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Sample records for stages cancerous tissues

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research.

  2. Presence of S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in cancer tissues correlates with an early stage cancer and a better prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Biao; Li, Ying-Ai; Du, Hong; Zhao, Wei; Niu, Zhao-Jian; Lu, Ai-Ping; Li, Ji-You; Ji, Jia-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Hai; Jia, Yong-ning; Zhong, Xi-Yao; Liu, Yi-Qiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Xing, Xiao-Fang; Hu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    S100A9 was originally discovered as a factor secreted by inflammatory cells. Recently, S100A9 was found to be associated with several human malignancies. The purpose of this study is to investigate S100A9 expression in gastric cancer and explore its role in cancer progression. S100A9 expression in gastric tissue samples from 177 gastric cancer patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of its dimerization partner S100A8 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimer were also assessed by the same method. The effect of exogenous S100A9 on motility of gastric cancer cells AGS and BGC-823 was then investigated. S100A9 was specifically expressed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils in human gastric cancer and gastritis tissues. Statistical analysis showed that a high S100A9 cell count (> = 200) per 200x magnification microscopic field in cancer tissues was predictive of early stage gastric cancer. High S100A9-positive cell count was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.009) and tumor invasion (P = 0.011). S100A9 was identified as an independent prognostic predictor of overall survival of patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.04). Patients with high S100A9 cell count were with favorable prognosis (P = 0.021). Further investigation found that S100A8 distribution in human gastric cancer tissues was similar to S100A9. However, the number of S100A8-positive cells did not positively correlate with patient survival. The inflammatory cells infiltrating cancer were S100A8/A9 negative, while those in gastritis were positive. Furthermore, exogenous S100A9 protein inhibited migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results suggested S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in gastric cancer tissues are associated with early stage of gastric cancer and good prognosis

  3. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detailed information about the cancer stage. TNM Staging System The most common system for staging cancer in the form of solid tumor is the TNM system. Most providers and cancer centers use it to stage ...

  4. Human breast tissue disposition and bioactivity of limonene in women with early stage breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica A.; Lang, Julie E.; Ley, Michele; Nagle, Ray; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Cordova, Catherine; Waer, Amy; Chow, H.-H. Sherry

    2013-01-01

    Limonene is a bioactive food component found in citrus peel oil that has demonstrated chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in preclinical studies. We conducted an open label pilot clinical study to determine the human breast tissue disposition of limonene and its associated bioactivity. We recruited forty-three women with newly diagnosed operable breast cancer electing to undergo surgical excision to take 2 grams of limonene daily for 2 – 6 weeks before surgery. Blood and breast tissue were collected to determine drug/metabolite concentrations and limonene-induced changes in systemic and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk or carcinogenesis. Limonene was found to preferentially concentrate in the breast tissue, reaching high tissue concentration (mean=41.3 μg/g tissue) while the major active circulating metabolite, perillic acid, did not concentrate in the breast tissue. Limonene intervention resulted in a 22% reduction in cyclin D1 expression (P=0.002) in tumor tissue but minimal changes in tissue Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 expression. No significant changes in serum leptin, adiponectin, TGF-β1, IGFBP-3 and IL-6 levels were observed following limonene intervention. There was a small but statistically significant post-intervention increase in IGF-1 levels. We conclude that limonene distributed extensively to human breast tissue and reduced breast tumor cyclin D1 expression that may lead to cell cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation. Further placebo-controlled clinical trials and translational research are warranted to establish limonene’s role for breast cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23554130

  5. Human breast tissue disposition and bioactivity of limonene in women with early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica A; Lang, Julie E; Ley, Michele; Nagle, Ray; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Thompson, Patricia A; Cordova, Catherine; Waer, Amy; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2013-06-01

    Limonene is a bioactive food component found in citrus peel oil that has shown chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in preclinical studies. We conducted an open-label pilot clinical study to determine the human breast tissue disposition of limonene and its associated bioactivity. We recruited 43 women with newly diagnosed operable breast cancer electing to undergo surgical excision to take 2 grams of limonene daily for two to six weeks before surgery. Blood and breast tissue were collected to determine drug/metabolite concentrations and limonene-induced changes in systemic and tissue biomarkers of breast cancer risk or carcinogenesis. Limonene was found to preferentially concentrate in the breast tissue, reaching high tissue concentration (mean = 41.3 μg/g tissue), whereas the major active circulating metabolite, perillic acid, did not concentrate in the breast tissue. Limonene intervention resulted in a 22% reduction in cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.002) in tumor tissue but minimal changes in tissue Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. No significant changes in serum leptin, adiponectin, TGF-β1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed following limonene intervention. There was a small but statistically significant postintervention increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. We conclude that limonene distributed extensively to human breast tissue and reduced breast tumor cyclin D1 expression that may lead to cell-cycle arrest and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, placebo-controlled clinical trials and translational research are warranted to establish limonene's role for breast cancer prevention or treatment.

  6. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  7. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 is elevated in early-stage breast cancers with accelerated progression and poor clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michaelann; Sreedhar, Nandhini; Keshgegian, Albert; Sauter, Guido; Chernick, Michael R; Prendergast, George C; Wallon, U Margaretha

    2009-09-01

    An increasing number of breast cancer patients are diagnosed with small, localized, early-stage tumors. These patients are typically thought to have a good prognosis for long-term disease-free survival, but epidemiological studies indicate that up to 30% may have a recurrence within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. Identifying patients with a high risk of recurrence and/or progression is important because they could be more aggressively treated at diagnosis to improve their chances for disease-free survival. Recent evidence suggests that elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-4, are associated with malignant progression of ductal carcinoma in situ, a precancerous lesion. To examine the association of TIMP-4 with survival outcomes, we conducted a retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of 314 cases from patients with early-stage disease, defined as tumors smaller than 2 cm and no spread to lymph nodes (tumor-node-metastasis staging: T1N0MX). We found that tumors with elevated levels of TIMP-4 were correlated with a reduced probability of long-term disease-free survival, especially in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Our findings prompt further evaluation of TIMP-4 as a simple prognostic marker that may help identify patients with early-stage breast cancer who could benefit from more aggressive treatment at diagnosis.

  8. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  14. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  15. Stages of Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat anal cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  16. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat penile cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  18. Staging for vaginal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Maheshwari, Amita; Srivastava, Astha

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer comprising about 3% of all gynecologic cancers. Primary vaginal cancer should be carefully assigned as spread from cervix, vulva, and other metastatic tumors to vagina can occur. Although vaginal cancer traditionally occurs in older postmenopausal women, the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is increasing in younger women. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histopathologic type followed by adenocarcinoma. With decreasing use of diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy, non-diethylstilbestrol-associated cancers are described. The Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) staging of vaginal cancer (2009) follows the same rules as cervical cancer; it is clinically staged and allows the use of routine investigative modalities for staging. Although FIGO encourages the use of advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), to guide therapy, the imaging findings may not be used to change or reassign the stage. TNM staging is the pathologic staging system proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and information available from examination of the resected specimen, including pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, may be used for staging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  1. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stages of Urethral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  3. The principles of cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, James; Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic disease extent or tumour stage of a cancer at diagnosis as a determinant of prognosis is discussed. The importance of cancer stage in individual patient prognosis and determination of treatment is reviewed as well as its value in research and cancer control activities. The conflict between the need for stability of cancer stage definitions over time and the need to evolve with advances in medicine are examined. The e cancer elearning modules on Cancer Stage are introduced.

  4. Proteomic patterns analysis with multivariate calculations as a promising tool for prompt differentiation of early stage lung tissue with cancer and unchanged tissue material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Tomasz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer diagnosis in tissue material with commonly used histological techniques is sometimes inconvenient and in a number of cases leads to ambiguous conclusions. Frequently advanced immunostaining techniques have to be employed, yet they are both time consuming and limited. In this study a proteomic approach is presented which may help provide unambiguous pathologic diagnosis of tissue material. Methods Lung tissue material found to be pathologically changed was prepared to isolate proteome with fast and non selective procedure. Isolated peptides and proteins in ranging from 3.5 to 20 kDa were analysed directly using high resolution mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF with sinapic acid as a matrix. Recorded complex spectra of a single run were then analyzed with multivariate statistical analysis algorithms (principle component analysis, classification methods. In the applied protocol we focused on obtaining the spectra richest in protein signals constituting a pattern of change within the sample containing detailed information about its protein composition. Advanced statistical methods were to indicate differences between examined groups. Results Obtained results indicate changes in proteome profiles of changed tissues in comparison to physiologically unchanged material (control group which were reflected in the result of principle component analysis (PCA. Points representing spectra of control group were located in different areas of multidimensional space and were less diffused in comparison to cancer tissues. Three different classification algorithms showed recognition capability of 100% regarding classification of examined material into an appropriate group. Conclusion The application of the presented protocol and method enabled finding pathological changes in tissue material regardless of localization and size of abnormalities in the sample volume. Proteomic profile as a complex, rich in signals spectrum of proteins

  5. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  6. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, WD; Berlind, CG; Gee, JC; Simone, CB

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  7. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  8. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  9. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  10. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cancer. Tracheostomy : Surgery to create an opening ( stoma ) into the windpipe to help you breathe. The ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  11. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterus. See the PDQ summary on Uterine Sarcoma Treatment for more information about uterine sarcoma . Obesity and having metabolic syndrome may increase the risk of endometrial cancer. Anything ...

  12. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sign of disease. Sestamibi scan : A type of radionuclide scan used to find an overactive parathyroid gland. ... speech problems caused by this nerve damage. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses ...

  13. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be at risk. Risk factors for gastric cancer include the following: Having any of the following medical conditions : Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the stomach. Chronic gastritis ( inflammation of the stomach). Pernicious anemia . Intestinal metaplasia ( ...

  14. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  15. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  16. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide . Taking Aristolochia fangchi , a Chinese herb . Drinking water from a well that has high ... patients may be given chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ...

  17. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  18. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Lymph node dissection : ... pelvic lymph nodes may be removed. If the cancer is in the lower vagina, lymph nodes in ... colon , rectum , bladder , cervix, vagina, and ovaries . Nearby lymph ...

