WorldWideScience

Sample records for stages phase-i final

  1. Phase I Final Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xijia [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Fetvedt, Jeremy [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Dimmig, Walker [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This Final Scientific Report addresses the accomplishments achieved during Phase I of DE- FE0023985, Coal Syngas Combustor Development for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles. The primary objective of the project was to develop a coal syngas-fueled combustor design for use with high-pressure, high-temperature, oxy-fuel, supercritical CO2 power cycles, with particular focus given to the conditions required by the Allam Cycle. The primary goals, from the Statement of Project Objectives, were to develop: (1) a conceptual design of a syngas-fueled combustor-turbine block for a 300MWe high-pressure, oxy-fuel, sCO2 power plant; (2) the preliminary design of a 5MWt test combustor; and (3) the definition of a combustor test program. Accomplishments for each of these goals are discussed in this report.

  2. Brayton isotope power system, phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Phase I program resulted in the development and ground demonstration of a dynamic power conversion system. The two key contractual objectives of 25% conversion efficiency and 1000 h of endurance testing were successfully met. As a result of the Phase I effort, the BIPS is a viable candidate for further development into a flight system capable of sustained operation in space. It represents the only known dynamic space power system to demonstrate the performance and endurance coupled with the simplicity necessary for reliable operation. This final report follows thirty-five monthly reports. For expediency, it makes liberal use of referenced documents which have been submitted to DOE during the course of the program

  3. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning, Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, S.

    1978-07-01

    United Nuclear Industries (UNI) entered into a subcontract with Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Ed) on August 8, 1977, for the purpose of developing methods to chemically clean the secondary side tube to tube support crevices of the steam generators of Indian Point Nos. 1 and 2 PWR plants. This document represents the first reporting on activities performed for Phase I of this effort. Specifically, this report contains the results of a literature search performed by UNI for the purpose of determining state-of-the-art chemical solvents and methods for decontaminating nuclear reactor steam generators. The results of the search sought to accomplish two objectives: (1) identify solvents beyond those proposed at present by UNI and Con Ed for the test program, and (2) confirm the appropriateness of solvents and methods of decontamination currently in use by UNI

  4. Phase I Cultural Resources Survey and Archeological Inventory of the Segura Staging Area, Iberia Parish, Louisiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the results of a Phase I cultural resources survey and archeological inventory of the Segura Staging Area located on the right descending bank of Bayou Teche at approximate River Mile...

  5. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. (author)

  6. Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

    1999-06-30

    This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

  7. Final Work Plan: Phase I Investigation at Bladen, Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division. Applied Geosciences and Environmental Management Section; Yan, Eugene [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division

    2014-07-01

    The village of Bladen is a town of population approximately 237 in the northwest part of Webster County, Nebraska, 30 mi southwest of Hastings and 140 mi southwest of Lincoln, Nebraska. In 2000, the fumigant-related compound carbon tetrachloride was detected in public water supply well PWS 68-1, at a trace level. Low-level contamination, below the maximum contamination level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L, has been detected intermittently in well PWS 68-1 since 2000, including in the last sample taken in July 2013. In 2006, the village installed a new well, PWS 2006-1, that remains free of contamination. Because the carbon tetrachloride found in well PWS 68-1 might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at grain storage facilities, including its former facility in Bladen, the CCC/USDA is proposing an investigation to (1) delineate the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with its former facility, (2) characterize pathways and controlling factors for contaminant migration in the subsurface, and (3) establish a basis for estimating potential health and environmental risks. The work will be performed in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the NDEQ and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. The site investigation at Bladen will be implemented in phases, so that data collected and interpretations developed during each phase can be evaluated to determine if a subsequent phase of investigation is warranted and, if warranted, to provide effective guidance for the subsequent investigation activities. This Work Plan identifies the specific technical objectives and defines the scope of work proposed for the Phase I investigation by compiling and evaluating historical data. The proposed investigation activities will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research

  8. Near-term electric vehicle program: Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlett, B. H.; Murry, R.

    1977-08-01

    A final report is given for an Energy Research and Development Administration effort aimed at a preliminary design of an energy-efficient electric commuter car. An electric-powered passenger vehicle using a regenerative power system was designed to meet the near-term ERDA electric automobile goals. The program objectives were to (1) study the parameters that affect vehicle performance, range, and cost; (2) design an entirely new electric vehicle that meets performance and economic requirements; and (3) define a program to develop this vehicle design for production in the early 1980's. The design and performance features of the preliminary (baseline) electric-powered passenger vehicle design are described, including the baseline power system, system performance, economic analysis, reliability and safety, alternate designs and options, development plan, and conclusions and recommendations. All aspects of the baseline design were defined in sufficient detail to verify performance expectations and system feasibility.

  9. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  10. U.S. LCI Database Project--Final Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-08-01

    This Phase I final report reviews the process and provides a plan for the execution of subsequent phases of the database project, including recommended data development priorities and a preliminary cost estimate. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop publicly available LCI Data modules for commonly used materials, products, and processes.

  11. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Hutchins, D.A.; Chodak, P. III

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide open-quotes proof-of-principleclose quotes data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.)

  12. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

  13. Phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials: proposal of a two-stage Bayesian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    We propose a new design for phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials aiming at determining a dose of an experimental treatment to satisfy safety (respectively efficacy) requirements, at treating a sufficiently large number of patients to estimate the toxicity (respectively failure) probability of the dose level with a given reliability, and at stopping the trial early if it is likely that no dose is safe (respectively efficacious). A two-stage design was derived from the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM), with implementation of Bayesian criteria to generate stopping rules. A simulation study was conducted to compare the operating characteristics of the proposed two-stage design to those reached by the traditional CRM. Finally, two applications to real data sets are provided.

  14. 77 FR 23741 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... (Phase I ERP/EA) describing the first eight restoration projects selected by the Trustees to commence the... notice is to inform the public of the availability of the Phase I ERP/EA. ADDRESSES: Obtaining Documents: You may download the Phase I ERP/EA and the Framework Agreement at http://www.gulfspillrestoration...

  15. Computational Particle Dynamic Simulations on Multicore Processors (CPDMu) Final Report Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmalz, Mark S

    2011-07-24

    Statement of Problem - Department of Energy has many legacy codes for simulation of computational particle dynamics and computational fluid dynamics applications that are designed to run on sequential processors and are not easily parallelized. Emerging high-performance computing architectures employ massively parallel multicore architectures (e.g., graphics processing units) to increase throughput. Parallelization of legacy simulation codes is a high priority, to achieve compatibility, efficiency, accuracy, and extensibility. General Statement of Solution - A legacy simulation application designed for implementation on mainly-sequential processors has been represented as a graph G. Mathematical transformations, applied to G, produce a graph representation {und G} for a high-performance architecture. Key computational and data movement kernels of the application were analyzed/optimized for parallel execution using the mapping G {yields} {und G}, which can be performed semi-automatically. This approach is widely applicable to many types of high-performance computing systems, such as graphics processing units or clusters comprised of nodes that contain one or more such units. Phase I Accomplishments - Phase I research decomposed/profiled computational particle dynamics simulation code for rocket fuel combustion into low and high computational cost regions (respectively, mainly sequential and mainly parallel kernels), with analysis of space and time complexity. Using the research team's expertise in algorithm-to-architecture mappings, the high-cost kernels were transformed, parallelized, and implemented on Nvidia Fermi GPUs. Measured speedups (GPU with respect to single-core CPU) were approximately 20-32X for realistic model parameters, without final optimization. Error analysis showed no loss of computational accuracy. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits - The proposed research will constitute a breakthrough in solution of problems related to efficient

  16. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sumit [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Krok, Michael [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  17. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO 2 tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study

  18. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  19. Automatic component calibration and error diagnostics for model-based accelerator control. Phase I final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl Stern; Martin Lee

    1999-01-01

    Phase I work studied the feasibility of developing software for automatic component calibration and error correction in beamline optics models. A prototype application was developed that corrects quadrupole field strength errors in beamline models

  20. Automatic component calibration and error diagnostics for model-based accelerator control. Phase I final report

    CERN Document Server

    Carl-Stern

    1999-01-01

    Phase I work studied the feasibility of developing software for automatic component calibration and error correction in beamline optics models. A prototype application was developed that corrects quadrupole field strength errors in beamline models.

  1. Phase I decontamination of the J.C. Haynes site, Newark, Ohio. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emswiler, T.R.

    1985-11-01

    Phase I consisted of the primary decontamination, packaging, and shipment of all 241 Am-contaminated gloveboxes, vent system, and miscellaneous waste items located in the laboratory restricted area in the J.C. Haynes house. The primary goals of Phase I were to locate and account for a major quantity of 241 Am which was unaccounted for and to remove all radioactive materials and contamination posing an imminent hazard to public health and safety. All Phase I operations were conducted under a Quality Assurance (QA) Program Plan and QA procedures written specifically for this program. In addition, certain generic Battelle QA procedures were used for routine tasks. All operations were conducted under strict health physics supervision and procedures. Cognizant ORAU and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel were on site during the entire Phase I operation and provided support and approval in the daily operations. All staff members had participated in previous decontamination and decommissioning programs involving transuranic waste and completed Phase I in a well controlled, timely, and safe manner

  2. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  3. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II

  4. Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid Passenger-Vehicle Development Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    Under contract to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, Minicars conducted Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle (NTHV) Development Program. This program led to the preliminary design of a hybrid (electric and internal combustion engine powered) vehicle and fulfilled the objectives set by JPL. JPL requested that the report address certain specific topics. A brief summary of all Phase I activities is given initially; the hybrid vehicle preliminary design is described in Sections 4, 5, and 6. Table 2 of the Summary lists performance projections for the overall vehicle and some of its subsystems. Section 4.5 gives references to the more-detailed design information found in the Preliminary Design Data Package (Appendix C). Alternative hybrid-vehicle design options are discussed in Sections 3 through 6. A listing of the tradeoff study alternatives is included in Section 3. Computer simulations are discussed in Section 9. Section 8 describes the supporting economic analyses. Reliability and safety considerations are discussed specifically in Section 7 and are mentioned in Sections 4, 5, and 6. Section 10 lists conclusions and recommendations arrived at during the performance of Phase I. A complete bibliography follows the list of references.

  5. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation

  6. Alternatives generation and analysis for phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, M.D.

    1996-10-02

    This document provides; a decision analysis summary; problem statement; constraints, requirements, and assumptions; decision criteria; intermediate waste feed staging system options and alternatives generation and screening; intermediate waste feed staging system design concepts; intermediate waste feed staging system alternative evaluation and analysis; and open issues and actions.

  7. ERDA nuclear energy center program. Phase I. Program definition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    This Phase I report describes the procedures used and the results obtained from a survey of SINB states and major utilities to determine their interest in participating in an ERDA-sponsored study to investigate the technical, economic, and institutional practicality of establishing a potential Nuclear Energy Center at a specific site. The State of South Carolina was the only SINB member to express positive interest in ERDA's Nuclear Energy Center Program, and to offer to submit a proposal through the SINB to select and evaluate a site in South Carolina having the potential for being developed into a Nuclear Energy Center

  8. Early mortality estimates for different nuclear accidents. Final Phase I report, October 1977-April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.

    1979-08-01

    Several studies have previously been made of the number of early deaths which might be expected in a population exposed to a cloud of radionuclides which could result from a nuclear accident. These analyses, however, have been limited to one accident scenario or to exposures involving limited numbers of radionuclides. The purpose of this Phase I study was to examine the existing data on the early health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and determined what, if any, new studies were needed to make reasonable estimates of early mortality after exposure of a population to a cloud of radionuclides of any type. The approach used in the Phase I project was to analyze the data bases available on the health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and document those which were adequate and useful. Using these data, a computer based simulation model was developed depicting exposure to a radioactive aerosol, the dose to an individual exposed to the aerosol and the probability of dying from early effects.

  9. California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

    2009-09-09

    Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

  10. Early mortality estimates for different nuclear accidents. Final Phase I report, October 1977-April 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.

    1979-08-01

    Several studies have previously been made of the number of early deaths which might be expected in a population exposed to a cloud of radionuclides which could result from a nuclear accident. These analyses, however, have been limited to one accident scenario or to exposures involving limited numbers of radionuclides. The purpose of this Phase I study was to examine the existing data on the early health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and determined what, if any, new studies were needed to make reasonable estimates of early mortality after exposure of a population to a cloud of radionuclides of any type. The approach used in the Phase I project was to analyze the data bases available on the health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and document those which were adequate and useful. Using these data, a computer based simulation model was developed depicting exposure to a radioactive aerosol, the dose to an individual exposed to the aerosol and the probability of dying from early effects

  11. High Performance Hybrid Upper Stage for NanoLaunch Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Parabilis Space Technologies, Inc. (Parabilis), in collaboration with Utah State University (USU), proposes a low cost, high performance launch vehicle upper stage...

  12. Collaborative development of the EPICS Qt framework Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayssat, Robert E. [Lyncean Technologies, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    At Lyncean, a private company spun-off from technology developed at the SLAC National Lab, we have been using EPICS for over a decade. EPICS is ubiquitous on our flagship product – the Compact Light Source. EPICS is not only used to control our laser and accelerator systems, but also to control our x-ray beamlines. The goal of this SBIR is for Lyncean Technologies to spearhead a worldwide collaborative effort for the development of control system tools for EPICS using the Qt framework, a C++-based coding environment that could serve as a competitive alternative to the Java-based Control System Studio (CSS). This grant's Phase I, not unlike a feasibility study, is designed for planning and scoping the preparatory work needed for Phase II or other funding opportunities. The three main objectives of this Phase I are (1) to become better acquainted with the existing EPICS Qt software and Qt framework in order to evaluate the best options for ongoing development, (2) to demonstrate that our engineers can lead the EPICS community and jump-start the Qt collaboration, and (3) to identify a scope for our future work with solicited feedback from the EPICS community. This Phase I report includes key technical findings. It clarifies the differences between the two apparently-competing EPICS Qt implementations, caQtDM and the QE Framework; it explains how to create python-bindings, and compares Qt graphical libraries. But this report is also a personal story that narrates the birth of a collaboration. Starting a collaboration is not the work of a single individual, but the work of many. Therefore this report is also an attempt to publicly give credit to many who supported the effort. The main take-away from this grant is the successful birth of an EPICS Qt collaboration, seeded with existing software from the PSI and the Australian Synchrotron. But a lot more needs to be done for the collaboration founders' vision to be realized, and for the collaboration to reach

  13. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  14. Continuous fiber ceramic composite. Phase I final report, April 1992--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettler, R.W.

    1995-04-01

    Babcock and Wilcox assembled a team to develop the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) processing technology, identify the industrial applications, generate design and life prediction software, and to begin the necessary steps leading to full commercialization of CFCC components. Following is a summary of Phase I activities on this program. B&W has selected an oxide-oxide composite system for development and optimization in this program. This selection was based on the results of exposure tests in combustion environments typical of the boiler and heat exchanger applications. Aluminum oxide fiber is the selected reinforcement, and both aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide matrices were selected, based on their superior resistance to chemical attack in hostile industrial service.

  15. Final Report SBIR Phase I, Improvement of Properties of Tubular Internal-Tin Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Final report of SBIR to develop an economical process that can produce the best material for high field magnets to be used in the next generation of accelerators. The overall problem is to develop an economical process that can produce material with good properties for high field magnets to be used in the future for High Energy Physics (HEP) applications. The Internal-tin (IT) process, called by some the Restacked Rod process (RRP), for making Nb 3 Sn has been very successful in achieving high J c properties in the high field region. As a result it has been used effectively in several high field magnets. Originally, when this material was processed to give the highest J c it behaved unstably in the low field region and consequently did not perform as well in magnets designed for intermediate field applications. In this field range, the Powder-in-Tube (PIT) material, that has a lower d eff and a high RRR, behaved more reliably. The IT material has been improved to give better stability in the low field range and consequently the process offers a considerable challenge to the PIT process for application in both types of magnets. The PIT material has two principal drawbacks - lower J c and high cost. Work has been carried out to address these two problems and Supergenics I LLC has reported, on a low cost tubular process that is under development. It has fewer problems than the (IT) process in making low d eff materials and is of lower cost than both the IT and PIT processes. At the present stage, the J c 's that have been achieved are similar to those of the PIT material but are below those of the IT material. The purpose of the work proposed here is to improve the properties of the material made by this tubular process that has been described previously.

  16. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical

  17. Hazardous waste management programs; Florida: authorization for interim authorization phase I--Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of final determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-07

    The State of Florida has applied for interim Authorization Phase I. EPA has reviewed Florida's application for Phase I and has determined that Florida's hazardous waste program is substantially equivalent to the Federal program covered by Phase I. The State of Florida is, hereby, granted Interim Authorization for Phase I to operate the State 's hazardous waste program, in lieu of the Federal program.

  18. Final Technical Report for Phase I Award DE-SC0003559

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Jeff L.; Glenn, Lee J.

    2010-09-28

    The Smart Grid opens the door to the development of many companion technologies which will in turn enable the development of a variety of devices for household electricity-consuming appliances that can communicate with it; especially, many major appliance manufacturers (such as Whirlpool and General Electric) have made public commitments to design their appliances to be Smart Grid-compatible over the next several years. Yet during that same time period, customers will purchase many millions of long-lasting appliances which are not compatible with the Smart Grid. This research project's purpose is to bring significant Smart Grid compatibility to previously-installed appliances that were not specifically designed for any Smart Grid communications, in a way that is both economical and attractive for users who want to share in the energy cost savings and reduction of peak power demand opportunities provided by the evolving Smart Grid infrastructure. The focus of this effort is to identify and research smart control solutions which take advantage of the effective strategies of demand-response (DR) communications from utilities [including time-of-day (TOD) and peak-demand pricing options] and function apart from any need for operational changes to be designed into the non-smart appliances. Our Phase I concepts promote technological advancements for enabling devices that shift the available-use time of millions of different appliances which otherwise have no Smart Grid capability. We researched low-cost microcontroller-based ways of creating devices with the ability to: (1) maintain an accurate time and day (with no need for battery backup throughout a power outage); (2) perform two-way wired and wireless communications directly with the utility company's demand management signals, to identify both low-cost time periods as well as critical-reduction periods when the cost of energy use would otherwise be much higher; (3) measure the power usage of the connected

  19. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  20. Parallel tools GUI framework-DOE SBIR phase I final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galarowicz, James [Argo Navis Technologies LLC., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2013-12-05

    Many parallel performance, profiling, and debugging tools require a graphical way of displaying the very large datasets typically gathered from high performance computing (HPC) applications. Most tool projects create their graphical user interfaces (GUI) from scratch, many times spending their project resources on simply redeveloping commonly used infrastructure. Our goal was to create a multiplatform GUI framework, based on Nokia/Digia’s popular Qt libraries, which will specifically address the needs of these parallel tools. The Parallel Tools GUI Framework (PTGF) uses a plugin architecture facilitating rapid GUI development and reduced development costs for new and existing tool projects by allowing the reuse of many common GUI elements, called “widgets.” Widgets created include, 2D data visualizations, a source code viewer with syntax highlighting, and integrated help and welcome screens. Application programming interface (API) design was focused on minimizing the time to getting a functional tool working. Having a standard, unified, and userfriendly interface which operates on multiple platforms will benefit HPC application developers by reducing training time and allowing users to move between tools rapidly during a single session. However, Argo Navis Technologies LLC will not be submitting a DOE SBIR Phase II proposal and commercialization plan for the PTGF project. Our preliminary estimates for gross income over the next several years was based upon initial customer interest and income generated by similar projects. Unfortunately, as we further assessed the market during Phase I, we grew to realize that there was not enough demand to warrant such a large investment. While we do find that the project is worth our continued investment of time and money, we do not think it worthy of the DOE's investment at this time. We are grateful that the DOE has afforded us the opportunity to make this assessment, and come to this conclusion.

  1. Study on an innovative fast reactor utilizing hydride neutron absorber - Final report of phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konashi, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Itoh, K.; Hirai, M.; Sato, J.; Kurosaki, K.; Suzuki, A.; Matsumura, Y.; Abe, S.

    2010-01-01

    These days, the demand to use nuclear resources efficiently is growing for long-term energy supply and also for solving the green house problem. It is indispensable to develop technologies to reduce environmental load with the nuclear energy supply for sustainable development of human beings. In this regard, the development of the fast breeder reactor (FBR) is preferable to utilize nuclear resources effectively and also to burn minor actinides which possess very long toxicity for more than thousands years if they are not extinguished. As one of the FBR developing works in Japan this phase I study started in 2006 to introduce hafnium (Hf) hydride and Gadolinium-Zirconium (Gd-Zr) hydride as new control materials in FBR. By adopting them, the FBR core control technology is improved by two ways. One is extension of control rod life time by using long life Hf hydride which leads to reduce the fabrication and disposal cost and the other is reduction of the excess reactivity by adopting Gd-Zr hydride which leads to reduce the number of control rods and simplifies the core upper structure. This three year study was successfully completed and the following results were obtained. The core design was performed to examine the applicability of the Hf hydride absorber to Japanese Sodium Fast Reactor (JSFR) and it is clarified that the control rod life time can be prolonged to 6 years by adopting Hf hydride and the excess reactivity of the beginning of the core cycle can be reduced to half and the number of the control rods is also reduced to half by using the Gd-Zr hydride burnable poison. The safety analyses also certified that the core safety can be maintained with the same reliability of JSFR Hf hydride and Gd-Zr hydride pellets were fabricated in good manner and their basic features for design use were measured by using the latest devices such as SEM-EDX. In order to reduce the hydrogen transfer through the stainless steel cladding a new technique which shares calorizing

  2. Phase I Final Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    processor we easily distinguish between these two risetimes and thereby count only alpha particles emitted by the sample. Alpha particles emitted from the sample tray are absorbed in the rear of the sample, so the tray's emissivity does not contribute to the background either. Extensions of the method to the counter's sidewalls similarly allow us to reject alpha particles emitted from the sidewalls. We can thus able obtain background rates over a factor of 1000 lower than in conventional instruments without active background rejection. Extending this principle to count at the 0.00001 alpha/cm 2 /hour, level encounters difficulties because there will typically be only 2.4 alpha particles per square meter per day. Since about 6 counts are required to measure activity at the 95% confidence level, large sample areas are required to make measurements in reasonable times. Unfortunately, increasing the counter's anode area to a square meter raises its capacitance so much that the preamplifier noise levels swamp the alpha particle signals and make counting impossible. In this SBIR we worked to solve this dilemma by segmenting the single large area electrode into several smaller, lower capacitance electrodes that could still detect the alpha particles reliably. Each electrode would have its own electronic and we would capture signals from all of them in coincidence (since an alpha track might well deposit charge on more than one electrode), a technique in which XIA is experienced. Therefore, in Phase I we worked to show proof of principle by subdividing our original 1,800 cm 2 electrode into 4 square segments, each 625 cm 2 and demonstrating that signal noise on individual channels reduced as expected. Because the Phase II counter with a 1 m 2 segmented anode would require 16 segments plus a segmented guard as well, we also designed low cost signal processing electronics to instrument it in Phase II. Our Phase I effort met our major proof of principle goals. In particular, reducing

  3. NIAC Phase I Study Final Report on Large Ultra-Lightweight Photonic Muscle Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The research goal is to develop new tools support NASA's mission of understanding of the Cosmos by developing cost effective solutions that yield a leap in performance and science data. 'Maikalani' in Hawaiian translates to, "knowledge we gain from the cosmos." Missions like Hubble have fundamentally changed humanity's view of the cosmos. Last year's Nobel prize in physics was a result of astronomical discoveries. $9B class JWST size (6.5 meter diameter) space telescopes, when launched are anticipated to rewrite our knowledge of physics. Here we report on a neoteric meta-material telescope mirror technology designed to enable a factor of 100 or more reduction in areal density, a factor of 100 reduction in telescope production and launch costs as well as other advantages; a leap to enable missions to image the cosmos in unprecedented detail, with the associated gain in knowledge. Whether terahertz, visible or X-ray, reflectors used for high quality electromagnetic imaging require shape accuracy (surface figure) to far better than 1 wavelength (lambda) of the incident photons, more typically lambda/10 or better. Imaging visible light therefore requires mirror surfaces that approximate a desired curve (e.g. a sphere or paraboloid) with smooth shape deviation of th less than approximately 1/1000 the diameter of a human hair. This requires either thick high modulus material like glass or metal, or actuators to control mirror shape. During Phase I our team studied a novel solution to this systems level design mass/shape tradespace requirement both to advance the innovative space technology concept and also to help NASA and other agencies meet current operational and future mission requirements. Extreme and revolutionary NASA imaging missions such as Terrestrial Planet Imager (TPI) require lightweight mirrors with minimum diameters of 20 to 40 meters. For reference, NASA's great achievement; the Hubble space telescope, is only 2.4 meters in diameter. What is required is a

  4. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  5. I. Final Report for DOE SBIR Phase I Project DE-SC0013795 Final Report for DOE SBIR Phase I Project DE-SC0013795 Microtron-based Compact, Portable Gamma-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, Robert J. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-01-09

    versions of microtrons with various energies, sizes and types would be produced and marketed, including a more compact and more portable 6 MeV battery-powered model that more closely meets the requirements in the original FOA topic description. In the course of the Phase I study, we also identified another microtron version, one that was larger (not compact) and more powerful than that of the Phase II prototype, which could serve as an intense source of photo- neutrons, up to 4 x 1012 n/s for use in nuclear medicine, short-lived isotope production, or other applications. In addition, it could produce gamma dose rates up to 130 kR/min-m with a heavy metal bremsstrahlung target. The results and specifications of this were submitted to IPAC16 (Reference [12]) the paper is included in Addendum B. Because this version was beyond the scope of the Phase I project, there is no additional description in the Final Report.

  6. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1979-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel, and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to protect the Zircaloy cladding tube from the harmful effects of localized stress, and reactive fission products during reactor service. This is the final report for PHASE 1 of this program. Support tests have shown that the barrier fuel resists PCI far better than does the conventional Zircaloy-clad fuel. Power ramp tests thus far have shown good PCI resistance for Cu-barrier fuel at burnup > 12 MWd/kg-U and for Zr-liner fuel > 16 MWd/kg-U. The program calls for continued testing to still higher burnup levels in PHASE 2

  7. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029)

  8. Systems study of fuels from grains and grasses. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, W.; Allen, A.; Athey, R.; McElroy, A.; Davis, M.; Bennett, M.

    1978-02-24

    The program reported on herein consists of a first phase analysis of the potential for significant and economically viable contributions to U.S. energy needs from grasses and grains by the photosynthetic production of biomass. The study does not include other cultivated crops such as sugar cane, sugar beets, cotton, tobacco, vegetables, fruits, etc. The scope of the study encompasses grain crop residues, whole plant biomass from grain crops and nongrain crops on cropland, and whole plant biomass from grasses on pasture, rangeland, and federal range. The basic approach to the study involves first an assessment of current total biomass generation from the various grasses and grains on cropland, pasture, range, and federal range, and aggregating the production by combinations of crop residues and whole plant biomass; second, evaluation of possibilities for introduction of new crops and expanding production to marginal or presently idle land; third, development of proposed reasonable scenarios for actually harvesting biomass from selected combinations of crop residues, forages and hays, and new crops from land now in production, plus additional marginal or underutilized land brought into production; and finally, assessment on national and regional or local scales of the production that might be affected by reasonable scenarios. This latter effort includes analysis of tentative possibilities for reallocating priorities and needs with regard to production of grain for export or for livestock production. The overall program includes a case study analysis of production economics for a representative farm of about 1,000 acres (405 ha) located in Iowa.

  9. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  10. Final Report Phase I Study to Characterize the Market Potential for Non-Motorized Travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    availability, population size, and a mix of geographic locations across the nation. Given the similarities in modeling results from walk trips and walk mileages, additional modeling efforts conducted under the later part of this study were focused on walk trips per person. Bike models were limited only with the stepwise logistic models using Census tracts in the selected regions. Due to NHTS sampling limitations, only about 12% of these tracts have bike trips recorded from NHTS sampled households. The modeling with NHTS bike data proved to be more challenging and time consuming than what was anticipated. Along with the late arrival of Nielsen employment data, the project team had to limit the modeling effort to focus on walking. Therefore, the final modeling and discriminant analysis was conducted only for walking trips.

  11. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical investigations in boreholes - Final report of the phase I geochemical investigations of the Stripa groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordstroem, D.K.; Carlsson, L.; Fontes, J.C.; Frits, P.; Moser, H.; Olsson, T.

    1985-07-01

    The hydrogeochemical investigations of Phase I of the Stripa Project (1980-1984) have been completed, and the results are presented in this final report. All chemical and isotopic data on the groundwaters from the beginning to the Stripa Project to the present (1977-84) are tabulated an used in the final interpretations. The background geology and hydrology is summarized and updated along with new analyses of the Stripa grantie. Water-rock interactions form a basic framework for the changes in major-element chemistry with depth, including carbonate geochemistry, the fluid-inclusion hypothesis, redox processes, and mineral precipitation. The irregular distribution of chloride suggests channelling is occurring and the effect of thermomechanical perturbations on the groundwater chemistry is documented. Stable and radioactive isotpes provide information of the origin and evolution of the groundwater itself and of several elments within the groundwater. Subsurface production of radionuclides is documented in these investigations, and a general picture of uranium transformations during weathering is presented. One of the primary conclusions reached in these studies is that different dissolved constituents will provide different residence times because they have different origins and different evolutionary histories that may or may not be related to the overall evolution of the groundwater itself. (author)

  12. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  13. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  14. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. Unit 1 of the Zion plant has been validated as a good choice for the Phase I study plant. Although no single nuclear power plant can represent all such plants equally well, selection criteria were developed to maximize the generic implications of Phase I of the SSMRP. On the basis of the selection criteria, the Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic acceleration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock). (author)

  15. COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardeman, B.; Swenson, D.; Finsterle, S.; Zhou, Q.

    2008-01-01

    This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

  16. Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1364-96: Phase I SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This project was a relationship between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Biological Detection, Inc. (now known as Cellomics, Inc.) It was funded as a Phase I SBIR from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded to Cellomics, Inc. with a subcontract to LLNL.

  17. Feasibility of an Integrated Expert Video Authoring Workstation for Low-Cost Teacher Produced CBI. SBIR Phase I: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IntelliSys, Inc., Syracuse, NY.

    This was Phase I of a three-phased project. This phase of the project investigated the feasibility of a computer-based instruction (CBI) workstation, designed for use by teachers of handicapped students within a school structure. This station is to have as a major feature the ability to produce in-house full-motion video using one of the…

  18. High Performance Nanolauncher, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Low Cost Nanolauncher (LCN) is an upper stage using a new, inexpensive propulsion system. The Phase I program will combine several technologies with a...

  19. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) defect characterization of nuclear reactor piping welds. Phase I. Final report, October 1985-March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.J.; Thome, D.K.

    1986-05-01

    The Phase I workscope was successfully completed. This work was directed at determining the most promising methods for application of EMATs to stainless steel piping examination. It consisted of a literature review, evaluation of shear and longitudinal wave inspection modes, and evaluation of several signal processing techniques to enhance signal/noise ratios. The work involved both hardware and software development. A high degree of success was obtained during the course of the work, indicating that further exploitation of the technique is fully warranted. Defects as small as 0.1 cm deep could be detected in wrought stainless piping, and the ability to detect defects in thick centrifugally cast stainless samples was demonstrated. In addition, the techniques showed promise for sizing the flaws. These results were achieved through a combination of synthetic aperture processing, temporal averaging and low frequency illumination. Additional techniques were evaluated, including frequency analysis, angle beam scanning and multimode inspection, but were shown to be of limited benefit for the samples available in Phase I. However, these techniques may offer potential for discriminating between cracks and geometric reflectors. 56 refs., 21 figs

  20. Central interstate low-level radioactive waste compact region site exclusionary screening study. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 assigns to the states the responsibility for disposal of the low-level radioactive waste generated within their boundaries. It also provides for regional compacts among states to address their needs on a broader basis and permits restriction of the use of regional disposal facilities after January 1, 1986, to generators of low-level waste within the region. Each state, either individually or as a member of a compact, must therefore consider the establishment of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility within its borders. The states of Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, and Oklahoma adopted the Central Interstate Low-Level Waste Compact (CILLWC) and legislation was submitted to Congress for consent in June of 1983 legislation is being reintroduced in the 99th Congress. In August of 1984, the CILLWC selected and contracted Dames and Moore to conduct a Phase I-Site Suitability Screening Study for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in the five-state region. This report presents the results of the Phase I Screening Study. Dames and Moore reported to the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the CILLWC which provided guidance and comment on work progress and direction

  1. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  2. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  3. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

  4. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  5. Commercial Application of a Photovoltaic Concentrator system. Phase I. Final report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.J.; Anderson, E.R.; Bardwell, K.M.

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the design and analysis of the BDM CAPVC (Commercial Application of a Photovoltaic Concentrator) system. The preliminary design, prototype test and evaluation, system analysis, and final design of a large-scale concentrating photovoltaic system are described. The application is on an attractive new office building which represents a large potential market. The photovoltaic concentrating array is a roof-mounted, single-axis linear parabolic trough, using single crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells. A total of 6720 square feet of aperture is focussed on 13,944 PV cells. The photovoltaic system operates in parallel with the local utility in an augmentary loadsharing operating mode. The array is actively cooled and the thermal energy utilized for building heat during winter months. (WHK)

  6. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation with boost chemotherapy for advanced T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Faye M.; Garden, Adam S.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Shin, Dong M.; Morrison, William; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Khuri, Fadlo; Clayman, Gary; Goepfert, Helmuth; Ang, K. Kian; Hong, Waun K.; Glisson, Bonnie S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the most common site of failure for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (PF) and definitive radiation at our center. Based on this, we studied the addition of chemotherapy during the boost phase of radiation after neoadjuvant PF for advanced T-stage (T3-T4) NPC. This strategy was based on theoretical radiosensitization with chemotherapy during accelerated repopulation of the tumor with relatively radioresistant clonogens. Methods and Materials: Three cycles of neoadjuvant PF was followed by conventionally fractionated radiation with additional PF during the boost portion of the radiation course. An initial Phase I study was done to establish the maximum tolerated dose of concurrent PF. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled. Six patients in Phase I defined the MTD for concurrent PF as: cisplatin 10 mg/m 2 /day and PF 320 mg/m 2 /day, on Days 1-5 during Weeks 6 and 7 of radiation therapy based on dose-limiting toxicities of mucositis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Forty-one patients were treated with concurrent therapy per protocol: complete, partial, and minor responses were seen in 23, 16, and 2 patients, respectively. Progression-free and overall survival rates at 5 years were 55% (95% CI, 41-75%) and 66% (95% CI, 52-85%), respectively. Seven of 11 tumor-related deaths were due to local recurrence. Nine of 10 patients with local recurrence had T4-stage disease at presentation. Local control of T4 disease was achieved in 74% of patients overall, and in 25% (1/4) with World Health Organization (WHO) type 1, 76% (16/21) with WHO type 2, and 90% (9/10) with WHO type 3 histology. Common toxicities included mucositis, dermatitis, fatigue, vomiting, and weight loss. Conclusions: This regimen was feasible and associated with promising overall survival. Local recurrence remains the major reason for treatment failure in advanced T-stage NPC, especially WHO types 1 and 2

  7. SBIR Phase I final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Grot

    2009-07-07

    The approach that we propose here in this SBIR proposal is a modified water electrolysis cell. In conventional water electrolysis the H2O is split into electrons, protons, and oxygen gas at the anode electrode. The electrons travel through an external power source and the protons travel through an electrolyte membrane to the cathode where they recombine to form hydrogen gas. The power source requires a minimum of 1.23 V to overcome the potential difference of the electrodes for the splitting of water. In contrast in our approach proposed here, instead of splitting water we are using acetate in wastewater and bacteria to oxidize the acetate into electrons and protons at the anode surface. The microbes release the electrons to the anode and the resulting protons move to the cathode electrode through the proton exchange membrane as described above and recombine to form hydrogen gas. The advantage here is that the required potential is now on the order of 0.25 to 0.8 V, and a considerable savings in electricity is realized to produce the same amount of hydrogen while at the same time removing organic matter from wastewater streams. Significant improvements in current density needs to be made in order for this type of technology to be economically viable

  8. Final Technical Report Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, Robert J

    2012-01-27

    Low energy electrons (often referred to as "electron clouds") in the beam chambers of high intensity accelerators and storage rings can limit their performance. They can limit intensity by causing instabilities, unacceptable pressure increases or increases in beam size. Thus, reliable simulations of electron cloud generation in the Los Alamos high intensity Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and similar machines would be a most valuable tool for improving our understanding of its origin, the parameters that affect it and how it might be controlled. Such tools would provide cost-effective methods for designing mitigation measures and evaluating them before going to the expense of fabrication and experimental testing in an operating accelerator facility. In this project we have developed and tested several significant improvements to a widely used electron cloud simulation code, POSINST. In our version, LANLPOSINST V6, we have add several important features including the capability to model a multi-element section of the ring consisting of two quadrupole magnets with 3-dimensional magnetic fields, dipole magnet end fields, several drift spaces and various electron cloud diagnostics. Improvements were also added to the modeling of the initial primary or seed electrons from proton beam losses. One important conclusion from benchmarking these improvements was the need to include seed electrons produced from secondary particles resulting from the primary proton beam losses.

