaki, Kaname; Hamano, Kyoichi; Kouno, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To clarify the usefulness and limitations of CT and MRI in preoperative assessment of the wall invasion of rectal cancer, we compared the results of CT and MRI with the histopathological findings, classifying tumors by the region and site in 34 patients with rectal cancer. Subjects were patients preoperatively examined by MRI and CT. Overall, the percent of cases with the extent of invasion accurately assessed by MRI was 88.2%, and that by CT was 64.7%. In all instances of wrong assessment, the extent of invasion was overestimated. The accurate assessment rate was significantly higher for MRI than for CT. After classification by the region, the accurate assessment rate at Rs was low as 50% for both MRI and CT because slices were not perpendicular to the tumor. The accurate assessment rate was 100% for MRI and 82% for CT at Ra, and respectively 94% and 59% at Rb. The majority of tumors at Ra or Rb centering on the lateral wall of the rectum were accurately assessed either by MRI or CT. With tumors at Ra or Rb (particularly Rb) centering on the anterior or posterior wall, CT frequently failed to identify the extent of invasion accurately, so that MRI seemed more suitable for these tumors. (author)

  6. Evaluation of 18-F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT as a staging and monitoring tool for dogs with stage-2 splenic hemangiosarcoma - A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Borgatti

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT is routinely used for staging and monitoring of human cancer patients and is becoming increasingly available in veterinary medicine. In this study, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET-CT was used in dogs with naturally occurring splenic hemangiosarcoma (HSA to assess its utility as a staging and monitoring modality as compared to standard radiography and ultrasonography. Nine dogs with stage-2 HSA underwent 18FDG-PET-CT following splenectomy and prior to commencement of chemotherapy. Routine staging (thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography was performed prior to 18FDG-PET-CT in all dogs. When abnormalities not identified on routine tests were noted on 18FDG-PET-CT, owners were given the option to repeat a PET-CT following treatment with eBAT. A PET-CT scan was repeated on Day 21 in three dogs. Abnormalities not observed on conventional staging tools, and most consistent with malignant disease based on location, appearance, and outcome, were detected in two dogs and included a right atrial mass and a hepatic nodule, respectively. These lesions were larger and had higher metabolic activity on the second scans. 18FDG-PET-CT has potential to provide important prognostic information and influence treatment recommendations for dogs with stage-2 HSA. Additional studies will be needed to precisely define the value of this imaging tool for staging and therapy monitoring in dogs with this and other cancers.

  7. Evaluation of 18-F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a staging and monitoring tool for dogs with stage-2 splenic hemangiosarcoma - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgatti, Antonella; Winter, Amber L; Stuebner, Kathleen; Scott, Ruth; Ober, Christopher P; Anderson, Kari L; Feeney, Daniel A; Vallera, Daniel A; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Modiano, Jaime F; Froelich, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and monitoring of human cancer patients and is becoming increasingly available in veterinary medicine. In this study, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET-CT was used in dogs with naturally occurring splenic hemangiosarcoma (HSA) to assess its utility as a staging and monitoring modality as compared to standard radiography and ultrasonography. Nine dogs with stage-2 HSA underwent 18FDG-PET-CT following splenectomy and prior to commencement of chemotherapy. Routine staging (thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography) was performed prior to 18FDG-PET-CT in all dogs. When abnormalities not identified on routine tests were noted on 18FDG-PET-CT, owners were given the option to repeat a PET-CT following treatment with eBAT. A PET-CT scan was repeated on Day 21 in three dogs. Abnormalities not observed on conventional staging tools, and most consistent with malignant disease based on location, appearance, and outcome, were detected in two dogs and included a right atrial mass and a hepatic nodule, respectively. These lesions were larger and had higher metabolic activity on the second scans. 18FDG-PET-CT has potential to provide important prognostic information and influence treatment recommendations for dogs with stage-2 HSA. Additional studies will be needed to precisely define the value of this imaging tool for staging and therapy monitoring in dogs with this and other cancers.