  19. PET in lung cancer staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R. E. [Duke University Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The primary clinical application of FDG-PET is in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer and includes diagnosis, staging and restaging of non-small cell lung cancer. PET has a very high accuracy (sensitivity=97%, specificity=78%) for characterizing nodules that are indeterminate by chest radiograph and computed tomography. The major utility of PET in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer is the staging of the entire body. PET is more accurate than the conventional imaging modalities of CT and bone scans in the detection of metastatic disease. PET is accurate in the staging of the mediastinum, adrenal glands, and the skeletal system. PET is not as accurate in the detection of brain metastases because of their small size and the normal cortical accumulation.

  20. Development and independent validation of a prognostic assay for stage II colon cancer using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Richard D

    2011-12-10

    Current prognostic factors are poor at identifying patients at risk of disease recurrence after surgery for stage II colon cancer. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based prognostic assay using clinically relevant formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples.

  1. Analysis of interventional therapy for progressing stage gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingde; Zhang Zijing; Ji Hongsheng; Ge Chenlin; Hao Gang; Wei Kongming; Yuan Yuhou; Zhao Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the interventional therapy and its curative effect for progressing stage gastric cancer. Methods: two hundred and twelve patients with progressing stage gastric cancer were treated with arterial perfusion and arterial embolization. Gastric cardia cancer was treated through the left gastric artery and the left inferior phrenic artery or splenic artery. Cancers of lesser and greater gastric curvature was treated either through the left and right gastric arteries or common hepatic artery or through gastroduodenal artery, right gastroomental artery or splenic artery. Gastric antrum cancers were perfused through gastroduodenal artery or after the middle segmental embolization of right gastroomental artery. Results: One hundred and ninety three cases undergone interventional management were followed up. The CR + PR of gastric cardia cancer was 53.13%; gastric body cancer 44.44%; gastric antrum cancer 10%; recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer 0. There was no significant difference in outcome between gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer (P>0.05) but significant differences were shown both between gastric cardia cancer and gastric antrum cancer, and between gastric body cancer and gastric antrum cancer (P<0.05), with 1 year and 2 years survival rates of 81% and 56% respectively. Conclusion: The interventional therapeutic effect of progressing stage gastric cancers is different due to the different sites of the lesions in the gastric tissue. The curative effect of gastric cardia cancer and gastric body cancer is better than that of gastric antrum cancer, recurrent cancer and remnant gastric cancer. (authors)

  2. Preoperative ultrasound staging of the axilla make's peroperative examination of the sentinel node redundant in breast cancer: saving tissue, time and money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berckelaer, Christophe; Huizing, Manon; Van Goethem, Mireille; Vervaecke, Andrew; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Verslegers, Inge; Trinh, Bich X; Van Dam, Peter; Altintas, Sevilay; Van den Wyngaert, Tim; Huyghe, Ivan; Siozopoulou, Vasiliki; Tjalma, Wiebren A A

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the role of preoperative axillary staging with ultrasound (US) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Can we avoid intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) examination, with an acceptable revision rate by preoperative staging? This study is based on the retrospective data of 336 patients that underwent US evaluation of the axilla as part of their staging. A FNAC biopsy was performed when abnormal lymph nodes were visualized. Patients with normal appearing nodes on US or a benign diagnostic biopsy had removal of the SLNs without intraoperative pathological examination. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US/FNAC in predicting the necessity of an axillary lymphadenectomy. Subsequently we looked at the total cost and the operating time of 3 models. Model A is our study protocol. Model B is a theoretical protocol based on the findings of the Z0011 trial with only clinical preoperative staging and in Model C preoperative staging and intraoperative pathological examination were both theoretically done. sentinel node, staging, ultrasound, preoperative axillary staging, FNAC, axilla RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are respectively 0.75 (0.66-0.82), 1.00 (0.99-1.00) and 0.92 (0.88-0.94). Only 26 out of 317 (8.2%) patients that successfully underwent staging needed a revision. The total cost of Model A was 1.58% cheaper than Model C and resulted in a decrease in operation time by 9,46%. The benefits compared with Model B were much smaller. Preoperative US/FNAC staging of the axillary lymph nodes can avoid intraoperative examination of the sentinel node with an acceptable revision rate. It saves tissue, reduces operating time and decreases healthcare costs in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1...... and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  4. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  5. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat penile cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  8. Images of gastric cancer stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Aragon, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The present work has the objective to review the importance of the images in the preoperating stage of the gastric cancer. It has been emphasized in the modalities of transabdominal ultrasound as much as endoscopic and TAC since they are most valuable in the stage. Certainly the importance of conventional radiology (gastroduodenal series) is also valuable in the stage of the tumor, specially in considering the depth of the same one. In order to make this overhaul, the recent bibliography was consulted but, specially the published one by Japaneses since they follow a classification and methodology different from the used one in most of the countries that belong to the World-wide Organization of the Health. They made an overhaul of approximately 200 cases of patients who have been diagnosed and treated in the Center of Detection of Gastric Cancer of Cartago. In each case review the file, radiological, sonographic and pathological studies, and the cases were chosen that better illustrated the exposed subjects. (Author) [es

  9. CXCL5 overexpression is associated with late stage gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Kyung Hwa; Bang, Seungmin; Kim, Myoung Hwan; Lee, Ji-Eun; Gang, Jingu; Koh, Sang Seok; Song, Si Young

    2007-11-01

    Chemokines play multiple roles in the development and progression of many different tumors. Our cDNA array data suggested that chemokine CXCL5 was upregulated in gastric cancer. Here, we analyzed CXCL5 protein expression in gastric cancer and investigated the clinical implications of CXCL5 upregulation. Immunostaining for CXCL5 was performed on gastric tissue microarrays of tissue specimens obtained by gastrectomy. The intensity of immunostaining in tumor tissue was considered strong when tumor tissue staining was more intense than in normal tissue; the intensity was null when staining was weaker in the tumor than in normal tissue; and the intensity was weak when staining was similar in both tissues. Serum CXCL5 levels and microvascular density in tumor tissue were measured by ELISA and monoclonal antibody to Factor VIII. Strong CXCL5 expression correlated with tumor stage. CXCL5 expression did not correlate with T stage. However, N stage positively correlated with CXCL5 expression. Serum CXCL5 levels in late stage (IIIB, IV) gastric cancer patients were higher than in patients with benign conditions. Microvascular density was higher in tumors with strong CXCL5 expression, but the correlation with CXCL5 was not linear. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that, compared to no or weak expression, strong expression of CXCL5 was a significant risk factor for high N stage (N2, N3). CXCL5 overexpression was associated with late stage gastric cancer and high N stage. These results suggest a role for CXCL5 in the progression of gastric cancer, specifically in lymph node metastasis.

  10. A study about trace element distribution in cancer tissue and serum of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Eun Joo; Jung, Young Joo

    1993-01-01

    Authers analyzed the trace element distribution of cancer tissue and its corresponding normal tissue and serum of preoperative and postoperative stage in gastric, colon, breast cancer patients. Zinc and rubidium were higher in concentration in breast cancer tissue than in normal tissue. As for the distribution of trace element in serum, bromine became about 10 times higher after gastric resection. This result can be applied to experimental carcinogenesis and to relationship with other prognostic factors. (Author)

  11. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  12. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  13. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  14. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  15. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  17. Stages of Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Childhood ...

  18. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  20. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  1. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chansky, Kari; Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Revisions to the TNM stage classifications for lung cancer, informed by the international database (N = 94,708) of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee, need external validation. The objective was to externally v...

  2. Prospective Cohort Study Depending on the Use of Palliative Care for Advanced Stage of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Liver Cancer; Malignant Hematologic Neoplasm; Biliary Cancer Metastatic; Pediatric Leukemia; Pediatric Lymphoma; Pediatric Brain Tumor; Pediatric Solid Tumor

  3. Intravital Microscopy in Evaluating Patients With Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, or Stage IA-IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-28

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  4. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  5. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  6. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Improving Well-Being in Patients With Stage III-IV Cancer and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Partner; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  8. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system.

  9. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  10. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  11. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  12. Adipose Tissue Immunity and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eCatalan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete proinflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favourable for tumour growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching towards M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumour growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumour cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumour microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoural drugs.

  13. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: pathologic staging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, T W; Chen, L-Q; Hofstetter, W L; Smithers, B M; Rusch, V W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Chen, K L; Davies, A R; D'Journo, X B; Kesler, K A; Luketich, J D; Ferguson, M K; Räsänen, J V; van Hillegersberg, R; Fang, W; Durand, L; Cecconello, I; Allum, W H; Cerfolio, R J; Pera, M; Griffin, S M; Burger, R; Liu, J-F; Allen, M S; Law, S; Watson, T J; Darling, G E; Scott, W J; Duranceau, A; Denlinger, C E; Schipper, P H; Lerut, T E M R; Orringer, M B; Ishwaran, H; Apperson-Hansen, C; DiPaola, L M; Semple, M E; Blackstone, E H

    2016-10-01

    We report data-simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival-for patients with pathologically staged cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction after resection or ablation with no preoperative therapy from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted de-identified data using standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 13,300 patients, 5,631 had squamous cell carcinoma, 7,558 adenocarcinoma, 85 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 26 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (62 years) men (80%) with normal body mass index (51%), little weight loss (1.8 kg), 0-2 ECOG performance status (83%), and a history of smoking (70%). Cancers were pT1 (24%), pT2 (15%), pT3 (50%), pN0 (52%), pM0 (93%), and pG2-G3 (78%); most involved distal esophagus (71%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma was monotonic and distinctive across pTNM. Survival was more distinctive for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma when pT was ordered by pN. Survival for pTis-1 adenocarcinoma was better than for squamous cell carcinoma, although monotonic and distinctive for both. WECC pathologic staging data is improved over that of the 7th edition, with more patients studied and patient and cancer variables collected. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient, cancer, and treatment characteristics, and should direct 9th edition data collection. However, the role of pure pathologic staging as the principal point of reference for esophageal cancer staging is waning. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  14. Early diagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the detection of premalignant changes of bronchial mucosa and early stages of lung cancer frequent chest X-ray, spiral low dose computed tomography, fluorescence bronchoscopy, sputum cytology (also with automated systems with genetic and molecular changes in the sputum cells and bronchial mucosa were used. These screening methods of the high-risk groups for lung cancer achieved: earlier diagnosis of lung cancer in lower stage, higher operability, longer 5-year survival, but without mortality reduction.Conclusions: In the clinical practice we can examine higher risk groups for lung cancer in randomised control trials with multimodality approach: frequent chest low-dose fast spiral computed tomography, sputum cytology with genetic and molecular examinations and fluorescence bronchoscopy. Smoking cessation remains the best means to achieve mortality reduction from lung cancer.