  9. Photovoltaic Wire, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  10. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  11. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

  13. DOE SBIR Phase I Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER83067, ''A Flexible and Economical Automated Nucleophilic [18F]Fluorination synthesis System for PET Radiopharmaceuticals.'' Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, Henry C.

    2001-01-01

    Phase I Final Report. A prototype manual remote synthesis system based on the unit operations approach was designed, constructed, and functionally tested. This general-purpose system was validated by its configuration and initial use for the preparation of the PET radiopharmaceutical [F-18]FLT using [F-18]fluoride ion

  14. Final Stage Development of Reactor Console Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Idris Taib; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2013-01-01

    The Reactor Console Simulator PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor was developed since end of 2011 and now in the final stage of development. It is will be an interactive tool for operator training and teaching of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor. Behavior and characteristic for reactor console and reactor itself can be evaluated and understand. This Simulator will be used as complement for actual present reactor console. Implementation of human system interface (HSI) is using computer screens, keyboard and mouse. Multiple screens are used to match the physical of present reactor console. LabVIEW software are using for user interface and mathematical calculation. Polynomial equation based on control rods calibration data as well as operation parameters record was used to calculate and estimated reactor console parameters. The capabilities in user interface, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics can be expanded and explored to simulation as well as modeling for New Reactor Console, Research Reactor and Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  15. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    . This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigative activities at Savannah will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with the DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Savannah will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Savannah investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Savannah site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne will issue a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that will be submitted to the MoDNR for review and approval. The agency has already reviewed and approved (with minor changes) the present Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) under which Argonne currently operates in Kansas. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) will provide detailed information and guidance on the investigative technologies, analytical methodologies, quality assurance-quality control measures, and general health and safety policies to be employed by

  16. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the possible subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at the Montgomery City site and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially represented by the contamination. This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigations at Montgomery City will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Montgomery City will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Montgomery City investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Montgomery City site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne has issued a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that has been reviewed and approved by the MoDNR for current use. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) provides

  17. SBIR PHASE I FINAL REPORT: Adoption of High Performance Computational (HPC) Modeling Software for Widespread Use in the Manufacture of Welded Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brust, Frederick W. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2), Columbus, OH (United States); Punch, Edward F. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2), Columbus, OH (United States); Kurth, Elizabeth A. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2), Columbus, OH (United States); Kennedy, James C. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2), Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-12-02

    Many US manufacturing companies have moved fabrication and production facilities off shore because of cheaper labor costs. A key aspect in bringing these jobs back to the US is the use of technology to render US-made fabrications more efficient overall with higher quality. A new initiative of the current administration has the goal of enhancing competitiveness to retain manufacturing jobs in the US. One significant competitive advantage that has emerged in the US over the last two decades is the use of virtual design for fabrication of large structures in the light and heavy materials industries. Industries that have used virtual design and analysis tools have reduced material parts size, developed environmentally-friendly fabrication processes, improved product quality and performance, and reduced manufacturing costs. Indeed, Caterpillar Inc. (CAT), one of the partners in this effort, continues to have a large fabrication presence in the US because of the use of weld fabrication modeling to optimize fabrications by controlling weld residual stresses and distortions and improving fatigue, corrosion, and fracture performance. This report describes Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2's) DOE SBIR Phase I results which extended an existing, state-of-the-art software code, VFT, currently used to design and model large welded structures prior to fabrication - to a broader range of products with widespread applications for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). VFT helps control distortion, can minimize and/or control residual stresses, control welding microstructure, and pre-determine welding parameters such as weld-sequencing, pre-bending, thermal-tensioning, etc. VFT uses material properties, consumable properties, etc. as inputs. Through VFT, manufacturing companies can avoid costly design changes after fabrication. This leads to the concept of joint design/fabrication where these important disciplines are intimately linked to minimize

  18. Design of clinical trials Phase I and II with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, C.A.; Soroa, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    We presented some usual designs for clinical studies in Phase I and Phase II. For Phase I we considered the 3 + 3 Classic design, designs with accelerated titration and those with dose escalation schemes with overdose control (EWOC). For Phase II designs with efficacy outcomes are presented. The design proposed by Fleming is discussed as well as those with inclusion of patients in two stages: Gehan’s design and the Optimal two–stage Simon’s design. We also discussed the design of combined endpoints of efficacy and safety of Bryant and Day with an application example of therapeutically Lu-177. Finally some proposals for phase II trials with control group are considered. (authors) [es

  19. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  20. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  1. Palliation of advanced pelvic malignant disease with large fraction pelvic radiation and misonidazole: final report of RTOG phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanos, W.J. Jr.; Wasserman, T.; Meoz, R.; Sala, J.; Kong, J.; Stetz, J.

    1987-01-01

    Between October 1979 and June 1982 forty-six patients were entered on a non-randomized Phase I-II protocol for the evaluation of Misonidazole combined with high dose per fraction radiation for the treatment of advanced pelvic malignancies. Pelvic radiation consisted of 1000 cGy in one fraction repeated at 4-week intervals for a total of three treatments. Oral Misonidazole at a dose of 4 gm/m2 was administered 4-6 hr prior to radiation (total dose 12 g/m2). The distribution of histology consisted of 20 gynecologic, 24 bowel, and 2 prostate malignancies. Of the thirty-seven patients completing the three treatments; there were 6 complete responses (14% CR), 10 partial responses (27% PR) 19 minimal or no response (32% NR), and 4 unevaluable. One patient remains NED 5.5 years following radiation. Toxicity directly related to Misonidazole was minimal and consisted primarily of transcient Grade 1, 2 peripheral neuropathy (20% Grade 1, 4% Grade 2) and Grade 2 ototoxicity (4%). Radiation toxicity was significant for late bowel damage. There were 4 (11%) Grade 3 and 7 (19%) Grade 4 gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities. Kaplan-Meier plot of GI toxicity showed a progressive increase in incidence with time for projected rate of 49% Grade 3, 4 by 12-month. GI toxicity (Grade 3, 4) was also related to tumor response. The complication rate was 80% (4/6) for CR, 30% (3/10) for PR and 26% (5/19) for NR or progression. Because of the GI complication rate, this protocol for palliation of advanced pelvic malignancies has been replaced by a protocol that uses 4 fractions over 2 days (b.i.d.) of 370 cGy per fraction repeated at 3-week intervals for a total of 3 courses

  2. Biomass gasification, stage 2 LTH. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerle, I.; Chambert, L.; Hallgren, A.; Hellgren, R.; Johansson, Anders; Mirazovic, M.; Maartensson, R.; Padban, N.; Ye Zhicheng [comps.] [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering II

    1996-11-01

    This report presents the final report of the first phase of a project dealing with a comprehensive investigation on pressurized biomass gasification. The intention with the project first phase was firstly to design, install and to take in operation a PCFB biomass gasifier. A thorough feasibility study was made during the first half year including extensive calculations on an internal circulating fluidized bed concept. The experimental phase was intended to study pressurized gasification up to 2.5 MPa (N{sub 2}, air) at temperatures in the interval 850-950 deg C. The more specific experimental objective was to examine the impact from various process conditions on the product formation as well as on the function of the different systems. The technical concept has been able to offer novel approaches regarding biomass feeding and PCFB gasification. The first gasification test run was made in December 1993 after almost 18 months of installation work. Extensive work was made during 1994 and the first half of 1995 to find the balance of the PCFB gasifier. It turned out to be very difficult to find operating parameters such that gave a stable circulation of the bed material during gasification mode. Apparently, the produced gas partly changed the pressure profile over the riser which in turn gave unstable operation. After a comprehensive investigation involving more than 100 hours of tests runs it was decided to leave the circulating bed concept and focus on bubbling bed operations. The test rig is currently operating as a bubbling bed gasifier. 4 refs, 24 figs, 6 tabs

  3. Joint U. S. --U. S. S. R. test of U. S. MHD electrode systems in U. S. S. R. U-02 MHD facility (phase I). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosler, W R [ed.

    1976-01-01

    The first (Phase I) joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. test of U.S. electrode materials was carried out in Moscow between September 25 and October 8, 1975 in the Soviet U-02 MHD facility. The test procedure followed closely a predetermined work plan designed to test five different zirconia based materials and the cathode and anode electrode wall modules under MHD operating conditions. The materials which were selected were 88Zr0/sub 2/-12Y/sub 2/0/sub 3/, 82Zr0/sub 2/-18Ce02, 50Zr0/sub 2/-50Ce0/sub 2/, 25Zr0/sub 2/-75Ce0/sub 2/ and 20Zr0/sub 2/-78Ce0/sub 2/-2Ta/sub 2/0/sub 5/. The electrode modules were constructed by Westinghouse Research and Development Laboratory. Each of the five electrode materials had four different current densities established between the anode and cathode during the experiment which lasted a total of 127 hours. There were four main phases in the test schedule: (1) start-up of the channel over a specific heating period. No seed (K/sub 2/C0/sub 3/) introduction - 18 hours. (2) Electrical tests at operating temperature to investigate electro-physical characteristics of the channel and electrodes - 6 hours. (3) Operating life test - 94 hours. (4) Shut-down of the channel over a specific cool down period - 9 hours. All except six electrode pairs performed satisfactorily during the entire test. These were the pairs which were designated to carry maximum or near maximum current density. Five pairs failed early in the life test and the sixth pair failed in the last several hours. Failure was not due to the electrode materials, however, but due to lead-out melting caused by joule heating in the platinum wires. The U-02 facility is described and the operational parameters are given for each phase of the test. The electrode and insulating walls are described and the appropriate parameters that are used to predict the performance of the module are given.

  4. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankaanranta, Leena [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boneca Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Saarilahti, Kauko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Atula, Timo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Collan, Juhani [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika [Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Uusi-Simola, Jouni [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vaelimaeki, Petteri [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boneca Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Maekitie, Antti [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Revitzer, Hannu [Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Esopo (Finland); Kouri, Mauri [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.joensuu@hus.fi [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  5. Hybrid Nanocomposite Photovoltaics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will develop an innovative solar cell design that combines nanotechnology with conducting polymer...

  6. A prospective phase I comparison of toxicity and cosmesis outcomes of single-fraction IORT and hypofractionated radiotherapy with IORT boost in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Tanuja; Babaran, Wesley; Forouzannia, Afshin; Williams, Venita; Harness, Jay; Carpenter, Michele; Gobran, Maher; Khanijou, Rajesh; Wagman, Brittany; Ash, Robert; Wagman, Lawrence D

    Radiation therapy is proven to reduce local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer. To reduce toxicity, treatment time, and improve accuracy, intraoperative radiation therapy was used as definitive treatment or as a boost. The study's objective was to compare the short-term toxicity and cosmesis of single-fraction (SF) IORT and hypofractionated radiotherapy with IORT boost (HfB) given as definitive treatment. Between March 2011 and December 2013, 57 patients aged 45-91 years and 24 patients aged 43-83 years (total n = 81) with Stage 0-II were treated with SF or HfB (Mobetron, IntraOp Medical, Sunnyvale, CA). For SF treatment, 21 Gy was delivered using 4.5-6 cm applicators with electron energies from 6 to 12 MeV. For HfB, an intraoperative boost of 10 Gy was delivered using 4-7 cm applicators with energies from 4 to 12 MeV followed by whole-breast radiation with 40.5 Gy over 15 fractions. Toxicity was assessed at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria and cosmesis. At 12 months, SF and HfB were well tolerated by all patients with no Grade 3+ toxicity. At 1 year, Grade-2 toxicity was resolved. Ninety-eight percent of SF patients and ninety percent of HfB patients had 0-1 grade toxicity. In the SF and HfB groups, 100% of patients had excellent or good cosmesis at 12-month followup interval. The SF exhibited a more favorable cosmesis with a higher percentage of excellent scores compared with HfB (80.4% vs. 45%; p = 0.0033). After breast conservation surgery, SF or HfB may be an option for patients with early-stage breast cancer compared to conventional external beam radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase I study of cisplatin analogue nedaplatin, paclitaxel, and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    The standard treatment of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer is concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients in good general condition, but where the optimal chemotherapeutic regimen has not been determined. Patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel on day 1 every 4 weeks for 3-4 cycles and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions for 6 weeks) starting on day 1. The dose of paclitaxel was escalated from 120 mg/m 2 in level 1, 135 mg/m 2 in level 2 to 150 mg/m 2 in level 3. A total of 18 patients (14 males and 4 females, with a median age of 62.5 years) were evaluated in this study. Full cycles of chemotherapy were administered in 83% of patients in level 1, and in 50% of patients in levels 2 and 3. No more than 50% of patients developed grade 4 neutropenia. Transient grade 3 esophagitis and infection were noted in one patient, and unacceptable pneumonitis was noted in three (17%) patients, two of whom died of the toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), evaluated in 15 patients, noted in one of the six patients in level 1, three of the six patients in level 2 and one of the three patients in level 3. One DLT at level 2 developed later as radiation pneumonitis. Thus, the maximum tolerated dose was determined to be level 1. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 67% (41-87%) with 12 partial responses. The doses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin could not be escalated as a result of severe pulmonary toxicity. (author)

  8. Phase I Trial of Radiation With Concurrent and Consolidation Pemetrexed and Cisplatin in Patients With Unresectable Stage IIIA/B Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; MacRae, Robert; Laurie, Scott; Sun, Alex; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha; Pearson, Shannon; Southwood, Bernadette; Wang, Lisa; McGill, Shauna; Iscoe, Neill; Shepherd, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of concurrent pemetrexed/cisplatin/thoracic radiotherapy followed by consolidation pemetrexed/cisplatin for unresectable Stage IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with 2 on Days 1 and 22 for Dose Levels 1, 2, and 3/4, respectively) and cisplatin (25 mg/m 2 Days 1-3 for Dose Levels 1-3; 20 mg/m 2 Days 1-5 for Dose Level 4) concurrent with thoracic radiation (61-66 Gy in 31-35 fractions). Consolidation consisted of two cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin (500 mg/m 2 , 75 mg/m 2 ) 21 days apart, after concurrent therapy. Results: Between January 2006 and October 2007, 16 patients entered the study. Median follow-up was 17.2 months. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Median radiation dose was 64 Gy (range, 45-66 Gy). Rates of significant Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity were 38% and 7%, respectively. One patient experienced Grade 3 acute esophagitis, and 2 experienced late (Grade 3) esophageal stricture, successfully managed with dilation. One patient experienced Grade 3 pneumonitis. The overall response rate was 88%. One-year overall survival was 81%. Conclusions: Full systemic dose pemetrexed seems to be safe with full-dose cisplatin and thoracic radiation in Stage IIIA/B NSCLC. Pemetrexed is the first third-generation cytotoxic agent tolerable at full dose in this setting. A Phase II study evaluating Dose Level 4 is ongoing.

  9. DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM ENABLING CUBESAT EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru; Dr. Steven Howe

    2014-06-01

    -based systems. The second scenario allows for the production of electrical power, which is then available for electric-based propulsion. Additionally, once at location the production of electrical power can be dedicated to the payload’s communication system for data transfer. Ultimately, the proposed dual-mode propulsion platform capitalizes on the benefits of two types of propulsion methods – the thrust of thermal propulsion ideal for quick orbital maneuvers and the specific impulse of electric propulsion ideal for efficient inter-planetary travel. Previous versions of this RTR-based concept have been studied for various applications [NETS 1-3]. The current version of this concept is being matured through a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I grant, awarded for FY 2014. In this study the RTR concept is being developed to deliver a 6U CubeSat payload to the orbit of the Saturnian moon - Enceladus. Additionally, this study will develop an entire mission architecture for Enceladus targeting a total allowable launch mass of 1,000 kg.

  10. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  11. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A', the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-I13 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval scenario similar to those used for TRU drum retrieval at LANL and SRS. Phase I retrieval consists of the activities associated with the assessment of approximately 10,000 55-gallon drums of suspect TRU-waste in burial ground 218-W-4C and the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Four of the trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 1,4,20, and 29) are prime candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain large numbers of suspect TRU drums, stacked from 2 to 5 drums high, on an asphalt pad. In fact, three of the trenches (Trenches 1,20, and 29) contain waste that has not been covered with soil, and about 1500 drums can be retrieved without excavation. The other three trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 7, 19, and 24) are not candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain significant numbers of boxes. Drums will be retrieved from the four candidate trenches, checked for structural integrity, overpacked, if necessary, and assayed at the burial

  12. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A1, the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-113 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval scenario similar to those used for TRU drum retrieval at LANL and SRS. Phase I retrieval consists of the activities associated with the assessment of approximately 10,000 55-gallon drums of suspect TRU-waste in burial ground 218-W-4C and the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Four of the trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 1, 4, 20, and 29) are prime candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain large numbers of suspect TRU drums, stacked from 2 to 5 drums high, on an asphalt pad. In fact, three of the trenches (Trenches 1 , 20, and 29) contain waste that has not been covered with soil, and about 1500 drums can be retrieved without excavation. The other three trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 7, 19, and 24) are not candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain significant numbers of boxes. Drums will be retrieved from the four candidate trenches, checked for structural integrity, overpacked, if necessary, and assayed at the burial

  13. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit and distribution networks. Phase I. Identification and assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The study assesses the preliminary technical, economic, and institutional feasibility of district heating systems achieved by retrofitting existing utility power plants in three Wisconsin cities: Green Bay, Janesville/Beloit, and Madison. The overall approach consists of surveying the State of Wisconsin to identify all existing intermediate and base-loaded electric-generating facilities. Once identified, screening criteria are developed to narrow the list to the three most promising sites. For each of the three sites, an extensive market analysis is performed to identify and characterize thermal loads and survey potential users on their views and concerns regarding the concept. Parallel to this effort, each of the three sites is evaluated on its technical and institutional merits. The technical evaluation centers on identifying and evaluating utility plant retrofit schemes and distribution system alternatives to service the identified thermal market. The institutional analysis evaluates potential barriers such as environmental, distribution system right-of-way, and legal issues within the infrastructure of the state, city, and community. Finally, all previous aspects of the analysis are combined to determine the economic viability of each site. It is concluded that Green Bay is the most promising site.

  14. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  15. Use of heat from tunnel water from the low-level Gotthard and Loetschberg tunnels - Final report phase I - Basic heat potential; Waermenutzung Tunnelwasser. Basistunnel Loetschberg und Gotthard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppermann, G; Dups, Ch

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of investigations made into the possible use of the drainage water collected in the low-level tunnels under the Swiss Alps for heating purposes. The report presents the findings of the first phase of the project concerning basic data on the amount of heat available, possible areas for its use and details concerning the integration in the general planning of the building and operation of the tunnels. Details of the thermal potential, based on prognoses for drainage water quantities made by the tunnel builders are presented. Possible uses of the heat, such as for the heating of residential buildings in towns near the ends of the tunnels are discussed and reference is made to further reports on concrete projects in Frutigen and Bodio. The authors emphasise the importance of the careful co-ordination with AlpTransit, the builders of the tunnel, and of planning the use of the heat in good time.

  16. Composite Repair System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GTL has developed an innovative composite repair methodology known as the Composite Repair System (CRS). In this phase I effort, CRS is being developed for the...

  17. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  18. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Yolanda I.; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m 2 ) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 ) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m 2 ) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade ≥4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade ≥3 dyspnea, or Grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade ≥3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine

  19. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  20. The European Dioxin Emission Inventory. Stage II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quass, U.; Fermann, M.; Broeker, G.

    2001-07-01

    For Stage II of the European Dioxin Project the following objectives were set: - Amendment of existing emission data collected for most relevant emission sources in order to reduce uncertainties of emission estimates. Collecting first emission data from countries not yet performing dioxin emission measurement programs. Extending the inventory of dioxin emissions to ambient air produced in Stage I by a complementary study on emissions to land and water. Extending the regional scope of data collection to countries in Central Europe. The report of Stage II of the European Dioxin Project is presented in 3 Volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview on the background and approach of different activities carried out and on the results obtained. These results are put into a broader view regarding the dioxin reduction measures in Europe leading to conclusions and recommendation for future work. Volume 2 of the report contains a detailed presentation of the sub-projects carried out. The chapters of Volume 2 are structured in a similar manner and start with a short summary in order to allow for a fast cross-reading. In the case of the desk-top studies an overview of the main results or statements is given. Regarding emission measurements details on the experimental set-up and the facilities being investigated are presented. Volume 3 contains a re-evaluation of the dioxin emission inventory presented for the most relevant sources types in the Stage I report. New data gathered from the projects of Stage II as well as from independent activities in the European countries are considered for a revision of the 1995 emission estimates. Additionally, based on current trends and activities the PCDD/F emissions for the years 2000 and 2005 are estimated. Finally, an attempt is made to evaluate the PCDD/F emission reduction rates which might be possible to achieve by the year 2005 compared to 1985. (orig.)

  1. Dynamics of process at the final stage of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koljari, I.G.; Mavlitov, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous experimental data show, that the final stage of nuclear fission near to a scission point plays an essential role at formation of characteristics of fission products. At the description of a final stage of fission there is a number of problems: Definition of the form of the nuclear near the scission point and definition forms of a fission fragments; The account of dynamic processes in compound nuclear directly before of fission. The condition of the quasistatic al adiabatic process - dS/dt=0 - is applied in a point of transition from the uniform compound nuclei to several forms for definition of generalized coordinates and speeds. Calculation of dependence of post neutrons from nuclear mass of fission fragments for reactions is α+ 83 Bi 209 → 85 At 213 (E lab = 45 MeV); α+ 92 U 242 → 94 Pu 242 (E lab = 45 MeV); 8 O 18 + 79 Au 197 → 97 Fr 215 (E lab = 159 MeV). System of equations, which describes behaviour of system in a point of nuclear fission-transition from the uniform form to system of a two (and, probably more) fission fragments is given. The system of the equations allows in a fission point to define the generalized coordinates, and the generalized speeds for each of the generalized coordinates of collective deformation variables

  2. Availability program: Phase I report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.; Keeton, D.C.; Riemer, B.W.; Waganer, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    An Availability Working Group was formed within the Office of Fusion Energy in March 1984 to consider the establishment of an availability program for magnetic fusion. The scope of this program is defined to include the development of (1) a comprehensive data base, (2) empirical correlations, and (3) analytical methods for application to fusion facilities and devices. The long-term goal of the availability program is to develop a validated, integrated methodology that will provide (1) projections of plant availability and (2) input to design decisions on maintainability and system reliability requirements. The Phase I study group was commissioned to assess the status of work in progress that is relevant to the availability program. The scope of Phase I included surveys of existing data and data collection programs at operating fusion research facilities, the assessment of existing computer models to calculate system availability, and the review of methods to predict and correlate data on component failure and maintenance. The results of these investigations are reported to the Availability Working Group in this document

  3. The Final Stages of Massive Star Evolution and Their Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Alexander

    In this chapter I discuss the final stages in the evolution of massive stars - stars that are massive enough to burn nuclear fuel all the way to iron group elements in their core. The core eventually collapses to form a neutron star or a black hole when electron captures and photo-disintegration reduce the pressure support to an extent that it no longer can hold up against gravity. The late burning stages of massive stars are a rich subject by themselves, and in them many of the heavy elements in the universe are first generated. The late evolution of massive stars strongly depends on their mass, and hence can be significantly effected by mass loss due to stellar winds and episodic mass loss events - a critical ingredient that we do not know as well as we would like. If the star loses all the hydrogen envelope, a Type I supernova results, if it does not, a Type II supernova is observed. Whether the star makes neutron star or a black hole, or a neutron star at first and a black hole later, and how fast they spin largely affects the energetics and asymmetry of the observed supernova explosion. Beyond photon-based astronomy, other than the sun, a supernova (SN 1987) has been the only object in the sky we ever observed in neutrinos, and supernovae may also be the first thing we will ever see in gravitational wave detectors like LIGO. I conclude this chapter reviewing the deaths of the most massive stars and of Population III stars.

  4. The Final Stage of Gravitationally Collapsed Thick Matter Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Nicolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a minimal length, physical objects cannot collapse to an infinite density, singular, matter point. In this paper, we consider the possible final stage of the gravitational collapse of “thick” matter layers. The energy momentum tensor we choose to model these shell-like objects is a proper modification of the source for “noncommutative geometry inspired,” regular black holes. By using higher momenta of Gaussian distribution to localize matter at finite distance from the origin, we obtain new solutions of the Einstein equation which smoothly interpolates between Minkowski’s geometry near the center of the shell and Schwarzschild’s spacetime far away from the matter layer. The metric is curvature singularity free. Black hole type solutions exist only for “heavy” shells; that is, M ≥Me, where Me is the mass of the extremal configuration. We determine the Hawking temperature and a modified area law taking into account the extended nature of the source.

  5. Service water system aging assessment - Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrell, D.B.; Zimmerman, P.W.; Gore, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Service Water System (SWS) represents the final heat transfer loop between decay heat generated in the nuclear core and the safe dispersal of that heat energy in the environment. It is the objective of this investigation to demonstrate that aging phenomena can be identified and quantified such that aging degradation of system components can be detected and mitigated prior to the reduction of system availability to below an acceptable threshold. The approach used during the Phase I task was to (1) perform a literature search of government and private sector reports which relate to service water, aging related degradation, and potential methodologies for analysis; (2) assemble a data base which contains all the commercial power plants in the US, their Service Water System configuration, characteristics, and water source; (3) obtain and examine the available service water data from large generic data bases, i.e. NPRDS, LER, NPE, inspection reports, and other relevant plant reference data; (4) perform a fault tree analysis of a typical plant service water systems to examine failure propagation and understand specific input requirements of probabilistic risk analyses; (5) develop an in-depth questionnaire protocol for examining the information resource at a power plant which is not available through data base query and visit a central station power plant and solicit the required information; (6) analyze the information obtained from the in-depth plant interrogation and draw contrasts and conclusions with the data base information; (7) utilize the plant information to perform an interim assessment of service water system degradation mechanisms and focus future investigations. This paper addresses the elements of this task plan numbered 1, 3, 6, and 7. The remaining items are detailed in the phase-I report

  6. Surface Abrasion Tool, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Program Planning Group (MPPG) Final Report reiterates the importance of planetary sample return stating that sample return architectures provide a promising...

  7. Results on neutrinoless double beta decay from GERDA phase I

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    After motivating searches of double beta decay and lepton number violation details about the construction, operation and analysis of GERDA will be given. Results of the recently completed phase I of data taking will then be presented and interpreted. Finally an outlook on future plans will be given.

  8. COMPASS Final Report: Enceladus Solar Electric Propulsion Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The results of the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) COllaborative Modeling and Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) internal Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) stage design are documented in this report (Figure 1.1). The SEP Stage was designed to deliver a science probe to Saturn (the probe design was performed separately by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center s (GSFC) Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC)). The SEP Stage delivers the 2444 kg probe on a Saturn trajectory with a hyperbolic arrival velocity of 5.4 km/s. The design carried 30 percent mass, 10 percent power, and 6 percent propellant margins. The SEP Stage relies on the probe for substantial guidance, navigation and control (GN&C), command and data handling (C&DH), and Communications functions. The stage is configured to carry the probe and to minimize the packaging interference between the probe and the stage. The propulsion system consisted of a 1+1 (one active, one spare) configuration of gimbaled 7 kW NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion thrusters with a throughput of 309 kg Xe propellant. Two 9350 W GaAs triple junction (at 1 Astronomical Unit (AU), includes 10 percent margin) ultra-flex solar arrays provided power to the stage, with Li-ion batteries for launch and contingency operations power. The base structure was an Al-Li hexagonal skin-stringer frame built to withstand launch loads. A passive thermal control system consisted of heat pipes to north and south radiator panels, multilayer insulation (MLI) and heaters for the Xe tank. All systems except tanks and solar arrays were designed to be single fault tolerant.

  9. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, C.E.

    1995-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates

  10. Dental Age Estimation (DAE): Data management for tooth development stages including the third molar. Appropriate censoring of Stage H, the final stage of tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Graham J; McDonald, Fraser; Andiappan, Manoharan; Lucas, Victoria S

    2015-11-01

    The final stage of dental development of third molars is usually helpful to indicate whether or not a subject is aged over 18 years. A complexity is that the final stage of development is unlimited in its upper border. Investigators usually select an inappropriate upper age limit or censor point for this tooth development stage. The literature was searched for appropriate data sets for dental age estimation and those that provided the count (n), the mean (x¯), and the standard deviation (sd) for each of the tooth development stages. The Demirjian G and Demirjian H were used for this study. Upper and lower limits of the Stage G and Stage H data were calculated limiting the data to plus or minus three standard deviations from the mean. The upper border of Stage H was limited by appropriate censoring at the maximum value for Stage G. The maximum age at attainment from published data, for Stage H, ranged from 22.60 years to 34.50 years. These data were explored to demonstrate how censoring provides an estimate for the correct maximum age for the final stage of Stage H as 21.64 years for UK Caucasians. This study shows that confining the data array of individual tooth developments stages to ± 3sd provides a reliable and logical way of censoring the data for tooth development stages with a Normal distribution of data. For Stage H this is inappropriate as it is unbounded in its upper limit. The use of a censored data array for Stage H using Percentile values is appropriate. This increases the reliability of using third molar Stage H alone to determine whether or not an individual is over 18 years old. For Stage H, individual ancestral groups should be censored using the same technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. All optical vector magnetometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research project will investigate a novel method of operating an atomic magnetometer to simultaneously measure total magnetic fields and vector magnetic...

  12. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring the state of consciousness of crew members in operational...

  13. Shape Memory Alloy Adaptive Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will demonstrate and scale up an innovative manufacturing process that yields aerospace grade shape memory alloy (SMA) solids and periodic...

  14. Novel Versatile Intelligent Drug Delivery, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project will demonstrate and develop a novel micro-pump capable of controlled and selective chemical transport. Phase I will create, characterize, and...

  15. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop an ultrasensitive, laser-based formaldehyde gas sensor system for airborne and ground-based...

  16. Slow and Fast Light, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program 2015 Phase I Solicitation S3.08: Slow and Fast Light, Torch Technologies in partnership...

  17. Deep Ultraviolet Macroporous Silicon Filters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make deep and far UV optical filters from macroporous silicon. This type of filter consists of an array of...

  18. Uncertainty Quantification in Aerodynamics Simulations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work (Phases I and II) is to develop uncertainty quantification methodologies and software suitable for use in CFD simulations of...

  19. Architecture-Based Reuse Innovations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I proposal responds to the Solicitation requirements by scoping the effort involved in developing a common software executive and aligned library of...

  20. Magnetically Modified Asymmetric Supercapacitors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is for the development of an asymmetric supercapacitor that will have improved energy density and cycle life....

  1. Scrubbers: A popular Phase I compliance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.E.; Bissell, P.E.; Koch, B.J.; Rutledge, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    As utilities commit to compliance plans to meet the Phase I requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, there are indications that scrubbing may account for up to 50 percent of the total SO 2 reductions in Phase I. This paper presents and analyzes the critical reasons that explain how and why scrubber-based compliance strategies have developed into the least-cost option in Phase I for many utilities. A hypothetical utility system was simulated to study the impacts of various technological, legislative, and regulatory issues on compliance decisions and costs. Issues evaluated using the hypothetical system include the emissions cap, Clean Air Act and state incentives to scrub, improvements in scrubber technology and costs, and the integration of Phase I and II compliance strategies by the phased installation of scrubbers. In combination, these considerations increase the attractiveness of scrubbers during the 1995-1999 Phase I period. Other considerations that will ultimately influence the amount of Phase I scrubbing capacity include the additional power generation costs associated with fuel switching, the uncertainty of low-sulfur coal price projections, fuel supply flexibility, scrubber market aspects, and socioeconomic considerations

  2. Dose escalation methods in phase I cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Lee, J Jack; Siu, Lillian L

    2009-05-20

    Phase I clinical trials are an essential step in the development of anticancer drugs. The main goal of these studies is to establish the recommended dose and/or schedule of new drugs or drug combinations for phase II trials. The guiding principle for dose escalation in phase I trials is to avoid exposing too many patients to subtherapeutic doses while preserving safety and maintaining rapid accrual. Here we review dose escalation methods for phase I trials, including the rule-based and model-based dose escalation methods that have been developed to evaluate new anticancer agents. Toxicity has traditionally been the primary endpoint for phase I trials involving cytotoxic agents. However, with the emergence of molecularly targeted anticancer agents, potential alternative endpoints to delineate optimal biological activity, such as plasma drug concentration and target inhibition in tumor or surrogate tissues, have been proposed along with new trial designs. We also describe specific methods for drug combinations as well as methods that use a time-to-event endpoint or both toxicity and efficacy as endpoints. Finally, we present the advantages and drawbacks of the various dose escalation methods and discuss specific applications of the methods in developmental oncotherapeutics.

  3. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  4. Investigations on site suitability for a final repository of low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Status report of phase I investigations for the feasible Bois de la Glaive site (community of Ollon, VD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    On 30 th September 1985, site suitability investigations with a view to disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste were licensed by the Federal Government at three locations - Bois de la Glaive (Canton Vaud), Oberbauenstock (Canton Uri) and Piz Pian Grand (Canton Graubuenden). This report presents the status of the investigations at Bois de la Glaive as at the end of 1987 and discusses the results of the programme. Because of the opposition of the community of Ollon, none of the investigations subject to authorization have been carried out, even though these investigations had been approved by the Federal Government on 30 th September 1985. Nevertheless, various investigations not requiring a license have provided a considerable store of data. The details of the work actually carried out are as follows: (1) Detailed geological mapping of the earth's surface over an area of 22.5 km 2 on a scale of 1:5000. This study included the first geological recording of the Galerie de Salin (Salin drift) which formed part of an 18 th -century mine. (2) The existing hydrogeological data on the area were compiled and provided a first impression of the overall hydrogeological conditions. (3) The provisional concept of a possible repository at Bois de la Glaive and of the corresponding exploration gallery was elaborated under the point of view of civil engineering and the long-term behaviour of the host rock was assessed qualitatively. To summarize, based on the present stage of the investigations and on rock- resp. site-specific knowledge of the anhydrite as a host rock, there are no real reasons for ruling out the site. 54 refs., 11 figs

  5. Final chlorine dioxide stage at near-neutral pH for bleaching eucalypt pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robisnéa A. Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that pH is an important parameter for controlling the eucalyptus pulp bleaching when using the final chlorine dioxide stage, since it affects the effectiveness of the process. Recommendations found in the literature for operating are in the 3.5 to 4.0 range. However, in this paper it was shown that final chlorine dioxide has better performance, with significant brightness gain while also preserving pulp quality, when it is operated at near neutral pH. This result can be explained by the generation of sodium bicarbonate in situ upon adding carbon dioxide at this stage.