  8. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  9. Ultra-high pitch chest computed tomography at 70 kVp tube voltage in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom and non-sedated pediatric patients. Initial experience with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, Claudia; Henzler, Thomas; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Neff, K. Wolfgang; Weis, Meike [Univ. Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2016-07-01

    Minimizing radiation dose while at the same time preserving image quality is of particular importance in pediatric chest CT. Very recently, CT imaging with a tube voltage of 70 kVp has become clinically available. However, image noise is inversely proportional to the tube voltage. We aimed to investigate radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT performed at 70 kVp in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom as well as in clinical patients. An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom, which resembles a one-year-old child in physiognomy, was scanned on the 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT) system at 70 kVp and 80 kVp and a fixed ultra low tube-current of 8 mAs to solely evaluate the impact of lowering tube voltage. After the phantom measurements, 18 pediatric patients (mean 29.5 months; range 1-91 months; 21 examinations) underwent 3.2 high-pitch chest CT on the same DSCT system at 70 kVp tube voltage without any sedation. Radiation dose and presence of motion artifacts was compared to a retrospectively identified patient cohort examined at 80 kVp on a 16-slice single-source-CT (SSCT; n = 15; 14/15 with sedation; mean 30.7 months; range 0-96 months; pitch = 1.5) or on a 2{sup nd} generation DSCT without any sedation (n = 6; mean 32.8 months; range 4-61 months; pitch = 3.2). Radiation dose in the phantom scans was reduced by approximately 40% when using a tube voltage of 70 kVp instead of 80 kVp. In the pediatric patient group examined at 70 kVp age-specific effective dose (ED; mean 0.5 ± 0.2 mSv) was significantly lower when compared to the retrospective cohort scanned at 80 kVp on the 16-slice-SSCT (mean ED: 1.0 ± 0.3 mSv; p < 0.0001) and also considerably lower when compared to the cohort scanned at 80 kVp on the 2{sup nd} generation DSCT (mean ED: 0.9 ± 0.5 mSv). None of the prospective, sedation-free CT examinations showed any motion artifacts whereas 13/15 examinations of the retrospective patient cohort scanned at 80 kVp with a pitch of 1

  10. PET/CT in initial staging and therapy response assessment of early mediastinal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Hosam EL Din Behairy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: PET/CT proved higher sensitivity and specificity over CECT. The major strength of PET/CT over CECT was its higher ability for detection of extra-nodal sites of lymphoma and excluding active disease in residual nodal mass lesions on follow up.

  11. PET/CT and dedicated PET in breast cancer: Implications for classification, staging, and response monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.

    2013-01-01

    De PET-CT, een scan die gebruik maakt van radioactiviteit om tumoren in beeld te brengen, is een zinvol instrument voor beeldvorming van patiënten met borstkanker, met name van patiënten met een tumor groter dan drie centimeter of tumor-positieve lymfeklieren. De PET-CT is vooral van waarde voor de

  12. Chest X-ray: routine indication in the follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Beese, M.; Mester, J.; Brumma, K.; Beyer, W.; Clausen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The hospital files of 609 patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer were analysed. Pulmonary formation of metastases was diagnosed in 50 patients. The thyroglobulin value at the time of diagnosis was compared with the chest X-ray findings and, if present, additional diagnostic information such as Iodine-131 whole body scintigraphy (WBS) and thorax CT. The sensitivity of the chest X-ray to detect pulmonary metastases was at 52% lower than that of WBS (64%), thorax CT (82%) and thyroglobulin during suppression therapy (86%). Among the patients with papillary carcinoma stage I and II (UICC 1987), only 1 patient developed pulmonary metastases during follow up. In this low risk group of patients, detection of lung metastases exclusively by chest X-ray, without elevation of thyroglobulin level is extremely rare (calculated probability 1/4000) and associated with considerable costs. (orig.) [de

  13. Integrated Fluorine-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT Compared to Standard Contrast-Enhanced CT for Characterization and Staging of Pulmonary Tumors Eligible for Surgical Resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaia, E.; Tona, G.; Gelain, F.; Lubin, E.; Pizzolato, R.; Boscolo, E.; Bussoli, L. (Dept. of Radiology, Cattinara Hospital, Univ. of Trieste, Trieste (Italy))