  15. MR mammography in the pre-operative staging of breast cancer in patients with dense breast tissue: comparison with mammography and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Goethem, M.; Schelfout, K.; Verslegers, I.; Biltjes, I.; De Schepper, A.; Dijckmans, L.; Van Der Auwera, J.C.; Weyler, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-operative MR mammography could predict the extent of breast cancer in patients with dense breasts or whether dense parenchyma will lead to false-positive or inconclusive examinations. Sixty-seven patients with dense breasts with a malignant breast tumor planned for conservative surgery were reviewed. Detection rates of mammography, ultrasound, and MR mammography were studied, and the diameters of the lesions were measured and compared with pathological examination. Pathology revealed breast cancer in 65 patients. Sensitivity for detection of index lesions was 83% for mammography, 70.8% for ultrasound, and 98% for MR mammography. Mammography underestimated tumor extent in 37%, ultrasound in 40%, and MR in 12.5%. Of the 20 patients (31%) with multifocal or multicentric carcinoma, mammography detected the lesions in 35%, ultrasound in 30%, and MR in 100%, with a false-positive rate of 12.5, 14, and 23%. The MR mammography is more accurate in assessing tumor extent and multifocality in patients with dense breasts, but benign changes may lead to false-positive examinations. (orig.)

  16. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: clinical staging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, T W; Apperson-Hansen, C; DiPaola, L M; Semple, M E; Lerut, T E M R; Orringer, M B; Chen, L-Q; Hofstetter, W L; Smithers, B M; Rusch, V W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Chen, K N; Davies, A R; D'Journo, X B; Kesler, K A; Luketich, J D; Ferguson, M K; Räsänen, J V; van Hillegersberg, R; Fang, W; Durand, L; Allum, W H; Cecconello, I; Cerfolio, R J; Pera, M; Griffin, S M; Burger, R; Liu, J-F; Allen, M S; Law, S; Watson, T J; Darling, G E; Scott, W J; Duranceau, A; Denlinger, C E; Schipper, P H; Ishwaran, H; Blackstone, E H

    2016-10-01

    To address uncertainty of whether clinical stage groupings (cTNM) for esophageal cancer share prognostic implications with pathologic groupings after esophagectomy alone (pTNM), we report data-simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival-for clinically staged patients from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted data using variables with standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 22,123 clinically staged patients, 8,156 had squamous cell carcinoma, 13,814 adenocarcinoma, 116 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 37 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (62 years) men (80%) with normal body mass index (18.5-25 mg/kg 2 , 47%), little weight loss (2.4 ± 7.8 kg), 0-1 ECOG performance status (67%), and history of smoking (67%). Cancers were cT1 (12%), cT2 (22%), cT3 (56%), cN0 (44%), cM0 (95%), and cG2-G3 (89%); most involved the distal esophagus (73%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for squamous cell carcinoma was not distinctive for early cT or cN; for adenocarcinoma, it was distinctive for early versus advanced cT and for cN0 versus cN+. Patients with early cancers had worse survival and those with advanced cancers better survival than expected from equivalent pathologic categories based on prior WECC pathologic data. Thus, clinical and pathologic categories do not share prognostic implications. This makes clinically based treatment decisions difficult and pre-treatment prognostication inaccurate. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient characteristics, cancer categories, and treatment characteristics and should direct 9th edition data collection. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  17. Nedd4L expression is decreased in ovarian epithelial cancer tissues compared to ovarian non-cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiuyun; Zhao, Jinghe; Cui, Manhua; Gi, Shuting; Wang, Wei; Han, Xiaole

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-like (Nedd4L) gene plays a role in the progression of various cancers. However, reports describing Nedd4L expression in ovarian cancer tissues are limited. A cohort (n = 117) of archival formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded resected normal ovarian epithelial tissues (n = 10), benign ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 10), serous borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 14), mucous borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 11), and invasive ovarian epithelial cancer tissues (n = 72) were assessed for Nedd4L protein expression using immunohistochemistry. Nedd4L protein expression was significantly decreased in invasive ovarian epithelial cancer tissues compared to non-cancer tissues (P < 0.05). Decreased Nedd4L protein expression correlated with clinical stage, pathological grade, lymph node metastasis and survival (P < 0.05). Nedd4L protein expression may be an independent prognostic marker of ovarian cancer development. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Surveillance in stage I testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Rørth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Treatment results on 695 stage I testicular cancer patients followed with surveillance are described. Seminoma (SGCT) was present in 394 patients and nonseminoma (NSGCT) in 301 patients. Relapses were detected in 155 patients (22%), in 69 patients with SGCT (17%) and 86 with NSGCT (29%). In patie......Treatment results on 695 stage I testicular cancer patients followed with surveillance are described. Seminoma (SGCT) was present in 394 patients and nonseminoma (NSGCT) in 301 patients. Relapses were detected in 155 patients (22%), in 69 patients with SGCT (17%) and 86 with NSGCT (29...

  19. Surveillance for Stage I Nonseminoma Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Gundgaard, Maria Gry; Mortensen, Mette Saksø

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe treatment results in a large cohort with stage I nonseminoma germ cell cancer (NSGCC) treated in a surveillance program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2007, 1,226 patients with stage I NSGCC, including high-risk patients with vascular invasion....... Relapses after 5 years were seen in 0.5% of the whole cohort or in 1.6% of relapsing patients. The majority of relapses (94.4%) belonged to the good prognostic group according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group classification. The disease-specific survival at 15 years was 99...

  20. A comparison of tumor motion characteristics between early stage and locally advanced stage lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z. Henry; Lin, Steven H.; Balter, Peter; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of conformal radiation therapy methods for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is necessary to accurately determine respiratory-induced tumor motion. The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the motion characteristics of early and locally advanced stage NSCLC tumors in a large population and correlate tumor motion with position, volume, and diaphragm motion. Methods and materials: A total of 191 (94 early stage, 97 locally advanced) non-small cell lung tumors were analyzed for this study. Each patient received a four-dimensional CT scan prior to receiving radiation treatment. A soft-tissue-based rigid registration algorithm was used to track the tumor motion. Tumor volumes were determined based on the gross tumor volume delineated by physicians in the end of expiration phase. Tumor motion characteristics were correlated with their standardized tumor locations, lobe location, and clinical staging. Diaphragm motion was calculated by subtracting the diaphragm location between the expiration and the inspiration phases. Results: Median, max, and 95th percentile of tumor motion for early stage tumors were 5.9 mm, 31.0 mm, and 20.0 mm, which were 1.2 mm, 12 mm, and 7 mm more than those in locally advanced NSCLC, respectively. The range of motion at 95th percentile is more than 50% larger in early stage lung cancer group than in the locally advanced lung cancer group. Early stage tumors in the lower lobe showed the largest motion with a median motion of 9.2 mm, while upper/mid-lobe tumors exhibited a median motion of 3.3 mm. Tumor volumes were not correlated with motion. Conclusion: The range of tumor motion differs depending on tumor location and staging of NSCLC. Early stage tumors are more mobile than locally advanced stage NSCLC. These factors should be considered for general motion management strategies when 4D simulation is not performed on individual basis.

  1. High copy number of mitochondrial DNA predicts poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; He, Shuixiang; Zhu, Xingmei; Qiao, Wei; Zhang, Juan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in colon cancer were associated with clinicopathological parameters and postsurgical outcome. By quantitative real-time PCR assay, the mtDNA copy number was detected in a cohort of colon cancer and matched adjacent colon tissues (n = 162). The majority of patients had higher mtDNA content in colon cancer tissues than matched adjacent colon tissues. Moreover, high mtDNA content in tumor tissues was associated with larger tumor size, higher serum CEA level, advanced TNM stage, vascular emboli, and liver metastases. Further survival curve analysis showed that high mtDNA content was related to the worst survival in patients with colon cancer at advanced TNM stage. High mtDNA content is a potential effective factor of poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

  2. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-03-01

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

  3. Prognostic factors in stage IB gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Toru; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Fujikawa, Hirohito; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Yamada, Takanobu; Hasegawa, Shinichi; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Yukawa, Norio; Oshima, Takashi; Oba, Mari S; Morita, Satoshi; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2014-06-07

    To identify the subset of patients with stage IB gastric cancer with an unfavorable prognosis. Overall survival (OS) rates were examined in 103 patients with stage IB (T1N1M0 and T2N0M0) gastric cancer between January 2000 and December 2011. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors using a Cox proportional hazards model. The OS rates of patients with T1N1 and T2N0 cancer were 89.2% and 94.1% at 5-years, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that tumor location was the only significant prognostic factor. The OS rate was 81.8% at 5-years when the tumor was located in the upper third of the stomach and was 95.5% at 5-years when the tumor was located in the middle or lower third of the stomach (P = 0.0093). These data may suggest that tumor location is associated with survival in patients with stage IB gastric cancer.

  4. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Nanoparticles target early-stage breast cancer metastasis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evgeniya; Zinger, Assaf; da Silva, Dana; Yaari, Zvi; Kajal, Ashima; Vardi-Oknin, Dikla; Goldfeder, Mor; Schroeder, Josh E.; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Hershkovitz, Dov; Schroeder, Avi

    2017-10-01

    Despite advances in cancer therapy, treating cancer after it has metastasized remains an unmet clinical challenge. In this study we demonstrate that 100 nm liposomes target triple-negative murine breast-cancer metastases post intravenous administration. Metastatic breast cancer was induced in BALB/c mice either experimentally, by a tail vein injection of 4T1 cells, or spontaneously, after implanting a primary tumor xenograft. To track their biodistribution in vivo the liposomes were labeled with multi-modal diagnostic agents, including indocyanine green and rhodamine for whole-animal fluorescent imaging, gadolinium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and europium for a quantitative biodistribution analysis. The accumulation of liposomes in the metastases peaked at 24 h post the intravenous administration, similar to the time they peaked in the primary tumor. The efficiency of liposomal targeting to the metastatic tissue exceeded that of a non-liposomal agent by 4.5-fold. Liposomes were detected at very early stages in the metastatic progression, including metastatic lesions smaller than 2 mm in diameter. Surprisingly, while nanoparticles target breast cancer metastasis, they may also be found in elevated levels in the pre-metastatic niche, several days before metastases are visualized by MRI or histologically in the tissue. This study highlights the promise of diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for treating metastatic cancer, possibly even for preventing the onset of the metastatic dissemination by targeting the pre-metastatic niche.