  6. ARAC feasibility study for the NRC Phase I: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.; Orphan, R.C.

    1979-11-01

    The feasibility of implementing ARAC (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) services in a particular nuclear power plant is examined. The criteria for selecting Rancho Seco are discussed and the physical, meteorological and procedural factors related to the plant are assessed. The potential benefits and limitations of implementing ARAC at Rancho Seco are analyzed. The costs of employing the system at the nuclear power plant are given for alternative plans. A training and familiarization program is outlined

  7. Flexible Automation for Final Assembly of Blanket Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Topic Z1.01, NASA seeks advanced photovoltaic technologies that can deliver cost, reliability, mass, volume and efficiency gains over current solutions. Future...

  8. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

  9. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkazalli, G.

    1980-07-01

    Month-by-month energy transfer data between an occupied residence and its energy supply systems are presented. The data were obtained during the first phase of photovoltaic/thermal residential research conducted at the University of Texas at Arlington/Solar Energy Research Facility. This research was part of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic/Thermal Project managed by the M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. Energy transfer data are divided into different categories depending on how the energy is consumed. Energy transfers between some system components are also categorized. These components include a flat-plate thermal collector array, a flat-plate photovoltaic array, a dc-to-ac inverter, thermal storage tanks, and a series heat pump. System operations included directing surplus electrical energy (generated by the photovoltaic array) into the local utility grid. The heat pump used off-peak utility power to chill water during the cooling season.

  10. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  11. Final report on the maintenance asset management project : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This project resulted in the development of a proof of concept for a features inventory process to be used by field staff. The resulting concept is adaptable for different asset classes (e.g. culverts, guardrail) and able to leverage existing DOT res...

  12. Final Work Plan: Phase I investigation at Eustis, Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The village of Eustis is located in the northeast corner of Frontier County, Nebraska (Figure 1.1), near Interstate 80 and approximately 190 mi west of Lincoln. From 1950 to 1964, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the southeastern edge of Eustis. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use to preserve grain in storage. In July 2011, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS) calculated a running annual average concentration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from one of the Eustis public water supply wells (PWS 70-1) at 5.24 μg/L, exceeding the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L. The running average value was calculated on the basis of results (4.01-6.87 μg/L) from four groundwater sampling events in 2011 for well PWS 70-1 (NDHHS 2011). On January 16, 2012, the village placed well PWS 70-1 on backup/standby status for emergency use only (Village of Eustis 2012). This results of this groundwater sampling are presented here.

  13. A DoD/DESAT Phase I Final Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-30

    19-22, 1982 in Albuquerque, New Mexico: 1) Spatially Correlated Redistribution of Mn and Ge in Inl.x Gax As MBE layers, E. Silberg , T.Y. Chang, and...Urbana-Champaign. 2) Spatially correlated redistribution of Mn and Ge in InGaAs MBE layers in conjunction with E. Silberg , T.Y. Chang and E.A. Caridi at...AlGaAs MBE layers. 2) A group headed by Ors. T. Chang and E. Silberg of Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, New Jersey, have been involved in growing Mn and

  14. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER ampersand WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements

  15. Physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report. Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, A.L.

    1983-12-01

    Methods were selected, equipment installed, and procedures developed for determining rheological properties; for determining thermal properties (stability, density, thermal expansion, and heat capacity); for purification and characterization of lignin (glass transition, stability, weight average molecular weight, and number average molecular weight); and for performing chemical analyses (negative inorganic ions, positive inorganic ions, acid organic salts, lignin, and total solids). A strategy for pulping to supply test liquors was developed, and a statistically designed pulping experiment was specified for a Southern softwood species. Arrangements were made for performing initial pulping work in an industrial pilot plant, and a preliminary set of pulping experiments were conducted. Liquors from the preliminary pulping experiments were used to test procedures and to determine reproducibility of the experiment. Literature was also surveyed and preliminary selection of designs for a pilot digester, and for equipment to determine surface tension were made.

  16. Organic Rankine Kilowatt Isotope Power System. Final phase I report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    On 1 August 1975 under Department of Energy Contract EN-77-C-02-4299, Sundstrand Energy Systems commenced development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) directed toward satisfying the higher power requirements of satellites of the 1980s and beyond. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system which will provide design output power in the range of 500 to 2000 W/sub (e)/ with a minimum of system changes. The principal objectives of the Phase 1 development effort were to: conceptually design a flight system; design a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) that is prototypic of the flight system in order to prove the feasibility of the flight system design; fabricate and assemble the GDS; and performance and endurance test the GDS using electric heaters in lieu of the isotope heat source. Results of the work performed under the Phase 1 contract to 1 July 1978 are presented

  17. Long-term follow-up of a phase I/II trial of dose escalating three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy with induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Rivera, M Patricia; Halle, Jan; Limentani, Steven; Rosenman, Julian G; Socinski, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    We conducted a modified phase I/II trial investigating the incorporation of three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy (TCRT) into the treatment paradigm of induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer. Patients received 2 cycles of induction carboplatin (area under the curve of 6) and paclitaxel (225 mg/m) on days 1, and 22. On day 43 concurrent TCRT and weekly x6 of carboplatin (area under the curve = 2) and paclitaxel (45 mg/m) was initiated. The TCRT dose was escalated from 60 to 74 Gy in 4 cohorts (60, 66, 70, and 74 Gy), and the 74 Gy cohort was expanded into a phase II trial. Sixty-two patients were enrolled; the median age 57 years (range, 36-82), 39 were male (63%), 61 (98%) had a performance status of 0 or 1, 28 (45%) had stage IIIA disease, 21 (34%) had >5% weight loss, and the median forced expiratory volume 1 = 2.10 liters (range, 1.02-3.75). With a median follow-up for survivors of approximately 9 years (range, 7-11 years) the median progression-free survival, time to tumor progression, and overall survival (OS) (with 95% confidence intervals) were 10 (8.5-17), 15 (9-50), and 25 months (18-37), respectively. The 5-year progression-free survival and OS rates were 21% (12-32%) and 27% (17-39%), respectively. The 10-year OS rate was 14% (7-25%). The long term survival rate compares favorably to other treatment approaches for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

  18. High Input Voltage Hall Thruster Discharge Converter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall scope of this Phase I/II effort is the development of a high efficiency 15kW (nominal) Hall thruster discharge converter. In Phase I, Busek Co. Inc. will...

  19. LHC Interaction Region Upgrade Phase I

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, R

    2009-01-01

    The LHC is starting operation with beam in 2008. The primary goal of CERN and the LHC community is to ensure that the collider is operated efficiently, maximizing its physics reach, and to achieve the nominal performance in the shortest term. Since several years the community has been discussing the directions for upgrading the experiments, in particular ATLAS and CMS, the LHC machine and the CERN proton injector complex. A well substantiated and coherent scenario for the first phase of the upgrade, which is foreseen in 2013, is now approved by CERN Council. In this paper, we present the goals and the proposed conceptual solution for the Phase-I upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology, with the target of increasing the luminosity by a factor of 2-3 with respect to the nominal luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1, while maximising the use of the existing infrastructure.

  20. 77 FR 33097 - Application To Participate in an Auction for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... America Fund & Intercarrier Compensation Reform Order (Order), FCC 11-161 and a Bureau Order, DA 12-147...-147] Application To Participate in an Auction for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Application for Mobility Fund Phase I Support AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; announcement...

  1. Final stage of high energy hadron-nucleus nuclear collision reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugal'ski, Z.; Jedrzejec, H.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Mulas, E.

    1996-01-01

    The final or 'slow' stage of the hadron-nucleus collision reactions at high energy is considered on the basis of the collision mechanism prompted experimentally. The transmutation process of the damaged target nucleus into nucleons and stable nuclear fragments is discussed. Relations between intensities or multiplicities n p of the emitted fast protons and the mean intensities or multiplicities b > of the evaporated nucleons and nuclear fragments are presented. 14 refs

  2. Phase I Report: DARPA Exoskeleton Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.F.

    2004-01-21

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) inaugurated a program addressing research and development for an Exoskeleton for Human Performance Augmentation in FY!2001. A team consisting of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the prime contractor, AeroVironment, Inc., the Army Research Laboratory, the University of Minnesota, and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute has recently completed an 18-month Phase I effort in support of this DARPA program. The Phase I effort focused on the development and proof-of-concept demonstrations for key enabling technologies, laying the foundation for subsequently building and demonstrating a prototype exoskeleton. The overall approach was driven by the need to optimize energy efficiency while providing a system that augmented the operator in as transparent manner as possible (non-impeding). These needs led to the evolution of two key distinguishing features of this team's approach. The first is the ''no knee contact'' concept. This concept is dependent on a unique Cartesian-based control scheme that uses force sensing at the foot and backpack attachments to allow the exoskeleton to closely follow the operator while avoiding the difficulty of connecting and sensing position at the knee. The second is an emphasis on energy efficiency manifested by an energetic, power, actuation and controls approach designed to enhance energy efficiency as well as a reconfigurable kinematic structure that provides a non-anthropomorphic configuration to support an energy saving long-range march/transport mode. The enabling technologies addressed in the first phase were controls and sensing, the soft tissue interface between the machine and the operator, the power system, and actuation. The controller approach was implemented and demonstrated on a test stand with an actual operator. Control stability, low operator fatigue, force amplification and the human interface were all successfully demonstrated, validating the controls

  3. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, K M

    2000-01-01

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A1, the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-113 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval ...

  4. Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P. [ed.

    1994-08-01

    During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

  5. HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

  6. Commissioning of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The final phase of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I upgrade was performed during the Extended Year End Technical Stop of 2016 and 2017. In the framework of the upgrade, the PMT boxes were reworked to implement two channel readout in order to exploit the benefits of the multi-anode PMTs in background tagging and signal recovery. The front-end electronics were also upgraded to QIE10-based electronics which implement larger dynamic range and a 6-bit TDC. Following this major upgrade, the Hadron Forward Calorimeters were commissioned for operation readiness in 2017. Here we describe the details and the components of the upgrade, and discuss the operational experience and results obtained during the upgrade and commissioning.

  7. Commissioning of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The final phase of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I upgrade is being performed during the Extended Year End Technical Stop of 2016 â?? 2017. In the framework of the upgrade, the PMT boxes are being reworked to implement two channel readout in order to exploit the benefits of the multi-anode PMTs in background tagging and signal recovery. The front-end electronics is also being upgraded to QIE10-based electronics which will implement larger dynamic range and a 6-bit TDC to eliminate the background to have an effect on the trigger. Following this major upgrade, the Hadron Forward Calorimeters will be commissioned for operation readiness in 2017. Here we describe the details and the components of the upgrade, and discuss the operational experience and results obtained during the upgrade and commissioning.

  8. Commissioning of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.

    2018-03-01

    The final phase of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I Upgrade was performed during the Extended Year End Technical Stop of 2016-2017. In the framework of the upgrade, the PMT boxes were reworked to implement two channel readout in order to exploit the benefits of the multi-anode PMTs in background tagging and signal recovery. The front-end electronics were also upgraded to QIE10-based electronics which implement larger dynamic range and a 6-bit TDC. Following this major upgrade, the Hadron Forward Calorimeters were commissioned for operation readiness in 2017. Here we describe the details and the components of the upgrade, and discuss the operational experience and results obtained during the upgrade and commissioning.

  9. Radiotoxicity of Actinides During Transmutation in Final Stage of Atomic Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, Aleksander S.; Bergelson, Boris R.; Myrtsymova, Lidia A.; Tikhomirov, Georgy V.

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of a transmutation mode in final stage of atomic power are analyzed. In this stage, transmutation of actinides accumulated in transmutation reactors is performed without feed by actinides from other reactors. The radiotoxicity during first 20 years of transmutation is caused mainly by 244 Cm. During following period of time, 252 Cf is main nuclide. Contribution of 246 Cm and 250 Cf is 5-7 times less than that of 252 Cf. During 50 years of a transmutation, the total radiotoxicity falls by 50 times. Long-lived radiotoxicity decreases slowly. During the period between T=50 years and T=100 years, long-lived radiotoxicity falls by 3.7 times. For each following 50 years after this period, long-lived radiotoxicity falls by 3.2 times. These results corresponding to neutron flux density 10 14 neutr/(cm 2 s) in transmutation reactor demonstrate that the final stage of a transmutation should be performed with use of high flux transmutation facilities which provide shorter time of transmutation. (authors)

  10. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  11. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  12. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase I program, a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite will be developed and fabricated. This structural radiation shielding will...

  13. Gradiometer Based on Nonlinear Magneto-Optic Rotation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project will demonstrate sensitive measurements of magnetic field gradients by nonlinear atomic spectroscopy. The gradients are determined by...

  14. High Impulse Nanoparticulate-Based Gel Propellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase I addresses the development of advanced gel propellants and determination of their suitability for...

  15. Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a "Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer." Several novel concepts are integrated to produce the final design, which is compatible with...

  16. High Pressure EVA Glove (HPEG), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Final Frontier Design's (FFD) High Pressure EVA Glove (HPEG) is a game changing technology enabling future exploration class space missions. The high operating...

  17. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  18. Close set in volleyball. Differences and discriminatory power of final game actions in formative stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávila Romero, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish which final game actions discriminate final victories and defeats in women volleyball formative stages during ended sets, which are solved by regulation with a minimal advantage of two points. A total of 57 sets were analyzed in infantile category and 69 sets in cadet category during the national volleyball championship at school age (12-16, Valladolid 2008 and Huelva 2009. Statistics analysis shows differences between the condition of both the winner and the loser teams in sets in the positive attack in infantile category and in positive block and error in cadet category. Discriminative analysis, statistical test that determines those most significant game actions when establishing the differences existing between the winner and loser teams, shows how to predict victory and defeat in the ended sets regarding the positive attack, negative service and error in infantile category and positive block and error in cadet category. These ones suggest that during decisive set moments in both categories, either technical gestures control or errors which arise from a regulation infraction may predict their final performance.

  19. System design description for master equipment list, phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    This System Design Description (SDD) is for the Master Equipment List Phase I (MEL). It has been prepared following the WI-IC-CM-3-10, ''Software Practices,'' (Ref. 6). This SDD describes the internal design for implementation of the MEL Phase I

  20. 40 CFR 76.12 - Phase I NOX compliance extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase I NOX compliance extension. 76.12 Section 76.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.12 Phase I NOX compliance extension. (a...

  1. 40 CFR 73.25 - Phase I extension reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase I extension reserve. 73.25 Section 73.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.25 Phase I extension reserve. The...

  2. The remains of the Danes: The final stages of language shift in Sanpete County, Utah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, Karoline; Peterson, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    This article first presents an overview of the social and demographic phenomena specific to the language shift situation in Sanpete County, Utah, focusing on the biggest non-English-speaking group, the Danes. This overview includes the assimilation norms that were present in the community...... (including from the dominant religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), social and geographical isolation, and related issues of identity and language maintenance. Using interdisciplinary methods under the rubric of sociocultural linguistic research, our analysis presents an overview....... This study of the Danish language situation in Sanpete County offers a glimpse of the final stages of complete language shift, revealing information about a rare and under-examined linguistic community within the American context....

  3. Research program in reactor core diagnostics with neutron noise methods: Stage 3. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Garis, N.S.; Karlsson, J.; Racz, A.

    1997-09-01

    Stage 3 of the program has been executed 96-04-12. The long term goal is to develop noise methods for identification and localization of perturbations in reactor cores. The main parts of the program consist of modelling the noise source, calculation of the space- and frequency dependent transfer function, calculation of the neutron noise via a convolution of the transfer function of the system and the noise source, i.e. the perturbation, and finally finding an inversion or unfolding procedure to determine noise source parameters from the neutron noise. Most previous work is based on very simple (analytical) reactor models for the calculation of the transfer function as well as analytical unfolding methods. The purpose of this project is to calculate the transfer function in a more realistic model as well as elaborating powerful inversion methods that do not require analytical transfer functions. The work in stage 3 is described under the following headlines: Further investigation of simplified models for the calculation of the neutron noise; Further investigation of methods based on neural networks; Further investigation of methods for detecting the vibrations and impacting of detectors; Application of static codes for determination of the neutron noise using the adiabatic approximation

  4. Postgraduate research methodological flaws detected at final examination stage: Who is to blame?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aceme Nyika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of globalisation, most universities are intensifying efforts to improve their overall performance in order to attract students and enhance chances of securing competitive funding from various sources. As part of these efforts, universities are striving to ensure that their postgraduate programmes meet nationally and internationally acceptable standards. Research projects conducted by students form a critical component of most postgraduate programmes and universities have put in place procedures meant to ensure that postgraduate research meets acceptable minimum standards. The procedures include setting minimum entry educational qualifications, supervision by qualified members of university academic staff, institutional evaluation of research proposals before the proposed research is embarked on, submission of progress reports by postgraduate students during the course of their programmes, and final examination of students theses, dissertations or research reports by internal as well as external examiners. In some instances, the examiners recommend outright rejection of the student's write-up if they consider the methodology used to be inappropriate to answer research questions of the project conducted. The implications of research methodological shortcomings which are identified at the final examination stage, even if the research proposals were evaluated and approved by appropriate university structures before commencement of the research projects, are discussed. As postgraduate programmes are meant to nurture a competent and resourceful workforce and future researchers, universities need to pay attention to the issue of research methodology and internal evaluation systems in order to minimise chances of compromising the quality of their postgraduate degree programmes.

  5. NPP A-1 decommissioning - Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstenik, A.; Blazek, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plant A-1 with output 150 MW e , with metallic natural uranium fuelled, CO 2 cooled and heavy water moderated reactor had been prematurely finally shut down in 1977. It is necessary to mention that neither operator nor regulatory and other authorities have been prepared for the solution of such situation. During next two consecutive years after shutdown main effort of operator focused on technical and administrative activities which are described in the previous paper together with approach, condition and constraints for NPP A-1 decommissioning as well as the work and research carried out up to the development and approval of the Project for NPP A-1 decommissioning - I. phase. Subject of this paper is description of: (1) An approach to NPP A -1 decommissioning; (2) An approach to development of the project for NPP A-1 decommissioning; (3) Project - tasks, scope, objectives; (4) Mode of the Project realisation; (5) Progress achieved up to the 1999 year. (authors)

  6. TWRS phase I privatization site environmental baseline and characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides a plan to characterize and develop an environmental baseline for the TWRS Phase I Privatization Site before construction begins. A site evaluation study selected the former Grout Disposal Area of the Grout Treatment Facility in the 200 East Area as the TWRS Phase I Demonstration Site. The site is generally clean and has not been used for previous activities other than the GTF. A DQO process was used to develop a Sampling and Analysis Plan that would allow comparison of site conditions during operations and after Phase I ends to the presently existing conditions and provide data for the development of a preoperational monitoring plan

  7. Dose Escalation Methods in Phase I Cancer Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Lee, J. Jack; Siu, Lillian L.

    2009-01-01

    Phase I clinical trials are an essential step in the development of anticancer drugs. The main goal of these studies is to establish the recommended dose and/or schedule of new drugs or drug combinations for phase II trials. The guiding principle for dose escalation in phase I trials is to avoid exposing too many patients to subtherapeutic doses while preserving safety and maintaining rapid accrual. Here we review dose escalation methods for phase I trials, including the rule-based and model-...

  8. Pulse shape discrimination studies of Phase I Ge-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, Andrea [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge by using isotopically enriched germanium crystals as source and detector simultaneously. The bare semiconductor diodes are operated in liquid argon at cryogenic temperatures in an ultra-low background environment. In addition, Gerda applies different active background reduction techniques, one of which is pulse shape discrimination studies of the current Phase I germanium detectors. The analysis of the signal time structure provides an important tool to distinguish single site events (SSE) of the ββ-decay from multi site events (MSE) of common gamma-ray background or surface events. To investigate the correlation between the signal shape and the interaction position, a new, also to the predominantly deployed closed-ended coaxial HPGe detectors applicable analysis technique has been developed. A summary of the used electronic/detector assembly is given and followed by a discussion of the performed classification procedure by means of accurate pulse shape simulations of 0νββ-like signals. Finally, the obtained results are presented along with an evaluation of the relevance for the Gerda experiment.

  9. Phase-I monitoring of standard deviations in multistage linear profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaei, Mahdiyeh; Soleimani, Paria; Niaki, Seyed Taghi Akhavan; Atashgar, Karim

    2018-03-01

    In most modern manufacturing systems, products are often the output of some multistage processes. In these processes, the stages are dependent on each other, where the output quality of each stage depends also on the output quality of the previous stages. This property is called the cascade property. Although there are many studies in multistage process monitoring, there are fewer works on profile monitoring in multistage processes, especially on the variability monitoring of a multistage profile in Phase-I for which no research is found in the literature. In this paper, a new methodology is proposed to monitor the standard deviation involved in a simple linear profile designed in Phase I to monitor multistage processes with the cascade property. To this aim, an autoregressive correlation model between the stages is considered first. Then, the effect of the cascade property on the performances of three types of T 2 control charts in Phase I with shifts in standard deviation is investigated. As we show that this effect is significant, a U statistic is next used to remove the cascade effect, based on which the investigated control charts are modified. Simulation studies reveal good performances of the modified control charts.

  10. Cultural differences in cognition: Rosetta Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Helen Altman; Lin, Mei-Hua; Radford, Mark; Masuda, Takahiko; Choi, Incheol; Lien, Yunnwen; Yeh, Yeiyuh; Boff, Kenneth R

    2009-10-01

    Cultural differences in cognition are important during multinational commercial, military, and humanitarian operations. The Rosetta Project addresses definition and measurement of key cognitive dimensions. Six potential diagnostic measures related to Analytic-Holistic reasoning were assessed: the Exclusion Task, the Attribution Complexity Scale, the Syllogism Task, Categorization, the Framed Line Test, and the Facial Expression Task. 379 participants' ages ranged from 17 to 24 years (M = 19.8, SD = 1.4). 64.6% were women; Eastern Asian groups (Japan, Korea, and Taiwan) were assumed to have Holistic reasoning tendencies, and those from a Western group (USA) were assumed to have Analytic tendencies. Participants were recruited from subject pools in psychology using the procedures of each university. Results on the Exclusion and Categorization Tasks confirmed hypothesized differences in Analytic-Holistic reasoning. The Attribution Complex-ity Scale and the Facial Expression Task identified important differences among the four groups. Outcomes on the final two tasks were confounded by unrelated group differences, making comparisons difficult. Building on this exploratory study, Rosetta Phase II will include additional groups and cognitive tasks. Measures of complex cognition are also incorporated to link findings to the naturalistic contexts.

  11. Radar Location Equipment Development Program: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandness, G.A.; Davis, K.C.

    1985-06-01

    The work described in this report represents the first phase of a planned three-phase project designed to develop a radar system for monitoring waste canisters stored in a thick layer of bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The canisters will be contained in holes drilled into the floor of the underground waste storage facility. It is hoped that these measurements can be made to accuracies of +-5 cm and +-2/sup 0/, respectively. The initial phase of this project was primarily a feasibility study. Its principal objective was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the radar method in the planned canister monitoring application. Its scope included an investigation of the characteristics of radar signals backscattered from waste canisters, a test of preliminary data analysis methods, an assessment of the effects of salt and bentonite (a proposed backfill material) on the propagation of the radar signals, and a review of current ground-penetrating radar technology. A laboratory experiment was performed in which radar signals were backscattered from simulated waste canisters. The radar data were recorded by a digital data acquisition system and were subsequently analyzed by three different computer-based methods to extract estimates of canister location and tilt. Each of these methods yielded results that were accurate within a few centimeters in canister location and within 1/sup 0/ in canister tilt. Measurements were also made to determine the signal propagation velocities in salt and bentonite (actually a bentonite/sand mixture) and to estimate the signal attenuation rate in the bentonite. Finally, a product survey and a literature search were made to identify available ground-penetrating radar systems and alternative antenna designs that may be particularly suitable for this unique application. 10 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Radar Location Equipment Development Program: Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandness, G.A.; Davis, K.C.

    1985-06-01

    The work described in this report represents the first phase of a planned three-phase project designed to develop a radar system for monitoring waste canisters stored in a thick layer of bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The canisters will be contained in holes drilled into the floor of the underground waste storage facility. It is hoped that these measurements can be made to accuracies of +-5 cm and +-2 0 , respectively. The initial phase of this project was primarily a feasibility study. Its principal objective was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the radar method in the planned canister monitoring application. Its scope included an investigation of the characteristics of radar signals backscattered from waste canisters, a test of preliminary data analysis methods, an assessment of the effects of salt and bentonite (a proposed backfill material) on the propagation of the radar signals, and a review of current ground-penetrating radar technology. A laboratory experiment was performed in which radar signals were backscattered from simulated waste canisters. The radar data were recorded by a digital data acquisition system and were subsequently analyzed by three different computer-based methods to extract estimates of canister location and tilt. Each of these methods yielded results that were accurate within a few centimeters in canister location and within 1 0 in canister tilt. Measurements were also made to determine the signal propagation velocities in salt and bentonite (actually a bentonite/sand mixture) and to estimate the signal attenuation rate in the bentonite. Finally, a product survey and a literature search were made to identify available ground-penetrating radar systems and alternative antenna designs that may be particularly suitable for this unique application. 10 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs

  13. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  14. Micromachined High-Temperature Sensors for Planet Exploration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In phase I of the SBIR program, LEEOAT Company will develop, simulate, fabricate and test high-temperature piezoelectric miniature sensors (up to 800oC), for...

  15. Planetary-Whigs: Optical MEMS-Based Seismometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase I, Michigan Aerospace Corporation will adapt the design of an optical MEMS seismometer for lunar and other planetary science instrumentation. The...

  16. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our key innovation will be the use of single-layer graphene as LENA conversion foils, with appropriate microgrids and nanogrids to support the foils. Phase I...

  17. Vapor Compressor Driven Hybrid Two-Phase Loop, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate a vapor compressor driven hybrid two-phase loop technology. The hybrid two-phase loop...

  18. Titanium Loop Heat Pipes for Space Nuclear Radiators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will develop titanium Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) that can be used in low-mass space nuclear radiators, such as...

  19. Self-Healing Inflatable Extraterrestrial Shield (SHIELD), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The team of Astro Terra Corp, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), and Virginia Tech (VT) propose the development of a composite polymer over Phase-I and Phase-II...

  20. Foamed Antenna Support for Very Large Apertures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I program will demonstrate the feasibility of the in-space production of large aperture antenna structures. The use of a novel open cell foam,...

  1. Componentized Models as a Service (CMaaS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project, which will conclude with a Technical Readiness Level of 3-4, will demonstrate the feasibility of the...

  2. Plasma Control of Turbine Secondary Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose Phase I and II efforts that will focus on turbomachinery flow control. Specifically, the present work will investigate active control in a high speed...

  3. Birefringent Microlens Array for Ultra High Resolution HMDs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will be used to analyze, design, model, and test a birefringent microlens array for use in a new type of...

  4. Bulk Nano-structured Materials for Turbomachinery Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort seeks to exploit some of the tremendous benefits that could be attained from a revolutionary new approach to grain refinement in bulk...

  5. Higher Strength, Lighter Weight Aluminum Spacecraft Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I program proposes to develop a bulk processing technology for producing ultra fine grain (UFG) aluminum alloy structures. The goal is to demonstrate...

  6. Compact 2050 nm Semiconductor Diode Laser Master Oscillator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to develop DFB laser master oscillators at the novel wavelength of 12050 nm. Two prototypes will be built, tested, and delivered ....

  7. Joining Silicon Carbide Components for Space Propulsion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I program will identify the joining materials and demonstrate the processes that are suited for construction of advanced ceramic matrix composite...

  8. Manufacturing For Design of Titanium Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I program proposes to exploit the tremendous benefits that could be offered by the development of a microstructural refinement and control technology...

  9. Mars Ascent Vehicle Reaction Control System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase I NASA program, Valley Tech Systems (VTS) will develop an innovative solid Reaction Control System (RCS) architecture concept design that can...

  10. Real-time Multispecies Spacecraft Air Quality Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop an ultrasensitive, multispecies sensor system for use in determining the efficacy of air...

  11. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  12. Simulating Nonlinear Dynamics of Deployable Space Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To support NASA's vital interest in developing much larger solar array structures over the next 20 years, MotionPort LLC's Phase I SBIR project will strengthen...

  13. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  14. Torrefaction Processing of Human Fecal Waste, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New technology is needed to collect, stabilize, safen, recover useful materials, and store human fecal waste for long duration missions. The current SBIR Phase I...

  15. A Novel Cyclic Catalytic Reformer for Hydrocarbon Fuels, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase I addresses development of a compact reformer system based on a cyclic partial oxidation (POx)...

  16. RFI mitigating receiver back end for radiometers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal requests support for Alphacore, Inc. to design and a low power application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) RFI mitigating receiver back...

  17. Dalit Women's Rights and Citizenship in India - Phase I | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Dalit Women's Rights and Citizenship in India - Phase I ... little occupational diversification, and little voice in the domestic or public sphere. ... Delhi; organised by Indian Institute of Dalit Studies and International Development Research Centre.

  18. SELENE - Self-Forming Extensible Lunar EVA Network, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this research effort (Phase I and Phase II) by Scientific Systems Company, Inc. and BBN Technologies is to develop the SELENE network --...

  19. Wireless, Passive Encoded Saw Sensors and Communication Links, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are several objectives of this Phase I proposal. One major objective is to investigate SAW sensor embodiments for pressure and acceleration. Two approaches...

  20. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase I program is to develop novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous measurements of gas...

  1. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  2. Multi-channel tunable source for atomic sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will establish the feasibility of developing compact, robust, integrated components suitable for atomic interferometry. AdvR's design is enabled by...

  3. Inorganic Nanostructured High-Temperature Magnet Wires, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a high-temperature tolerant electrically-insulating coating for magnet wires. The Phase I program will result in a flexible, inorganic...

  4. Distributed Engine Control Empirical/Analytical Verification Tools, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I project, Impact Technologies, in collaboration with Prof. R.K. Yedavalli, propose a novel verification environment for eventual rapid certification...

  5. Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes proposed development of a conceptual design for a Self-Calibrating Vector Helium Magnetometer (SVHM) for design and fabrication...

  6. Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Robotic Science Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C3 Propulsion's Hybrid Propulsion Technology will be applied to a NASA selected Sample Return Mission. Phase I will demonstrate Proof-of-Principle and Phase II will...

  7. Fiber Optic Sensor System for Cryogenic Fuel Measurement, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will address the feasibility of using a fiber Bragg grating array as a means of detecting liquid and slush hydrogen in gravity and zero...

  8. High Performance Low Mass Nanowire Enabled Heatpipe, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Illuminex Corporation proposes a NASA Phase I SBIR project to develop high performance, lightweight, low-profile heat pipes with enhanced thermal transfer properties...

  9. Multi-layer Far-Infrared Component Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR will demonstrate the feasibility of a process to create multi-layer thin-film optics for the far-infrared/sub-millimeter wave spectral region. The...

  10. Technical report on LWR design decision methodology. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Energy Incorporated (EI) was selected by Sandia Laboratories to develop and test on LWR design decision methodology. Contract Number 42-4229 provided funding for Phase I of this work. This technical report on LWR design decision methodology documents the activities performed under that contract. Phase I was a short-term effort to thoroughly review the curret LWR design decision process to assure complete understanding of current practices and to establish a well defined interface for development of initial quantitative design guidelines

  11. Sensitive Spitzer Photometry of Supermassive Black Holes at the Final Stage of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Netzer, Hagai; Mor, Rivay; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2011-05-01

    We propose to obtain sensitive Spitzer snapshot observations of a unique sample of 35 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at redshift 4.8 for which we obtained reliable, Mg II-based determinations of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass and normalized accretion rate (L/L_Edd). These quasars appear to mark the final stage of SMBH `adolescence' in the history of the Universe as their SMBHs are significantly less massive and their L/L_Edd values are significantly higher with respect to their counterparts at lower redshifts. Our observations will provide both 1) deep coverage of the fields around these quasars which will be utilized as crucial priors for our approved Herschel/SPIRE observations of these sources, and 2) coverage of the rest-frame optical SEDs of these fast accreting quasars. The results will maximize our ability to measure the star-formation rate in the host galaxies of these quasars using Herschel. We will thus be able to investigate correlations between SMBH growth and star-forming activity in the early Universe. The Spitzer photometry will also provide invaluable information about the shape of the rest-frame optical continuum in these quasars which will be used to search for extreme disk properties that may be signatures of the remarkably high accretion rates in these sources.

  12. Phase I remedial action of properties associated with the former Middlesex Sampling Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The Phase I Remedial Action Work on properties associated with the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site in Middlesex, New Jersey was completed during 1980. In addition to the two properties included in the original scope of work, three other properties were decontaminated. In the playground across the street from the Rectory, contaminated soil was discovered and subsequently removed. Later, at the request of the DOE, the Kays and Rosamilia properties were decontaminated. Decontamination of the properties included in Phase I has, in the judgment of NLO, been successfully achieved, as evidenced by the data presented in this and in the referenced Eberline Instrument Corporation reports. Final certification of the sites for unrestricted use will be by ASEP/OOS based upon all available data, of which this report is a part. Work completed at Middlesex, together with the lessons learned during the execution of the entire project, is indicative that future decontamination assignments can be accomplished with mutual benefits for the DOE, as well as the local citizens. Restoration of the Rectory and the William Street property exemplifies the excellence of work performed by the Remedial Action Subcontractors and is further evidence of the success of the Phase I work. A summary of the Phase I costs are tabulated

  13. High Temperature Air/Steam Gasification of Biomass Wastes - Stage 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasiak, Wlodzimierz; Szewczyk, Dariusz; Lucas, Carlos; Rafidi, Nabil; Abeyweera Ruchira; Jansson, Anna; Bjoerkman, Eva [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2003-05-01

    In Jan 2002 the Division of Energy and Furnace Technology started the project High Temperature Air an Steam Gasification (HTAG) of biomass wastes, following the approval made by Swedish Energy Agency. The research proved successful; with the fixed bed updraft gasifier coupled to the highly regenerative preheater equipment able to produce a fuel gas not only from wood pellets but also from wood chips, bark and charcoal with considerably reduced amount of tar. This report provides information on solid biomass conversion into fuel gas as a result of air and steam gasification process performed in a fixed bed updraft gasifier. The first chapter of the report presents the overall objectives and the specific objectives of the work. Chapter 2 summarizes state-of-the-art on the gasification field stating some technical differences between low and high temperature gasification processes. Description and schemes of the experimental test rig are provided in Chapter 3. The equipment used to perform measurements of different sort and that installed in the course of the work is described in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 describes the methodology of experiments conducted whose results were processed and evaluated with help of the scheme of equations presented in Chapter 6, called raw data evaluation. Results of relevant experiments are presented and discussed in Chapter 7. A summary discussion of the tar analysis is presented in Chapter 8. Chapter 9 summarizes the findings of the research work conducted and identifies future efforts to ensure the development of next stage. Final chapter provides a summary of conclusions and recommendations of the work. References are provided at the end of the report. Aimed to assist the understanding of the work done, tables and graphs of experiments conducted, irrespective to their quality, are presented in appendices.