    2008-11-15

    Background: Accurate staging is necessary to determine the appropriate therapy in patients with lung cancer. Few studies have compared integrated fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT in the characterization and staging of pulmonary tumors considered eligible for surgical resection. Purpose: To compare 18F-FDG PET/CT with standard contrast-enhanced CT for the diagnosis and staging of lung neoplasms eligible for surgical resection. Material and Methods: Seventy-six consecutive patients (56 male, 20 female; mean age+-SD, 63.4+-20 years) with 84 pulmonary tumors suspected for malignancy and considered eligible for surgical resection were prospectively enrolled. Seventy-three malignant (65 non-small-cell lung carcinomas, one small-cell lung cancer, two carcinoids, and five metastases) and 11 benign lung tumors (three hamartomas, two sarcoidosis, one amyloidosis, one Wegener granulomatosis, one tuberculosis, and three areas of scarring) were finally diagnosed by histology. Tumor staging was based on the revised American Joint Committee on Cancer. Results: In lesion characterization, the sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG PET/CT versus contrast-enhanced CT were 90% vs. 83% and 18% vs. 63% (P<0.05, McNemar test), respectively. In nodal staging, the sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG PET/CT versus contrast-enhanced CT were 78% vs. 46% and 80% vs. 93% (P<0.05), respectively. Conclusion: In patients with lung neoplasms considered eligible for surgical resection, 18F-FDG PET/CT versus contrast-enhanced CT revealed higher sensitivity in nodal staging, but lower specificity both in lesion characterization and nodal staging.

  14. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Chung, Man Pyo; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2014-01-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  15. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations; Valoracion en el paciente pediatrico de la eficacia de los protectores de bien procedimientos de TC de torax con sistemas de control automatico de intensidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  16. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  17. Estimation and comparison of effective dose (E) in standard chest CT by organ dose measurements and dose-length-product methods and assessment of the influence of CT tube potential (energy dependency) on effective dose in a dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jijo; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Krauss, Bernhard; Vogl, Thomas J; Maentele, Werner; Bauer, Ralf W

    2012-04-01

    To determine effective dose (E) during standard chest CT using an organ dose-based and a dose-length-product-based (DLP) approach for four different scan protocols including high-pitch and dual-energy in a dual-source CT scanner of the second generation. Organ doses were measured with thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) in an anthropomorphic male adult phantom. Further, DLP-based dose estimates were performed by using the standard 0.014mSv/mGycm conversion coefficient k. Examinations were performed on a dual-source CT system (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens). Four scan protocols were investigated: (1) single-source 120kV, (2) single-source 100kV, (3) high-pitch 120kV, and (4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140kV with equivalent CTDIvol and no automated tube current modulation. E was then determined following recommendations of ICRP publication 103 and 60 and specific k values were derived. DLP-based estimates differed by 4.5-16.56% and 5.2-15.8% relatively to ICRP 60 and 103, respectively. The derived k factors calculated from TLD measurements were 0.0148, 0.015, 0.0166, and 0.0148 for protocol 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for single-energy and dual-energy protocols show a difference of less than 0.04mSv. Estimates of E based on DLP work equally well for single-energy, high-pitch and dual-energy CT examinations. The tube potential definitely affects effective dose in a substantial way. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for both single-energy and dual-energy examinations differ not more than 0.04mSv. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing 18F-FDG-PET/CT analysis in lung cancer patients. Is CT-CT image fusion helpful in predicting pleural involvement? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, A; Winkens, T; Lesser, T; Reissig, A; Steinert, M; Freesmeyer, M