  7. Radiotherapy for stage IV oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kaori; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Motegi, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with stage IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy in our facility from January 1993 to August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. The age of the patients was 34-84 (median 62) years old. Thirty-four were male and 14 were female. Subsite of the tumor was anterior: 16, lateral: 39, posterior: 1, and superior: 1. Forty-nine patients were treated with chemotherapy. Induction chemotherapy (ICT) was done in 25 patients, ICT+concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in 15 patients, and CCRT in 9 patients. A dose of 60-82 Gy (median 72 Gy) by hyperfractionated radiotherapy, at 1.2 Gy/fraction twice a day, was delivered in 37 patients, and 60-72 Gy (median 66 Gy) with a conventional daily fractionation in 20 patients. Salvage surgery was performed in 5 patients as a part of primary treatment after radiotherapy. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 52.9% and 51.4%, respectively. By univariate analysis, the impact of age, sex, T-stage, N-stage, histological differentiation, chemotherapy and fractionation of radiation therapy on survivals were evaluated. T-stage, N-stage and histological differentiation were significantly covariate correlated with survival. The treatment results were not satisfactory. Further investigation of the treatment strategy to improve the treatment outcome of advanced oropharyngeal cancer is desired. (author)

  8. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  9. Indications for staging laparoscopy in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Antonella; Cameron, Iain C.; Gomez, Dhanwant

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify indications for staging laparoscopy (SL) in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, and suggest a pre-operative algorithm for staging these patients. Methods Relevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords ‘pancreatic cancer’, ‘resectability’, ‘staging’, ‘laparoscopy’, and ‘Whipple's procedure’. Results Twenty four studies were identified which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the published data, the most reliable surrogate markers for selecting patients for SL to predict unresectability in patients with CT defined resectable pancreatic cancer were CA 19.9 and tumour size. Although there are studies suggesting a role for tumour location, CEA levels, and clinical findings such as weight loss and jaundice, there is currently not enough evidence for these variables to predict resectability. Based on the current data, patients with a CT suggestive of resectable disease and (1) CA 19.9 ≥150 U/mL; or (2) tumour size >3 cm should be considered for SL. Conclusion The role of laparoscopy in the staging of pancreatic cancer patients remains controversial. Potential predictors of unresectability to select patients for SL include CA 19.9 levels and tumour size. PMID:26776846

  10. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Survival Advantage Associated with Decrease in Stage at Detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefringhouse, Jason; Pavlik, Edward; Miller, Rachel; DeSimone, Christopher; Ueland, Frederick; Kryscio, Richard; van Nagell, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to document the survival advantage of lowering stage at detection from Stage IIIC to Stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Treatment outcomes and survival were evaluated in patients with Stage IIIA and Stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer treated from 2000 to 2009 at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center (UKMCC) and SEER institutions. Results. Cytoreduction to no visible disease (P < 0.0001) and complete response to platinum-based chemotherapy (P < 0.025) occurred more frequently in Stage IIIA than in Stage IIIC cases. Time to progression was shorter in patients with Stage IIIC ovarian cancer (17 ± 1 months) than in those with Stage II1A disease (36 ± 8 months). Five-year overall survival (OS) improved from 41% in Stage IIIC patients to 60% in Stage IIIA patients treated at UKMCC and from 37% to 56% in patients treated at SEER institutions for a survival advantage of 19% in both data sets. 53% of Stage IIIA and 14% of Stage IIIC patients had NED at last followup. Conclusions. Decreasing stage at detection from Stage IIIC to stage IIIA epithelial ovarian cancer is associated with a 5-year survival advantage of nearly 20% in patients treated by surgical tumor cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:25254047

  14. Staging Lung Cancer: Current Controversies and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyad Karmy-Jones

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A consistent approach to staging is required for the rational management of lung cancer. This paper was prepared at the request of the Standards Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and reviews and discusses the relative merits of the available methods of staging. Whichever methods are chosen by a particular institution, the following points must be stressed. No patient can be considered automatically "unresectable" when chest radiography and/ or computed tomography demonstrate adenopathy or only suggest local invasion. Clinical and/or radiographical evidence suggesting extensive local or metastatic disease should be evaluated as completely as possible before subjecting the patient to a possible "nontherapeutic" thoracotomy. Finally, in some cases thoracotomy is required to decide whether the lesion is "completely" resectable.

  15. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Braojos, Ines; Diaz Gestoso, Yadira; Franco Odio, Sonia; Samuel Gonzalez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  16. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  17. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  18. Stage-associated overexpression of the ubiquitin-like protein, ISG15, in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JB; Jensen, Mads Aaboe; Borden, EC

    2006-01-01

    Bladder cancer is among the most prevalent malignancies, and is characterised by frequent tumour recurrences and localised inflammation, which may promote tissue invasion and metastasis. Microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression in normal bladder urothelium with that in tumours...... at different stages of progression. The innate immune response gene, interferon-stimulated gene 15 kDa (ISG15, GIP2), was highly expressed at all stages of bladder cancer as compared to normal urothelium. Western blotting revealed a tumour-associated expression of ISG15 protein. ISG15 exhibited a stage...... component of bladder cancer-associated gene expression....

  19. Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Sarcoma

  20. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  1. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Early-Stage Lung Cancer: From Innovation to Standard of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Abby; Swanson, Scott J

    2016-11-15

    The era of minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer follows decades of research; the collection and interpretation of countless qualitative and quantitative data points; and tireless efforts by a few pioneering thoracic surgeons who believed they could deliver a safe and oncologically sound operation with less tissue trauma, an improved physiologic profile, and fewer complications than traditional open surgery. This review highlights those efforts and the role of minimally invasive surgery for early-stage lung cancer in light of evolving technology, the emerging understanding of the biology of early-stage lung cancer, and lung cancer screening.

  2. Stages of Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ovaries, through the fallopian tubes, to the uterus. Cancer sometimes begins at the end of the fallopian ... into stage IIA and stage IIB. Stage IIA : Cancer has spread from where it first formed to the uterus and/or the fallopian tubes and/or the ...

  3. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  4. Uterine cervical cancer. Preoperative staging with magnetic resonance imaging; Zervixkarzinom. Praeoperatives Staging mittels Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, F.; Hamm, B. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma is largely dependent on the tumor stage. Despite significant inaccuracies in the clinical examination, uterine cervical cancer remains the only gynecological form of cancer still largely staged according to clinical findings. Although imaging is still not included in the staging the recently published revised FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) system encourages the use of modern cross-sectional imaging (magnetic resonance imaging MRI and computed tomography CT). Due to its high soft tissue contrast MRI allows excellent non-invasive assessment of the cervix with direct tumor delineation as well as assessment of the prognosis based on morphological factors. Studies in the literature report an accuracy of 93% for MRI in the preoperative assessment of tumor size and in the differentiation of operable from advanced cervical cancer. Therefore MRI is considered to be the optimal modality for diagnostic evaluation starting from FIGO stage IB1, for radiation therapy planning, and for exclusion of recurrence in follow-up. In this paper we give an overview of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in preoperative staging of uterine cervical cancer. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieplanung beim Zervixkarzinom ist weitgehend von der Stadieneinteilung nach FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) abhaengig, die trotz erheblicher Ungenauigkeiten bei der klinischen Stadieneinteilung weiterhin aufgrund klinischer Untersuchungsbefunde erfolgt. Obwohl bildgebende Verfahren nach wie vor fuer die Stadieneinteilung nicht vorgesehen sind, wird im kuerzlich erschienen revidierten Stagingsystem der FIGO zum ersten Mal die Verwendung moderner Schnittbilddiagnostik (MRT und CT) befuerwortet. Die MRT ermoeglicht dank ihres hohen Weichteilkontrasts ein ausgezeichnetes nichtinvasives Staging des Zervixkarzinoms mit direkter Tumordarstellung sowie einer Prognoseabschaetzung anhand

  5. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  7. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ...

  8. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. Classifications of Multispectral Colorectal Cancer Tissues Using Convolution Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hassan, Hawraa; Chaddad, Ahmad; Harkouss, Youssef; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew; Tanougast, Camel

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer among men and women. Its diagnosis in early stages, typically done through the analysis of colon biopsy images, can greatly improve the chances of a successful treatment. This paper proposes to use convolution neural networks (CNNs) to predict three tissue types related to the progression of CRC: benign hyperplasia (BH), intraepithelial neoplasia (IN), and carcinoma (Ca). Multispectral biopsy images of thirty CRC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Images of tissue samples were divided into three groups, based on their type (10 BH, 10 IN, and 10 Ca). An active contour model was used to segment image regions containing pathological tissues. Tissue samples were classified using a CNN containing convolution, max-pooling, and fully-connected layers. Available tissue samples were split into a training set, for learning the CNN parameters, and test set, for evaluating its performance. An accuracy of 99.17% was obtained from segmented image regions, outperforming existing approaches based on traditional feature extraction, and classification techniques. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CNN for the classification of CRC tissue types, in particular when using presegmented regions of interest.

  10. Classifications of multispectral colorectal cancer tissues using convolution neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawraa Haj-Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer among men and women. Its diagnosis in early stages, typically done through the analysis of colon biopsy images, can greatly improve the chances of a successful treatment. This paper proposes to use convolution neural networks (CNNs to predict three tissue types related to the progression of CRC: benign hyperplasia (BH, intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, and carcinoma (Ca. Methods: Multispectral biopsy images of thirty CRC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Images of tissue samples were divided into three groups, based on their type (10 BH, 10 IN, and 10 Ca. An active contour model was used to segment image regions containing pathological tissues. Tissue samples were classified using a CNN containing convolution, max-pooling, and fully-connected layers. Available tissue samples were split into a training set, for learning the CNN parameters, and test set, for evaluating its performance. Results: An accuracy of 99.17% was obtained from segmented image regions, outperforming existing approaches based on traditional feature extraction, and classification techniques. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CNN for the classification of CRC tissue types, in particular when using presegmented regions of interest.