  14. 75 FR 32748 - Availability of Testing and Evaluation Report and Intent To Proceed With the Final Stages of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... of Domain Name System Security Extensions Implementation in the Authoritative Root Zone AGENCY... report and NTIA's intent to proceed with the final stages of DNSSEC deployment in the authoritative root... (ICANN) and VeriSign to deploy DNSSEC at the authoritative root zone of the Internet.\\3\\ Subsequently...

  15. Status report of the GERDA experiment phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboldi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Phase I of GERDA, aimed at investigating neutrino-less double beta decay of 76 Ge is in the active phase since November 2011 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN—Italy. GERDA Ge detectors are non-encapsulated and operate immersed in liquid argon, equipped with a front-end readout electronics consisting of cryogenic charge sensitive preamplifiers designed and manufactured to cope with the characteristics of the GERDA experiment (radio-purity, long and resistive cables, etc.). The presentation will report on the current status of the GERDA experiment phase I, focusing on Ge detectors performance in terms of energy resolution, stability over time, counting rate and related issues

  16. Status report of the GERDA experiment phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboldi, Stefano; Gerda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Phase I of GERDA, aimed at investigating neutrino-less double beta decay of 76Ge is in the active phase since November 2011 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN-Italy. GERDA Ge detectors are non-encapsulated and operate immersed in liquid argon, equipped with a front-end readout electronics consisting of cryogenic charge sensitive preamplifiers designed and manufactured to cope with the characteristics of the GERDA experiment (radio-purity, long and resistive cables, etc.). The presentation will report on the current status of the GERDA experiment phase I, focusing on Ge detectors performance in terms of energy resolution, stability over time, counting rate and related issues.

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Final report of the first stage of the tracer retention understanding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, A.; Andersson, Peter; Hermanson, Jan; Byegaard, Johan

    2000-03-01

    The first stage of the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE) was performed as a SKB funded project. The overall objectives of TRUE are to develop the understanding of radionuclide migration and retention in fractured rock, to evaluate the realism in applied model concepts, and to assess whether the necessary input data to the models can be collected from site characterisation. Further, to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of different model approaches, and finally to provide in situ data on radionuclide migration and retention. The strive for address with multiple approaches is facilitated through a close collaboration with the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes. The TRUE programme is a staged programme which addresses various scales from laboratory ( 22 Na + 47 Ca 2+ ≅ 85 Sr 2+ 86 Rb + ≅ 133 Ba 2+ The field tracer tests, using essentially the same cocktail of sorbing tracers as in the laboratory, were found to show the same relative sorbtivity as seen in the laboratory. A test using 137 Cs showed that after termination of the test, some 63% of the injected activity remained sorbed in the rock. The interpretation of the in situ tests with sorbing tracers was performed using the LaSAR approach, developed as a part of the TRUE project. In this approach the studied flow path is viewed as a part of an open fracture. Key processes are spatially variable advection and mass transfer. The evaluation shows that laboratory diffusion data are not representative for in situ conditions, and that a close fit between field and modelled breakthrough is obtained only when a parameter group which includes diffusion is enhanced with a factor varying between 32-50 for all tracers and experiments (except for Cs) and 137 for Cs. Our interpretation is that the enhancement is mainly due to higher diffusivity/porosity and higher sorption in the part of the altered rim zone of the feature which is accessible over the time scales

  18. Transient phenomena in the final implosion stage at the PF-1000 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribkov, V.A.; Banaszak, A.; Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M.J.; Szydlowski, A.; Bienkowska, B.; Borowiecki, M.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Karpinski, L.; Miklaszewski, R.A.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; Tomaszewski, K.; Dubrovsky, A.V.

    2006-12-01

    is equal to 1 MJ so it makes this device one of the few where one can investigate an effect of the 'neutron saturation' phenomenon. It was found about 20 years ago and is still under discussion up to now. During these experiments we concentrated our efforts in an investigation of very fast non-equilibrium phenomena taking place in the final stage of plasma implosion, i.e. namely in the period of time, when neutron pulse is generated

  19. Final Report on Two-Stage Fast Spectrum Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Sik; Lin, C. S.; Hader, J. S.; Park, T. K.; Deng, P.; Yang, G.; Jung, Y. S.; Kim, T. K.; Stauff, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the performance characteristics of two ''two-stage'' fast spectrum fuel cycle options proposed to enhance uranium resource utilization and to reduce nuclear waste generation. One is a two-stage fast spectrum fuel cycle option of continuous recycle of plutonium (Pu) in a fast reactor (FR) and subsequent burning of minor actinides (MAs) in an accelerator-driven system (ADS). The first stage is a sodium-cooled FR fuel cycle starting with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel; at the equilibrium cycle, the FR is operated using the recovered Pu and natural uranium without supporting LEU. Pu and uranium (U) are co-extracted from the discharged fuel and recycled in the first stage, and the recovered MAs are sent to the second stage. The second stage is a sodium-cooled ADS in which MAs are burned in an inert matrix fuel form. The discharged fuel of ADS is reprocessed, and all the recovered heavy metals (HMs) are recycled into the ADS. The other is a two-stage FR/ADS fuel cycle option with MA targets loaded in the FR. The recovered MAs are not directly sent to ADS, but partially incinerated in the FR in order to reduce the amount of MAs to be sent to the ADS. This is a heterogeneous recycling option of transuranic (TRU) elements

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Final report of the first stage of the tracer retention understanding experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, A. [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Peter [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Grundteknik, Solna (Sweden); Byegaard, Johan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; Cvetkovic, V. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Water Resources Engineering; Birgersson, Lars [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-03-15

    The first stage of the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE) was performed as a SKB funded project. The overall objectives of TRUE are to develop the understanding of radionuclide migration and retention in fractured rock, to evaluate the realism in applied model concepts, and to assess whether the necessary input data to the models can be collected from site characterisation. Further, to evaluate the usefulness and feasibility of different model approaches, and finally to provide in situ data on radionuclide migration and retention. The strive for address with multiple approaches is facilitated through a close collaboration with the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes. The TRUE programme is a staged programme which addresses various scales from laboratory (< 0.5 m), detailed scale (< 10 m) and block scale (10-50 m). The First TRUE Stage was performed in the detailed scale with the specific objectives of providing data and conceptualising the investigated feature using conservative and sorbing tracers. Further, to improve methodologies for performing tracer tests, and to develop and test a methodology for obtaining pore volume/aperture data from epoxy resin injection, excavation and subsequent analyses. The experimental site is located at approximately 400 m depth in the northeastern part of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The identification of conductive fractures and the target feature has benefited from the use of BIPS borehole TV imaging combined with detailed flow logging. The assessment of the conductive geometry has been further sustained by cross-hole pressure interference data. The investigated target feature (Feature A) is a reactivated mylonite which has later undergone brittle deformation. The feature is oriented northwest, along the principal horizontal stress orientation, and is a typical conductor for Aespoe conditions. Hydraulic characterisation shows that the feature is relatively well isolated

  1. Understanding cognitive processes behind acceptance or refusal of phase I trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Mazzocco, Ketti; Gorini, Alessandra; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Participation in phase I trials gives patients the chance to obtain control over their disease by trying an experimental therapy. The patients' vulnerability, the informed consent process aiming at understanding the purpose and potential benefits of the phase I trial, and the complexity of the studies may impact the patient's final decision. Emotionally difficult health conditions may induce patients to succumb to cognitive biases, allocating attention only on a part of the provided information. Filling the gap in patients' information process can foster the implementation of strategies to help physicians tailor clinical trials' communication providing personalized support and tailored medical information around patients' need, so avoiding cognitive biases in patients and improving informed shared decision quality. The aim of the present review article focuses on the analysis of cognitive and psychological factors that affect patients' decision to participate or not to early phase clinical trials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. 129I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Roberts, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129 I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129 I/ 127 I ratios of the samples varied from 10 -8 to 10 -14 . In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the 129 I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129 I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I 129 I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the 129 I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating 129 I AMS facilities and 129 I/ 127 I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented

  3. Phase I clinical trial with the AMC-bioartificial liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhove, M. P.; Di Florio, E.; Scuderi, V.; Mancini, A.; Belli, A.; Bracco, A.; Dauri, M.; Tisone, G.; Di Nicuolo, G.; Amoroso, P.; Spadari, A.; Lombardi, G.; Hoekstra, R.; Calise, F.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a bio-artificial liver (BAL) system has been developed at the Academic Medical Center (AMC) of Amsterdam to bridge patients with acute liver failure (ALF) to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). After successful testing of the AMC-BAL in rodents and pigs with ALF, a phase I study in ALF

  4. Compact Monitor for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Eltron Research we anticipate a TRL of 4 by the end of Phase I. By the end of the Phase II program, a prototype instrument will be built with ±0.1 ppm resolution in...

  5. Testing for Sphericity in Phase I Control Chart Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windfeldt, Gitte Bjørg; Bisgaard, Søren

    2009-01-01

    , to check this assumption. We supply a graph of the exact percentage points for the distribution of the test statistics. The test statistics can be computed with standard statistical software. Together with the graph of the exact percentage points, the test can easily be performed during a phase I study. We...

  6. Dalit Women's Rights and Citizenship in India - Phase I | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Dalit Women's Rights and Citizenship in India - Phase I. Dalits - the Scheduled Castes - constitute more than 16% of India's population. In the caste-based social order, Dalits have experienced untouchability and faced social exclusion from economic, civil, cultural and political rights. By any indicator of development, the ...

  7. Savanna ecosystem project: phase I summary and phase II progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntely, BJ

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the results of the first phase (mid 1974 to mid 1976) of the South African Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. Phase I of this ten year study of the structure and functioning...

  8. Effect of thermal shock on developmental stages of estuarine fish. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.M.

    1978-12-01

    Physiological data and ecological data show that the few estuarine spawners have a higher thermal tolerance in the embryonic and larval stages than do the freshwater, coastal, or oceanic spawning species. However, since all three groups (freshwater, estuarine, and oceanic spawners) occupy the estuary and coastal waters at different times of the year, knowledge of their physiology and ecology at different developmental or life cycle stages is critical for estuarine management decisions

  9. Final Report on Two-Stage Fast Spectrum Fuel Cycle Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lin, C. S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hader, J. S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Park, T. K. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Deng, P. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Yang, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Jung, Y. S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kim, T. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stauff, N. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-30

    This report presents the performance characteristics of two “two-stage” fast spectrum fuel cycle options proposed to enhance uranium resource utilization and to reduce nuclear waste generation. One is a two-stage fast spectrum fuel cycle option of continuous recycle of plutonium (Pu) in a fast reactor (FR) and subsequent burning of minor actinides (MAs) in an accelerator-driven system (ADS). The first stage is a sodium-cooled FR fuel cycle starting with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel; at the equilibrium cycle, the FR is operated using the recovered Pu and natural uranium without supporting LEU. Pu and uranium (U) are co-extracted from the discharged fuel and recycled in the first stage, and the recovered MAs are sent to the second stage. The second stage is a sodium-cooled ADS in which MAs are burned in an inert matrix fuel form. The discharged fuel of ADS is reprocessed, and all the recovered heavy metals (HMs) are recycled into the ADS. The other is a two-stage FR/ADS fuel cycle option with MA targets loaded in the FR. The recovered MAs are not directly sent to ADS, but partially incinerated in the FR in order to reduce the amount of MAs to be sent to the ADS. This is a heterogeneous recycling option of transuranic (TRU) elements

  10. APT, The Phase I tool for HST Cycle 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Brett S.; Bertch, Maria; Curtis, Gary; Douglas, Robert E., Jr.; Krueger, Anthony P.

    2002-12-01

    In the continuing effort to streamline our systems and improve service to the science community, the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is developing and releasing, APT The Astronomer’s Proposal Tool as the new interface for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Phase I and Phase II proposal submissions for HST Cycle 12. APT, was formerly called the Scientist’s Expert Assistant (SEA), which started as a prototype effort to try and bring state of the art technology, more visual tools and power into the hands of proposers so that they can optimize the scientific return of their programs as well as HST. Proposing for HST and other missions, consists of requesting observing time and/or archival research funding. This step is called Phase I, where the scientific merit of a proposal is considered by a community based peer-review process. Accepted proposals then proceed thru Phase II, where the observations are specified in sufficient detail to enable scheduling on the telescope. In this paper, we will present our concept and implementation plans for our Phase I development and submission tool, APT. More importantly, we will go behind the scenes and discuss why it’s important for the Science Policies Division (SPD) and other groups at the STScI to have a new submission tool and submission output products. This paper is an update of the status of the HST Phase I Proposal Processing System that was described in the published paper “A New Era for HST Phase I Development and Submission.”

  11. Final Report on the Research Project Ringhals Diagnostics and Monitoring. Stage 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V.; Karlsson, Joakim K.H.; Pazsit, I.

    1999-01-01

    This report gives an account of the work performed by the Department of Reactor Physics in the frame of a research contract with Ringhals, Vattenfall AB. The contract constitutes Stage 4 of a long-term co-operative research work concerning diagnostics and monitoring of the BWR and PWR units. The work in Stage 4 has been performed between 1 October 1998 and 1 September 1999. In Stage 4 we have worked with four items as follows: 1. Regional modes in R1 stability measurements; 2. Analysis of data from the measurement 980604; 3. Study of the possibility of measuring the moderator temperature coefficient using noise methods. Literature survey and measurement evaluation; 4. Transfer of the method for determining axial control rod elevation. Current situation and progress

  12. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  13. Final report of the cooperative study on seismic isolation design. The second stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uryu, Mitsuru; Terada, Syuji; Shioya, Tsutomu (and others)

    1999-05-01

    The applicability of the seismic isolation design onto the nuclear fuel facilities, which must clear severe criteria of integrity, has been examined. Following the first stage of the cooperative study, conducted from 1988 to 1991, the second stage included critical vibration testing, seismic observation of seismic isolation building and founded buildings of non-isolation, with the objectives of clarifying the policies on critical design of seismic isolation building. Integrity of the seismic isolation piping system was tested by means of static deformation test, with variable inner water pressure and relative deformation. (Yamamoto, A.)

  14. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Much of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL's main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers

  15. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables

  16. Status report of the GERDA experiment phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riboldi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.riboldi@mi.infn.it [Universita' degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Phase I of GERDA, aimed at investigating neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge is in the active phase since November 2011 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN—Italy. GERDA Ge detectors are non-encapsulated and operate immersed in liquid argon, equipped with a front-end readout electronics consisting of cryogenic charge sensitive preamplifiers designed and manufactured to cope with the characteristics of the GERDA experiment (radio-purity, long and resistive cables, etc.). The presentation will report on the current status of the GERDA experiment phase I, focusing on Ge detectors performance in terms of energy resolution, stability over time, counting rate and related issues.

  17. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.S.; Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report

  18. Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility: Phase I. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, D.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    In order to expedite design and construction of the Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility (WMETF), the project has been divided into two phases. Phase I consists of four storage basins and the associated transfer lines, diversion boxes, and control rooms. The design data pertaining to Phase I of the WMETF project are presented together with general background information and objectives for both phases. The project will provide means to store and decontaminate wastewater streams that are currently discharged to the seepage basins in F Area and H Area. This currently includes both routine process flows sent directly to the seepage basins and diversions of contaminated cooling water or storm water runoff that are stored in the retention basins before being pumped to the seepage basins

  19. The development of pneumoconiosis and its final stages in miners of the Karvina district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochmon, O; Kratochvil, Z

    1974-01-01

    The authors studied 63 retired miners from the Ostrava- Karvina coal mines who had a complicated form of pneumoco niosis. They had been repeatedly hospitalized in the department for tuberculosis and respiratory diseases, mostly because of a complicated respiratory illness. Under conditions of the Ostrava-Karvina mines, pneumoco niosis develops rapidly in proportion to the dust pollution the miners are exposed to. In the above 63 miners pneumoconiosis was in an advanced stage (type B and C according to the Geneva classification). The disease progressed most rapidly (within 10 years) in the group of drifters. Chronic bronchitis was found in 44% of the patients, lung emphysema in 56%, cor pulmonale in 57% of cases. The gravest complications in retired miners with an advanced stage of pneumoconiosis were exacerbated chronic bronchitis and bronchopneumonia endangering the lives of the patients.

  20. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  1. Developing an inventor support service which performs early stage market and manufacturing evaluations. [Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    American businesses are learning the difficult high cost lesson of ignoring production and market factors (producibility, unit product cost (UPC), marketability, etc) during the engineering design phase of product development. Studies have shown that the Japanese spend three times as long as Americans in the design feasibility and decision process of new product introductions and one third the amount of time in the implementation of those products. There is a 20 to 1 cost benefit on effort applied in the design phase versus the production phase of the product life cycle. The number one goal of this project was to establish an organization that has, as one of its purposes, the providing of services responsive to the needs of independent inventors. The number two goal was to demonstrate the value of providing marketing and manufacturing counsel at an early stage in the product development process. The first study goal was met by providing the materials and information necessary to establish an evaluation team and an organization to handle such evaluations. The second study goal was met by demonstrating the impact of early market analysis and manufacturing considerations on product design and therefore on the description of the invention for four different inventions. These inventions were selected at various stages of development. Regardless of stage of development, the marketing and manufacturing reviews resulted in significant changes in design and/or market positioning.

  2. Characterisation of GERDA Phase-I detectors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabe Heider, Marik; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Gusev, Konstantin [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge by submerging bare enriched HPGe detectors in liquid argon. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, and reprocessed natural-Ge detectors from Genius-TF, will be redeployed. We have tested the operation and performance of bare HPGe detectors in liquid nitrogen and in liquid argon over more than three years with three non-enriched p-type prototype detectors. The detector handling and mounting procedures have been defined and the Phase-I detector technology, the low-mass assembly and the long-term stability in liquid argon have been tested successfully. The Phase-I detectors were reprocessed by Canberra Semiconductor NV, Olen, according to their standard technology but without the evaporation of a passivation layer. After their reprocessing, the detectors have been mounted in their low-mass holders and their characterisation in liquid argon performed. The leakage current, the counting characteristics and the efficiency of the detectors have been measured. The testing of the detectors was carried out in the liquid argon test stand of the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory (GDL) at LNGS. The detectors are now stored underground under vacuum until their operation in GERDA.

  3. The Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Enari, Yuji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electronics developments are pursued for the trigger readout of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeter towards the Phase-I upgrade scheduled in the LHC shut-down period of 2019-2020. The LAr Trigger Digitizer system will digitize 34000 channels at a 40 MHz sampling with 12 bit precision after the bipolar shaper at the front-end system, and transmit to the LAr Digital Processing system in the back-end to extract the transverse energies. Results of ASIC developments including QA and radiation hardness evaluations, performances of the final prototypes and results of the system integration tests will presented along with the overall system design.

  4. Induction of micronuclei in the mouse. Revised timing of the final stage of erythropoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, J.W. (Leo Pharmaceutical Products Ltd., Ballerup (Denmark)); Hartley-Asp, B. (AB Leo, Helsingborg (Sweden))

    1983-05-01

    the early effects of X-rays, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, quinacrine dihydrochloride, cycloheximide, actinomycin D and hydroxyurea on the induction of micronuclei in mouse bone-marrow erythrocytes were studied. A significant increase in the incidence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes was seen as early as 5 h after a single treatment with vincristine, 6 h after treatment with X-rays and 10 h after treatment with cyclophosphamide. The cell kinetics of the mouse erythropoietic system described by Cole et al. (1981) can be modified to fit these results. According to this revised model, the final mitosis takes place only 5 h before the expulsion of the nucleus.

  5. Induction of micronuclei in the mouse. Revised timing of the final stage of erythropoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.W.; Hartley-Asp, B.

    1983-01-01

    the early effects of X-rays, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, quinacrine dihydrochloride, cycloheximide, actinomycin D and hydroxyurea on the induction of micronuclei in mouse bone-marrow erythrocytes were studied. A significant increase in the incidence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes was seen as early as 5 h after a single treatment with vincristine, 6 h after treatment with X-rays and 10 h after treatment with cyclophosphamide. The cell kinetics of the mouse erythropoietic system described by Cole et al. (1981) can be modified to fit these results. According to this revised model, the final mitosis takes place only 5 h before the expulsion of the nucleus. (orig.)

  6. The influence of particle size on intermediate and final stages of molybdenum sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskokovic, D.; Novakovic, B.; Petrovic, V.; Ristic, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of initial particle size on kinetics of molybdenum sintering was investigated. Three fractions of monodispersed molybdenum powder (2, 5 and 10 μm) were used as well as a polydispersed powder with mean particle size of 12 μm. Decrease in particle size accelerates to a great extent densification and grain growth processes. During sintering of 10 μm powder and to a smaller extent in the case of polydispersed powder, Zeners's relation was confirmed. Quantitative equations for the intermediate sintering stages could not be fitted to the investigated particulate systems, even though the grain growth process could be described by cubic law and though the volume diffusion coefficient and the surface energy were known with great reliability. (Auth.)

  7. Phase I Source Investigation, Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, Nancy P; Evans, Nathan R

    2002-12-18

    This report represents Phase I of a multi-phase approach to a source investigation of DDT at the Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California, the former site of a pesticide packaging plant, and the adjacent waterway, the Lauritzen Channel. Potential identified sources of contamination were from sloughed material from undredged areas (such as side banks) and from outfall pipes. Objectives of Phase I included the (1) evaluation of pesticide concentrations associated with discharge from outfalls, (2) identification of additional outfalls in the area, (3) identification of type, quantity, and distribution of sediment under the Levin pier, (4) quantification of pesticide concentrations in sediment under the pier, and (5) evaluation of sediment structure and slope stability under the pier. Field operations included the collection of sediment directly from inside the mouths of outfall pipes, when possible, or the deployment of specially designed particle traps where direct sampling was problematic. Passive water samplers were placed at the end of known outfall pipes and analyzed for DDT and other pesticides of concern. Underwater dive surveys were conducted beneath the Levin pier to document type, slope, and thickness of sediment. Samples were collected at locations of interest and analyzed for contaminants. Also sampled was soil from bank areas, which were suspected of potentially contributing to continued DDT contamination of the Lauritzen Channel through erosion and groundwater leaching. The Phase I Source Investigation was successful in identifying significant sources of DDT contamination to Lauritzen Channel sediment. Undredged sediment beneath the Levin pier that has been redistributed to the channel is a likely source. Two outfalls tested bear further investigation. Not as well-defined are the contributions of bank erosional material and groundwater leaching. Subsequent investigations will be based on the results of this first phase.

  8. The first stage of BFS integrated system for nuclear materials control and accounting. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The BFS computerized accounting system is a network-based one. It runs in a client/server mode. The equipment used in the system includes a computer network consisting of: One server computer system, including peripheral hardware and three client computer systems. The server is located near the control room of the BFS-2 facility outside of the 'stone sack' to ensure access during operation of the critical assemblies. Two of the client computer systems are located near the assembly tables of the BFS-1 and BFS-2 facilities while the third one being the Fissile Material Storage. This final report details the following topics: Computerized nuclear material accounting methods; The portal monitoring system; Test and evaluation of item control technology; Test and evaluation of radiation based nuclear material measurement equipment; and The integrated demonstration of nuclear material control and accounting methods

  9. Atomic force microscopy employed as the final imaging stage for soft x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, R.A.; Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Fletcher, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM) enables a high resolution image of a living biological specimen to be recorded in an X-ray sensitive photoresist at unity magnification. Until recently scanning electron microscopes (SEM) have been employed to obtain the final magnified image. Although this has been successful in producing many high resolution images, this method of viewing the resist has several disadvantages. Firstly, a metallic coating has to be applied to the resist surface to provide electrical conductivity, rendering further development of the resist impossible. Also, electron beam damage to the resist surface can occur, in addition to poor resolution and image quality. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows uncoated resists to be imaged at a superior resolution, without damage to the surface. The use of AFM is seen as a major advancement in SXCM. The advantages and disadvantages of the two technologies are discussed, with illustrations from recent studies of a wide variety of hydrated biological specimens imaged using SXCM

  10. CERTIFICATION - The final and critical stage of every civil or military aviation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile STEFAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As a general rule the final step in every aviation program is the certification of the airplane, an important step in which the airplane, the engins and the equipments are checked by an authority or commission according to the airworthiness rules. The main scope of the certification is to promote a safe aviation product and to protect the general public from unnecessary risk. In all the contries the national authorieties require a civil certificability for all the parts or equipments and a full aircraft certification for a new or wholly modified airplane. The military aircrafts must pased and respond to a specific way of certification and many actual efforts are done in order to unify the diffrent national rules in this field. This paper presents the existing situation in the certification of civil and military airplans and the actual measures done for the unification of certification procedures in the world.

  11. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    The University of Minnesota Grid-ICES was divided into four identifiable programs in order to study the feasibility of each of the parts of the ICES independently. The total program involves cogeneration, fuel conversion, fuel substitution, and energy conservation by system change. This Phase II report substantiates the theory that the Basic Grid ICES is not only energy-effective, but it will become cost effective as unit operating costs adjust to supply and demand in the 1980's. The Basic Program involves the cogeneration of steam and electricity. The University of Minnesota has been following an orderly process of converting its Central Heating Plant from gas-oil to 100% coal since 1973. The first step in the transition is complete. The University is presently 100% on coal, and will begin the second step, the test burning of low Btu Western coal during the spring, summer, and fall, and high Btu Eastern coal during the high thermal winter period. The final step to 100% Western coal is planned to be completed by 1980. In conjunction with the final step a retired Northern States Power generating plant has been purchased and is in the process of being retrofitted for topping the existing plant steam output during the winter months. The Basic Plan of ICES involves the add-on work and expense of installing additional boiler capacity at Southeast Steam and non-condensing electric generating capability. This will permit the simultaneous generation of electricity and heat dependent upon the thermal requirements of the heating and cooling system in University buildings. This volume presents an overview of the Community and the ICES. (MCW)

  12. Improved nuclear gage development - phase i and ii. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, E.L.; Champion, F.C.; Castanon, D.R.; Chang, J.C.; Hannon, J.B.

    1976-09-01

    This report contains Phase I and II of an investigation covering the design and construction of a prototype nuclear-moisture-density backscatter gage. Gage development was based upon the analysis of several factors which affect gage performance. This research indicated that the prototype gage measurements are approximately equivalent to measurements obtained by a commercial transmission gage. The implication of this research finding concerns the qualification of the backscatter test method as a valid, reliable, and expedient procedure for determining in-situ soil conditions

  13. [Adding value to the care at the final stage of chronic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas Guerrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing number of people with advanced chronic health conditions and with palliative care needs who die without their health and social needs satisfied. This is enough to redefine the traditional models of care in order to focus on the person, rather than on the disease. In these new models, the important role of nursing is unquestionably to promote an approach based on comprehensive care, coordination and continuity, and at a social health level appropriate to respond to the care of patients who require complex long-term care. The nurse contribution in the end stages of chronic conditions must be in the value of care. Taking care of someone is to be concerned about them. And this is related to attitude, commitment and responsibility. In the care of patients who live in a situation of extreme vulnerability, it is possible to help them feel warmth, confident, relieve their suffering, respect their autonomy, and help them them find sense and hope, through daily tasks. With gestures, words and facial expressions that go with this care, it is possible to preserve patient dignity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage three. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    The development of the copper/iron canister proposed for the containment of high-level waste in the Swedish disposal programme has been studied from the points of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and Q A. This report describes the observations on progress which has been made between March 1995 and February 1996 and the results of further literature studies. A first trial canister has been produced by SKB using a fabricated steel liner and an extruded copper tubular, a second one using a fabricated tubular is at an advanced stage. A change from a fabricated steel inner canister to a proposed cast canister has been justified by a criticality argument but the technology for producing a cast canister is at present untried. It is considered that such a change will require a significant development programme. The microstructure achieved in the extruded copper tubular for the first canister is unacceptable. An improved microstructure may be achieved by extruding at a lower temperature but this remains to be demonstrated. Similar problems exist with plate used for the fabricated tubular but some more favourable structures have been achieved already by this route. Seam welding of the first tubular failed through a suspected material problem. The second fabricated tubular welded without difficulty. However it was necessary to constrain it during welding and it subsequently distorted during machining. There was some evidence of hot tearing close to the weld. The distortion problem may be overcome by a stress relieving anneal but this could cause further grain size problems. 19 refs

  15. Solar central receiver hybrid power system. Phase I study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-11-01

    A management plan is presented for implementation during the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System - Phase I study project. The project plan and the management controls that will be used to assure technically adequate, timely and cost effective performance of the work required to prepare the designated end products are described. Bechtel in-house controls and those to be used in directing the subcontractors are described. Phase I of the project consists of tradeoff studies, parametric analyses, and engineering studies leading to conceptual definition and evaluation of a commercial hybrid power system that has the potential for supplying economically competitive electric power to a utility grid in the 1985-1990 time frame. The scope also includes the preparation of a development plan for the resolution of technical uncertainties and the preparation of plans and a proposal for Phase II of the program. The technical approach will be based on a central receiver solar energy collection scheme which supplies thermal energy to a combined cycle, generating system, consisting of a gas turbine cycle combined with a steam bottoming cycle by means of a heat recovery steam generator.

  16. Automated recognition of helium speech. Phase I: Investigation of microprocessor based analysis/synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    This is the Final Report of Electronic Design Associates on its Phase I SBIR project. The purpose of this project is to develop a method for correcting helium speech, as experienced in diver-surface communication. The goal of the Phase I study was to design, prototype, and evaluate a real time helium speech corrector system based upon digital signal processing techniques. The general approach was to develop hardware (an IBM PC board) to digitize helium speech and software (a LAMBDA computer based simulation) to translate the speech. As planned in the study proposal, this initial prototype may now be used to assess expected performance from a self contained real time system which uses an identical algorithm. The Final Report details the work carried out to produce the prototype system. Four major project tasks were: a signal processing scheme for converting helium speech to normal sounding speech was generated. The signal processing scheme was simulated on a general purpose (LAMDA) computer. Actual helium speech was supplied to the simulation and the converted speech was generated. An IBM-PC based 14 bit data Input/Output board was designed and built. A bibliography of references on speech processing was generated.

  17. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

    2014-04-22

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a heating

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE ACCURACY OF PRE-CONTRACT STAGE ESTIMATION OF FINAL CONTRACT PRICE IN NEW ZEALAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Ji

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing and prioritising the factors that may influence the final contract price when responding to a call for tenders is crucial for proper risk analysis and reliable forecasting; it could make or mar the ability to achieve expected profit margin in an era of lump sum fixed price contracts where clients often contest variation claims. In New Zealand, these factors have not been researched; hence estimators rely only on judgement to ‘guess-estimate’ in their price forecasting. This study aimed to fill the knowledge gap by investigating the priority factors. 150 responses from professional members of the New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors were analysed using multi-attribute method. Results showed thirty-seven factors which could influence the final contract price; the three most influential being poor tender documentation, complexity of design & construction, and completeness of project information. Other factors relating to project, client and contractor characteristics, design consultants and tendering conditions, estimating practice and external factors were reported. Concordance analysis indicated high level of agreement amongst survey participants in the rank-ordering of the relative importance of the identified factors. The findings could assist quantity surveyors to prepare more reliable contract price estimates at the pre-contract stage. It would also improve construction-stage cost control.

  19. HEAL G-C ICES, Phase II: detailed feasibility analysis and preliminary design. Final report, Stage 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    In this preliminary report for Phase II of Health Education Authority of Louisiana's (HEAL) ICES program, specific elements of the basic intitutional issues were readdressed, as requested by the U.S. Department of Energy. The draft environmental assessment was reassessed and updated. Thermal energy demand profiles for the major community sectors, i.e., the five institutions comprising the HEAL Complex, were refined on a month-by-month basis and resulted in establishing ICES plant systems design capacities of 121,500 pounds per hour demand and 418,175,000 pounds per year for steam; 10,000 tons demand and 38,885,000 ton-hours per year for cooling. From these values the concept of the plant was developed. The Phase I capital cost estimate was updated. Total capital cost is now indicated as $29,960,500. The Phase I operating cost estimate was updated, with that figure now $8,468,479. The Phase I financial analysis was updated, producing an estimated annual revenue level of $9,907,062.

  20. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage five. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, W.H.

    1999-05-01

    cause, in electron beam welding. The improvement in creep strength conferred by the phosphorus is valuable, but the evidence that is available suggests that the influence of phosphorus is very complicated. A view is expressed that further work is required to understand the coupling between the effects on creep properties of phosphorus, processing and grain size. The writer is concerned that the problem of low creep ductility may not have been overcome. It has been recognised that the roll forming method is not suitable for serial production and this approach has been abandoned. Two candidate processes are under investigation for tubular production. These are extrusion and a pierce and draw process, which is similar to backward extrusion. Both these methods are more suitable for serial production and there is a reasonable prospect that either may be developed to provide a satisfactory metallurgical structure. A further option under investigation is reduction of the thickness of the overpack from 50 mm to 30 mm. Very good results have been achieved by using an extrusion temperature of 675 deg C and the problem of controlling grain size in the tubular appears to have been overcome. The pierce and draw process has the advantage that it produces a tubular with an integral bottom. The first trial with this process used a processing temperature of 800 deg C. The resulting grain size was very coarse and the draw did not continue to completion. Further trials are planned. A new electron beam welder has been developed to overcome the problems, which have beset the earlier trials. It has been supplied to the SKB pilot plant where commissioning is in progress. An alternative welding process, friction stir welding, is being examined as a candidate for attaching lids. This is potentially a more favourable process than electron beam welding but it is in an early stage of development. Ultrasonic and radiographic test equipment have been developed for examination of lid welds. They have

  1. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage five. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, W.H. [Meadow End Farm, Farnham (United Kingdom)

    1999-05-01

    cause, in electron beam welding. The improvement in creep strength conferred by the phosphorus is valuable, but the evidence that is available suggests that the influence of phosphorus is very complicated. A view is expressed that further work is required to understand the coupling between the effects on creep properties of phosphorus, processing and grain size. The writer is concerned that the problem of low creep ductility may not have been overcome. It has been recognised that the roll forming method is not suitable for serial production and this approach has been abandoned. Two candidate processes are under investigation for tubular production. These are extrusion and a pierce and draw process, which is similar to backward extrusion. Both these methods are more suitable for serial production and there is a reasonable prospect that either may be developed to provide a satisfactory metallurgical structure. A further option under investigation is reduction of the thickness of the overpack from 50 mm to 30 mm. Very good results have been achieved by using an extrusion temperature of 675 deg C and the problem of controlling grain size in the tubular appears to have been overcome. The pierce and draw process has the advantage that it produces a tubular with an integral bottom. The first trial with this process used a processing temperature of 800 deg C. The resulting grain size was very coarse and the draw did not continue to completion. Further trials are planned. A new electron beam welder has been developed to overcome the problems, which have beset the earlier trials. It has been supplied to the SKB pilot plant where commissioning is in progress. An alternative welding process, friction stir welding, is being examined as a candidate for attaching lids. This is potentially a more favourable process than electron beam welding but it is in an early stage of development. Ultrasonic and radiographic test equipment have been developed for examination of lid welds. They have

  2. Phase I trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers with bi-weekly docetaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Simizu, Shigetaka

    2005-01-01

    Docetaxel (DOC) has radiation-sensitizing effects because it synchronizes with the most radiation-sensitive G2/M phase of the cell cycle. From the results of concurrent radiotherapy with weekly DOC administrations in a phase I trial, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was mucositis and the recommended dose was 10 mg/m 2 , but the administration schedule was a problem. We planned concurrent radiation therapy in a bi-weekly DOC phase I trial to improve the larynx preservation rate and to determine which schedule and dosage of DOC would yield its inherent cytotoxic effects. We decided the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and DLT to serve as an index of the appearance of adverse events. Patients with stage II or stage III T2N1 hypopharyngeal cancer or stage II or III laryngeal cancer were included in this study. DOC was administered on the days of initiation of bi-weekly radiation (day 1, day 15, day 29). Radiation was given (2 Gy/day: 5 days per week) for a total of 30 Fr, with a total of 60 Gy. The starting dose of DOC was 30 mg/m 2 (level 1) and the dosage was raised by 5 mg/m 2 at each level. DLT was observed due to mucositis and neutropenia at 40 mg/m 2 (level 3), the MTD was 40 mg/m 2 and the recommended dose (RD) was 35 mg/m 2 . Especially in hypopharyngeal cancer of Grade 3 or more, mucositis appeared, with swallowing difficulty in cases with a wide range of irradiation. At dosages of 35 mg/m 2 , the effectiveness was favorable and this was the suitable dosage recommended for the subsequent phase II trial. This clinical study was performed with permission of our IRB (Institutional Review Board). (author)

  3. CMS FPix sensor study for phase I upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The next incarnation of the CMS forward pixel detector, to be installed at the extended year end technical stop 2016-17, will need to survive an integrated luminosity of 300\\,fb$^{-1}$, with the inner radius of the active region of the disks decreasing from 6 to 4.5\\,cm. The number of disks on each side will increase from two to three. Based on the Run I experience and irradiation studies, the Phase I forward pixel detector sensors will again be n$^+$-in-n diffusion oxygenated float zone, with parameters similar to those in the present run. Results from the quality assurance probing of the first batches of sensor wafers are described. The leakage current (IV) measurements are particularly impressive with current densities in the range of 6-7\\,nA/cm$^2$ at about twice the full depletion voltage.