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and value of CT-CT image fusion to assess the shift of peripheral lung cancers with/-out chest wall infiltration, comparing computed tomography acquisitions in shallow-breathing (SB-CT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH-CT) in patients undergoing FDG-PET/CT for lung cancer staging. Image fusion of SB-CT and DIBH-CT was performed with a multimodal workstation used for nuclear medicine fusion imaging. The distance of intrathoracic landmarks and the positional shift of tumours were measured using semi-transparent overlay of both CT series. Statistical analyses were adjusted for confounders of tumour infiltration. Cutoff levels were calculated for prediction of no-/infiltration. Lateral pleural recessus and diaphragm showed the largest respiratory excursions. Infiltrating lung cancers showed more limited respiratory shifts than non-infiltrating tumours. A large respiratory tumour-motility accurately predicted non-infiltration. However, the tumour shifts were limited and variable, limiting the accuracy of prediction. This pilot fusion study proved feasible and allowed a simple analysis of the respiratory shifts of peripheral lung tumours using CT-CT image fusion in a PET/CT setting. The calculated cutoffs were useful in predicting the exclusion of chest wall infiltration but did not accurately predict tumour infiltration. This method can provide additional qualitative information in patients with lung cancers with contact to the chest wall but unclear CT evidence of infiltration undergoing PET/CT without the need of additional investigations. Considering the small sample size investigated, further studies are necessary to verify the obtained results.

  19. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Moreno, Elena; Jimenez de la Peña, Mar; Cano Alonso, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI) including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume

  20. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, E.A.; Pena, M.J.; Alonso, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI) including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as bio markers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume

  1. PET/CT Staging Followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT Improves Treatment Outcome of Locally Advanced Pharyngeal Carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütolf Urs M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess. It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma. Patients and methods Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and treated with definitive chemoradiation with IMRT from 2002 until 2005. To estimate the impact of PET/CT with IMRT on outcome, a case-control analysis on all patients with PET/CT and IMRT was done after matching with eighty six patients treated between 1991 and 2001 without PET/CT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy with respect to gender, age, stage, grade, and tumor location with a ratio of 1:2. Median follow-up was eighteen months (range, 6–49 months for the PET/CT-IMRT group and twenty eight months (range, 1–168 months for the controls. Results PET/CT and treatment with IMRT improved cure rates compared to patients without PET/CT and IMRT. Overall survival of patients with PET/CT and IMRT was 97% and 91% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 74% and 54% for patients without PET/CT or IMRT (p = 0.002. The event-free survival rate of PET/CT-IMRT group was 90% and 80% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 72% and 56% in the control group (p = 0.005. Conclusion PET/CT in combination with IMRT and chemotherapy for pharyngeal carcinoma improve oncological therapy of pharyngeal carcinomas. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these findings.

  2. PET/CT Staging Followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Improves Treatment Outcome of Locally Advanced Pharyngeal Carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, Sacha; Studer, Gabriela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Huguenin, Pia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Davis, J Bernard; Lütolf, Urs M; Hany, Thomas F; Ciernik, I Frank

    2007-01-01

    Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess. It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma. Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and treated with definitive chemoradiation with IMRT from 2002 until 2005. To estimate the impact of PET/CT with IMRT on outcome, a case-control analysis on all patients with PET/CT and IMRT was done after matching with eighty six patients treated between 1991 and 2001 without PET/CT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy with respect to gender, age, stage, grade, and tumor location with a ratio of 1:2. Median follow-up was eighteen months (range, 6–49 months) for the PET/CT-IMRT group and twenty eight months (range, 1–168 months) for the controls. PET/CT and treatment with IMRT improved cure rates compared to patients without PET/CT and IMRT. Overall survival of patients with PET/CT and IMRT was 97% and 91% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 74% and 54% for patients without PET/CT or IMRT (p = 0.002). The event-free survival rate of PET/CT-IMRT group was 90% and 80% at 1 and 2 years respectively, compared to 72% and 56% in the control group (p = 0.005). PET/CT in combination with IMRT and chemotherapy for pharyngeal carcinoma improve oncological therapy of pharyngeal carcinomas. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm these findings

  3. CT mucosal window settings: a novel approach to evaluating early T-stage head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Jenny K; Glastonbury, Christine M; Chen, Luke F; Salvatore, Jaime K; Eastwood, James D