  11. Staging colorectal cancer with the TNM 7(th)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puppa, Giacomo; Poston, Graeme; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    lesions encountered, in particular, during radiological staging of patients with colorectal cancer. In this article the diagnosis of these lesions with multiple imaging modalities, their frequency, significance and relevance to staging and disease management are described in a multidisciplinary way...

  12. Molecular staging of gynaecological cancer – what is the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Pratibha S; Prat, Jaime; Mutch, David G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of cancer staging is to classify cancers into prognostic groups and to allow for comparison of treatment results and survival between patients and institutions. Staging for gynecologic cancers is based on extent of disease and metastasis, which was historically determined by physical examination and is now based on surgical and histologic examination of tumor specimens. While extent of disease is currently considered the most important predictor of recurrence and survival, current staging does not include molecular features that are associated with tumor aggressiveness, response to therapy, and prognosis. This review focuses on genomic and proteomic features of gynecologic cancers and the future of biomarkers in staging classification. PMID:25934522

  13. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Wielenga, V T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  14. Limited prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of cyclin E in Danish ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression of cyclin E in tumour tissues from 661 patients with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate whether cyclin E tissue expression levels correlate with clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis of the disease. Using...... tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the cyclin E expression levels in tissues from 168 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (147 stage I, 4 stage II, 17 stage III) and 493 Ovarian cancer (OC) patients (127 stage I, 45 stage II, 276 stage III, 45 stage IV). Using a 10% cut-off level for cyclin E...... overexpression, 20% of the BOTs were positive with a higher proportion of serous than mucinous tumours. Sixty-two per cent of the OCs were positive for cyclin E expression with the highest percentage found in clear cell carcinomas. Results based on univariate and multivariate survival analyses with a 10% cut...

  15. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC.......The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...

  16. Two-Stage Tissue-Expander Breast Reconstruction: A Focus on the Surgical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Breast cancer, the most common malignancy in women, comprises 18% of all female cancers. Mastectomy is an essential intervention to save lives, but it can destroy one’s body image, causing both physical and psychological trauma. Reconstruction is an important step in restoring patient quality of life after the mutilating treatment. Material and Methods. Tissue expanders and implants are now commonly used in breast reconstruction. Autologous reconstruction allows a better aesthetic result; however, many patients prefer implant reconstruction due to the shorter operation time and lack of donor site morbidity. Moreover, this reconstruction strategy is safe and can be performed in patients with multiple health problems. Tissue-expander reconstruction is conventionally performed as a two-stage procedure starting immediately after mammary gland removal. Results. Mastectomy is a destructive but essential intervention for women with breast cancer. Tissue expansion breast reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and efficacious procedure with considerable psychological benefits since it provides a healthy body image. Conclusion. This article focuses on this surgical technique and how to achieve the best reconstruction possible.

  17. Stage-adjusted chemoradiation in cervical cancer after transperitoneal laparoscopic staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, S.; Bischoff, A.; Budach, V. [Charite Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Koehler, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, A. [Charite Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology; Fueller, J.; Wendt, T. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of transperitoneal laparoscopic staging on choice of subsequent therapy including oncologic outcome and toxicity of chemoradiation after surgical staging. Patients and Methods: 101 patients with cervical cancer FIGO IB1-IVB underwent chemoradiation after transperitoneal laparoscopic staging. Results: 101 women (FIGO IB1-IVB) were laparoscopically staged. In 68/101 patients, pelvic and/or paraaortic lymph node metastases were confirmed histologically. Only 17/101 patients (17%) retained their original FIGO stage after laparoscopy. Laparoscopic staging and chemoradiation were well tolerated. Laparoscopic debulking of tumor-involved lymph nodes resulted in significantly improved overall survival. Conclusion: In patients with cervical cancer, laparoscopic staging led to an upstaging of 83% of cases with significant impact on therapeutic strategies. Nodal debulking prior to chemoradiation improves the prognosis of node positive women. Pretherapeutic laparoscopic staging should be the basis of the primary chemoradiation in patients with cervical cancer. (orig.)

  18. Loss of KCNQ1 expression in stage II and stage III colon cancer is a strong prognostic factor for disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Uil, Sjoerd H; Coupé, Veerle M H; Linnekamp, Janneke F; van den Broek, Evert; Goos, Jeroen A C M; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M; Belt, Eric J Th; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Scott, Patricia M; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Cormier, Robert T; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A

    2016-12-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurately identifying stage II CRC patients at risk for recurrence is an unmet clinical need. KCNQ1 was previously identified as a tumour suppressor gene and loss of expression was associated with poor survival in patients with CRC liver metastases. In this study the prognostic value of KCNQ1 in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients was examined. KCNQ1 mRNA expression was assessed in 90 stage II colon cancer patients (AMC-AJCCII-90) using microarray gene expression data. Subsequently, KCNQ1 protein expression was evaluated in an independent cohort of 386 stage II and stage III colon cancer patients by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. Low KCNQ1 mRNA expression in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancers was associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.025). Loss of KCNQ1 protein expression from epithelial cells was strongly associated with poor DFS in stage II MSS (PKCNQ1 seemed an independent prognostic value in addition to other high-risk parameters like angio-invasion, nodal stage and microsatellite instability-status. We conclude that KCNQ1 is a promising biomarker for prediction of disease recurrence and may aid stratification of patients with stage II MSS colon cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  19. Stage and tissue-specific prognostic impact of miR-182 in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvold, Helge; Donnem, Tom; Andersen, Sigve; Al-Saad, Samer; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-182 is frequently upregulated in cancers, has generally been viewed as an oncogene and is possibly connected to angiogenesis. We aimed to explore what impact miR-182 has in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and more explicitly its correlation with angiogenic markers. From 335 unselected stage I to IIIA NSCLC carcinomas, duplicate tumor and tumor-associated stromal cores were collected in tissue microarray blocks (TMAs). In situ hybridization (ISH) was used to detect the expression of miR-182 in tumor cells, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect the expression of angiogenesis related protein markers. In univariate analyses, high tumor cell expression of miR-182 was a positive prognostic factor for patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, P = 0.042) and stage II patients (P = 0.003). Also in the multivariate analysis, high tumor cell miR-182 expression was associated with a good prognosis in the same groups (SCC: HR 0.57, CI 95% 0.33-0.99, P = 0.048; stage II: HR 0.50, CI 95% 0.28-0.90, P = 0.020). We found significant correlations between miR-182 and the angiogenesis related markers FGF2, HIF2α and MMP-7. In patients with SCC and in stage II patients, high tumor cell miR-182 expression is an independent positive prognostic factor

  20. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhao Niu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6 in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC. NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage (p = 0.006, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006, vital status (p < 0.001, tumor recurrence (p = 0.001, chemotherapy (p = 0.039, and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001. Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer.

  1. CIP2A protein expression in high-grade, high-stage bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Lisa P; Savoly, Diana; Sidi, Abraham A; Adelson, Martin E; Mordechai, Eli; Trama, Jason P

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States. Numerous markers have been evaluated for suitability of bladder cancer detection and surveillance. However, few of them are acceptable as a routine tool. Therefore, there exists a continuing need for an assay that detects the presence of bladder cancer in humans. It would be advantageous to develop an assay with a protein that is associated with the development of bladder cancer. We have identified the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A) protein as a novel bladder cancer biomarker. In this study, Western blot analysis was used to assess the expression level of CIP2A protein in bladder cancer cell lines and bladder cancer patient tissues (n = 43). Our studies indicated CIP2A protein was abundantly expressed in bladder cancer cell lines but not in nontumor epithelial cell lines. Furthermore, CIP2A was specifically expressed in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder tumor tissues but not in adjacent nontumor bladder tissue. Our data showed that CIP2A protein detection in high-grade TCC tissues had a sensitivity of 65%, which is 3.4-fold higher than that seen in low-grade TCC tissues (19%). The level of CIP2A protein expression increased with the stage of disease (12%, 27%, 67%, and 100% for pTa, pT1, pT2, and pT3 tumor, respectively). In conclusion, our studies suggest that CIP2A protein is specifically expressed in human bladder tumors. CIP2A is preferentially expressed in high-grade and high-stage TCC tumors, which are high-risk and invasive tumors. Our studies reported here support the role of CIP2A in bladder cancer progression and its usefulness for the surveillance of recurrence or progression of human bladder cancer

  2. Stage-specific predictive models for breast cancer survivability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Rohit J; Nadig, Ramya

    2017-01-01

    Survivability rates vary widely among various stages of breast cancer. Although machine learning models built in past to predict breast cancer survivability were given stage as one of the features, they were not trained or evaluated separately for each stage. To investigate whether there are differences in performance of machine learning models trained and evaluated across different stages for predicting breast cancer survivability. Using three different machine learning methods we built models to predict breast cancer survivability separately for each stage and compared them with the traditional joint models built for all the stages. We also evaluated the models separately for each stage and together for all the stages. Our results show that the most suitable model to predict survivability for a specific stage is the model trained for that particular stage. In our experiments, using additional examples of other stages during training did not help, in fact, it made it worse in some cases. The most important features for predicting survivability were also found to be different for different stages. By evaluating the models separately on different stages we found that the performance widely varied across them. We also demonstrate that evaluating predictive models for survivability on all the stages together, as was done in the past, is misleading because it overestimates performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral cancer staging established by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Ribeiro de Paiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare clinical staging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI staging for oral cancer, and to assess inter-observer agreement between oral and medical radiologists. A total of 10 patients diagnosed with oral cancer were assessed before treatment. A head and neck surgeon performed clinical TNM staging. Two medical radiologists and two oral radiologists performed a new staging assessment by interpreting MRI scans, without prior knowledge of the clinical staging. They evaluated the extent of the primary tumor (T, metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N and grouping by stages. The data were analyzed using the Kappa Index. There was significant agreement (p < 0.05 between the clinical and MRI staging assessments made by one oral radiologist for N stage, and between those made by one medical radiologist for the T and N stages and for the grouping by stages. In the MRI assessment, there was significant agreement among all four observers for both T stage and grouping by stages. For the N stage, there was no significant agreement between one oral radiologist and one medical radiologist or between both medical radiologists. There was significant agreement among the remaining radiologists. There was no agreement between the clinical and MRI staging. These results indicate the importance of using MRI for the diagnosis of oral cancer. Training initiatives and calibration of medical and oral radiologists should be promoted to provide an improved multidisciplinary approach to oral cancer.