  4. Status of the CMS Phase I pixel detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannagel, S., E-mail: simon.spannagel@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  5. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase I awards, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-12-01

    This booklet presents technical abstracts of Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 under the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. SBIR research explores innovative concepts in important technological and scientific areas that can lead to valuable new technology and products. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications, as described by the awardee, are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations, including venture capital and larger industrial firms, with an interest in the research described in any of the abstracts are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  6. Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, David A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Enders, Alexander L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document reviews the progress of Phase I of the Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing (DEEW) project. The DEEW project is the implementation of software incorporating an algorithm which reviews data generated by radiation portal monitors and utilizes advanced and novel techniques for detecting radiological and fissile material while not alarming on Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material. Independent testing indicated that the Enhanced Energy Windowing algorithm showed promise at reducing the probability of alarm in the stream of commerce compared to existing algorithms and other developmental algorithms, while still maintaining adequate sensitivity to threats. This document contains a brief description of the project, instructions for setting up and running the applications, and guidance to help make reviewing the output files and source code easier.

  7. Status of the CMS Phase I Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon

    2016-09-21

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase~I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  8. Frequency-wavenumber spectrum for GATE phase I rainfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Shoichiro; Valdes, Juan B.; North, Gerald R.

    1990-01-01

    The oceanic rainfall frequency-wavenumber spectrum and its associated space-time correlation have been evaluated from subsets of GATE phase I data. The records, of a duration of four days, were sampled at 15 minutes intervals in 4 x 4 km grid boxes over a 400 km diameter hexagon. In the low frequencies-low wavenumber region the results coincide with those obtained by using the stochastic model proposed by North and Nakomoto (1989). From the derived spectrum the inherent time and space scales of the stochastic model were determined to be approximately 13 hours and 36 km. The formalism proposed by North and Nakamoto was taken together with the derived spectrum to compute the mean square sampling error due to intermittent visits of a spaceborne sensor.

  9. Steam generator tube integrity program. Phase I report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Vagins, M.

    1979-09-01

    The results are presented of the pressure tests performed as part of Phase I of the Steam Generator Tube Integrity (SGTI) program at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These tests were performed to establish margin-to-failure predictions for mechanically defected Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing under operating and accident conditions. Defect geometries tested were selected because they simulate known or expected defects in PWR steam generators. These defect geometries are Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) slots, elliptical wastage, elliptical wastage plus through-wall slot, uniform thinning, denting, denting plus uniform thinning, and denting plus elliptical wastage. All defects were placed in tubing representative of that currently used in PWR steam generators

  10. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the Component Fragility Research Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, BNL is involved in establishing seismic fragility levels for various nuclear power plant equipment by identifying, collecting and analyzing existing test data from various sources. In Phase I of this program, BNL has reviewed approximately seventy test reports to collect fragility or high level test data for switchgears, motor control centers and similar electrical cabinets, valve actuators and numerous electrical devices of various manufacturers and models. This report provides an assessment and evaluation of the data collected in Phase I. The fragility data for medium voltage and low voltage switchgears and motor control centers are analyzed using the test response spectra (TRS) as a measure of the fragility level. The analysis reveals that fragility levels can best be described by a group of TRS curves corresponding to various failure modes. The lower-bound curve indicates the initiation of malfunctioning or structural damage; whereas, the upper-bound curve corresponds to overall failure of the equipment based on known failure modes. High level test data for some components are included in the report. These data indicate that some components are inherently strong and do not exhibit any failure mode even when tested at the vibration limit of a shake table. The common failure modes are identified in the report. The fragility levels determined in this report have been compared with those used in the PRA and Seismic Margin Studies. It appears that the BNL data better correlate with the HCLPF (High Confidence of a Low Probability of Failure) level used in Seismic Margin Studies and can improve this level as high as 60% for certain applications. Specific recommendations are provided for proper application of BNL fragility data to other studies

  11. Lightweight Exit Cone for Liquid Rocket Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) J-2X engine will power the upper stage of the Ares I and the earth departure stage (EDS) of the Ares V, which will enable...

  12. 77 FR 9655 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated List of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 12-25; DA 12-187] Mobility Fund Phase I Auction.... DATES: Pursuant to the Auction 901 (Mobility Fund Phase I) Comment Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February... 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: Pursuant to the Auction 901 (Mobility Fund Phase I) Comment Public Notice, 77 FR...

  13. Concept for urban heating systems using co-generation; Conception de systemes de chauffage urbain pour la cogeneration. Phase I: application au quartier des Morasses (Martigny) de la methode de conception des reseaux de chauffage urbain developpe au LENI. Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherix, G. [Centre de competence en urbistique CREM, Martigny (Switzerland); Weber, C. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Laboratoire d' energetique industrielle (LENI), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews the work done in the first phase of a project concerning the concept for a district heating system in Martigny, Switzerland. This work was carried out by the Centre for Municipal and Energy Research CREM in Martigny, Switzerland, and the Laboratory for Industrial Energy LENI at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. Software developed at the LENI is introduced and its use for the determination of the necessary configuration and modes of operation of a district heating system in Martigny is discussed. The situation in the Morasses district of Martigny and the promising results obtained are looked at. These can lead to the optimisation of heating supply in other such areas.

  14. Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies: Phase I. Initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    already spent on these technologies also lead to commercial success. The project ‘Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies: Phase I. Initiation’ was aiming at starting with the Establishment of such a center. The following report documents the achievements within the project...... of the fluctuating wind energy. As the fuel cell and hydrogen technologies come closer to commercialization, development of testing methodology, qualified testing and demonstration become increasingly important. Danish industrial players have expressed a strong need for support in the process to push fuel cell...... and hydrogen technologies from the research and development stage into the commercial domain. A Center to support industry with test, development, analysis, approval, certification, consultation, and training in the areas of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was needed. Denmark has demonstrated leading...

  15. Pulse shape discrimination for Gerda Phase I data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barnabé Heider, M.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Cossavella, F.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Ferella, A.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Guthikonda, K. K.; Hampel, W.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Liu, X.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Machado, A. A.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Misiaszek, M.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Tarka, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Volynets, O.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-10-01

    The Gerda experiment located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN searches for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay of 76Ge using germanium diodes as source and detector. In Phase I of the experiment eight semi-coaxial and five BEGe type detectors have been deployed. The latter type is used in this field of research for the first time. All detectors are made from material with enriched 76Ge fraction. The experimental sensitivity can be improved by analyzing the pulse shape of the detector signals with the aim to reject background events. This paper documents the algorithms developed before the data of Phase I were unblinded. The double escape peak (DEP) and Compton edge events of 2.615 MeV γ rays from 208Tl decays as well as two-neutrino double beta (2 νββ) decays of 76Ge are used as proxies for 0 νββ decay. For BEGe detectors the chosen selection is based on a single pulse shape parameter. It accepts 0.92±0.02 of signal-like events while about 80 % of the background events at Q ββ =2039 keV are rejected. For semi-coaxial detectors three analyses are developed. The one based on an artificial neural network is used for the search of 0 νββ decay. It retains 90 % of DEP events and rejects about half of the events around Q ββ . The 2 νββ events have an efficiency of 0.85±0.02 and the one for 0 νββ decays is estimated to be . A second analysis uses a likelihood approach trained on Compton edge events. The third approach uses two pulse shape parameters. The latter two methods confirm the classification of the neural network since about 90 % of the data events rejected by the neural network are also removed by both of them. In general, the selection efficiency extracted from DEP events agrees well with those determined from Compton edge events or from 2 νββ decays.

  16. Pulse shape discrimination for Gerda Phase I data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Bode, T.; Budjas, D.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Lazzaro, A.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Muenchen (Germany); Allardt, M.; Barros, N.; Domula, A.; Lehnert, B.; Wester, T.; Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Andreotti, E. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Bakalyarov, A.M.; Belyaev, S.T.; Lebedev, V.I.; Zhukov, S.V. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Balata, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Junker, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Macolino, C.; Nisi, S.; Pandola, L.; Zavarise, P. [LNGS, INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Barabanov, I.; Bezrukov, L.; Gurentsov, V.; Inzhechik, L.V.; Kuzminov, V.V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Yanovich, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barnabe Heider, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Muenchen (Germany); Baudis, L.; Benato, G.; Ferella, A.; Guthikonda, K.K.; Tarka, M.; Walter, M. [Physik Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Bauer, C.; Hampel, W.; Heisel, M.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Kirsch, A.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Lindner, M.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Machado, A.A.; Maneschg, W.; Salathe, M.; Schreiner, J.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Strecker, H.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Caldwell, A.; Cossavella, F.; Liao, H.Y.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Schulz, O.; Volynets, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Bellotti, E.; Pessina, G. [Universita Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); INFN Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Belogurov, S.; Kornoukhov, V.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bettini, A.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Hemmer, S.; Sada, C. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); INFN Padova, Padova (Italy); Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Kochetov, O.; Nemchenok, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Shevchik, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cattadori, C.; Gotti, C. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Chernogorov, A.; Demidova, E.V.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Vasenko, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Falkenstein, R.; Freund, K.; Grabmayr, P.; Hegai, A.; Jochum, J.; Schmitt, C. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Frodyma, N.; Misiaszek, M.; Pelczar, K.; Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G. [Jagiellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Muenchen (Germany); Hult, M.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Klimenko, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Lippi, I.; Stanco, L.; Ur, C.A. [INFN Padova, Padova (Italy); Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (IT); INFN Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (IT); Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (RU); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (RU); Sturm, K. von [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (IT); INFN Padova, Padova (IT); Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (DE)

    2013-10-15

    The Gerda experiment located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN searches for neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge using germanium diodes as source and detector. In Phase I of the experiment eight semi-coaxial and five BEGe type detectors have been deployed. The latter type is used in this field of research for the first time. All detectors are made from material with enriched {sup 76}Ge fraction. The experimental sensitivity can be improved by analyzing the pulse shape of the detector signals with the aim to reject background events. This paper documents the algorithms developed before the data of Phase I were unblinded. The double escape peak (DEP) and Compton edge events of 2.615 MeV {gamma} rays from {sup 208}Tl decays as well as two-neutrino double beta (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) decays of {sup 76}Ge are used as proxies for 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. For BEGe detectors the chosen selection is based on a single pulse shape parameter. It accepts 0.92{+-}0.02 of signal-like events while about 80 % of the background events at Q{sub {beta}{beta}} =2039 keV are rejected. For semi-coaxial detectors three analyses are developed. The one based on an artificial neural network is used for the search of 0 {nu}{beta}{beta} decay. It retains 90 % of DEP events and rejects about half of the events around Q{sub {beta}{beta}}. The 2 {nu}{beta}{beta} events have an efficiency of 0.85 {+-}0.02 and the one for 0 {nu}{beta}{beta} decays is estimated to be 0.90{sup +0.05}{sub -0.09}. A second analysis uses a likelihood approach trained on Compton edge events. The third approach uses two pulse shape parameters. The latter two methods confirm the classification of the neural network since about 90 % of the data events rejected by the neural network are also removed by both of them. In general, the selection efficiency extracted from DEP events agrees well with those determined from Compton edge events or from 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decays. (orig.)

  17. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  18. Oman Drilling Project Phase I Borehole Geophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Pezard, P. A.; Henry, G.; Brun, L.; Célérier, B.; Lods, G.; Robert, P.; Benchikh, A. M.; Al Shukaili, M.; Al Qassabi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) drilled six holes at six sites in the Samail ophiolite in the southern Samail and Tayin massifs. 1500-m of igneous and metamorphic rocks were recovered at four sites (GT1, GT2, GT3 and BT1) using wireline diamond core drilling and drill cuttings at two sites (BA1, BA2) using air rotary drilling, respectively. OmanDP is an international collaboration supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the Deep Carbon Observatory, NSF, NASA, IODP, JAMSTEC, and the European, Japanese, German and Swiss Science Foundations, and with in-kind support in Oman from Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, Public Authority of Mining, Sultan Qaboos University and the German University of Technology. A comprehensive borehole geophysical survey was conducted in all the OmanDP Phase I boreholes shortly after drilling in April 2017. Following geophysical wireline logs, using slim-hole borehole logging equipment provided and run by the Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Université de Montpellier/ Géosciences Montpellier, and logging trucks from the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Water Resources, were collected in most of the holes: electrical resistivity (dual laterolog resistivity, LLd and LLs), spectral gamma ray (K, U, and Th contents), magnetic susceptibility, total natural gamma ray, full waveform sonic (Vp and Vs), acoustic borehole wall imaging, optical borehole wall imaging, borehole fluid parameters (pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox potential, non-polarized spontaneous electrical potential), and caliper (borehole diameter). In addition, spinner flowmeter (downhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) and heatpulse flow meter logs (dowhole fluid flow rate along borehole axis) were collected in BA1 to characterize downhole fluid flow rates along borehole axis. Unfortuantely, only incomplete wireline logs are available for

  19. Radioactive and industrial waste water collection system study, Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Phase I of the Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) Collection System Study has been completed, and the deliverables for this portion of the study are enclosed. The deliverables include: The Work Break-down Structure (WBS) for Phase II; The Annotated Outline for the Collection Study Report; The Process Flow Diagrams (PFD) of the RLW collection system based on current literature and knowledge; The Configuration database; The Reference Index, listing all currently held documents of the RLW collection system; The Reference Drawing Index listing all currently held, potentially applicable, drawings reviewed during the PFD development; The Regulation Identification Document for RCRA and CWA; The Regulation Database for RCRA and CWA; The Regulation Review Log, including statements justifying the non-applicability of certain regulations; Regulation Library, including the photocopied regulations with highlighted text for RCRA and CWA; The summary of RTG's waste water treatment plant design experience and associated regulations on which RTG based the design of these treatment facilities; TA-50 Influent Database; Radioactive Liquid Waste Stream Characterization Database

  20. A random walk rule for phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, S D; Flournoy, N; Rosenberger, W F

    1997-06-01

    We describe a family of random walk rules for the sequential allocation of dose levels to patients in a dose-response study, or phase I clinical trial. Patients are sequentially assigned the next higher, same, or next lower dose level according to some probability distribution, which may be determined by ethical considerations as well as the patient's response. It is shown that one can choose these probabilities in order to center dose level assignments unimodally around any target quantile of interest. Estimation of the quantile is discussed; the maximum likelihood estimator and its variance are derived under a two-parameter logistic distribution, and the maximum likelihood estimator is compared with other nonparametric estimators. Random walk rules have clear advantages: they are simple to implement, and finite and asymptotic distribution theory is completely worked out. For a specific random walk rule, we compute finite and asymptotic properties and give examples of its use in planning studies. Having the finite distribution theory available and tractable obviates the need for elaborate simulation studies to analyze the properties of the design. The small sample properties of our rule, as determined by exact theory, compare favorably to those of the continual reassessment method, determined by simulation.

  1. Geothermal energy: opportunities for California commerce. Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longyear, A.B. (ed.)

    1981-12-01

    The potential geothermal direct-use energy market and its application to projects in California are assessed. Project identification effort is to be focused on those that have the highest probability for near-term successful commercial operations. Near-term herein means 2 to 5 years for project implementation. Phase I has been focused on defining and assessing: (1) the geothermal direct-use resources that are suitable for near-term utilization; and (2) the generic applications (municipal heating districts, horticultural greenhouse firms, laundries, etc.) that are suitable for near-term projects. Five economic development regions in the state, containing recognized geothermal direct-use resources, have been defined. Thirty-eight direct use resources have been evaluated in these regions. After assessment against pre-selected criteria, twenty-seven have been rated with a priority of I, II or III, thereby qualifying them for further marketing effort. The five areas with a priority of I are summarized. These areas have no perceived impediments to near-term development. Twenty-nine generic categories of applications were assessed against previously selected criteria to determine their near term potential for direct use of geothermal fluids. Some twenty industry, commercial and institutional application categories were rated with a priority of I, II or III and warrant further marketing efforts. The seven categories with a priority of I are listed. These categories were found to have the least impediments to near-term application projects.

  2. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Bell, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village is the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff, and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. These measures include increased wall and attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. The report discusses how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10-month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  3. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Bell, C.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village, the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. The energy efficiency measures that are incorporated into these apartments include increased wall & attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. Results discuss how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10 month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  4. Installation and Commissioning of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Onel, Yasar

    2017-01-01

    The final phase of the CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeters Phase I upgrade was performed during the Extended Year End Technical Stop of 2016-2017. In the framework of the upgrade, the PMT boxes were reworked to implement two channel readout in order to exploit the benefits of the multi-anode PMTs in background tagging and signal recovery. The front-end electronics was also being upgraded to QIE10-based electronics which will implement larger dynamic range and a 6-bit TDC to provide additional handles to eliminate the background. Following this major upgrade, the Hadron Forward Calorimeters are being commissioned for operation readiness in 2017. Here we describe the details and the components of the upgrade, and discuss the operational experience and results obtained during the upgrade and commissioning.

  5. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Aircraft- 2013 ARMD Seedling Fund Phase I Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Douglas P.; McDonald, Robert; Campbell, Robbie; Chase, Adam; Daniel, Jason; Darling, Michael; Green, Clayton; MacGregor, Collin; Sudak, Peter; Sykes, Harrison; hide

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the final written documentation for the Aeronautic Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Fund's Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) Aircraft Phase I project. The findings presented include propulsion system concepts, synergistic missions, and aircraft concepts. LENR is a form of nuclear energy that potentially has over 4,000 times the energy density of chemical energy sources. It is not expected to have any harmful emissions or radiation which makes it extremely appealing. There is a lot of interest in LENR, but there are no proven theories. This report does not explore the feasibility of LENR. Instead, it assumes that a working system is available. A design space exploration shows that LENR can enable long range and high speed missions. Six propulsion concepts, six missions, and four aircraft concepts are presented. This report also includes discussion of several issues and concerns that were uncovered during the study and potential research areas to infuse LENR aircraft into NASA's aeronautics research.

  6. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027)

  7. Phase I/II trial of concurrent use of S-1 and radiation therapy for T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Meijin; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okamoto, Makito; Niibe, Yuzuru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2010-01-01

    A Phase I/II study of S-1 combined radiation therapy was conducted in patients with Stage II (T2N0) glottic cancer. The purpose of the Phase I study was to identify the maximum tolerated dose, the recommended dose and the dose limiting toxicity. The objectives in the phase II study were to estimate the local control and the overall survival, and the incidence of adverse events. In Phase I, S-1 was administered orally in a split-course fashion as two doses of 40 mg/m 2 , for a total daily dose of 80 mg/m 2 . The course involved a 2-week rest after a 2-week administration (Level 1) and a 1-week rest after a 3-week administration (Level 2). Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily (total 60-Gy) standard fractionation. Seven patients were enrolled in the Phase I, and 19 in the Phase II study. Mucositis was the most common toxicity encountered. All 26 patients completed radiation therapy without delay. The overall response rate was 100% (26/26) with all patients showing a complete response. One patient developed a local recurrence 28 months after the treatment. The 3-year local control and overall survival rates were 94.7 and 85.4%, respectively (limited to 22 patients from Level 2). The use of S-1 at 80 mg/m 2 per day in a split-course with 1-week rest during the course of radiation therapy was safe and effective for Stage II glottic cancer. The treatment strategy employing orally available S-1 proved to be beneficial over the conventional injection of antitumor agents for maintaining the patients' quality of life. (author)

  8. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III

  9. SPIRIT: A seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beibei; Li, Daniel; Yuan, Ying

    2018-06-07

    Immunotherapy-treatments that enlist the immune system to battle tumors-has received widespread attention in cancer research. Due to its unique features and mechanisms for treating cancer, immunotherapy requires novel clinical trial designs. We propose a Bayesian seamless phase I/II randomized design for immunotherapy trials (SPIRIT) to find the optimal biological dose (OBD) defined in terms of the restricted mean survival time. We jointly model progression-free survival and the immune response. Progression-free survival is used as the primary endpoint to determine the OBD, and the immune response is used as an ancillary endpoint to quickly screen out futile doses. Toxicity is monitored throughout the trial. The design consists of two seamlessly connected stages. The first stage identifies a set of safe doses. The second stage adaptively randomizes patients to the safe doses identified and uses their progression-free survival and immune response to find the OBD. The simulation study shows that the SPIRIT has desirable operating characteristics and outperforms the conventional design. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A virosomal formulated Her-2/neu multi-peptide vaccine induces Her-2/neu-specific immune responses in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Ursula; Wiltschke, C; Jasinska, J; Kundi, M; Zurbriggen, R; Garner-Spitzer, E; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Pehamberger, H; Scheiner, O; Zielinski, C C

    2010-02-01

    We have previously shown in mice that vaccination with three Her-2-peptides representing B-cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of Her-2/neu induces Her-2/neu-specific IgG antibodies with strong anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. We have now finalized a phase I clinical trial with an anti-Her-2/neu vaccine-construct of immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes with the three peptides in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Ten MBC patients with low protein overexpression of Her-2/neu of MBC (+ or ++ upon immunohistochemistry, FISH negative) and positive hormone receptor status were enrolled in a single center phase I study. The virosomal formulated vaccine, consisting of 10 microg/peptide, was intramuscularly applied three times on days 1, 28, and 56. The primary endpoint of the study, which lasted 12 weeks, was safety, the secondary endpoint immunogenicity. Local erythema at the injection site was the only vaccine-related side effect occurring in four patients. In 8 of 10 patients an increase in peptide-specific antibody titer measured by ELISA was found. Importantly, the induced antibodies were also directed against the native Her-2/neu protein. Cellular immune responses, as measured by in vitro production of IL-2, IFN-c, and TNF-a of PBMCs showed a marked increase after vaccination in the majority of vaccinees. Notably, the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T regulatory cells, which were significantly increased compared to healthy controls prior to vaccination, was markedly reduced following vaccination. In all, the immunological responses after vaccination indicated that the patients in stage IV of disease were immunocompetent and susceptible to vaccination. The Her-2/neu multipeptide vaccine was safe, well tolerated and effective in overcoming immunological tolerance to Her-2/neu. The induction of anti-Her-2-specific antibodies could result in clinical benefit comparable to passive anti-Her-2 antibody therapy.

  11. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate and finalize designs. Insufficient correlation between wind tunnel results and flight tests, have...

  12. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in 76 Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in 76 Ge inside a 64 m 3 cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 10 26 yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg·yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T 1/2 > 2.1 · 10 25 yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of 76 Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 10 23 yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 10 23 yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of 76 Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10

  13. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, Thomas [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, TU Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, Germany thomas.wester@tu-dresden.de (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in {sup 76}Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge inside a 64 m{sup 3} cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 10{sup 26} yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg·yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T{sub 1/2} > 2.1 · 10{sup 25} yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of {sup 76}Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 10{sup 23} yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 10{sup 23} yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of {sup 76}Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10.

  14. Results from phase I of the GERDA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array Gerda at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the INFN in Italy is an experiment dedicated to the search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment employs high purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge inside a 64 m3 cryostat filled with liquid argon. Gerda was planned in two phases of data taking with the goal to reach a half-life sensitivity in the order of 1026 yr. Phase I of Gerda was running from November 2011 until May 2013. With about 18 kg total detector mass, data with an exposure of 21.6 kg.yr was collected and a background index of 0.01 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was achieved in the region of interest. No signal was found for the 0νββ decay and a new limit of T1/2 > 2.1 . 1025 yr (90% C.L.) was obtained, strongly disfavoring the previous claim of observation. Furthermore, the 2νββ decay half-life of 76Ge was measured with unprecedented precision. Other results include new half-life limits of the order of 1023 yr for Majoron emitting double beta decay modes with spectral indices n = 1, 2, 3, 7 and new limits in the order of 1023 yr for 2νββ decays to the first 3 excited states of 76Se. In Phase II, currently in preparation, the detector mass will be doubled while reducing the background index by a factor of 10.

  15. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I & II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. However, POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a new series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016, and described herein, were done in two phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I and II, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  16. Dilution Ratios for HB Line Phase I Eductor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    HB Line Phase I product transfer includes an eductor which transfers liquid from Product Hold Tank (PHT) RT-33 or RT-34 to Tank 11.1. The eductor also dilutes the liquid from the PHT with eductant. Dilution must be reliably controlled because of criticality concerns with H Canyon Tanks. The eductor system, which contains a 1 inch Model 264 Schutte and Koerting eductor, was previously modeled [1] in 1998 and dilution ratios were calculated for different flow restrictors, eductant pressures and densities for the eductant and the contents of the PHT. The previous calculation was performed using spreadsheet software no longer supported at SRS. For the previous work dilution ratio was defined as the volume of eductant consumed divided by volume of PHT contents transferred. Since 1998 HB Line Engineering has changed the definition of dilution ratio to the total volume of liquid, eductant consumed plus the volume of PHT liquid transferred, divided by the volume of PHT liquid transferred. The 1998 base case calculation was for a restrictor diameter of 0.334 inches, an eductant supply pressure of 15 psig, full PHT, an eductant specific gravity of 1.385 and a PHT density of 1.015. The base case dilution ratio calculated in 1998 using the current definition was 3.52. After accounting for uncertainty the minimum dilution ratio decreased to 3.23. In 2001 HB Line Engineering requested that the calculation be repeated for a manganous nitrate solution eductant and also a process water eductant. The other conditions were the same as for the 1998 calculation. The objective of this report is to document the calculations and the results

  17. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  18. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  19. Phase I trial of sargramostim in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Rosh, Joel; Heyman, Mel; Winter, Harland S; Ferry, George; Cohen, Stanley; Mamula, Petar; Baldassano, Robert N

    2010-07-01

    Improving granulocyte function may represent an effective therapy for Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a Phase I-2 trial of sargramostim (SRG) in children with CD. This was multicenter, open-label study in 6-16-year-old patients with moderate to severely active CD. Patients received either 4 or 6 microg/kg SRG subcutaneously daily for 8 weeks, with and without concomitant corticosteroids (CS). The primary endpoint was identification of a safe and tolerable dose in children. The secondary endpoint was establishment of the pharmacokinetics (PK). Efficacy, a tertiary endpoint, was measured by the Pediatric CD Activity Index (PCDAI). Response was defined as a decrease from baseline of > or =12.5 points and remission as absolute PCDAI of < or =10. In all, 22 patients were enrolled: 12 and 10 received 4 and 6 mg/kg, respectively; 19 completed the course. Both doses were found to be safe and well tolerated. Mild injection-site reactions occurred in 90% of patients. Three patients required dose reductions due to elevated absolute neutrophil counts. Following 4 microg/kg the mean area under the curve (AUC) was 2.64 and 2.80 ngh/mL for the 6-11- and 12-16-year-old groups, respectively. The mean half-life (t(1/2)) was 1.22 and 1.59 hours, respectively. Following 6 microg/kg, the mean AUC was 5.01 ngh/mL for the 12-16-year-old group, a 1.8-fold increase. A total of 16/18 patients (88%) achieved remission or response. Sargramostim at both 4 and 6 mg/kg was well tolerated. PK analysis suggested dose proportionality unaffected by CS exposure. Remission and response data are encouraging, but further trials are needed to assess efficacy.

  20. Phase I study of intravenous iododeoxyuridine as a clinical radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Russo, A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Collins, J.M.; Rowland, J.; Wright, D.; Glatstein, E.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty-four patients with locally advanced (19 patients) or metastatic (5 patients) tumors were treated in a Phase I study combining constant intravenous infusions of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and hyperfractionated radiation therapy. IUdR was given as a constant infusion for 12 hours/day for two separate 14-day infusion periods in most patients. The dose of IUdR was escalated from 250 to 1200 mg/m2/12-hour infusion in this study. The initial tumor volume was treated to 45 Gy/1.5 Gy BID/3 weeks followed by a cone-down boost to 20-25 Gy/1.25 Gy BID/2 weeks after a planned 2-week break. THe IUdR infusion preceded the initial and cone-down irradiation by 1 week. Local acute toxicity (within the radiation volume) was uncommon and few patients required an alteration of the planned treatment schedule. Two patients developed late local toxicity with one patient showing clinical signs of radiation hepatitis and another patient developing a large bowel obstruction that required surgical bypass. Dose-limiting systemic toxicity was confined to the bone marrow with moderate to severe thrombocytopenia developing on Day 10-14 of infusions at 1200 mg/m2/12 hours. Mild stomatitis and partial alopecia occurred in some patients at this dose level. No systemic skin toxicity was seen. Pharmacology studies revealed steady-state arterial plasma levels of IUdR of 1 to 8 X 10(-6) M over the dose range used. In vivo IUdR incorporation into tumors was studied in three patients with high-grade sarcomas using an anti-IUdR monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry and demonstrated incorporation in up to 50-70% of tumor cells. The preliminary treatment results, particularly in patients with unresectable sarcomas, are encouraging.

  1. Outbreaks of paralytic poliomyelitis during 1996-2012: the changing epidemiology of a disease in the final stages of eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Ondrej; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Wassilak, Steve G; Singh, Simarjit; Sutter, Roland W

    2014-11-01

    Despite substantial progress toward eradication of poliomyelitis, the risk of poliomyelitis outbreaks resulting from virus importations into polio-free areas persists. We reviewed the changing epidemiology of outbreaks in the final stages of the eradication initiative. Available literature on outbreaks of poliomyelitis caused by wild polioviruses between 1996 and 2012 was reviewed. During this period, there were 22 outbreaks involving 39 countries. Outbreaks ranged in size from 1 to 1335 cases. These outbreaks caused 4571 cases, representing 21% of all cases reported during this period. Five outbreaks involved multiple countries. In 76% of outbreaks (16/21) with a known age distribution, cases concentrated among children aged poliomyelitis had not occurred for many years. The changing epidemiology, with cases and higher case-fatality ratios among adults, increased the severity of these outbreaks. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Transonic Performance Flight Demonstration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altitude compensating nozzles continue to be of interest for use on future launch vehicle boosters and upper stages because of their higher mission average Isp and...

  3. Zero Boil Off System for Cryogen Storage, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to develop a zero boil off (ZBO) dewar using a two-stage pulse-tube cooler together with two innovative, continuous-flow cooling loops and an...

  4. Research and development program in reactor diagnostics and monitoring with neutron noise methods. Stage 6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Avdic, S.; Dahl, B. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Reactor Physics

    2000-07-15

    by a finite difference scheme, similar to the one used in the previous stage. Actually, a relatively large and involved computational tool was elaborated, containing several modules. In the first module the static, space-dependent group constants are generated, to be used as input by the finite difference dynamic code. These are calculated through CASMO/SIMULATE for a realistic heterogeneous core. The dynamic code then calculates the noise for a number of hypothetical perturbations. The perturbations can be given either as direct changes in the cross-sections, or changes in the temperature of various components (coolant, fuel etc.). In the latter case the temperature fluctuations are converted into cross-section fluctuations by another module. Finally the noise is calculated in two or three dimensions by using the static group constants, the time derivatives, the delayed neutron data and the perturbations data. By a suitable choice of the perturbation, the Green's function can also be calculated, from which the noise induced by other perturbations can be calculated by integration. The model was verified through comparison to analytical calculations. It has been proposed a long time ago that the cross-correlation or coherence between the neutron noise, measured locally in the core, and the core-exit thermocouples can be used to determine the MTC. Such a method would have large advantages over the traditional ones because it would not interfere with the reactor operation. Earlier investigations showed nevertheless that the MTC value, obtained from such investigations, gave a quantitative value for the MTC that was 2 to 5 times lower than the true one. One very likely reason for this deviation lies in the fact that in the evaluation of the noise measurement, it is assumed that the temperature fluctuations, driving the neutron noise, are homogeneously distributed in the core, and that the response of the reactor is point-kinetic. In reality none of these two

  5. Near term hybrid passenger vehicle development program. Phase I. Appendices C and D. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The derivation of and actual preliminary design of the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle (NTHV) are presented. The NTHV uses a modified GM Citation body, a VW Rabbit turbocharged diesel engine, a 24KW compound dc electric motor, a modified GM automatic transmission, and an on-board computer for transmission control. The following NTHV information is presented: the results of the trade-off studies are summarized; the overall vehicle design; the selection of the design concept and the base vehicle (the Chevrolet Citation), the battery pack configuration, structural modifications, occupant protection, vehicle dynamics, and aerodynamics; the powertrain design, including the transmission, coupling devices, engine, motor, accessory drive, and powertrain integration; the motor controller; the battery type, duty cycle, charger, and thermal requirements; the control system (electronics); the identification of requirements, software algorithm requirements, processor selection and system design, sensor and actuator characteristics, displays, diagnostics, and other topics; environmental system including heating, air conditioning, and compressor drive; the specifications, weight breakdown, and energy consumption measures; advanced technology components, and the data sources and assumptions used. (LCL)

  6. Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring Project: Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Randy M.; Hill, David E.; Gorman, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    As a proof of concept tested in an operational context, the Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (GRadSSTraM) Project successfully demonstrated that radio frequency identification (RFID) and Web 2.0* technologies can be deployed to track controlled shipments between the United States and the European Union. Between November 2009 and May 2010, a total of 19 shipments were successfully shipped from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and tracked to their delivery at England's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) by the United Kingdom Royal Mail. However, the project can only be viewed as a qualified success as notable shortcomings were observed. Although the origin and terminus of all RFID-enabled shipments were recorded and no shipments were lost, not all the waypoints between ORNL and NPL were incorporated into the pilot. Given limited resources, the project team was able to install RFID listeners/actuators at three waypoints between the two endpoints. Although it is likely that all shipments followed the same route between ORNL and NPL, it cannot be determined beyond question that all 19 shipments were routed on identical itineraries past the same three waypoints. The pilot also raises the distinct possibility that unattended RFID tracking alone, without positive confirmation that a tagged item has been properly recorded by an RFID reader, does not meet a rigorous standard for shipping controlled items. Indeed, the proof of concept test strongly suggests that a multifaceted approach to tracking may be called for, including tracking methods that are capable of reading and accepting multiple inputs for individual items (e.g., carrier-provided tracking numbers, Universal Product Codes (UPCs), and RFID tags). For controlled items, another apparent requirement is a confirmation feature, human or otherwise, which can certify that an item's RFID tag, UPC, or tracking number has been recorded.