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the CT densities of small head and neck mucosal cancers as a means of deriving a CT mucosal window display of narrower window width and higher window level to better detect and delineate head and neck carcinomas. We retrospectively studied 19 subjects with T1-2 head and neck carcinomas. The density of tumor and adjacent normal mucosa on CT were measured. CT scans for the 19 patients with tumors and 35 subjects without mucosal tumors were anonymized and interpreted by two readers using standard soft-tissue windows and were reviewed again 1 week later with the addition of mucosal windows. The mean (± SD) attenuation of 17 visible tumors was 85.5 ± 18.3 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the surrounding normal mucosa was 55.3 ± 15.2 HU (p < 0.0001). From our data, we derived guideline mucosal window settings-a window width of 120 HU and a window level of 60 HU. On blinded review, reader A detected 12 tumors with the addition of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 63%; specificity, 82%) and nine tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 94%). Reader B detected nine tumors with use of mucosal windows (sensitivity, 47%; specificity, 71%) and eight tumors on soft-tissue windows alone (sensitivity, 42%; specificity, 74%). Early T-stage tumors have higher CT density than normal mucosa. Their conspicuity can be amplified using display windows with narrower window width and higher window level. The potential clinical applications are for the improved detection of unknown primary tumors and delineation of a known mucosal tumor.

  4. Pragmatic approach to chest pain patients discharged with undetectable high-sensitivity troponin T and normal electrocardiogram: the STABS + CT protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Warrick; Girao, Gary

    2017-06-01

    A strategy that discharges chest pain patients with negative high-sensitivity troponin and non-ischaemic electrocardiography changes may still result in 0.44% of patients experiencing myocardial infarction within 30 days. We observed that a pragmatic approach that systematically discharged 25 patients on cardio-protective medications of aspirin, metoprolol and atorvastatin followed with prompt (<10 days) coronary computed tomography angiography resulted in no major adverse cardiac event and adverse drug reaction 30 days post-presentation. The strategy resulted in three patients (12%) ultimately diagnosed with likely unstable angina, which required planned coronary intervention in two patients and medical management in one patient. No unplanned readmissions for chest pains were noted from initial presentation through to 6-month follow up. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Wilson, Gareth A.

    2017-01-01

    The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ct...

  6. A combination of preoperative CT findings and postoperative serum CEA levels improves recurrence prediction for stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Motohiko, E-mail: xackey2001@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Ishikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Kunii, Ryosuke [Division of Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Tasaki, Akiko; Sato, Suguru; Ikeda, Yohei; Yoshimura, Norihiko [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Hashimoto, Takehisa; Tsuchida, Masanori [Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan); Aoyama, Hidefumi [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Objectives: To assess the prognostic value of combined evaluation of preoperative CT findings and pre/postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels for pathological stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: This retrospective study included 250 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection for ≤3-cm pathological stage I (T1–2aN0M0) adenocarcinomas (132 men, 118 women; mean age, 67.8 years). Radiologists evaluated following CT findings: maximum tumor diameter, percentage of solid component (%solid), air bronchogram, spiculation, adjacency of bullae or interstitial pneumonia (IP) around the tumor, notch, and pleural indent. These CT findings, pre/postoperative CEA levels, age, gender, and Brinkman index were assessed by Cox proportional hazards model to determine the best prognostic model. Prognostic accuracy was examined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Median follow-up period was 73.2 months. In multivariate analysis, high %solid, adjacency of bullae or IP around the tumor, and high postoperative CEA levels comprised the best combination for predicting recurrence (P < 0.05). A combination of these three findings had a greater accuracy in predicting 5-year disease-free survival than did %solid alone (AUC = 0.853 versus 0.792; P = 0.023), with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 74.3% at the optimal threshold. The best cut-off values of %solid and postoperative CEA levels for predicting high-risk patients were ≥48% and ≥3.7 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to %solid alone, combined evaluation of %solid, adjacency of bullae or IP change around the tumor, and postoperative CEA levels improves recurrence prediction for stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. A Quantitative CT Imaging Signature Predicts Survival and Complements Established Prognosticators in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juheon; Li, Bailiang; Cui, Yi; Sun, Xiaoli; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming; Gensheimer, Michael F; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian; Li, Ruijiang