  4. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  5. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Clinical and endorectal ultrasound staging of circumferential rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Farmer, K.C.; Chapple, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Circumferential rectal cancers present at a more advanced stage than those located in a single quadrant. Although accurate staging is an important aspect of the preoperative management of the patient with a rectal cancer, the clinical and radiological staging of this subgroup of rectal cancer patients has been poorly studied. All patients with a rectal cancer were assessed clinically (by digital rectal examination and rigid sigmoidoscopy) before the radiological assessment by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS). Data collected included tumour height (distance from anal verge in centimetre) and tumour type (circumferential or non-circumferential). Radiological tumour staging was with the TNM system. Fifty-nine subjects (33 men, 26 women; median age 65 years (range 38-86 years)) were identified with a circumferential rectal cancer. Mean height of the cancer was 8 - 0.4 cm (standard error of the mean; range 2-13 cm). Forty-two cancers were palpable, and 17 cancers were impalpable. All cancers assessed clinically as circumferential were confirmed as circumferential on ERUS scanning. Tumour stage as assessed by ERUS was either T3 (n = 57) or T4 (n = 2). Nodal status was NO (n = 29) and N1 (n = 30). All rectal cancers assessed as circumferential on clinical examination have an ERUS stage of T3 or greater.

  7. Clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Hui, Yuzuo; Lin, Li; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Peishu

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues. One hundred and eight tissue samples from the patients with endometrial cancer enrolled in our hospital from August 2011 to July 2014 were selected, including 60 normal tissue samples (normal group), 60 neoplastic tissue samples (neoplastic group) and 60 cancer tissue samples (cancer group). All the samples were subjected to immunohistochemical assay to detect the expressions of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF. The clinical data were also investigated for correlation analysis. The positive rates of COX-2 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 21.7% and 55.0% respectively. The positive rates of GLUT-1 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 25.0% and 70.0% respectively. The positive rates of VEGF in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 1.7%, 23.3% and 63.3% respectively. With increasing stage of such cancer, decreasing degree of differentiation and lymphatic metastasis, the positive expression rates of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF proteins were raised significantly (PGLUT-1 (r=0.207, PGLUT-1 and VEGF (r=0.758, PGLUT-1 and VEGF were highly prominent in endometrial cancer, especially in the patients with low degree of differentiation, late stage and metastasis. They functioned synergistically in the onset and progression of this cancer.

  8. Mechanisms of glucose uptake in cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    1999-01-01

    Cancer cells are known to show increased rates of glycolysis metabolism. Based on this, PET studies using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose have been used for the detection of primary and metastatic tumors. To account for this increased glucose uptake, a variety of mechanisms has been proposed. Glucose influx across the cell membrane is mediated by a family of structurally related proteins known as glucose transporters (Gluts). Among 6 isoforms of Gluts, Glut-1 and/or Glut-3 have been reported to show increased expression in various tumors. Increased level of Glut mRNA transcription is supposed to be the basic mechanism of Glut overexpression at the protein level. Some oncogens such as src or ras intensely stimulate Glut-1 by means of increased Glut-1 mRNA levels. Hexokinase activity is another important factor in glucose uptake in cancer cells. Especially hexokinase type II is considered to be involved in glycolysis of cancer cells. Much of the hexokinase of tumor cells is bound to outer membrane of mitochondria by the porin, a hexokinase receptor. Through this interaction, hexokinase may gain preferred access to ATP synthesized via oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondria compartment. Other biologic factors such as tumor blood flow, blood volume, hypoxia, and infiltrating cells in tumor tissue are involved. Relative hypoxia may activate the anaerobic glycolytic pathway. Surrounding macrophages and newly formed granulation tissue in tumor showed greater glucose uptake than did viable cancer cells. To expand the application on FDG PET in oncology, it is important for nuclear medicine physicians to understand the related mechanisms of glucose uptake in cancer tissue

  9. Tissue factor in cancer progression and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Wolfram; Yokota, Naho; Schaffner, Florence

    2010-04-01

    Constitutive expression of tissue factor (TF) by cancer cells triggers local and systemic activation of the coagulation cascade and is a major cause of cancer-associated thrombosis. Primary breast cancer biopsies show a marked upregulation of TF and protease activated receptor (PAR) 2, as well as increased TF cytoplasmic domain phosphorylation that is correlated with cancer relapse. TF signaling involving PAR2 and integrins has multiple effects on angiogenesis and tumor progression. The non-coagulant, alternatively spliced form of TF retains an integrin-binding site and, upon deposition into the tumor stroma, stimulates angiogenesis by ligating endothelial integrins alpha(v)beta(3) and alpha(6)beta(1). On tumor cells, full-length TF is constitutively associated with laminin-binding beta(1) integrins that support TF-VIIa-PAR2 signaling leading to upregulation of pro-angiogenic and immune modulatory cytokines and growth factors. Deficiency of PAR2, but not of the thrombin receptor PAR1, delays spontaneous breast cancer development and the angiogenic switch in mice. In addition, human xenograft breast cancer growth and angiogenesis is suppressed by selective antibody inhibition of TF-VIIa-PAR2 signaling, but not by blocking TF initiated coagulation. Thus, interruption of TF signaling represents a potential anti-angiogenic strategy that does not carry an increased risk of bleeding associated with prolonged inhibition of the TF coagulation pathway.

  10. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    OpenAIRE

    Nilendu C Purandare; Venkatesh Rangarajan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  11. Trace elements determinations in cancerous and non-cancerous human tissues using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Insup.

    1989-01-01

    Recent improvements in analyzing techniques when coupled to the growing knowledge of trace element biochemistry provide a powerful tool to investigate the relationship between trace elements and cancer. It is hoped that selective delivery or restriction of specific minerals may aid in cancer prevention or treatment. Tissues were collected at the time of surgery of various cancer patients including colon cancer and breast cancer. Three kinds of tissues were taken from a patient; cancerous, noncancerous, and transitional tissue obtained from a region located between the cancer and healthy tissues. A total of 57 tissues were obtained from 19 cancer patients. Seven of them were colon cancer patients, and 5 of them were breast cancer patients. Nine elements were determined using instrumental activation analysis. Cancerous colon tissue had significantly higher concentrations of selenium and iron than healthy tissues. Cancerous breast tissue had significantly higher concentrations of selenium, iron, manganese, and rubidium than healthy tissues. Iron can be enriched in cancer tissue because cancer tissue retains more blood vessels. Selenium is enriched in cancer tissue, possibly in an effort of the body to inhibit the growth of tumors. The manganese enrichment can be explained in the same manner as selenium considering its suspected anticarcinogenicity. It is not certain why rubidium was enriched in cancer tissue. It could be that this is the result of alteration of cell membrane permeability, change in extracellular matrix, or increased metabolism in cancer tissue

  12. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  13. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cancer. Tracheostomy : Surgery to create an opening ( stoma ) into the windpipe to help you breathe. The ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  15. Leiomyosarcoma: A rare soft tissue cancer arising from multiple organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorawar Singh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcoma (LMS, a smooth muscle connective tissue tumor, is a rare form of cancer which accounts for 5–10% of soft tissue sarcomas. This type of cancer is highly unpredictable. LMS is a resistant type of cancer and can remain in the dormant state for long time. It can recur in the later stages of life. LMS has been reported in different animals including humans. A wide literature search was done. The PubMed database was used to search for journal articles on the occurrence of LMS in different organs from 1950 to 2016. LMS has been reported to be associated with different organs, including esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus and uterus. In this article, an attempt has been made to review the studies based on occurrence of LMS with respect to the organs affected and frequency of publications. Finding the organ-associated occurrence of LMS may be useful in assessing the overall risk and formulating future cancer preventive strategies.

  16. Establishment of the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort colorectal tissue repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter T; Deka, Anusila; Briggs, Peter; Cicek, Mine; Farris, Alton B; Gaudet, Mia M; Jacobs, Eric J; Newton, Christina C; Patel, Alpa V; Teras, Lauren R; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Tillmans, Lori; Gapstur, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    To better understand colorectal cancer etiology and prognosis, archived surgical tissues were collected from Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort participants who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Herein, the methodology for this collection is described to help inform other efforts to collect tissues. The main components to accruing tissue were: (i) obtaining consent from participants or next-of-kin; (ii) contacting hospitals to request materials; and (iii) pathology review and laboratory processing. In CPS-II, we identified 3,643 participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer between 1992/1993 and 2009. Of these, tissue could not be sought from cases verified through state cancer registry linkage (N = 1,622), because of insufficient information on tissue location. We sought tissue from the 2,021 cases verified using medical records, and received tissue from 882. When hospitals were contacted within 10 years of diagnosis, we received 87% of tissue materials; beyond that 10-year mark, we received 32%. Compared with the 2,761 colorectal cancer cases without tissue, the 882 cases with tissue were more likely to be alive, diagnosed more recently during follow-up, and had less-advanced staged disease. Cases with and without tissues were similar with respect to age at diagnosis, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and other epidemiologic factors. Some of the most important elements in forming a tissue repository included having the cases' hospital contact and surgical accession information as well as contacting patients/next-of-kin and hospitals within 10 years of surgery. This tissue repository will serve as an important resource for colorectal cancer studies. See all the articles in this CEBP Focus section, "Biomarkers, Biospecimens, and New Technologies in Molecular Epidemiology." Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(12); 2694-702. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  18. Quantitatively characterizing the microstructural features of breast ductal carcinoma tissues in different progression stages by Mueller matrix microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; Qi, Ji; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Liu, Shaoxiong; Wu, Jian; Elson, Daniel S; Ma, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Polarization imaging has been recognized as a potentially powerful technique for probing the microstructural information and optical properties of complex biological specimens. Recently, we have reported a Mueller matrix microscope by adding the polarization state generator and analyzer (PSG and PSA) to a commercial transmission-light microscope, and applied it to differentiate human liver and cervical cancerous tissues with fibrosis. In this paper, we apply the Mueller matrix microscope for quantitative detection of human breast ductal carcinoma samples at different stages. The Mueller matrix polar decomposition and transformation parameters of the breast ductal tissues in different regions and at different stages are calculated and analyzed. For more quantitative comparisons, several widely-used image texture feature parameters are also calculated to characterize the difference in the polarimetric images. The experimental results indicate that the Mueller matrix microscope and the polarization parameters can facilitate the quantitative detection of breast ductal carcinoma tissues at different stages.