  7. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Major structure response (Project IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, B.J.; Johnson, J.J.; Lo, T.Y.

    1981-08-01

    The primary task of the Major Structure Response Project within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was to develop detailed finite element models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant's containment building and auxiliary-fuel-turbine (AFT) complex. The resulting models served as input to the seismic methodology analysis chain. The containment shell was modeled as a series of beam elements with the shear and bending characteristics of a circular cylindrical shell. Masses and rotary inertias were lumped at nodal points; thirteen modes were included in the analysis. The internal structure was modeled with three-dimensional finite elements, with masses again lumped at selected nodes; sixty modes were included in the analysis. The model of the AFT complex employed thin plate and shell elements to represent the concrete shear walls and floor diaphragms, and beam and truss elements to model the braced frames. Because of the size and complexity of the model, and the potentially large number of degrees of freedom, masses were lumped at a limited number of node points. These points were selected so as to minimize the effect of the discrete mass distribution on structural response. One hundred and thirteen modes were extracted. A second objective of Project IV was to investigate the effects of uncertainty and variability on structural response. To this end, four side studies were conducted. Three of them, briefly summarized in this volume, addressed themselves respectively to an investigation of sources of random variability in the dynamic response of nuclear power plant structures; formulation of a methodology for modeling and evaluating the effects of structural uncertainty on predicted modal characteristics of major nuclear power plant structures and substructures; and a preliminary evaluation of nonlinear responses in shear-wall structures. A fourth side study, reported in detail in this volume, quantified variations in dynamic characteristics and seismic responses resulting from different modeling assumptions. Four different models were used to describe a portion of the AFT complex, and their dynamic characteristics and response quantities were compared. The effect of different modeling assumptions was most evident in the large variations in the response of locally flexible areas of the structure. In particular, the location of lumped-mass points profoundly affected dynamic behavior. (author)

  8. Detroit Lakes energy systems study: Phase I feasibility. Final report, February 1, 1978--July 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-07-31

    The objective of the Detroit Lakes Energy Systems Study is to determine the economic feasibility of alternative renewable energy system configurations in the northern latitudes. A forecast through both 1990 and the year 2000 is made of the demand for electrical energy in the Detroit Lakes area. An assessment of renewable energy resources including biomass, wind, and insolation is provided. A detailed analysis is made of system costs including biomass, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, selected hybrids, and conventional fuel systems. Lessons learned and recommendations for prototype fabrication are highlighted. (MHR)

  9. Materials, process, product analysis of coal process technology. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, J. C.; Roig, R. W.; Loridan, A.; Leggett, N. E.; Capell, R. G.; Humpstone, C. C.; Mudry, R. N.; Ayres, E.

    1976-02-01

    The purpose of materials-process-product analysis is a systematic evaluation of alternative manufacturing processes--in this case processes for converting coal into energy and material products that can supplement or replace petroleum-based products. The methodological steps in the analysis include: Definition of functional operations that enter into coal conversion processes, and modeling of alternative, competing methods to accomplish these functions; compilation of all feasible conversion processes that can be assembled from combinations of competing methods for the functional operations; systematic, iterative evaluation of all feasible conversion processes under a variety of economic situations, environmental constraints, and projected technological advances; and aggregative assessments (economic and environmental) of various industrial development scenarios. An integral part of the present project is additional development of the existing computer model to include: A data base for coal-related materials and coal conversion processes; and an algorithmic structure that facilitates the iterative, systematic evaluations in response to exogenously specified variables, such as tax policy, environmental limitations, and changes in process technology and costs. As an analytical tool, the analysis is intended to satisfy the needs of an analyst working at the process selection level, for example, with respect to the allocation of RDandD funds to competing technologies.

  10. Security Hardened Cyber Components for Nuclear Power Plants: Phase I SBIR Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franusich, Michael D. [SpiralGen, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    SpiralGen, Inc. built a proof-of-concept toolkit for enhancing the cyber security of nuclear power plants and other critical infrastructure with high-assurance instrumentation and control code. The toolkit is based on technology from the DARPA High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) program, which has focused on applying the science of formal methods to the formidable set of problems involved in securing cyber physical systems. The primary challenges beyond HACMS in developing this toolkit were to make the new technology usable by control system engineers and compatible with the regulatory and commercial constraints of the nuclear power industry. The toolkit, packaged as a Simulink add-on, allows a system designer to assemble a high-assurance component from formally specified and proven blocks and generate provably correct control and monitor code for that subsystem.

  11. Carolina Offshore Wind Integration Case Study: Phases I and II Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, Christopher [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Piper, Orvane [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hazelip, William [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Zhao, Yishan [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Salvador, Lisa [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Pruitt, Tom [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Peterson, Jeffrey [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Ashby, Rebecca [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Pierce, Bob [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Burner, Bob [Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Daniel, John [ABB, Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Zhu, Jinxiang [ABB, Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Moore, Maria [ABB, Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Liu, Shu [ABB, Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Pennock, Ken [AWS Truepower, LLC, Albany, NY (United States); Frank, Jaclyn [AWS Truepower, LLC, Albany, NY (United States); Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heaney, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bloom, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elliott, Dennis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Seim, Harvey E. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Duke Energy performed a phase 1 study to assess the impact of offshore wind development in the waters off the coasts of North Carolina and South Carolina. The study analyzed the impacts to the Duke Energy Carolinas electric power system of multiple wind deployment scenarios. Focusing on an integrated utility system in the Carolinas provided a unique opportunity to assess the impacts of offshore wind development in a region that has received less attention regarding renewables than others in the US. North Carolina is the only state in the Southeastern United States that currently has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) which requires that 12.5% of the state’s total energy requirements be met with renewable resources by 2021. 12.5% of the state’s total energy requirements in 2021 equates to approximately 17,000 GWH of energy needed from renewable resources. Wind resources represent one of the ways to potentially meet this requirement. The study builds upon and augments ongoing work, including a study by UNC to identify potential wind development sites and the analysis of impacts to the regional transmission system performed by the NCTPC, an Order 890 planning entity of which DEC is a member. Furthermore, because the region does not have an independent system operator (ISO) or regional transmission organization (RTO), the study will provide additional information unique to non-RTO/ISO systems. The Phase 2 study builds on the results of Phase 1 and investigates the dynamic stability of the electrical network in Task 4, the operating characteristics of the wind turbines as they impact operating reserve requirements of the DEC utility in Task 5, and the production cost of integrating the offshore wind resources into the DEC generation fleet making comparisons to future planned operation without the addition of the wind resources in Task 6.

  12. Viability Study for an Unattended UF_6 Cylinder Verification Station: Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Leon E.; Miller, Karen A.; Garner, James R.; Branney, Sean; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Webster, Jennifer B.; Zalavadia, Mital A.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Nordquist, Heather; Deshmukh, Nikhil S.; Stewart, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has pursued innovative techniques and an integrated suite of safeguards measures to address the verification challenges posed by the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the unattended instruments currently being explored by the IAEA is an Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) that could provide automated, independent verification of the declared relative enrichment, "2"3"5U mass, total uranium mass and identification for all declared UF_6 cylinders in a facility (e.g., uranium enrichment plants and fuel fabrication plants). Under the auspices of the United States and European Commission Support Programs to the IAEA, a project was undertaken to assess the technical and practical viability of the UCVS concept. The US Support Program team consisted of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL, lead), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL). At the core of the viability study is a long-term field trial of a prototype UCVS system at a Westinghouse fuel fabrication facility. A key outcome of the study is a quantitative performance evaluation of two nondestructive assay (NDA) methods being considered for inclusion in a UCVS: Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA), and Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM). This report provides context for the UCVS concept and the field trial: potential UCVS implementation concepts at an enrichment facility; an overview of UCVS prototype design; field trial objectives and activities. Field trial results and interpretation are presented, with a focus on the performance of PNEM and HEVA for the assay of over 200 ''typical'' Type 30B cylinders, and the viability of an ''NDA Fingerprint'' concept as a high-fidelity means to periodically verify that the contents of a given cylinder are consistent with previous scans. A modeling study, combined with field-measured instrument uncertainties, provides an assessment of the partial-defect sensitivity of HEVA and PNEM for both one-time assay and (repeated) NDA Fingerprint verification scenarios. The findings presented in this report represent a significant step forward in the community's understanding of the strengths and limitations of the PNEM and HEVA NDA methods, and the viability of the UCVS concept in front-end fuel cycle facilities. This experience will inform Phase II of the UCVS viability study, should the IAEA pursue it.

  13. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Suprotim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Raje, Sanyukta [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kumar, Satish [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Greenberg, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  14. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  15. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Surface Power, Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Buffalino, Andrew; Holliday, Ezekiel; Penswick, Barry; Gedeon, David

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the design of a 12 kW dual opposed free-piston Stirling convertor and controller for potential future use in space missions. The convertor is heated via a pumped NaK loop and cooling is provided by a pumped water circuit. Convertor efficiency is projected at 27 percent (AC electrical out/heat in). The controller converts the AC electrical output to 120 Vdc and is projected at 91 percent efficiency. A mechanically simple arrangement, based on proven technology, was selected in which the piston is resonated almost entirely by the working space pressure swing, while the displacer is resonated by planar mechanical springs in the bounce space.

  16. Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Phase I, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a coal-fired residential combustion system. This phase consisted of the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an advanced pulse combustor sized for residential space heating requirements. The objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor at the {approximately} 100,000 Btu/hr scale that can be integrated into a packaged space heating system for small residential applications. The strategy for the development effort included the scale down of the feasibility unit from 1-2 MMBtu/hr to 100,000 Btu/hr to establish a baseline for isolating the effect of scale-down and new chamber configurations separately. Initial focus at the residential scale was concentrated on methods of fuel injection and atomization in a bare metal unit. This was followed by incorporating changes to the advanced chamber designs and testing of refractory-lined units. Multi-fuel capability for firing oil or gas as a secondary fuel was also established. Upon completion of the configuration and component testing, an optimum configuration would be selected for integrated testing of the pulse combustor unit. The strategy also defined the use of Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) for Phases 1 and 2 of the development program with CWM firing to be a product improvement activity for a later phase of the program.

  17. Development of spark cathode E-guns. Draft final reprt, Phase I, July--October 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loda, G.; Lindstrand, R.

    1979-01-01

    A 12 sided spark cathode is designed and constructed to replace the bladed, cold cathode structure in the electron gun of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Antares prototype power amplifier. Design work includes computer modeling and full scale low voltage modeling. Life testing to 100,000 pulses is documented. The spark cathode offers precise control of emission site location and a high reliability

  18. Vocational Assessment for Special Needs Individuals. Project Final Report, Phase I, 1979-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.

    The present state of the art of vocational evaluation is largely manifested within the field of vocational rehabilitation, and as a result, the concepts, instrumentation, and strategies do not lend themselves readily to an educational setting. This project attempted to bridge the gap between the conceptualized model of vocational evaluation within…

  19. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume discusses the design, performance and failures of feed pumps, and recommendations for research on pump dynamics, design, and specifications.

  20. Computational Platform for Flux Analysis Using 13C-Label Tracing- Phase I SBIR Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dien, Stephen J.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic label tracing is a powerful experimental technique that can be combined with metabolic models to quantify metabolic fluxes in an organism under a particular set of growth conditions. In this work we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Methylobacterium extorquens, a facultative methylotroph with potential application in the production of useful chemicals from methanol. A series of labeling experiments were performed using 13C-methanol, and the resulting distribution of labeled carbon in the proteinogenic amino acids was determined by mass spectrometry. Algorithms were developed to analyze this data in context of the metabolic model, yielding flux distributions for wild-type and several engineered strains of M. extorquens. These fluxes were compared to those predicted by model simulation alone, and also integrated with microarray data to give an improved understanding of the metabolic physiology of this organism.

  1. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Two chemical cleaning solvent systems and two application methods were developed to remove the sludge in nuclear steam generators and to remove the corrosion products in the annuli between the steam generator tubes and the support plates. Laboratory testing plus subsequent pilot testing has demonstrated that, in a reasonable length of time, both solvents are capable of dissolving significant amounts of sludge, and of dissolving tightly packed magnetite in tube/support plate crevices. Further, tests have demonstrated that surface losses of the materials of construction in steam generators can be controlled to acceptable limits for the duration of the required cleaning period. Areas requiring further study and test have been identified, and a preliminary procedure for chemical cleaning nuclear steam generators has been chosen subject to quantification based on additional tests prior to actual in-plant demonstration

  2. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I final report - Subsystem response (Project V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, L.C.; Chuang, T.Y.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1981-10-01

    This document reports on (1) the computation of the responses of subsystems, given the input subsystem support motion for components and systems whose failure can lead to an accident sequence (radioactive release), and (2) the results of a sensitivity study undertaken to determine the contributions of the several links in the seismic methodology chain (SMC) - seismic input (SI), soil-structure interaction (SSI), structure response (STR), and subsystem response (SUB) - to the uncertainty in subsystem response. For the singly supported subsystems (e.g., pumps, turbines, electrical control panels, etc.), we used the spectral acceleration response of the structure at the point where the subsystem components were mounted. For the multiple supported subsystems, we developed 13 piping models of five safety-related systems, and then used the pseudostatic-mode method with multisupport input motion to compute the response parameters in terms of the parameters used in the fragility descriptions (i.e., peak resultant accelerations for valves and peak resultant moments for piping). Damping and frequency were varied to represent the sources of modeling and random uncertainty. Two codes were developed: a modified version of SAPIV which assembles the piping supports into groups depending on the support's location relative to the attached structure, and SAPPAC a stand-alone modular program from which the time-history analysis module is extracted. On the basis of our sensitivity study, we determined that the variability in the combined soil-structure interaction, structural response, and subsystem response areas contribute more to uncertainty in subsystem response than does the variability in the seismic input area, assuming an earthquake within the limited peak ground acceleration range, i.e., 0.15 to 0.30g. The seismic input variations were in terms of different earthquake time histories. (author)

  3. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacaster, A.J.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Literacy Project Phase I. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comsis Corp., Silver Spring, MD.

    An assessment of the information needs of providers of literacy services examined whether these needs could be met through an electronic information and communications system (EICS). The needs assessment was sent to 300 literacy providers; 134 responded. Responses indicated that literacy providers would benefit from a central, easily accessible…

  5. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS), Phase I: Soil washing final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    As a result of the U.S. Department of Energy's environmental restoration and technology development activities, GTS Duratek, Inc., and its subcontractors have demonstrated an integrated thermal waste treatment system at Fernald, OH, as part the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program. Specifically, MAWS integrates soil washing, vitrification of mixed waste streams, and ion exchange to recycle and remediate process water to achieve, through a synergistic effect, a reduction in waste volume, increased waste loading, and production of a durable, leach-resistant, stable waste form suitable for disposal. This report summarizes the results of the demonstration/testing of the soil washing component of the MAWS system installed at Fernald (Plant 9). The soil washing system was designed to (1) process contaminated soil at a rate of 0.25 cubic yards per hour; (2) reduce overall waste volume and provide consistent-quality silica sand and contaminant concentrates as raw material for vitrification; and (3) release clean soil with uranium levels below 35 pCi/g. Volume reductions expected ranged from 50-80 percent; the actual volume reduction achieved during the demonstration reached 66.5 percent. The activity level of clean soil was reduced to as low as 6 pCi/g from an initial average soil activity level of 17.6 pCi/g (the highest initial level of soil provided for testing was 41 pCi/g). Although the throughput of the soil washing system was inconsistent throughout the testing period, the system was online for sufficient periods to conclude that a rate equivalent to 0.25 cubic yards per hour was achieved

  6. Closed Brayton Cycle Power Conversion Unit for Fission Surface Power Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    A Closed Brayton cycle power conversion system has been developed to support the NASA fission surface power program. The goal is to provide electricity from a small nuclear reactor heat source for surface power production for lunar and Mars environments. The selected media for a heat source is NaK 78 with water as a cooling source. The closed Brayton cycle power was selected to be 12 kWe output from the generator terminals. A heat source NaK temperature of 850 K plus or minus 25 K was selected. The cold source water was selected at 375 K plus or minus 25 K. A vacuum radiation environment of 200 K is specified for environmental operation. The major components of the system are the power converter, the power controller, and the top level data acquisition and control unit. The power converter with associated sensors resides in the vacuum radiation environment. The power controller and data acquisition system reside in an ambient laboratory environment. Signals and power are supplied across the pressure boundary electrically with hermetic connectors installed on the vacuum vessel. System level analyses were performed on working fluids, cycle design parameters, heater and cooling temperatures, and heat exchanger options that best meet the needs of the power converter specification. The goal is to provide a cost effective system that has high thermal-to-electric efficiency in a compact, lightweight package.

  7. Standardization and Economics of Nuclear Spacecraft, Final Report, Phase I, Sense Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-03-01

    Feasibility and cost benefits of nuclear-powered standardized spacecraft are investigated. The study indicates that two shuttle-launched nuclear-powered spacecraft should be able to serve the majority of unmanned NASA missions anticipated for the 1980's. The standard spacecraft include structure, thermal control, power, attitude control, some propulsion capability and tracking, telemetry, and command subsystems. One spacecraft design, powered by the radioisotope thermoelectric generator, can serve missions requiring up to 450 watts. The other spacecraft design, powered by similar nuclear heat sources in a Brayton-cycle generator, can serve missions requiring up to 21000 watts. Design concepts and trade-offs are discussed. The conceptual designs selected are presented and successfully tested against a variety of missions. The thermal design is such that both spacecraft are capable of operating in any earth orbit and any orientation without modification. Three-axis stabilization is included. Several spacecraft can be stacked in the shuttle payload compartment for multi-mission launches. A reactor-powered thermoelectric generator system, operating at an electric power level of 5000 watts, is briefly studied for applicability to two test missions of divers requirements. A cost analysis indicates that use of the two standardized spacecraft offers sizable savings in comparison with specially designed solar-powered spacecraft. There is a duplicate copy.

  8. Brownfields Samoa Peninsula Project: Phase I Sustainable Site Analysis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report provides an analysis and scoring using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, Neighborhood Development Rating System, and the Land and Natural Development Code in order to assess the proposed redevelopment a master plan.

  9. Improved superconductor for transmission line applications, phase I. Final report, January 1, 1975--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginski, A.I.; Mauser, S.F.; Roland, G.W.; Burghardt, R.R.; Daniel, M.R.; Janocko, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of an existing superconducting power transmission cable design indicated that economic benefits in the area of refrigeration can be derived from the substitution of Nb 3 Ge superconductor for the presently planned Nb 3 Sn. However, the cost of Nb 3 Ge must be comparable to that of Nb 3 Sn, which is achievable when preparing Nb 3 Ge by the chemical vapor deposition. Alternatively, technical benefits can be obtained. The most essential and prerequisite requirement is that the Nb 3 Ge critical current density be improved significantly over the present state-of-the art. Other properties of Nb 3 Ge are generally suitable for the transmission line application and/or require only moderate improvements. (auth)

  10. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Josh (UQM Technologies, Inc.); Lutz, Jon (UQM Technologies, Inc.)

    2006-09-01

    (magnet-dominant PM machines). This report covers a trade study that was conducted in this phase I program to explore which type of machine best suits the FCVT requirements.

  11. Metal Oxide-Carbon Nanocomposites for Aqueous and Nonaqueous Supercapacitors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort focuses on development of novel metal-oxide-carbon nanocomposites for application in pseudocapacitive...

  12. Nanocomposite Textiles as Lightweight, Low-Volume Deployable Antenna Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR program will result in the application and characterization of highly conductive, inexpensive, nanostructured textiles and composites for ultra...

  13. Advanced Durable Flexible Ultra Low Outgassing Thermal Control Coatings for NASA Science Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I program proposes to synthesize novel nanoengineered ultra low out gassing elastomers and formulate high temperature capable flexible thermal control...

  14. Automated Manufacture of Damage Detecting, Self-Healing Composite Cryogenic Pressure Vessels, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, Aurora Flight Sciences and the University of Massachusetts Lowell propose to demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing a commercially available...

  15. Electrically Conductive, Hydrophilic Porous Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to produce a conductive polyethersulfone (PES) microporous membrane for fuel cell water management applications. This membrane will...

  16. Multifunctional Metal/Polymer Composite Fiber for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Program, Syscom Technology, Inc. (STI) will fabricate a metallized multifunctional composite fiber from a...

  17. OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project phase I: Benchmark of the ignition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina, E-mail: martina_adorni@hotmail.it [UNIPI (Italy); Herranz, Luis E. [CIEMAT (Spain); Hollands, Thorsten [GRS (Germany); Ahn, Kwang-II [KAERI (Korea, Republic of); Bals, Christine [GRS (Germany); D' Auria, Francesco [UNIPI (Italy); Horvath, Gabor L. [NUBIKI (Hungary); Jaeckel, Bernd S. [PSI (Switzerland); Kim, Han-Chul; Lee, Jung-Jae [KINS (Korea, Republic of); Ogino, Masao [JNES (Japan); Techy, Zsolt [NUBIKI (Hungary); Velazquez-Lozad, Alexander; Zigh, Abdelghani [USNRC (United States); Rehacek, Radomir [OECD/NEA (France)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A unique PWR spent fuel pool experimental project is analytically investigated. • Predictability of fuel clad ignition in case of a complete loss of coolant in SFPs is assessed. • Computer codes reasonably estimate peak cladding temperature and time of ignition. - Abstract: The OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project provided unique thermal-hydraulic experimental data associated with Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) complete drain down. The study conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was successfully completed (July 2009 to February 2013). The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full scale prototypic fashion (electrically heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate severe accident code validation and to reduce modeling uncertainties within the codes. Phase I focused on axial heating and burn propagation in a single PWR 17 × 17 assembly (i.e. “hot neighbors” configuration). Phase II addressed axial and radial heating and zirconium fire propagation including effects of fuel rod ballooning in a 1 × 4 assembly configuration (i.e. single, hot center assembly and four, “cooler neighbors”). This paper summarizes the comparative analysis regarding the final destructive ignition test of the phase I of the project. The objective of the benchmark is to evaluate and compare the predictive capabilities of computer codes concerning the ignition testing of PWR fuel assemblies. Nine institutions from eight different countries were involved in the benchmark calculations. The time to ignition and the maximum temperature are adequately captured by the calculations. It is believed that the benchmark constitutes an enlargement of the validation range for the codes to the conditions tested, thus enhancing the code applicability to other fuel assembly designs and configurations. The comparison of

  18. Trader types and volatility of emission allowance prices. Evidence from EU ETS Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balietti, Anca Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the relation between the trading activity of market participants and the volatility of the European Emission Allowance price during Phase I of the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS). We focus on the contrasting roles of different trader types. We find evidence of a positive and significant trading activity–volatility relation, which appears to be stronger when accounting for trader type. The positive relation can be mainly attributed to energy providers. In contrast, industrial companies seem to have traded more frequently when volatility levels were lower. Finally, the non-liable players, represented by financial intermediaries, appear to have acted as a flexible counterparty, trading more with the energy sector when volatility was higher, and more with the industrial firms when volatility was lower. We discuss possible explanations for these contrasted positions. Understanding the trading activity–volatility link is relevant for evaluating the efficiency of the EU ETS. Although the relation is generally positive, many players remained often inactive and traded mostly when volatility levels were lower. Policies targeting the engagement of less active players could lead to a smoother incorporation of information into prices and to an increase in market efficiency. - Highlights: • We study the permit price volatility–trading activity link in the EU ETS Phase I. • We focus on the contrasting roles of different market players. • We show that the relation was overall positive, mainly due to energy providers. • Many other players remained inactive and traded more when volatility was lower. • Policies for the engagement of less active traders could increase market efficiency.

  19. Open Business Models (Latin America) - Phase I | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They will endeavor to demonstrate the innovative character and economic superiority of ... Open business models (Latin America) : final technical report, Mar. ... Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), IDRC is ...

  20. High Performance Arm for an Exploration Space Suit, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Final Frontier Design (FFD) proposes to develop and deliver an advanced pressure garment arm with low torque and high Range of Motion (ROM), and increased...

  1. ROBUSTIFICATION OF MULTIVARIATE CONTROL CHART √|S| IN CONTROL PHASE I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Dugarte-Peña

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article, chart robustification based on the square root of the sample generalized variance √|S|, is studied to control the variability of a bivariate normal process in stage 1 of Phase I control, built with observations for rational subgroups, and using the robust estimators, MVE, MCD and estimator S. These charts, are being compared with the usual chart, based on unbiased sample estimator, S, of the covariance matrix, ∑_0, in the presence of outliers from perturbation schemes such as, ∑_0 inflation contamination, and contamination affecting only the correlation. We use as performance measure, the mean squared error in estimating ∑_0, and absolute bias in the estimate, used √(|∑_0 | , about the unbiased estimators for each one of the parameters respectively    built with the rational subgroups that remain after the purification process undertaken in Phase 1 and are consider as the data group that represent the stage of the stable variation process.

  2. The Use of Mg(OH2 in the Final Peroxide Bleaching Stage of Wheat Straw Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lan Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based alkali is an attractive alkaline source for the peroxide bleaching of high-yield pulp. However, little information is available on Mg(OH2 application in the final peroxide bleaching stage of wheat straw pulp. The use of Mg(OH2 was demonstrated as a partial replacement for NaOH in the peroxide bleaching of a chelated oxygen-delignified wheat straw pulp. The yield, viscosity, and strength properties of bleached pulp significantly increased with increasing replacement ratio of Mg(OH2, while the chemical oxygen demand load (COD of filtrate was decreased. For similar brightness of bleached pulp at a 24% replacement ratio of Mg(OH2, the tensile and tear indices were higher, by 2.1 Nm.g-1 and 1.75 mN*m2.g-1, respectively, than that of control pulp bleached with NaOH as the sole alkaline source. When the MgSO4 was eliminated and the dosage of Na2SiO3 was decreased in the bleaching process, the tear and burst indices of the bleached pulp were also enhanced, with the brightness maintained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that more swelling occurred in the fibers of bleached pulp from the Mg(OH2-based bleaching process. Fiber analysis indicated that peroxide bleaching with Mg(OH2 increased the proportion of fiber lengths between 0.20 to 1.20 mm and 1.20 to 7.60 mm.

  3. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods. Stage 11 and 12. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, C.; Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Dahl, O.; Mileshina, L.

    2006-06-01

    This report describes the results obtained during Stage 11 and 12 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The long-term goals are elaborated in more detail in e.g. the Final Reports of stage 1 and 2 (SKI Report 95:14 and 96:50). Higher order eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the diffusion equation, describing a static core, have lost their significance when doing calculations in realistic systems, since there are usually made by nodal methods or other direct numerical techniques. However, there are situations when knowledge of the higher order modes is still useful. Such case is the separation of the global and regional flux oscillations in the case of BWR instability. Another case is the investigation of the stability properties of large inhomogeneous cores, which is usually quantified with the so-called eigenvalue separation, ES=1/k 1 - 1/k 0 where k 0 and k 1 , are the fundamental and first higher order eigenvalues, respectively. Numerical codes used for ICMF calculations usually do not have the option of calculating the higher order eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. In idealised systems, these can be calculated with semi-analytical methods. In order to get insight into the characteristics of the higher order eigenmodes of the neutron flux and the adjoint, these were calculated in a reflected homogeneous system with two-group theory. The adjoint eigenmodes are necessary if an orthogonality property needs to be used, such as the separation of the modes from a flux shape which is a sum of several eigenmodes. At the same time, the so-called numerical noise simulator, developed at the Dept., was extended such that it became suitable for the calculation of the higher order eigenmodes, both direct and adjoint ones. This simulator can treat real inhomogeneous cores, with an input deck compatible with that of SIMULATE. The simulator was used to calculate the eigenfunctions and

  4. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods. Stage 11 and 12. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunde, C.; Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Dahl, O.; Mileshina, L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2006-06-15

    This report describes the results obtained during Stage 11 and 12 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The long-term goals are elaborated in more detail in e.g. the Final Reports of stage 1 and 2 (SKI Report 95:14 and 96:50). Higher order eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the diffusion equation, describing a static core, have lost their significance when doing calculations in realistic systems, since there are usually made by nodal methods or other direct numerical techniques. However, there are situations when knowledge of the higher order modes is still useful. Such case is the separation of the global and regional flux oscillations in the case of BWR instability. Another case is the investigation of the stability properties of large inhomogeneous cores, which is usually quantified with the so-called eigenvalue separation, ES=1/k{sub 1} - 1/k{sub 0} where k{sub 0} and k{sub 1}, are the fundamental and first higher order eigenvalues, respectively. Numerical codes used for ICMF calculations usually do not have the option of calculating the higher order eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. In idealised systems, these can be calculated with semi-analytical methods. In order to get insight into the characteristics of the higher order eigenmodes of the neutron flux and the adjoint, these were calculated in a reflected homogeneous system with two-group theory. The adjoint eigenmodes are necessary if an orthogonality property needs to be used, such as the separation of the modes from a flux shape which is a sum of several eigenmodes. At the same time, the so-called numerical noise simulator, developed at the Dept., was extended such that it became suitable for the calculation of the higher order eigenmodes, both direct and adjoint ones. This simulator can treat real inhomogeneous cores, with an input deck compatible with that of SIMULATE. The simulator was used to calculate the

  5. Benchmarks for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) for the Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs - Volume I: Specification and Support Data for Neutronics Cases (Phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Kamerow, S.; Kodeli, I.; Sartori, E.; Ivanov, E.; Cabellos, O.

    2013-01-01

    role. The participants are responsible for performing convergence studies with their computer codes in order to remove the uncertainties associated with numerical approximations (numerical method uncertainties) and reduce the uncertainties associated with the methods (physics uncertainties) used in their codes. The method related contribution of uncertainty can be derived from earlier benchmarks conducted within NEA/OECD or from the verification (mathematics) and validation (physics) studies performed with the computer code of choice. In the current LWR standard calculation scheme (utilised in industry and regulation) different modelling approximations are usually used at different stages of the calculation. These approximations are the second important source of input uncertainty. In order to assess the uncertainties due to utilisation of the above-mentioned approximations, one has to decompose and evaluate the errors of these approximations. Evaluation of the uncertainties introduced with such modelling approximations is important because in some situations these approximations work well and in others they do not. This is accomplished by designing appropriate test problems for a given exercise. Geometry, material properties and manufacturing uncertainties are also an important source of calculation uncertainty. Information for these uncertainties for the different test models as well as on their propagation will be provided in the final report on Phase I by the benchmark team. Understanding the uncertainties in key output reactor core parameters associated with steady-state core simulation is important with regard to introducing appropriate design margins and deciding where efforts should be directed to reduce uncertainties. The obtained output uncertainties from Phase I of the OECD LWR UAM benchmark will be utilised as input uncertainties in the remaining two phases - Phase II (Core Phase) and Phase III (System Phase)

  6. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 1, final report. Conceptual design, demand and fuel projections and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-08

    The Phase I Report, Grid ICES, presented the broad alternatives and implications for development of an energy system satisfying thermal demand with the co-generation of electric power, all predicated on the use of solid fuels. Participants of the system are the University of Minnesota, operator and primary thermal user, and Northern States Power Company, primary electrical user; with St. Mary's Hospital, Fairview Hospital, and Augsburg College as Add-on Customers for the thermal service (Option I). Included for consideration are the Options of (II) solid waste disposal by the Pyrolysis Method, with heat recovery, and (III) conversion of a portion of the thermal system from steam to hot water distribution to increase co-generation capability and as a demonstration system for future expansion. This report presents the conceptual design of the energy system and each Option, with the economic implications identified so that selection of the final system can be made. Draft outline of the Environmental Assessment for the project is submitted as a separate report.

  7. Runx2 is required for early stages of endochondral bone formation but delays final stages of bone repair in Axin2-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Carpio, Lomeli R.; Bradley, Elizabeth W.; Dudakovic, Amel; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Kakar, Sanjeev; Hsu, Wei; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Runx2 and Axin2 regulate skeletal development. We recently determined that Axin2 and Runx2 molecularly interact in differentiating osteoblasts to regulate intramembranous bone formation, but the relationship between these factors in endochondral bone formation was unresolved. To address this, we examined the effects of Axin2 deficiency on the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) phenotype of Runx2+/− mice, focusing on skeletal defects attributed to improper endochondral bone formation. Axin2 deficiency unexpectedly exacerbated calvarial components of the CCD phenotype in the Runx2+/− mice; the endocranial layer of the frontal suture, which develops by endochondral bone formation, failed to mineralize in the Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− mice, resulting in a cartilaginous, fibrotic and larger fontanel than observed in Runx2+/− mice. Transcripts associated with cartilage development (e.g., Acan, miR140) were expressed at higher levels, whereas blood vessel morphogenesis transcripts (e.g., Slit2) were suppressed in Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− calvaria. Cartilage maturation was impaired, as primary chondrocytes from double mutant mice demonstrated delayed differentiation and produced less calcified matrix in vitro. The genetic dominance of Runx2 was also reflected during endochondral fracture repair, as both Runx2+/− and double mutant Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− mice had enlarged fracture calluses at early stages of healing. However, by the end stages of fracture healing, double mutant animals diverged from the Runx2+/− mice, showing smaller calluses and increased torsional strength indicative of more rapid end stage bone formation as seen in the Axin2−/− mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate a dominant role for Runx2 in chondrocyte maturation, but implicate Axin2 as an important modulator of the terminal stages of endochondral bone formation. PMID:24973690

  8. 77 FR 38803 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated Data For Auction 901

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 12-25; DA 12-990] Mobility Fund Phase I Auction... files of census blocks eligible for the Mobility Fund Phase I support to be offered in Auction 901... 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus described how they identified census blocks eligible for the Mobility...

  9. Introducing the Objectives, Procedures and Structure of Lifestyle Promotion Project (LPP: Phase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Life style promotion project (LPP is a long term community-based project for prevention and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs. The design consisted of two stages; phase I was a cross-sectional prevalence study of NCDs and the associ¬ated risk factors. Phase II is a prospective follow-up study in which data recollection will be performed every 2 years after the intervention initiated. In this study, 1,500 households residing in Tabriz, Marand, Bonab, Oskoo, Varzeghan, Khodafrin (150 clusters of 10 households cities which in terms of socio-economic variables, distance from the center, population and access to medical facilities are in the same category of other cities of province will be examined. A total of 3000 patients (15-65 years living in East Azerbaijan province will be randomly enrolled. After obtaining informed consent from all participants, weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference and blood pressure will be measured with standard tools. Fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, TG, serum vitamin D, ALT, AST, Hb and serum ferritin will be assessed. The questionnaires related to socioeconomic status, dietary intake, physical activity, angina (Rose, asthma, anxiety, smoking, food security and safety will be completed. Necessary data in other variables such as age, gender, menopausal status, medical history and medication use will be collected using questionnaires. The results of this study can be used in formulating long term health programs for the prevention of non-communicable diseases.