    2018-01-10

    Prognostic biomarkers are needed to guide the management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This work aims to develop an image-based prognostic signature and assess its complementary value to existing biomarkers. We retrospectively analyzed data of stage I NSCLC in 8 cohorts. On the basis of an analysis of 39 computed tomography (CT) features characterizing tumor and its relation to neighboring pleura, we developed a prognostic signature in an institutional cohort (n = 117) and tested it in an external cohort (n = 88). A third cohort of 89 patients with CT and gene expression data was used to create a surrogate genomic signature of the imaging signature. We conducted further validation using data from 5 gene expression cohorts (n = 639) and built a composite signature by integrating with the cell-cycle progression (CCP) score and clinical variables. An imaging signature consisting of a pleural contact index and normalized inverse difference was significantly associated with overall survival in both imaging cohorts (P = .0005 and P = .0009). Functional enrichment analysis revealed that genes highly correlated with the imaging signature were related to immune response, such as lymphocyte activation and chemotaxis (false discovery rate CCP score. A composite signature outperformed the genomic surrogate, CCP score, and clinical model alone (P < .01) regarding concordance index (0.70 vs 0.62-0.63). The proposed CT imaging signature reflects fundamental biological differences in tumors and predicts overall survival in patients with stage I NSCLC. When combined with established prognosticators, the imaging signature improves survival prediction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. STUDY OF THE PATTERN AND DISTRIBUTION OF BRONCHOGENIC CARCINOMA IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha D. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Bronchogenic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer related deaths, more than Colon cancer, breast cancer and prostate cancer combined. Chest computed tomography (CT chest is widely used for diagnosis, part of staging, planning treatment and monitoring. The type and distribution of lesion in chest CT may give a fair idea regarding the nature and histology of lesion. Aims and Objectives- To study the chest CT patterns of bronchogenic carcinoma and to correlate the patterns with histological cell type. MATERIALS AND METHODS It was a hospital based retrospective study involving 101 patients aged 35-80 years with histologically diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma patients over a period of five years. Chest CT patterns were studied and compared to histology. Statistical analysis was done by chi square test. RESULTS Mass lesions formed 88.1% of cases (p value 0.0001, which was significant. This was followed by solitary pulmonary nodule (5.9%, consolidation (2.97% and cavitatory lesion (2.97%. 52% of mass lesions were located in both upper lobes and this was significant (p value 0.0001 Adenocarcinoma was the most common cell type. There were 6 (5.94% solitary pulmonary nodules. Among solitary pulmonary nodules majority were adenocarcinoma (83.33%. 2.97% with cavitating malignancy, all were squamous cell carcinoma. CONCLUSION Upper lobe mass lesion is the most common presentation of bronchogenic carcinoma in computed tomography of chest. Solitary pulmonary nodules are commonly located in upper lobes. Adenocarcinoma is the commonest cell type. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cause for cavitating bronchogenic carcinoma and common on right side. Adenocarcinoma is overall most common cell type.

  9. Characteristic of muscle involvement evaluated by CT scans in early stages of progressive muscular dystrophy; Comparison between Duchenne and Fukuyama types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yumi (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Muscle CT scans were performed in order to compare the characteristic distribution of progressive muscle involvement in the early stages of Duchenne type (DMD) and Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy (FCMD). Muscle images at the levels of the 3rd lumbar vertebra, thigh and calf were assessed by visual inspection, and mean CT numbers calculated for individual muscles were statistically analysed. On visual inspection, intramuscular low density areas and muscular atrophy were observed in the muscles of older patients with either disease. These changes were, however, more extensive at thigh level in DMD, and at calf level in FCMD. Nevertheless, the mean CT numbers of muscles in which only slight changes were grossly visible on CT scans displayed progressive decreases with increasing age. Moreover, a significant negative relationship was recognizable between age and mean CT number in almost all muscles examined. Comparison of the slopes of the regression lines revealed that the so-called selective pattern of muscle involvement characteristic of the symptomatic stage had already partially manifested in the preclinical or early stages of both diseases. In FCMD, the rates of decrease in CT numbers were extremely rapid for calf muscles as compared with those in DMD, indicating that this is one reason for FCMD patients never becoming ambulatory. However, for almost all of the other muscles, the CT numbers in FCMD decreased in parallel with the corresponding CT numbers in DMD; thus, these diseases displayed a similarity in the pattern of muscle involvement, despite their different pathogenetic mechanisms and inhe