  19. Different effects of ERβ and TROP2 expression in Chinese patients with early-stage colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ji-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ou, Qing-Jian; Zhang, Mei-Fang; Jiang, Wu; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and TROP2 expressed in colon carcinoma and might play an important role there. We explored the relationship of ERβ and TROP2 expression with the prognosis of early-stage colon cancer. ERβ and TROP2 levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa and tumoral tissues from 220 Chinese patients with T(3)N(0)M(0) (stage IIa) and T(4)N(0)M(0) (stage IIb) colon cancer in the Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, who underwent curative surgical resection between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to analyze the overall survival (OS) data, and the ROC curve, Kaplan-Meier estimate, log rank test, and Jackknife method were used to show the effect of ERβ and TROP2 expression at different stages of cancer. The 5-year survival rates were not significantly different between the patients with stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer (83 vs. 80 %, respectively). The high expression of ERβ was related to decreasing OS in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, while the high expression of TROP2 was related to decreasing OS in stage IIb colon cancer. The expression of ERβ and TROP2 has tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effect in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, respectively.

  20. Updated guidelines on the preoperative staging of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Recent studies have provided prognostic information and recommendations for staging thyroid cancers that have changed the staging and management guidelines for the disease. Consequently, minimal extrathyroidal extension (ETE) was removed from the T3 stage classification in the eighth edition of the TNM staging system by the American Joint Committee on Cancer. New T categories have been subsequently added, including T3a, defined as a tumor >4 cm in its greatest dimension, limited to the thyroid gland, and T3b, defined as a tumor of any size with gross ETE invading only the strap muscles. In this article, the author reviews the changes in the TNM staging system for thyroid cancer, with an emphasis on ultrasonography in preoperative staging.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have...... a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...

  2. Tissue metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer assessed by 1H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Hailong; Deng, Pengchi; Liu, Chunqi; Li, Dandan; Jie, Hui; Zhang, Hu; Zhou, Zongguang; Zhao, Ying-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second most deadly cancer worldwide. Study on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis will play a significant role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer. In this study, we reported the metabolic profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human gastric cancer subjects (n = 125) and normal controls (n = 54) based on 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) together with multivariate statistical analyses (PCA, PLS-DA, OPLS-DA and ROC curve). The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer tissues and normal controls, and meanwhile, the model excellently discriminated the stage-related of tissue samples (stage I, 30; stage II, 46; stage III, 37; stage IV, 12) and normal controls. A total of 48 endogenous distinguishing metabolites (VIP > 1 and p < 0.05) were identified, 13 of which were changed with the progression of gastric cancer. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA, amino acids and choline metabolism, which were correlated with the occurrence and development of human gastric cancer. The receiver operating characteristic diagnostic AUC of OPLS-DA model between cancer tissues and normal controls was 0.945. And the ROC curves among different stages cancer subjects and normal controls were gradually improved, the corresponding AUC values were 0.952, 0.994, 0.998 and 0.999, demonstrating the robust diagnostic power of this metabolic profiling approach. As far as we know, the present study firstly identified the differential metabolites in various stages of gastric cancer tissues. And the AUC values were relatively high. So these results suggest that the metabolic profiling of gastric cancer tissues has great potential in detecting this disease and helping

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterus. See the PDQ summary on Uterine Sarcoma Treatment for more information about uterine sarcoma . Obesity and having metabolic syndrome may increase the risk of endometrial cancer. Anything ...

  4. Improved clinical staging of esophageal cancer with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Yong Soo; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Han; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Byung Tae

    2004-01-01

    Since preoperative staging in esophageal cancer is important in both therapy and prognosis, there had been many efforts to improve its accuracy. Recent studies indicate that whole body FDG-PET has high sensitivity in detection of metastasis in esophageal cancer. Therefore, we added FDG-PET to other conventional methods in staging esophageal cancer to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Subjects were 142 esophageal cancer patients (average 62.3±8.3 yrs) who received CT and PET just before operation. First, we compared N stage and M stage of the CT or PET with those of the post-operative results. Then we compared the stage according to the EUS (T stage) and CT (N and M stage) or EUS (T stage) and CT and PET (N and M stage) to that according to the post-operative results. Among 142 patients, surgical staging of 69 were N0 and 73 were N1. In M staging, 128 were M0 and 14 were M1. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of N staging were 35.6%, 89.9%, 62.0% with CT and 58.9%, 71.0%, 64.7% with PET, respectively. In M staging, 14.3%, 96.9%, 88.7% with CT and 50.0%, 94.5%, 90.1% with PET, respectively. The concordances of [EUS+CT] and [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative results were 41.2% and 54.6%, respectively and there was significant improvement of staging with additional PET scan (p<0.005). The concordance of [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative result was significantly increased compared to that of [EUS+CT]. Thus, the addition of FDG-PET with other conventional methods may enable more accurate preoperative staging

  5. Inflammatory breast cancer in accessory abdominal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. Miles, MD, MPH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessory breast tissue results from failure of the embryologic mammary ridge, also known as the milk line, to involute. As a result, ectopic breast tissue can develop anywhere along this ridge, which extends from the axilla—the most common location—to the groin. Primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue is uncommon but has been reported in multiple prior studies. We present a rare case of inflammatory breast cancer presenting in upper abdominal accessory breast tissue in women with a personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, and highlight the challenges of both diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in accessory breast tissue.

  6. Comorbidities and the Risk of Late-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Fleming

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The degree to which comorbidities affect the diagnosis of prostate cancer is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine how comorbidities affect the stage at which prostate cancer is diagnosed in elderly white and black men. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute merged with Medicare claims data. For each patient, we estimated associations between stage of disease at diagnosis and each of the 27 comorbidities. The sample included 2,489 black and 2,587 white men with staged prostate cancer. Coronary artery disease, benign hypertension, and dyslipidemia reduced the odds of late-stage prostate cancer. A prior diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease, severe renal disease, or substance abuse increased the odds of being diagnosed with late-stage disease. The study shows some effect modification by race, particularly among white men with substance abuse, cardiac conduction disorders, and other neurologic conditions. The strongest predictors of late-stage prostate cancer diagnosis for both white and black men were age at diagnosis of at least 80 years and lack of PSA screening. Comorbidities do affect stage at diagnosis, although in different ways. Four hypotheses are discussed to explain these findings.

  7. DPEP1, expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, affects cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Hiromi; Saigusa, Susumu; Yokoe, Takeshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-02-01

    We investigated changes in the gene expression profile in colon cancer in order to identify gene markers that may be useful in the management of this disease. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project was used to detect differences in gene expression between normal and cancer tissue. The overexpression of dipeptidase-1 (DPEP1) in cancer tissue was confirmed in a sample of 76 patients by real-time PCR. To identify the function of DPEP1, RNA interference (RNAi) was used to inactivate this gene in the colon cancer cell line. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to characterize the pattern of DPEP1 expression in colon cancer. DPEP1 expression in cancer was significantly higher than that in normal tissue. However, DPEP1 expression decreased with pathological differentiation, lymph-node and distant metastasis. Patients with tumors with decreased DPEP1 expression showed a poorer prognosis, and this was also true of patients with tumors who are treated with curative intent. RNAi-mediated DPEP1 reduction in the colon cancer cell line did not result in cell proliferation or apoptosis, but was associated with an increased invasive ability. DPEP1 protein was observed on the apical side of the cancer cells, and is expressed in the early stages of carcinogenesis, even in adenomas of both sporadic colorectal cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis patients. DPEP1 expression in normal colonic mucosa is very low, but it is highly expressed in colorectal adenoma and cancer specimens and is negatively correlated with parameters of pathological aggressiveness and poor prognosis. DPEP1 is expressed in the early stages of colon carcinogenesis and affects cancer cell invasiveness.

  8. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  9. Human chorionic gonadotropin and its relation to grade, stage and patient survival in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhard, Miriam; Tsvilina, Alexandra; Schumacher, Lan; Kupka, Markus; Ditsch, Nina; Mayr, Doris; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2012-01-01

    An influence of gonadotropins (hCG) on the development of ovarian cancer has been discussed. Therefore, we quantified serum hCG levels in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors and the hCG expression in ovarian cancer tissue in order to analyze its relation to grade, stage, gonadotropin receptor (LH-R, FSH-R) expression and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Patients diagnosed and treated for ovarian tumors from 1990 to 2002 were included. Patient characteristics, histology including histological subtype, tumor stage, grading and follow-up data were available. Serum hCG concentration measurement was performed with ELISA technology, hCG tissue expression determined by immunohistochemistry. HCG-positive sera were found in 26.7% of patients with benign and 67% of patients with malignant ovarian tumors. In addition, significantly higher hCG serum concentrations were observed in patients with malignant compared to benign ovarian tumors (p = 0.000). Ovarian cancer tissue was positive for hCG expression in 68%. We identified significant differences in hCG tissue expression related to tumor grade (p = 0.022) but no differences with regard to the histological subtype. In addition, mucinous ovarian carcinomas showed a significantly increased hCG expression at FIGO stage III compared to stage I (p = 0.018). We also found a positive correlation of hCG expression to LH-R expression, but not to FSH-R expression. There was no significant correlation between tissue hCG expression and overall ovarian cancer patient survival, but subgroup analysis revealed an increased 5-year survival in LH-R positive/FSH-R negative and hCG positive tumors (hCG positive 75.0% vs. hCG negative 50.5%). Serum human gonadotropin levels differ in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors. HCG is often expressed in ovarian cancer tissue with a certain variable relation to grade and stage. HCG expression correlates with LH-R expression in ovarian cancer tissue, which has previously