  10. New bern biomass to energy project Phase I: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parson, F.; Bain, R.

    1995-10-01

    Weyerhaeuser, together with Amoco and Carolina Power & Light, performed a detailed evaluation of biomass gasification and enzymatic processing of biomass to ethanol. This evaluation assesses the potential of these technologies for commercial application to determine which technology offers the best opportunity at this time to increase economic productivity of forest resources in an environmentally sustainable manner. The work performed included preparation of site-specific plant designs that integrate with the Weyerhaeuser New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill to meet overall plant energy requirements, cost estimates, resource and product market assessments, and technology evaluations. The Weyerhaeuser team was assisted by Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation and technology vendors in developing the necessary data, designs, and cost information used in this comparative study. Based on the information developed in this study and parallel evaluations performed by Weyerhaeuser and others, biomass gasification for use in power production appears to be technically and economically viable. Options exist at the New Bern mill which would allow commercial scale demonstration of the technology in a manner that would serve the practical energy requirements of the mill. A staged project development plan has been prepared for review. The plan would provide for a low-risk and cost demonstration of a biomass gasifier as an element of a boiler modification program and then allow for timely expansion of power production by the addition of a combined cycle cogeneration plant. Although ethanol technology is at an earlier stage of development, there appears to be a set of realizable site and market conditions which could provide for an economically attractive woody-biomass-based ethanol facility. The market price of ethanol and the cost of both feedstock and enzyme have a dramatic impact on the projected profitability of such a plant.

  11. Seeking informed consent to Phase I cancer clinical trials: identifying oncologists' communication strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard; Bylund, Carma L; Siminoff, Laura A; Slovin, Susan F

    2011-04-01

    Phase I clinical trials are the gateway to effective new cancer treatments. Many physicians have difficulty when discussing Phase I clinical trials. Research demonstrates evidence of suboptimal communication. Little is known about communication strategies used by oncologists when recruiting patients for Phase I trials. We analyzed audio recorded Phase I consultations to identify oncologists' communication strategies. Subjects were consecutive cancer patients from six medical oncologists attending one of three outpatient clinics at a major Cancer Center in the United States. Sixteen patients signed informed consent for audio recording of their consultations in which a Phase I study was discussed. These were transcribed in full and analyzed to identify communication strategies. Six communication themes emerged from the analysis: (1) orienting, (2) educating patients, (3) describing uncertainty and prognosis, (4) persuading, (5) decision making, and (6) making a treatment recommendation. As expected, although there was some common ground between communication in Phase I and the Phase II and III settings, there were distinct differences. Oncologists used persuasive communication, made explicit recommendations, or implicitly expressed a treatment preference and were choice limiting. This highlights the complexity of discussing Phase I trials and the need to develop strategies to aid oncologists and patients in these difficult conversations. Patient centered communication that values patient preferences while preserving the oncologist's agenda can be a helpful approach to these discussions. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods. Stage 10. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.; Pazsit, I.; Sunde, S.; Wright, J.

    2004-12-01

    This report constitutes Stage 10 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. The program executed in Stage 10 consists of three parts and the work performed in each part is summarized below. A so-called 2-D 2-group neutron noise simulator was previously developed at the Department of Reactor Physics. This simulator is able to calculate the space-dependence of the neutron noise induced by localised or spatially-distributed absorbers of variable strength or by vibrating absorbers. These calculations are performed in the 2-group diffusion approximation and can treat an arbitrary heterogeneous 2-D system. The goal of the present investigation is to use the simulator for unfolding purposes, i.e. to reconstruct the noise source from the detector readings. This task is particularly challenging since the number of detectors available in a commercial PWR can be very low. In this study, five detectors are assumed to be present and evenly distributed in the core. Furthermore, only localised absorbers of variable strength are considered as perturbations. Numerical simulations were first carried out to verify that the space-dependent local and global components of the neutron noise were overwhelmingly large compared to the point-kinetic term of the neutron noise whose spatial structure does not depend on the position of the perturbation. The significance of the space-dependent global component is that its relaxation length is large enough, so that several neutron detectors can monitor it. Therefore, the neutron noise induced at the position of the detectors is itself a function of the position of the perturbation. Unfolding procedures could thus be considered. Prior to performing any unfolding, the type of the noise source has to be determined, since the algorithms developed in this report are based on the assumption of an absorber of variable strength. Such a noise source can also be

  13. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-01-01

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H(sub 2) via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H(sub 2) and O(sub 2) can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown

  14. 2νββ decay of 76Ge into excited states with GERDA phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    GERDA Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; di Vacri, A.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Fedorova, O.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Mi, Y.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Schütz, A.-K.; Selivanenko, O.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stepaniuk, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-11-01

    Two neutrino double beta decay of {}76{Ge} to excited states of {}76{Se} has been studied using data from Phase I of the GERDA experiment. An array composed of up to 14 germanium detectors including detectors that have been isotopically enriched in {}76{Ge} was deployed in liquid argon. The analysis of various possible transitions to excited final states is based on coincidence events between pairs of detectors where a de-excitation γ ray is detected in one detector and the two electrons in the other. No signal has been observed and an event counting profile likelihood analysis has been used to determine Frequentist 90% C.L. bounds for three transitions: {0}{{g}.{{s}}.}+-{2}1+: {T}1/22ν \\gt 1.6× {10}23 yr, {0}{{g}.{{s}}.}+-{0}1+: {T}1/22ν \\gt 3.7× {10}23 yr and {0}{{g}.{{s}}.}+-{2}2+: {T}1/22ν \\gt 2.3× {10}23 yr. These bounds are more than two orders of magnitude larger than those reported previously. Bayesian 90% credibility bounds were extracted and used to exclude several models for the {0}{{g}.{{s}}.}+-{0}1+ transition.

  15. Preliminary design of an osmotic-type salinity gradient energy converter. Phase I, design effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-30

    The base case that was studied for this Phase I Interim Report is a 50 kWe design with 3.5% salt water (seawater) on one side and saturated salt water on the other side of the semi-permeable membrane. This case included a solar evaporation pond. The report includes system descriptions, system component descriptions, siting restrictions, environmental considerations, pretreatment, membrane characteristics, preliminary system capital costs, and recommendations for further work. During the course of the study and investigations, it was decided to extend the review to develop an additional basic flow sheet using brackish water instead of seawater with a solar pond. This option requires reduced flow rates and therefore can utilize smaller and less expensive components as compared to the seawater base case. Based on data for reverse osmosis water purification systems, the operating costs for pretreatment and labor would also be expected to be less for the brackish water system than for the seawater system. Finally, the use of brackish water systems greatly increases the potential number of sites available for a practical Osmo-Hydro Power System.

  16. The Cryogenic Design of the Phase I Upgrade Inner Triplet Magnets for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    van Weelderen, R; Peterson, T

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is operating with beam since end 2009. However, with the present interaction region magnets it cannot reach its nominal performance and a phased approach to upgrading them to reach that nominal performance is taken. The first phase of the LHC interaction region upgrade was approved by Council in December 2007. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2 to 3×1034 cm-2s-1, while relying on the existing infrastructure which limits the total heat removal capacity at 1.9 K to 500 W. The Phase I Upgrade LHC interaction region final focus magnets will include four superconducting quadrupoles (low-β triplets) and one superconducting dipole (D1) cooled with pressurized, static superfluid helium (HeII) at 1.9 K. The heat absorbed in pressurized HeII, which may be more than 30 W/m due to dynamic heating from the particle beam halo, will be conducted to saturated He II at about 1.9 K and removed by the low pressure vapour. This p...

  17. Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry in Chagas' Disease: Compounds at The Final Stage of "Hit-To-Lead" Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2010-03-25

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomosiasis, has been the most relevant illness produced by protozoa in Latin America. Synthetic medicinal chemistry efforts have provided an extensive number of chemodiverse hits at the "active-to-hit" stage. However, only a more limited number of these have been studied in vivo in models of Chagas' disease. Herein, we survey some of the cantidates able to surpass the "hit-to-lead" stage discussing their limitations or merit to enter in clinical trials in the short term.

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  19. Study of Au+Au relativistic collisions with the Fopi-Phase I detector; Etude des collisions relativistes Au+Au avec le detecteur Fopi-Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupieux, P

    1995-01-01

    Au+Au relativistic collisions, in a 100-1000 MeV energy domain per nucleon, are described. Experiments have been carried out with the SIS accelerator at GSI/Darmstadt. Data are analysed with the FOPI-phase I detector. These data are compared with IQMD model (Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics) Predictions. (S.G). 80 refs., 77 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet on glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings: focusing on the final stage of thin droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya; Shonina, Anna M; Safonov, Alexey I; Sulyaeva, Veronica S; Kabov, Oleg A

    2018-03-07

    The evaporation dynamics of a water droplet with an initial volume of 2 μl from glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings are investigated using the shadow technique and an optical microscope. The droplet profile for a contact angle of less than 5° is constructed using an image-analyzing interference technique, and evaporation dynamics are investigated at the final stage. We coated the glass slides with a thin film of a fluoropolymer by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method at different deposition modes depending on the deposition pressure and the temperature of the activating wire. The resulting surfaces have different structures affecting the wetting properties. Droplet evaporation from a constant contact radius mode in the early stage of evaporation was found followed by the mode where both contact angle and contact radius simultaneously vary in time (final stage) regardless of wettability of the coated surfaces. We found that depinning occurs at small contact angles of 2.2-4.7° for all samples, which are smaller than the measured receding contact angles. This is explained by imbibition of the liquid into the developed surface of the "soft" coating that leads to formation of thin droplets completely wetting the surface. The final stage, which is little discussed in the literature, is also recorded. We have singled out a substage where the contact line velocity is abruptly increasing for all coated and uncoated surfaces. The critical droplet height corresponding to the transition to this substage is about 2 μm with R/h = 107. The duration of this substage is the same for all coated and uncoated surfaces. Droplets observed at this substage for all the tested surfaces are axisymmetric. The specific evaporation rate clearly demonstrates an abrupt increase at the final substage of the droplet evaporation. The classical R 2 law is justified for the complete wetting situation where the droplet is disappearing in an axisymmetric manner.

  1. Battery separator membrane having a selectable thermal shut-down temperature, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I proposal to NASA requests $69,367.13 support for Policell Technologies, Inc. to demonstrate the feasibility of...

  2. Electrochemically Modulated Gas/Liquid Separation Technology for In Situ Resource Utilization Process Streams, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this phase I program MicroCell Technologies, LLC (MCT) proposes to demonstrate the feasibility of an electrochemically modulated phase separator for in situ...

  3. Large Area Diamond Tribological Surfaces with Negligible Wear in Extreme Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I we propose to demonstrate the processing of very large area diamond sliding bearings and tribological surfaces. The bearings and surfaces will experience...

  4. Non-Parametric, Closed-Loop Testing of Autonomy in Unmanned Aircraft Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I program aims to develop new methods to support safety testing for integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace (NAS) with...

  5. Innovative Ultra-High Efficiency Cryogenic Actuators for Rocket Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SBIR Phase I project will develop advanced ultra-high efficiency cryogenic actuators for NASA cryogenic fluid transfer application. The actuator will have low...

  6. Lightweight, High Strength Nano-Composite Magnesium for Radiators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Terves will develop processing routes to produce high thermal conductivity magnesium composites for use in heat transfer applications such as...

  7. Next Generation , Lightweight, Durable Boot Materials to Provide Active & Passive Thermal Protection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase I SBIR program is to leverage lightweight, durable materials developed by NanoSonic for use within extra vehicular activity (EVA)...

  8. Benefit Analysis of Hybrid CNT/CFRP Composites in Future Aircraft Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, Aurora Flight Sciences and N12 Technologies propose to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the benefits of hybrid composites in future aircraft...

  9. Composite advanced polymers for low moisture and oxygen permeability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I program addresses NASA?s need for long duration shelf stable food by developing a high oxygen/moisture barrier...

  10. Polymer Flip Chips with Extreme Temperature Stability in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase I program is to develop highly thermally and electrically conductive nanocomposites for space-based flip chips for...

  11. Optical Sensors for Hydrogen and Oxygen for Unambiguous Detection in Their Mutual Presence, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I SBIR project is to develop sensors that can discriminate the presence of combustible gases like oxygen (O2) in hydrogen (H2) or H2 in O2...

  12. Fiber Optic Mass Flow Gauge for Liquid Cryogenic Fuel Facilities Monitoring and Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a fiber optic mass flow gauge that will aid in managing liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel storage and transport. The increasing...

  13. Live Fire Evaluation of the Expeditionary Fire Suppression System (EFSS); Phase I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalberer, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    .... The system uses AFFF-based compressed air foam and PKP dry chemical. Phase I evaluated the effectiveness of the modified-commercially available EFSS on live fires on static pool and running fuel fires...

  14. Bandwidth Controllable Tunable Filter for Hyper-/Multi-Spectral Imager, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal introduces a fast speed bandwidth controllable tunable filter for hyper-/multi-spectral (HS/MS) imagers. It dynamically passes a variable...

  15. mmWave PolyStrata(R) High Power Compact Transceiver, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to NASA SBIR Topic S1.02 on Microwave Technologies for Remote Sensing, Nuvotronics is pleased to propose a Phase I program focused on delivering an...

  16. High Thermal Conductivity Functionally Graded Heat Sinks for High Power Packaging, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase I program proposes the development of a high thermal conductivity (400 W/mK), low coefficient of thermal expansion (7-10 ppm/?K), and light...

  17. A High Energy and High Efficiency Spectral Shaping Single Frequency Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a tunable single frequency high energy fiber laser system for coherent Lidar systems for remote sensing. Current state-of-art...

  18. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase I proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for determining the optical figure of aspheric optical components, such as test...

  19. In Situ Manufacturing of Plastics and Composites to Support H&R Exploration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our proposed Phase I program will develop a reactor system for the synthesis of polyethylene from carbon dioxide and water. The proposed work will result in hardware...

  20. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  1. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  2. Wireless Health Monitoring for Large Arrays of MEMS Sensors and Actuators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I project is to demonstrate an automated on-line structural health monitoring system for aircraft structures using a combination of...

  3. Near Net Shape Fabrication Technology for Shape Memory Alloy Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I effort proposes to develop an innovative, affordable processing route for larger-sized shape memory alloy (SMA) components. Despite significant...

  4. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  5. CFD-Based Over-Determined Trim Analysis for Optimum Aerodynamic Efficiency, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this Phase I project is to develop a nonlinear trim module in FUN3D for enabling the determined and over-determined trim analyses to be...

  6. Dynamic Flight Simulation Utilizing High Fidelity CFD-Based Nonlinear Reduced Order Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall technical objective of the Phase I effort is to develop a nonlinear aeroelastic solver utilizing the FUN3D generated nonlinear aerodynamic Reduced Order...

  7. Linearized FUN3D for Rapid Aeroelastic and Aeroservoelastic Design and Analysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this Phase I project is to develop a hybrid approach in FUN3D, referred herein to as the Linearized FUN3D, for rapid aeroelastic and...

  8. A Revolutionary Wind and Precipitation Scanning Radar for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objectives for the proposed Phase I study are: 1.Develop a compact, dual-wavelength antenna system capable of electronically scanning or producing...

  9. 77 FR 14012 - Eligible Telecommunications Carrier Designation for Participation in Mobility Fund Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ...; DA 12-271] Eligible Telecommunications Carrier Designation for Participation in Mobility Fund Phase I... Wireless Telecommunications and Wireline Competition Bureaus describe the process and requirements for applicants seeking Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) Designation from the Commission for...

  10. Ultra-Lightweight, High Efficiency Silicon-Carbide (SIC) Based Power Electronic Converters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business of Innovation Research Phase I proposal seeks to investigate and prove the feasibility of developing highly efficient, ultra-lightweight SiC...

  11. Low-Cost Composite Technology for Large Rocket Payload Fairings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Commission on the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Industry states that reducing the cost to orbit is an essential ingredient for progress. This Phase I project will...

  12. Large Format LW Type-II SLS FPAs for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposes to develop high performance (low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and low NEdT) infrared epitaxy materials based on Type II Strained...

  13. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  14. Microfluidic System for CO2 Reduction to Hydrocarbons in Microgravity, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the combined Phase I and Phase II programs Faraday and our MIT collaborators will demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost fabrication of high-efficiency,...

  15. Aircraft Control Augmentation and Health Monitoring Using FADS Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research proposal is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of an innovative architecture comprising control augmentation and on-line health monitoring...

  16. Report on functional requirements and software architecture for the IDTO prototype : phase I demonstration site (Columbus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report documents the System Requirements and Architecture for the Phase I implementation of the Integrated Dynamic : Transit Operations (IDTO) Prototype bundle within the Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) portion of the Connected Vehicle : Pro...

  17. Printed Ultra-High Temperature NDE Sensors for Complex Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal will address the use of innovative additive manufacturing technologies applicable to Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural...

  18. Ullage Compatible Optical Sensor for Monitoring Safety-Significant Malfunctions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The tasks of this Phase I proposal are designed to establish the feasibility of an optical sensor for real-time, in situ monitoring of the ullage environment of an...

  19. Monolithic micro-laser with KTP ridge waveguides for injection seeding high power lasers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will develop a technique to greatly improve the direct coupling of a diode laser to an optical waveguide...

  20. CNT-Based Smart Electrostatic Filters for Capturing Nanoparticulate Lunar Regolith, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The abrasive, reactive, and ubiquitous nature of lunar regolith created significant and serious problems during the Apollo moon missions. In this Phase I, Agave...

  1. Handheld Nonlinear Detection of Delamination and Intrusion Faults in Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I of the SBIR program, LEEOAT Company will develop a hand-held high-resolution ultrasonic nonlinear imager for non-destructive inspection (NDI) of...

  2. A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal describes, "A New Approach to Commercialization of NASA's Human Research Program Technologies." NASA has a powerful research program that...

  3. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase I project...

  4. Flight-appropriate 3D Terrain-rendering Toolkit for Synthetic Vision, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TerraMetrics proposes an SBIR Phase I R/R&D effort to develop a key 3D terrain-rendering technology that provides the basis for successful commercial deployment...

  5. High-Resolution Silicon-based Particle Sensor with Integrated Amplification, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will deliver a breakthrough in particle-detection sensors, by integrating an amplifying junction as part of the detector topology. Focusing...

  6. Wireless Networked Sensors for Remote Monitoring in Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR program would fabricate wireless networked nanomembrane (NM) based surface pressure sensors for remote monitoring in propulsion systems, using...

  7. Silicon Germanium Alloy Photovoltaics for 1.06 Micron Wireless Power Transmission, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR effort, Structured Materials Industries, Inc. (SMI)will design, fabricate, and test more efficient photovoltaics for 1.06 micron wavelength...

  8. Highly Reflecting, Broadband Deformable Membrane Mirror for Wavefront Control Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I STTR project will develop a highly reflecting, broadband, radiation resistant, low-stress and lightweight, membrane integrated into an electrostatically...

  9. Model-Based Design Tools for Extending COTS Components To Extreme Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this Phase I project is to prove the feasibility of using model-based design (MBD) tools to predict the performance and useful life of...

  10. In situ Laser Diagnostics for Arc-Jet Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop novel instrumentation based on laser absorption spectroscopy techniques for ultrasensitive...

  11. Low Cost P/M Aluminum Syntactic Foam for Blade Containment in Turbine Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I SBIR proposes a low density (0.75-1.2g/cc)syntactic aluminum foam energy absorber co-manufactured inside a composite fan case for turbine...

  12. Damage Adaptation Using Integrated Structural, Propulsion, and Aerodynamic Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed SBIR Phase I plan of research seeks to develop and demonstrate an integrated architecture designed to compensate for combined propulsion, airframe,...

  13. Silicon-Carbide (SIC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMS) For Power Building Block Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project seeks to prove the feasibility of developing high power density modular power electronic building blocks...

  14. Multi-Cluster Network on a Chip Reconfigurable Radiation Hardened Radio, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase-I research is to architect, model and simulate a multi-cluster Network on a Chip (NoC) reconfigurable Radio in SystemC RTL, with...

  15. High Radiation Tolerant Ceramic Voltage Isolator (Non-optical Gate Driver), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the Phase I effort is to design, develop and demonstrate a novel solid-state ceramic-based voltage isolator and demonstrate its potential to provide a...

  16. Freeform optics: a non-contact "test plate" for manufacturing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this NASA SBIR Phase I study is to determine the feasibility of measuring precision (fractional wave) freeform optics using non-contact areal (imaging)...

  17. Digital acquisition and wavelength control of seed laser for space-based Lidar applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposes to establish the feasibility of using a space qualifiable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital controller to autonomously...

  18. High Power Compact Single-Frequency Volume Bragg Er-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal is to develop the prototype of a compact single-frequency mode one longitudinal and one transverse mode laser...

  19. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA Phase I STTR effort, the feasibility of fabricating isolated ridge waveguides in 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (5% MgO:LN) will be established....

  20. Ultraprecision Pointing Accuracy for SmallSat/CubeSat Attitude Control Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary objective of the Phase I investigation is to develop and demonstrate an innovative solution that can enable very high precision pointing accuracy...

  1. Simulation-Based Lunar Telerobotics Design, Acquisition and Training Platform for Virtual Exploration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I proposal will develop a virtual test fixture performing a high caliber 3D dynamic reproduction of an prototype lunar bucket wheel excavator prototype...

  2. High-Efficiency, Nanowire Based Thermoelectric Devices for Radioisotope Power Conversion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal responds to topic S3.03 of the 2010 NASA SBIR solicitation, for Power Generation and Conversion. Thermoelectric devices offer a simple and...

  3. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  4. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  5. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and 137 Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of 137 Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations

  6. Research and Development Program in Reactor Diagnostics and Monitoring with Neutron Noise Methods. Stage 8. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V.

    2003-01-01

    This report constitutes Stage 8 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. A brief proposal for the continuation of this program in stage 9 is also given at the end of the report. The program executed in Stage 8 consists of three parts and the work performed in each part is summarized below. In Stage 7, an anomaly localisation algorithm was presented and applied to the Forsmark-1 channel instability event. This investigation was carried out with a set of static data that were typical of a generic BWR model, since no data except the Local Power Range Monitors (LPRMs) time signals recorded during the instability event were made accessible to us at that time. In the present Stage, these static data were obtained from Vattenfall Fuel AB, who used the SIMULATE-3 code. The first Section of this report is thus devoted to this anomaly localisation but this time with a relevant set of data, both regarding the static core conditions and regarding the LPRMs time signals. The noise source pointed out by the localisation algorithm was once again found to be very close to an unseated fuel assembly discovered during the fuel outage following the instability event. The localisation procedure relies in fact on the prior calculation of the reactor transfer function, carried out via the neutron noise simulator first presented in Stage 6 and later improved in Stage 7. The neutron noise simulator was also improved in this Stage. More precisely, a 2-D 2- group static core simulator was developed in order to calculate the static flux and the associated eigenvalue with a spatial discretization scheme compatible with the one in use in the neutron noise simulator, i.e. finite differences. It has generally been assumed that the Decay Ratio (DR), a parameter characterizing the stability of BWRs, is a space-independent parameter of the reactor, i.e. it is independent of which LPRM is used in the core to

  7. Research and development program in reactor diagnostics and monitoring with neutron noise methods. Stage 7. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V.

    2001-08-01

    This report constitutes stage 7 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. A proposal for the continuation of this program in stage 8 is also given at the end of the report. In stage 6, the basic principles of a 3-D fully coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic simulator in the frequency domain were presented. The neutronic model relied on the two-group diffusion approximation, whereas the thermal-hydraulic algorithms relied on the so called 'lumped' model. The key element of this simulator was that only the static data were required which could be obtained from the Studsvik Scandpower CASMO-4/TABLES-3/ SIMULATE-3 code package. The simulator was developed with this underlying idea, which means that the calculation of the static fluxes and the eigenvalue were avoided. Depending on what kind of spatial discretization scheme which is used in the noise simulator to calculate the 'leakage' noise, it is not granted that the system remains critical by using the group constants supplied by SIMULATE. Nevertheless, when the system is critical, the balance equations should be fulfilled in all nodes with respect to the discretization scheme used. In concrete terms, the calculation of the static fluxes and eigenvalue can be avoided if the system is brought back to criticality by modifying the cross-sections so that the balance equations are always fulfilled with the chosen spatial discretization scheme. This approach was used in this study with the finite difference scheme. As pointed out in stage 6, the finite difference scheme is relatively inefficient compared to finite elements or nodal methods, but on the other hand it is rather easy to implement. These two more sophisticated schemes are planned to be investigated at a later stage, but for the time being the simulator relying on the finite difference scheme was improved as much as possible so that a 2-D entirely neutronic model could be

  8. Phase I study of conformal radiotherapy with concurrent gemcitabine in locally advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangar, Vijay K.; McBain, Catherine A.; Lyons, Jeanette; Ramani, Vijay; Logue, John; Wylie, James; Clarke, Noel W.; Cowan, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase I trial was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose of gemcitabine given once weekly during hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy to patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Eight male patients, median age 69 years, with Stage T2 (n = 4) or T3 (n = 4) N0M0, were enrolled in cohorts of 3. Treatment comprised conformal radiotherapy (52.5 Gy in 20 fractions) within 4 weeks, with concurrent gemcitabine once weekly for four cycles. The weekly gemcitabine dose was escalated from 100 mg/m 2 in increments of 50 mg/m 2 per cohort. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity Grade 3 or greater arising in >1 of 3 patients in each cohort. Tumor response was assessed cystoscopically and radiologically at 3 months. Results: All 8 patients completed radiotherapy, and 6 of 8 completed chemoradiotherapy. No acute toxicity greater than RTOG Grade 1 was seen with gemcitabine at 100 mg/m 2 . Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 150 mg/m 2 with Grade 3 toxicity seen in 2 of 2 patients (one bladder, one bowel). An additional 3 patients received 100 mg/m 2 with minimal toxicity. No hematologic toxicity was encountered. A complete response was seen in 7 (87.5%) of 8 patients, all of whom were disease free at a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 14-23 months). No late toxicity (greater than RTOG Grade 0) has been observed. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose for gemcitabine given once weekly with concurrent hypofractionated conformal bladder radiotherapy was 150 mg/m 2 , with a maximal recommended dose of 100 mg/m 2 . This dose regimen has now entered Phase II clinical trials

  9. 77 FR 11115 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Deadlines for Comments and Reply Comments on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 12-25; DA 12-236] Mobility Fund Phase I Auction... the Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Comment Deadlines Public Notice (Public Notice... respect to the potential eligibility of specific census blocks for Mobility Fund Phase I support by March...

  10. Marginal Bone Remodeling around healing Abutment vs Final Abutment Placement at Second Stage Implant Surgery: A 12-month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nabih; Aboulhosn, Maissa; Berberi, Antoine; Manal, Cordahi; Younes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The periimplant bone level has been used as one of the criteria to assess the success of dental implants. It has been documented that the bone supporting two-piece implants undergoes resorption first following the second-stage surgery and later on further to abutment connection and delivery of the final prosthesis. The aim of this multicentric randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the crestal bone resorption around internal connection dental implants using a new surgical protocol that aims to respect the biological distance, relying on the benefit of a friction fit connection abutment (test group) compared with implants receiving conventional healing abutments at second-stage surgery (control group). A total of partially edentulous patients were consecutively treated at two private clinics, with two adjacent two-stage implants. Three months after the first surgery, one of the implants was randomly allocated to the control group and was uncovered using a healing abutment, while the other implant received a standard final abutment and was seated and tightened to 30 Ncm. At each step of the prosthetic try-in, the abutment in the test group was removed and then retightened to 30 Ncm. Horizontal bone changes were assessed using periapical radiographs immediately after implant placement and at 3 (second-stage surgery), 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up examinations. At 12 months follow-up, no implant failure was reported in both groups. In the control group, the mean periimplant bone resorption was 0.249 ± 0.362 at M3, 0.773 ± 0.413 at M6, 0.904 ± 0.36 at M9 and 1.047 ± 0.395 at M12. The test group revealed a statistically significant lower marginal bone loss of 20.88% at M3 (0.197 ± 0.262), 22.25% at M6 (0.601 ± 0.386), 24.23% at M9 (0.685 ± 0.341) and 19.2% at M9 (0.846 ± 0.454). The results revealed that bone loss increased over time, with the greatest change in bone loss occurring between 3 and 6 months. Alveolar bone loss was significantly greater in the

  11. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: A feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Pi Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-01-01

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  12. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: a feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Pi, Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G; Andersen, Melvin E

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  13. Research and development program in reactor diagnostics and monitoring with neutron noise methods. Stage 7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazsit, I.; Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Department of Reactor Physics; Garis, N.S. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-08-01

    This report constitutes stage 7 of a long-term research and development program concerning the development of diagnostics and monitoring methods for nuclear reactors. A proposal for the continuation of this program in stage 8 is also given at the end of the report. In stage 6, the basic principles of a 3-D fully coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic simulator in the frequency domain were presented. The neutronic model relied on the two-group diffusion approximation, whereas the thermal-hydraulic algorithms relied on the so called 'lumped' model. The key element of this simulator was that only the static data were required which could be obtained from the Studsvik Scandpower CASMO-4/TABLES-3/ SIMULATE-3 code package. The simulator was developed with this underlying idea, which means that the calculation of the static fluxes and the eigenvalue were avoided. Depending on what kind of spatial discretization scheme which is used in the noise simulator to calculate the 'leakage' noise, it is not granted that the system remains critical by using the group constants supplied by SIMULATE. Nevertheless, when the system is critical, the balance equations should be fulfilled in all nodes with respect to the discretization scheme used. In concrete terms, the calculation of the static fluxes and eigenvalue can be avoided if the system is brought back to criticality by modifying the cross-sections so that the balance equations are always fulfilled with the chosen spatial discretization scheme. This approach was used in this study with the finite difference scheme. As pointed out in stage 6, the finite difference scheme is relatively inefficient compared to finite elements or nodal methods, but on the other hand it is rather easy to implement. These two more sophisticated schemes are planned to be investigated at a later stage, but for the time being the simulator relying on the finite difference scheme was improved as much as possible so that a 2-D entirely

  14. Chemistry in the final stages of stellar evolution: Millimeter and submillimeter observations of supergiants and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jessica Louise

    High mass loss rates in evolved stars make them the major contributors to recycling processed material back into the interstellar medium. This mass loss creates large circumstellar shells, rich in molecular material. This dissertation presents millimeter and submillimeter studies of the end stages of low mass and high mass stars in order to probe their molecular content in more detail. In low mass stars, the molecular material is carried on into the planetary nebula (PN) stage. Observations of CS, HCO+, and CO in planetary nebulae (PNe) of various post-asymptotic giant branch ages have shown that molecular abundances in these objects do not significantly vary with age, as previously thought. More detailed observations of the slightly oxygen-rich PN NGC 6537 resulted in the detection of CN, HCN, HNC, CCH, CS, SO, H 2CO, HCO+ and N2H+, as well as numerous 13C isotopologues. Observations of the middle-aged PN M2-48 showed the presence of CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, SO2, SiO, HCO+, N2H+, and several 13C isotopologues. These observations represent the first detections of CS, SO, SO2, and SiO in any planetary nebula. The implications of these observations are discussed. A 1 mm spectral survey of the supergiant star NML Cygni has been carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope resulting in the observation of 102 emission features arising from 17 different molecules and 4 unidentified features. The line profiles observed in this circumstellar shell are asymmetric and vary between different molecules, akin to what has been seen in another supergiant, VY Canis Majoris. The non-LTE radiative transfer code ESCAPADE has been used to model molecular abundances in the various asymmetric outflows of VY Canis Majoris, showing just how chemically and kinematically complex these supergiant circumstellar envelopes really are.

  15. Phase I metabolic genes and risk of lung cancer: multiple polymorphisms and mRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Rotunno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes that activate tobacco lung carcinogens may generate inter-individual differences in lung cancer risk. Previous studies had limited sample sizes, poor exposure characterization, and a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tested in candidate genes. We analyzed 25 SNPs (some previously untested in 2101 primary lung cancer cases and 2120 population controls from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE study from six phase I metabolic genes, including cytochrome P450s, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, and myeloperoxidase. We evaluated the main genotype effects and genotype-smoking interactions in lung cancer risk overall and in the major histology subtypes. We tested the combined effect of multiple SNPs on lung cancer risk and on gene expression. Findings were prioritized based on significance thresholds and consistency across different analyses, and accounted for multiple testing and prior knowledge. Two haplotypes in EPHX1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk in the overall population. In addition, CYP1B1 and CYP2A6 polymorphisms were inversely associated with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma risk, respectively. Moreover, the association between CYP1A1 rs2606345 genotype and lung cancer was significantly modified by intensity of cigarette smoking, suggesting an underlying dose-response mechanism. Finally, increasing number of variants at CYP1A1/A2 genes revealed significant protection in never smokers and risk in ever smokers. Results were supported by differential gene expression in non-tumor lung tissue samples with down-regulation of CYP1A1 in never smokers and up-regulation in smokers from CYP1A1/A2 SNPs. The significant haplotype associations emphasize that the effect of multiple SNPs may be important despite null single SNP-associations, and warrants consideration in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Our findings emphasize the necessity of post

  16. A systematic methodology review of phase I radiation dose escalation trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Mastrigt, Ghislaine van; Hahn, Steve M.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Lammering, Guido; Buijsen, Jeroen; Bentzen, Soren M.; Lievens, Yolande; Kramar, Andrew; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this review is to evaluate the methodology used in published phase I radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation trials. A specific emphasis was placed on the frequency of reporting late complications as endpoint. Materials and methods: We performed a systematic literature review using a predefined search strategy to identify all phase I trials reporting on external radiotherapy dose escalation in cancer patients. Results: Fifty-three trials (phase I: n = 36, phase I-II: n = 17) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 20 used a modified Fibonacci design for the RT dose escalation, but 32 did not specify a design. Late toxicity was variously defined as >3 months (n = 43) or > 6 months (n = 3) after RT, or not defined (n = 7). In only nine studies the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was related to late toxicity, while only half the studies reported the minimum follow-up period for dose escalation (n = 26). Conclusion: In phase I RT trials, late complications are often not taken into account and there is currently no consensus on the methodology used for radiation dose escalation studies. We therefore propose a decision-tree algorithm which depends on the endpoint selected and whether a validated early surrogate endpoint is available, in order to choose the most appropriate study design.

  17. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  18. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  19. In-situ gamma-analysis support for Phase I, Middlesex cleanup project, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, R.T.

    1983-07-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Energy Measurements Group of EG and G participated in the Remedial Action program for the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties at Middlesex, New Jersey from July to November 1980. EG and G provided real time analysis of the radiological character of the soil of each property included in the Phase I cleanup before, during, and after decontamination. The method used for the analysis was in situ gamma spectroscopy employing a high purity germanium detector. This report describes the in situ system and displays the results of the in situ measurements before and after decontamination of the properties surveyed during Phase I

  20. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  1. Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System. Phase II: detailed feasibility analysis and preliminary design. Final report, Stage 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the economic and environmental feasibility of a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) based on a multifuel (gas, oil, treated solid wastes, and coal) design with which to serve any or all the institutions within the Louisiana Medical Complex in cooperation with the Health Education Authority of Louisiana (HEAL). In this context, a preliminary design is presented which consists of ICES plant description and engineering analyses. This demonstration system is capable of meeting 1982 system demands by providing 10,000 tons of air conditioning and, from a boiler plant with a high-pressure steam capacity of 200,000 lb/h, approximately 125,000 lb/h of 185 psig steam to the HEAL institutions, and at the same time generating up to 7600 kW of electrical power as byproduct energy. The plant will consist of multiple-fuel steam boilers, turbine generator, turbine driven chillers and necessary auxiliaries and ancillary systems. The preliminary design for these systems and for the building to house the central plant systems are presented along with equipment and instrumentation schedules and outline specifications for major components. Costs were updated to reflect revised data. The final preliminary cost estimate includes allowances for contingencies and escalation, as well as cost for the plant site and professional fees. This design is for a facility specifically with coal burning capability, recognizing that it is more capital-intensive than a gas/oil facility. In the opinion of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the relatively modest allocations made for scrubbing and ash removal involve less than is implied in standard industry (EPRI) cost increments of over 30% for these duties. The preliminary environmental assessment is included. (LCL)

  2. Sensation seeking amongst healthy volunteers participating in phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, M; Lamas, X; Camí, J

    1995-01-01

    1. Phase I clinical trials are usually carried out in healthy volunteers. In addition to economic gain, factors that may influence willingness to participate include scientific interest, curiosity and choice for risky activities. 2. We assessed the relationship between personality variables and volunteering for clinical pharmacology research. Two personality questionnaires, the Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS, form V) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), were administered to 48 male healthy university students who volunteered to participate in a phase I clinical trial and to 43 male university students who were not willing to participate in phase I clinical trials. General norm data were also used for the comparison of results. 3. When healthy volunteers were compared with unwilling subjects, significant differences were found in thrill-and-adventure seeking (7.9 vs 6.7, P = 0.0034), experience seeking (6.4 vs 5.2, P = 0.0012), disinhibition (6.2 vs 4.3, P personality profile of healthy volunteers was characterized by a higher sensation seeking trait and extraversion as compared with individuals who were not willing to participate in phase I clinical trials and general norm data. PMID:7640147

  3. 40 CFR 300.300 - Phase I-Discovery or notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase I-Discovery or notification. 300.300 Section 300.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... person in charge of a vessel or a facility shall, as soon as he or she has knowledge of any discharge...

  4. Meteorological Sensor Array (MSA)-Phase I. Volume 3 (Pre-Field Campaign Sensor Calibration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Phase I thermodynamic sensors (barometers, thermometers, hygrometers, and pyranometers ). This report documents the results of a detailed calibration...barometer, thermometer, hydrometer, pyranometer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER...60 (02 Mar); the logger associated with each non-standard RH sensor is demonstrated in the legend ...............21 Fig. 16 Pyranometers percent

  5. Phase-I trigger readout electronics upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Trigger Readout. The design of custom developed hardware for fast real-time data processing and transfer is presented. Performance results from the prototype boards operated in the demonstrator system, first measurements of noise behavior and responses on the test pulses to the demonstrator system are shown.

  6. A PHASE-I STUDY OF IOBAPLATIN (D-19466) ADMINISTERED BY 72H CONTINUOUS INFUSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIETEMA, JA; GUCHELAAR, HJ; DEVRIES, EGE; AULENBACHER, P; SLEIJFER, DT; MULDER, NH

    A phase I trial with continuous intravenous infusion of lobaplatin (D-19466; 1,2-diamminomethyl-cyclobutane-platinum (II)-lactate) for 72 h was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Each patient received a single dose level, the total dose of lobaplatin ranged from 30 to 60

  7. 77 FR 15369 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction GIS Data of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... GIS Data of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Bureaus (the ``Bureaus'') announce the availability of geographic information system (GIS) data for the...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Mobility Fund Phase I Auction GIS Data for Potentially...

  8. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Henrique A; Baracos, Vickie E; Dhillon, Navjot; Hong, David S; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-01-01

    Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown. We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI); body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT) images. A body mass index (BMI)≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria. Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%); 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%), including 79% of patients with a BMIbody composition: 215 (71-358) (BMIcancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index. Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  9. Technical Design Report for the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS TDAQ System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069742; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Achenbach, Ralf; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexandrov, Evgeny; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, John Thomas; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Augusto, José; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Ballestrero, Sergio; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Batraneanu, Silvia; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bauss, Bruno; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertelsen, Henrik; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogdan, Mircea Arghir; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borga, Andrea; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Brawn, Ian; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Ciodaro Xavier, Thiago; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citraro, Saverio; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crone, Gordon Jeremy; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drake, Gary; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Ebke, Johannes; Edmunds, Daniel; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ermoline, Iouri; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Faulkner, Peter; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Front, David Moris; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghibaudi, Marco; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibson, Stephen; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Green, Barry; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Higuchi, Kota; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jansweijer, Peter Paul Maarten; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joos, Markus; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahra, Christian; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazarov, Andrei; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kiese, Patric Karl; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kolos, Serguei; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; K{ö}nig, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Laurens, Philippe; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberali, Valentino; Liberti, Barbara; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Luciano, Pierluigi; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dörthe; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Luongo, Carmela; Lupu, Nachman; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Macey, Tom; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Maldaner, Stephan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meessen, Christophe; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Garcia, Raul; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaidis, Spyridon; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; 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Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2013-01-01

    The Phase-I upgrade of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is to allow the ATLAS experiment to efficiently trigger and record data at instantaneous luminosities that are up to three times that of the original LHC design while maintaining trigger thresholds close to those used in the initial run of the LHC.

  10. Phase I trial with BMS-275183, a novel oral taxane with promising antitumor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broker, LE; de Vos, FYFL; van Groeningen, CJ; Kuenen, BC; Gall, HE; Woo, MH; Voi, M; Gietema, JA; deVries, EGE; Giaccone, G

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: BMS-275183 is an orally administered C-4 methyl carbonate analogue of paclitaxel. We did a dose-escalating phase I study to investigate its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and possible antitumor activity. Experimental Design: A cycle consisted of four weekly doses of BMS-275183. The

  11. Impact of SO2 emissions cap on Phase I compliance decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissell, P.E.; Fink, C.E.; Koch, B.J.; Chomka, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The SO 2 emissions cap provisions of impending clean air legislation will dramatically affect Phase I and Phase II compliance decisions by electric utilities. Technology-based SO 2 reduction alternatives could become the keystone of most compliance strategies as utilities attempt to achieve lower and lower SO 2 emission rates. Compliance with the Phase II emissions cap will require technological solutions for many utilities which must meet system-wide SO 2 emission rates well below those achievable with low-sulfur eastern coals and, in many instances, western coals. The emissions cap provision, however, will also induce more scrubbing during the Phase I compliance period. The power generation dispatch capability of a hypothetical utility system was simulated to study the impacts of an SO 2 emission cap on compliance strategies in Phase I. The effects of the cap were quantified for generation costs, total SO 2 emissions, and effective emission rates. The results show that achieving compliance by installing state-of-the-art high SO 2 removal scrubbers becomes increasingly attractive as utilities become constrained under the SO 2 cap, even in Phase I

  12. Advanced Coating Technology for Enhanced Performance of Microchannel Plates for UV Detectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal we propose to apply a highly conformal coating of ZnO and AlN or a double layer of GaN to the surface and internal pore walls of...

  13. Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase I ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase I ... the South Asia Forum for Human Rights (SAFHR) to examine the efficacy of partition as a method ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  14. Phase I study of 4-demethoxydaunorubicin by oral route in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Andersen, E; Elbaek, K

    1988-01-01

    In a phase I trial 4-demethoxydaunorubicin (4-dm DNR) was administered as oral capsules once a week to 51 adults with advanced mainly gastrointestinal solid tumors. No fatal toxicity was observed at doses up to 25.0 mg/m2. Dose-limiting granulocytopenia and non-hematologic toxicity developed...

  15. 78 FR 45071 - Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Record Retention, adopted as part of the Connect America Fund & Intercarrier Compensation Reform Order... Communications Commission released a Report and Order in the Universal Service Fund & Intercarrier Compensation... for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...

  16. Phase I feasibility study for the Canyon disposition initiative (221-U facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The objective of the Phase I Feasibility Study (FS) presented in this document is to provide decision makers sufficient information on the remedial alternatives specific to the disposition of the 221-U Canyon Building (221-U Facility) located at the Hanford Site, and to determine which alternatives are viable for further detailed analysis

  17. Chromaticity correction in the TRISTAN phase I main ring version 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yingzhi.

    1984-05-01

    This report deals with chromaticity correction in the TRISTAN phase I main ring version 11. The program PATRICIA is used to track the trajectories of test particles over 2000 turns. The results show that particles with transverse initial amplitudes of at least 11 σ in both planes and with a synchrotron oscillation amplitude of 7 σsub(e) remain stable. (author)

  18. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  19. High Performance Ultra Low-Power ADCs and DACs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase-I research is to design a multi-GHz high bandwidth Delta Sigma Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog converter using a deep sub-micron...

  20. Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Synthesis of phase I investigation 2001-2005. Volume 'geoscientific research'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Abe, Hironobu; Kunimaru, Takanori

    2011-03-01

    The Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Project is being pursued by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to enhance the reliability of relevant disposal technologies through investigations of the deep geological environment within the host sedimentary formations at Horonobe in Hokkaido, northern Japan. The project consists of two major research areas, 'Geoscientific Research' and 'R and D on Geological Disposal', and proceeds in three overlapping phases, 'Phase I: Surface-based investigation', 'Phase II: Construction' and 'Phase III: Operation', over a period of 20 years. The present report summarises the results of the Phase I geoscientific research carried out from March 2001 to March 2005. Integration of the results from different disciplines ensures that the Phase I goals have been successfully achieved and identifies key issues that need to be addressed in Phases II and III. More importantly, efforts are made to summarise as many lessons learnt from the Phase I investigations and other technical achievements as possible to form a 'knowledge base' that will reinforce the technical basis for both implementation and the formulation of safety regulations. Based on experiences of selecting the URL area and site in Horonobe Town, important factors that should be taken into consideration in such selection processes and their rationale are demonstrated. In the course of stepwise surface-based investigations, a number of achievements have been made, which can eventually provide examples of integrated methodologies for characterising the sedimentary formations. The relevant surface-based investigation techniques have thus been further developed. The Horonobe URL has been designed based on geoscientific information accumulated during the surface-based investigations and the plans for safe construction and operation of the URL have been defined in a feasible manner. In addition, a variety of environmental measures taken during Phase I have proved to be

  1. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  2. Intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy after surgery and carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer: phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  3. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  4. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meijde Jolanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1 and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1. Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2, formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1, or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8. Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b increased cholesterol secretion, c increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance

  5. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water fabrication plants. Control of iron content at the final stage of passivation. Pt. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is part of a series which corresponds to the carbon steel behaviour as construction material for Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. The present work analyses the iron concentration study during passivation in the passivating fluid. At the beginning, during the formation of the most soluble sulfide -that is the mackinawite-, the iron concentration reaches more than 10 ppm. After some days, this iron concentration begins to decrease up to its stabilization under 0.1 ppm. This process, which occurs in the 9th. and 11th days, indicates that passivation is over, and that a pyrite and pyrrhotite-pyrite layer exists on the iron. Some differences exist between the results obtained and those previsible for the iron sulfides solubilities. In spite of these difficulties, the procedure is perfectly adequate to judge the passivation final stage. (Author) [es

  6. Next Generation Advanced Binder Chemistries for High Performance, Environmetally DurableThermal Control Material Systems., Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative SBIR Phase I proposal will develop new binder systems through the systematic investigations to tailor required unique performance properties and...

  7. Research program in reactor core diagnostics with neutron noise methods: Stage 3. Final report; Forskningsprogram angaaende haerddiagnostik med neutronbrusmetoder. Etapp 3. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazsit, I.; Garis, N.S.; Karlsson, J.; Racz, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Reactor Physics

    1997-09-01

    Stage 3 of the program has been executed 96-04-12. The long term goal is to develop noise methods for identification and localization of perturbations in reactor cores. The main parts of the program consist of modelling the noise source, calculation of the space- and frequency dependent transfer function, calculation of the neutron noise via a convolution of the transfer function of the system and the noise source, i.e. the perturbation, and finally finding an inversion or unfolding procedure to determine noise source parameters from the neutron noise. Most previous work is based on very simple (analytical) reactor models for the calculation of the transfer function as well as analytical unfolding methods. The purpose of this project is to calculate the transfer function in a more realistic model as well as elaborating powerful inversion methods that do not require analytical transfer functions. The work in stage 3 is described under the following headlines: Further investigation of simplified models for the calculation of the neutron noise; Further investigation of methods based on neural networks; Further investigation of methods for detecting the vibrations and impacting of detectors; Application of static codes for determination of the neutron noise using the adiabatic approximation. 12 refs, 18 figs.

  8. Features of the Creation of the Belarusian Collaborationist Formations at the Final Stage of the Great Patriotic War (Winter-Summer of 1944

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanko Oleg Valentinovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the features of the process of organization and use of the Belarusian collaborationist formations, which were created by the Nazi military and political leadership at the final stages of the Great Patriotic War. It is noted that this aspect of the problem did not practically find the reflection in the historiography. Based on a wide complex of archival sources, the system of organization, training and combat use of such formation, as Belarusian regional defense, is analyzed. The reasons and the aims which were pursued by the German occupants and the Belarusian nationalists at creation of this military formation are established. The author investigates the key events of history of the Belarusian regional defense, its mobilization course, the quality of staff, and the training level of soldiers and officers. The quantitative characteristics of mobilization on a chronological and territorial basis are given. The main difficulties which led to the actual failure of mobilization in the Belarusian regional defense are shown. As a result, the conducted research substantiated conclusion that, despite all efforts of occupants and members of the Belarusian national movement, the process of the organization and use of the Belarusian collaborationist formations in this stage, from the military point of view, completely failed. The political effect was minimal but more essential, however it did not affect the further course of events.

  9. Brayton Isotope Power System. Phase I. (Ground demonstration system) Configuration Control Document (CCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration control document (CCD) defines the BIPS-GDS configuration. The GDS configuration is similar to a conceptual flight system design, referred to as the BIPS-FS, which is discussed in App. I. The BIPS is being developed by ERDA as a 500 to 2000 W(e), 7-y life, space power system utilizing a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine engine to convert thermal energy (from an isotope heat source) to electrical energy at a net efficiency exceeding 25 percent. The CCD relates to Phase I of an ERDA Program to qualify a dynamic system for launch in the early 1980's. Phase I is a 35-month effort to provide an FS conceptual design and GDS design, fabrication, and test. The baseline is a 7-year life, 450-pound, 4800 W(t), 1300 W(e) system which will use two multihundred watt (MHW) isotope heat sources being developed

  10. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  11. BEGe detectors in GERDA Phase I - performance, physics analysis and surface events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The Phase I of the Gerda experiment, which has concluded its data taking in Summer 2013, was based on coaxial HPGe detectors already used for IGEX and HdM experiments. In the upcoming Phase II customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will provide the major contribution to the total exposure. The first set of BEGe detectors has been deployed in Gerda since June 2012. The data collected in Phase I show the performance achieved in terms of spectroscopy and pulse shape discrimination. In particular the strongest background source, the {sup 42}K beta decay from the liquid argon surrounding the detectors, has been effectively rejected. The signals due to beta decay on the detector surface are indeed characterized by a longer charge collection time. This talk focuses on this key feature of the BEGe-PSD.

  12. Raman Frequencies Calculated at Various Pressures in Phase I of Benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tari, Ozlem; Yurtseven, Hamit [Istanbul Arel Univ., Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2013-04-15

    We calculate in this study the pressure dependence of the frequencies for the Raman modes of A (A{sub g}), B (A{sub g}, B{sub 2g}) and C (B{sub 1g}, B{sub 3g}) at constant temperatures of 274 and 294K (room temperature) for the solid phase I of benzene. Using the mode Gruneisen parameter of each lattice mode, which correlates the pressure dependence of the crystal volume and the frequency, the Raman frequencies of those modes are computed for phase I of benzene. Our results show that the Raman frequencies of the three lattice modes (A, B and C) increase as the pressure increases, as expected. The temperature effect on the Raman frequencies is not significant, which can be explained by the experimental measurements.

  13. Demonstration of a free piston Stirling engine driven linear alternator, phase I report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldwater, B.; Piller, S.; Rauch, J.; Cella, A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the work performed under Phase I of the free piston Stirling engine demonstrator program are described. The objective of the program is to develop a 2 kW free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator energy conversion system, for an isotopic heat source, with a greater than 30% overall efficiency. Phase I was a 15-month effort to demonstrate the feasibility of the system through analysis and experimental testing of the individual components. An introduction to Stirling engines and the details of the tasks completed are presented in five major sections: (1) introduction to Stirling engine; (2) preliminary design of an advanced free piston Stirling demonstrator engine; (3) design and test of a 1 kWE output linear alternator; (4) test of a model free piston Stirling engine; and (5) development of a free piston Stirling engine computer simulation code

  14. Improved uranium-utilization program, Phase I. First semiannual report, September 1979-March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.C.

    1980-11-01

    The Improved Uranium Utilization Program includes a Phase I evaluation of BWR design alternatives which have potential to reduce uranium ore requirements in once-through fuel cycles. The Phase I project is evaluating the alternatives in detail, including considerations of reliability, performance, manufacturing, safety and economics; is establishing implementation development requirements, costs and schedules; is selecting the most promising alternatives; and is developing detailed plans for Phase II projects for implementation. Emphasis is being placed on developing practical alternatives which can be demonstrated at the earliest possible date in existing operating BWR nuclear power stations. Priority is being given to alternatives which have the maximum payoff, measured by reduction of the nation's uranium resource requirements, on the shortest schedule. Alternatives included in current evaluations are: improved refueling and control rod pattern optimization, spectral shift, extended burnup, reduction in gadolinia residual, axial blanket optimization, reconstitution, and combinations of these alternatives

  15. Performance of the phase I superconducting x-ray lithography source (SXLS) at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.B.; Biscardi, R.; Halama, H.; Heese, R.; Kramer, S.; Nawrocky, R.; Krishnaswamy, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Phase I SXLS electron storage ring has a circumference of 8.5 meters, it uses conventional dipole magnets, B ≤ 1.1 T and ρ=60 cm, and it is capable of operating in the range of 50-250 MeV. It is the forerunner of the Phase II SXLS ring which will operate at 700 MeV and will make use of superconducting dipoles, B 0 =3.87 Tesla, as a source of λ c =10 angstrom x-rays for proximity printing lithography. The Phase I storage ring has been successfully commissioned; stored currents in excess of one ampere have been achieved. A report on the performance of the machine is presented. (author) 4 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Demonstration of a free piston Stirling engine driven linear alternator, phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, B.; Piller, S.; Rauch, J.; Cella, A.

    1977-03-30

    The results of the work performed under Phase I of the free piston Stirling engine demonstrator program are described. The objective of the program is to develop a 2 kW free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator energy conversion system, for an isotopic heat source, with a greater than 30% overall efficiency. Phase I was a 15-month effort to demonstrate the feasibility of the system through analysis and experimental testing of the individual components. An introduction to Stirling engines and the details of the tasks completed are presented in five major sections: (1) introduction to Stirling engine; (2) preliminary design of an advanced free piston Stirling demonstrator engine; (3) design and test of a 1 kWE output linear alternator; (4) test of a model free piston Stirling engine; and (5) development of a free piston Stirling engine computer simulation code.

  17. High-Temperature Superconductors as Electromagnetic Deployment and Support Structures in Spacecraft. [NASA NIAC Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getliffe, Gwendolyn V.; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Masterson, Rebecca; Miller, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report, concluding a one-year NIAC Phase I study, describes a new structural and mechanical technique aimed at reducing the mass and increasing the deployed-to-stowed length and volume ratios of spacecraft systems. This technique uses the magnetic fields generated by electrical current passing through coils of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to support spacecraft structures and deploy them to operational configurations from their stowed positions inside a launch vehicle fairing.

  18. Improvement of the energy resolution via an optimized digital signal processing in GERDA Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Vacri, A. di; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Fedorova, O.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, ********************M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stepaniuk, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-06-01

    An optimized digital shaping filter has been developed for the Gerda experiment which searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in Ge. The Gerda Phase I energy calibration data have been reprocessed and an average improvement of 0.3 keV in energy resolution (FWHM) corresponding to 10 % at the value for decay in Ge is obtained. This is possible thanks to the enhanced low-frequency noise rejection of this Zero Area Cusp (ZAC) signal shaping filter.

  19. Bioanalytical methods for determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunissen, S.F.; Rosing, H.; Schinkel, A.H.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is used in the treatment of early and advanced breast cancer and in selected cases for breast cancer prevention in high-risk subjects. The cytochrome P450 enzyme system and flavin-containing monooxygenase are responsible for the extensive metabolism of tamoxifen into several phase I metabolites that vary in toxicity and potencies towards estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ER beta. An extensive overview of publications on the determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in biological samples is presented. In these publications techniques were used such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid, gas and thin layer chromatography coupled with various detection techniques (mass spectrometry, ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, liquid scintillation counting and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). A trend is seen towards the use of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). State-of-the-art LC-MS equipment allowed for identification of unknown metabolites and quantification of known metabolites reaching lower limit of quantification levels in the sub pg mL -1 range. Although tamoxifen is also metabolized into phase II metabolites, the number of publications reporting on phase II metabolism of tamoxifen is scarce. Therefore the focus of this review is on phase I metabolites of tamoxifen. We conclude that in the past decades tamoxifen metabolism has been studied extensively and numerous metabolites have been identified. Assays have been developed for both the identification and quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites in an array of biological samples. This review can be used as a resource for method transfer and development of analytical methods used to support pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites.

  20. Comparison of reporting phase I trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov and matched publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepshelovich, D; Goldvaser, H; Wang, L; Abdul Razak, A R; Bedard, P L

    2017-12-01

    Background Data on completeness of reporting of phase I cancer clinical trials in publications are lacking. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for completed adult phase I cancer trials with reported results. PubMed was searched for matching primary publications published prior to November 1, 2016. Reporting in primary publications was compared with the ClinicalTrials.gov database using a 28-point score (2=complete; 1=partial; 0=no reporting) for 14 items related to study design, outcome measures and safety profile. Inconsistencies between primary publications and ClinicalTrials.gov were recorded. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with incomplete reporting. Results After a review of 583 trials in ClinicalTrials.gov , 163 matching primary publications were identified. Publications reported outcomes that did not appear in ClinicalTrials.gov in 25% of trials. Outcomes were upgraded, downgraded or omitted in publications in 47% of trials. The overall median reporting score was 23/28 (interquartile range 21-25). Incompletely reported items in >25% publications were: inclusion criteria (29%), primary outcome definition (26%), secondary outcome definitions (53%), adverse events (71%), serious adverse events (80%) and dates of study start and database lock (91%). Higher reporting scores were associated with phase I (vs phase I/II) trials (ppublication in journals with lower impact factor (p=0.004). Conclusions Reported results in primary publications for early phase cancer trials are frequently inconsistent or incomplete compared with ClinicalTrials.gov entries. ClinicalTrials.gov may provide more comprehensive data from new cancer drug trials.

  1. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique A Parsons

    Full Text Available Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown.We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI; body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT images. A body mass index (BMI≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria.Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%; 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%, including 79% of patients with a BMI<25 kg/m² and 34% of those with BMI≥25 kg/m². Sarcopenic patients were older and less frequently African-American. Symptom burden did not differ among patients classified according to BMI and presence of sarcopenia. Median (95% confidence interval survival (days varied according to body composition: 215 (71-358 (BMI<25 kg/m²; sarcopenic, 271 (99-443 (BMI<25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic, 484 (286-681 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; sarcopenic; 501 d (309-693 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic. Higher muscle index and gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index.Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  2. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers' Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided

  3. Status of JSFR development in phase I FaCT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoto, Kazumi; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Kotake, Shoji; Ito, Takaya

    2011-01-01

    The Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT) project is pursuing commercialization of fast reactor cycle system around 2050 under cooperation of MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry), utilities, venders and JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). As results of the FaCT Phase I, the key technologies for Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) has been evaluated. (author)

  4. Phase I Investigations at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Montgomery City, Missouri, in 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division. Applied Geoscience and Environmental Restoration Program

    2012-11-01

    This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne’s studies. The Phase I field investigation was initiated on October 18, 2010. The work was conducted in accord with (1) the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Montgomery City (Argonne 2010; approved by the MDNR [2010]); (2) applicable Missouri regulations; and (3) the standard operating procedures, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) measures, and general health and safety policies outlined in the Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) for operations in Kansas, which was reviewed by the MDNR and accepted for current use. A draft master plan specific to work in Missouri and a set of draft standard operating procedures are in review with the MDNR. The site-specific Work Plan for Montgomery City (Argonne 2010) (1) summarizes the pre-existing knowledge base for the Montgomery City investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) describes the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for the first phase of the investigation. Three primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: 1. Update the presently identified inventory and status of private and public drinking water wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical analyses. In conjunction with this effort, determine the present sources(s) of drinking water for all residents in an approximate 0.5-mi radius of the former CCC/USDA facility. 2. Investigate for possible evidence of a soil source of carbon tetrachloride contamination in the unconsolidated sediments beneath the former CCC/USDA facility that might affect the underlying bedrock aquifer units. 3. Obtain preliminary information on the site-specific lithologic and hydrologic characteristics of the unconsolidated sediments overlying bedrock at the former CCC/USDA grain storage location. Section 2 of this report

  5. Imitation of phase I oxidative metabolism of anabolic steroids by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Valkonen, Minna; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2014-12-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis for oxidation of anabolic steroids and for imitation of their phase I metabolism. The photocatalytic reaction products of five anabolic steroids were compared to their phase I in vitro metabolites produced by human liver microsomes (HLM). The same main reaction types - hydroxylation, dehydrogenation and combination of these two - were observed both in TiO2 photocatalysis and in microsomal incubations. Several isomers of each product type were formed in both systems. Based on the same mass, retention time and similarity of the product ion spectra, many of the products observed in HLM reactions were also formed in TiO2 photocatalytic reactions. However, products characteristic to only either one of the systems were also formed. In conclusion, TiO2 photocatalysis is a rapid, simple and inexpensive method for imitation of phase I metabolism of anabolic steroids and production of metabolite standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-activity waste envelope definitions for the TWRS Privatization Phase I Request For Proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patello, G.K.; Lauerhass, L.; Myers, R.L.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Radioactive waste has been stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. Approximately 212 million liters of waste containing approximately 240,000 metric tons of processed chemicals and 177 mega-curies of radionuclides are now stored in 177 tanks. These caustic wastes are in the form of liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludge. In 1991, the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of these wastes in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost-effective manner. The Department of Energy (DOE) has believes that it is feasible to privatize portions of the TWRS Program. Under the privatization strategy embodied in the Request for Proposal (RFP), DOE will purchase services from a contractor-owned, contractor-operated facility under a fixed-price contract. Phase I of the TWRS privatization strategy is a proof-of-concept/commercial demonstration-scale effort. The objectives of Phase I are to demonstrate the technical and business viability of using privatized facilities to treat Hanford tank waste; define and maintain required levels of radiological, nuclear, process, and occupational safety; maintain environmental protection and compliance; and substantially reduce life-cycle costs and time required to treat Hanford tank waste. Three low-activity waste (LAW) envelopes are identified for Phase I of the privatization contract and are representative of the range of Hanford double-shelled tank (DST) waste

  7. Low-activity waste envelope definitions for the TWRS Privatization Phase I Request For Proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patello, G.K.; Lauerhass, L.; Myers, R.L.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Radioactive waste has been stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. Approximately 212 million liters of waste containing approximately 240,000 metric tons of processed chemicals and 177 mega-curies of radionuclides are now stored in 177 tanks. These caustic wastes are in the form of liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludge. In 1991, the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of these wastes in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost-effective manner. The Department of Energy (DOE) has believes that it is feasible to privatize portions of the TWRS Program. Under the privatization strategy embodied in the Request for Proposal (RFP), DOE will purchase services from a contractor-owned, contractor-operated facility under a fixed-price contract. Phase I of the TWRS privatization strategy is a proof-of-concept/commercial demonstration-scale effort. The objectives of Phase I are to demonstrate the technical and business viability of using privatized facilities to treat Hanford tank waste; define and maintain required levels of radiological, nuclear, process, and occupational safety; maintain environmental protection and compliance; and substantially reduce life-cycle costs and time required to treat Hanford tank waste. Three low-activity waste (LAW) envelopes are identified for Phase I of the privatization contract and are representative of the range of Hanford double-shelled tank (DST) waste.

  8. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  9. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018

  10. Aging of snubbers in nuclear service: Phase I study results and Phase II plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.L.; Bush, S.H.; Page, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two major research areas were investigated in the Phase I snubber aging studies. The first area involved a preliminary evaluation of the effects of various aging mechanisms on snubber operation; failure modes of mechanisms were identified and their contributions to aging degradation were assessed relative to other failure modes. The second area involved estimating the efficacy of existing tests and examinations that are intended to determine the effects of aging and degradation. Available data on snubber behavior and operating experience were reviewed, using licensee event reports and other historical data for the 10-year period from 1973 through 1983. Value-impact was considered in terms of (1) exposure of workers to radioactive environments for examination/testing and (2) the cost for expansion of the snubber testing program due to failed snubbers. Results from the Phase I studies identified the need to modify or improve examination and testing procedures to enhance snubber reliability. Based on the results of the Phase I snubber studies, the seals and fluids were identified as the two principal elements affected by aging degradation in hydraulic snubbers. Phase II work, which was initiated in FY 1987, will develop cooperative activities between PNL and operating utilities through the Snubber Utility Group (SNUG), who will work to establish a strong data and experience base for both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers based on actual operating and maintenance history at nuclear power plants. Application guidelines for snubbers will be recommended based on the study results

  11. PEGylated carboxyhemoglobin bovine (SANGUINATE): results of a phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Hemant; Lickliter, Jason; Kazo, Friedericke; Abuchowski, Abraham

    2014-08-01

    PEGylated carboxyhemoglobin bovine (SANGUINATE) is a dual action carbon monoxide releasing (CO)/oxygen (O2 ) transfer agent for the treatment of hypoxia. Its components inhibit vasoconstriction, decrease extravasation, limit reactive oxygen species production, enhance blood rheology, and deliver oxygen to the tissues. Animal models of cerebral ischemia, peripheral ischemia, and myocardial ischemia demonstrated SANGUINATE's efficacy in reducing myocardial infarct size, limiting necrosis from cerebral ischemia, and promoting more rapid recovery from hind limb ischemia. In a Phase I trial, three cohorts of eight healthy volunteers received single ascending doses of 80, 120, or 160 mg/kg of SANGUINATE. Two volunteers within each cohort served as a saline control. There were no serious adverse events. Serum haptoglobin decreased, but did not appear to be dose related. The T1/2 was dose dependent and ranged from 7.9 to 13.8 h. In addition to the Phase I trial, SANGUINATE was used under an expanded access emergency Investigational New Drug. SANGUINATE was found to be safe and well tolerated in a Phase I clinical trial, and therefore it will advance into further clinical trials in patients. © 2014 The Authors. Artificial Organs published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation (ICAOT).

  12. Vaccination of metastatic melanoma patients with autologous dendritic cell (DC derived-exosomes: results of thefirst phase I clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piperno Sophie

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DC derived-exosomes are nanomeric vesicles harboring functional MHC/peptide complexes capable of promoting T cell immune responses and tumor rejection. Here we report the feasability and safety of the first Phase I clinical trial using autologous exosomes pulsed with MAGE 3 peptides for the immunization of stage III/IV melanoma patients. Secondary endpoints were the monitoring of T cell responses and the clinical outcome. Patients and methods Exosomes were purified from day 7 autologous monocyte derived-DC cultures. Fifteen patients fullfilling the inclusion criteria (stage IIIB and IV, HLA-A1+, or -B35+ and HLA-DPO4+ leukocyte phenotype, tumor expressing MAGE3 antigen were enrolled from 2000 to 2002 and received four exosome vaccinations. Two dose levels of either MHC class II molecules (0.13 versus 0.40 × 1014 molecules or peptides (10 versus 100 μg/ml were tested. Evaluations were performed before and 2 weeks after immunization. A continuation treatment was performed in 4 cases of non progression. Results The GMP process allowed to harvest about 5 × 1014 exosomal MHC class II molecules allowing inclusion of all 15 patients. There was no grade II toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. One patient exhibited a partial response according to the RECIST criteria. This HLA-B35+/A2+ patient vaccinated with A1/B35 defined CTL epitopes developed halo of depigmentation around naevi, a MART1-specific HLA-A2 restricted T cell response in the tumor bed associated with progressive loss of HLA-A2 and HLA-BC molecules on tumor cells during therapy with exosomes. In addition, one minor, two stable and one mixed responses were observed in skin and lymph node sites. MAGE3 specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses could not be detected in peripheral blood. Conclusion The first exosome Phase I trial highlighted the feasibility of large scale exosome production and the safety of exosome administration.

  13. 77 FR 57085 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction; Release of Files with Recalculated Road Miles for Auction 901...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 12-25; DA 12-1446] Mobility Fund Phase I Auction... Mobility Fund Phase I support to be offered in Auction 901, which is to be held on September 27, 2012, and..., 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus identified census blocks eligible for the Mobility Fund Phase...

  14. 78 FR 61350 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-1986, DA 13-1978] Tribal Mobility... Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions: Patricia Robbins at (202) 418-0660. To... to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will now open at 12 noon Eastern...

  15. 78 FR 68839 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-2057] Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to Auction 902 Schedule Following Resumption... up to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will be conducted on February 25...

  16. 76 FR 9786 - NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Program Ten-Year Review-Phase I Report on Customer Service; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Reconstruction Program Ten-Year Review--Phase I Report on Customer Service; Request for Public Review and Comment... Review--Phase I Report on Customer Service.'' This publication is part of a review by NIOSH of its... during the program review: The customer service provided by NIOSH in the program. The document can be...

  17. 76 FR 78641 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RC11-1-002; Docket No. RC11-2-002] Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing Take...) June 16, 2011 Order.\\1\\ \\1\\ Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC and Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC, 135...

  18. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractionated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using a hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. Materials and Methods: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and sixth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was carried out 4-6 weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was given for an additional 4 monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. Results: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 27 months (range 8-68). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Grade III acute toxicity from chemoradiation included proctitis (5 patients), dermatitis (9), diarrhea (five), leukopenia (1), cardiac (1). Grade IV toxicities included one patient with diarrhea (on dose Level I) and one patient (on dose Level III) with cardiac toxicity (unrelated to radiation). Surgical resection consisted of abdominal perineal resection in 16 and low anterior resection

  19. Geneva-on-the-Lake Ohio. Small Boat Harbor. Stage 2 Document for Reformulation Phase I General Design Memorandum. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    Seismic velocities of 3,000 to 6,700 feet per second indicate that the till is rippable , but in these areas where the velocities approach 6,700 feet per...marginally rippable to nonrippable using a D9H ripper. Bedrock excavation pro- bably will require drilling and blasting. A22. APPROACH CHANNELS Bedrock is

  20. Development of a high temperature solar powered water chiller. Volume 3. Phase I technical progress report, September 26, 1977--June 1, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, R. A.

    1978-06-01

    This section describes the conceptual design rationale and resulting design configuration as well as providing estimates of cost and performance. Because the development of the turbo-compressor design paralleled the development of the chiller system design, all of the cost and performance data are based on intermediate turbo-compressor performance data, as well as on unoptimized components. Optimized performance was computed at the very end of Phase I, and only a brief comparison is made to show the potential gains available. Updating of all the predicted performance data for the final conceptual design will await Phase II.