  10. Human chorionic gonadotropin and its relation to grade, stage and patient survival in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background An influence of gonadotropins (hCG) on the development of ovarian cancer has been discussed. Therefore, we quantified serum hCG levels in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors and the hCG expression in ovarian cancer tissue in order to analyze its relation to grade, stage, gonadotropin receptor (LH-R, FSH-R) expression and survival in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Patients diagnosed and treated for ovarian tumors from 1990 to 2002 were included. Patient characteristics, histology including histological subtype, tumor stage, grading and follow-up data were available. Serum hCG concentration measurement was performed with ELISA technology, hCG tissue expression determined by immunohistochemistry. Results HCG-positive sera were found in 26.7% of patients with benign and 67% of patients with malignant ovarian tumors. In addition, significantly higher hCG serum concentrations were observed in patients with malignant compared to benign ovarian tumors (p = 0.000). Ovarian cancer tissue was positive for hCG expression in 68%. We identified significant differences in hCG tissue expression related to tumor grade (p = 0.022) but no differences with regard to the histological subtype. In addition, mucinous ovarian carcinomas showed a significantly increased hCG expression at FIGO stage III compared to stage I (p = 0.018). We also found a positive correlation of hCG expression to LH-R expression, but not to FSH-R expression. There was no significant correlation between tissue hCG expression and overall ovarian cancer patient survival, but subgroup analysis revealed an increased 5-year survival in LH-R positive/FSH-R negative and hCG positive tumors (hCG positive 75.0% vs. hCG negative 50.5%). Conclusions Serum human gonadotropin levels differ in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors. HCG is often expressed in ovarian cancer tissue with a certain variable relation to grade and stage. HCG expression correlates with LH-R expression in ovarian

  11. Axillary staging for breast cancer during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, S N; Amant, F; Cardonick, E H

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Safety of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for breast cancer during pregnancy is insufficiently explored. We investigated efficacy and local recurrence rate in a large series of pregnant patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who underwent SLN biopsy during...... pregnancy were identified from the International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy, the German Breast Group, and the Cancer and Pregnancy Registry. Chart review was performed to record technique and outcome of SLN biopsy, locoregional and distant recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: We identified...... were alive and free of disease. Eleven patients experienced a locoregional relapse, including 1 isolated ipsilateral axillary recurrence (0.7%). Eleven (7.6%) patients developed distant metastases, of whom 9 (6.2%) died of breast cancer. No neonatal adverse events related to SLN procedure during...

  12. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  13. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  14. Stimuli-disassembling gold nanoclusters for diagnosis of early stage oral cancer by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo; Ingato, Dominique; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping; Kwon, Young Jik

    2018-01-01

    A key design consideration in developing contrast agents is obtaining distinct, multiple signal changes in diseased tissue. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been developed as contrast agents due to their strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This study aims to demonstrate that stimuli-responsive plasmonic Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) can be used as a contrast agent for optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting early-stage cancer. Au NPs were clustered via acid-cleavable linkers to synthesize Au NCs that disassemble under mildly acidic conditions into individual Au NPs, simultaneously diminishing SPR effect (quantified by scattering intensity) and increasing Brownian motion (quantified by Doppler variance). The acid-triggered morphological and accompanying optico-physical property changes of the acid-disassembling Au NCs were confirmed by TEM, DLS, UV/Vis, and OCT. Stimuli-responsive Au NCs were applied in a hamster check pouch model carrying early-stage squamous carcinoma tissue. The tissue was visualized by OCT imaging, which showed reduced scattering intensity and increased Doppler variance in the dysplastic tissue. This study demonstrates the promise of diagnosing early-stage cancer using molecularly programmable, inorganic nanomaterial-based contrast agents that are capable of generating multiple, stimuli-triggered diagnostic signals in early-stage cancer.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  16. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be at risk. Risk factors for gastric cancer include the following: Having any of the following medical conditions : Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the stomach. Chronic gastritis ( inflammation of the stomach). Pernicious anemia . Intestinal metaplasia ( ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide . Taking Aristolochia fangchi , a Chinese herb . Drinking water from a well that has high ... patients may be given chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ...

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  3. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Cosma

    Full Text Available The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC, with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812. The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR

  4. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Giovanni; Brown, David; Rees, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern) in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD) or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED) using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812). The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR = 0.032, TPR

  5. Evaluation of the stage IB designation of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Ballman, Karla V; McCall, Linda M; Yi, Min; Sahin, Aysegul A; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hansen, Nora; Gabram, Sheryl; Hurd, Thelma; Giuliano, Armando E; Hunt, Kelly K

    2015-04-01

    The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for breast cancer differentiates patients with T1 tumors and lymph node micrometastases (stage IB) from patients with T1 tumors and negative nodes (stage IA). This study was undertaken to determine the utility of the stage IB designation. The following two cohorts of patients with breast cancer were identified: 3,474 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1993 to 2007 and 4,590 patients from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0010 trial. Clinicopathologic and outcomes data were recorded, and disease was staged according to the seventh edition AJCC staging system. Recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Median follow-up times were 6.1 years and 9.0 years for the MD Anderson Cancer Center and ACOSOG cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, there were no significant differences between patients with stage IA and stage IB disease in 5- or 10-year RFS, DSS, or OS. Estrogen receptor (ER) status and grade significantly stratified patients with stage I disease with respect to RFS, DSS, and OS. Among patients with T1 breast cancer, individuals with micrometastases and those with negative nodes have similar survival outcomes. ER status and grade are better discriminants of survival than the presence of small-volume nodal metastases. In preparing the next edition of the AJCC staging system, consideration should be given to eliminating the stage IB designation and incorporating biologic factors. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-α is associated with advanced colorectal cancer stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Obeed, Omar A; Alkhayal, Khayal A; Al Sheikh, Abdulmalik; Zubaidi, Ahmad M; Vaali-Mohammed, Mansoor-Ali; Boushey, Robin; Mckerrow, James H; Abdulla, Maha-Hamadien

    2014-12-28

    To detect the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells among Saudi patients, and correlate its expression with clinical stages of cancer. Archival tissue specimens were collected from 30 patients with CRC who had undergone surgical intervention at King Khalid University Hospital. Patient demographic information, including age and gender, tumor sites, and histological type of CRC, was recorded. To measure TNF-α mRNA expression in CRC, total RNA was extracted from tumor formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and adjacent normal tissues. Reverse transcription and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed. Colorectal tissue microarrays were constructed to investigate the protein expression of TNF-α by immunohistochemistry. The relative expression of TNF-α mRNA in colorectal cancer was significantly higher than that seen in adjacent normal colorectal tissue. High TNF-α gene expression was associated with Stage III and IV neoplasms when compared with earlier tumor stages (P = 0.004). Eighty-three percent of patients (25/30) showed strong TNF-α positive staining, while only 10% (n = 3/30) of patients showed weak staining, and 7% (n = 2/30) were negative. We showed the presence of elevated TNF-α gene expression in cancer cells, which strongly correlated with advanced stages of tumor. High levels of TNF-α expression could be an independent diagnostic indicator of colorectal cancer, and targeting TNF-α might be a promising prognostic tool by assessment of the clinical stages of CRC.

  7. DUOX2 Expression Is Increased in Barrett Esophagus and Cancerous Tissues of Stomach and Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To detect the expression of dual oxidase (DUOX 2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer (CRC. Materials and Methods. The endoscopic biopsies were collected from patients with Barrett esophagus, while the curative resection tissues were obtained from patients with gastric cancer, CRC, or hepatic carcinoma. The DUOX2 protein and mRNA levels were detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. The correlation of DUOX2 expression with clinicopathological parameters of tumors was identified. Results. Low levels of DUOX2 mRNA were detected in Barrett esophagus and the adjacent normal tissues, and there was no difference between these two groups. DUOX2 protein was found in Barrett esophagus and undetectable in the normal epithelium. The DUOX2 mRNA and protein levels in the gastric cancer and CRC were increased compared to the adjacent nonmalignant tissues. The elevated DUOX2 in the gastric cancer was significantly associated with smoking history. In CRC tissues, the DUOX2 protein expression level in stages II–IV was significantly higher than that in stage I. In both hepatic carcinoma and the adjacent nonmalignant tissue, the DUOX2 was virtually undetectable. Conclusion. DUOX2 in Barrett esophagus, gastric cancer, and CRC may be involved in the tumorigenesis of these tissues.

  8. Evolving concepts in staging and treatment of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloothaak, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    For localized colorectal cancer (CRC), lymph node metastases are the most powerful prognostic factor for disease specific and overall survival. In the first part of the thesis, we explore the prognostic role of lymph nodes in patients with stage I/II colon cancer. In these patients, nodal metastases

  9. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  10. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-29

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC....... METHODS: We randomly assigned patients who were referred for preoperative staging of NSCLC to either conventional staging plus PET-CT or conventional staging alone. Patients were followed until death or for at least 12 months. The primary end point was the number of futile thoracotomies, defined as any...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  13. DIFFICULTIES IN DETERMINING THE STAGE OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Lukianov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a technique of treatment of prostate cancer depends on the age of the patient, accompanying diseases and prevalence of tumoral process. The basic methods at an inspection stage at which the cancer stage is defined are: definition of prostate specific membrane antigen, rectal examination, results of the rectal ultrasound guided biopsy, prostate imaging methods and an estimation of a grade of a tumor. Nowadays one of the main directions of determining the treatment for various stages of tumor is the development of prognostic models based on the analysis of predictors for tumor expansion.

  14. Staging with computed tomography of patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrom, M. L.; Brisling, S.; Klausen, T. W.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Accurate staging of colonic cancer is important for patient stratification. We aimed to correlate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT) with final histopathology as reference standard. Methods Data was collected retrospectively on 615 consecutive patients operated...... for colonic cancer. Evaluation was based upon T-stage. Patients were stratified into high-risk and low-risk groups, based on the extent of tumor invasion beyond the proper muscle layer of more or less than 5 mm. The Kendall tau correlation coefficient was used to calculate concordance between radiological (r...... to overstaging among all individuals was calculated as the number needed to harm 11.7 (95% CI, 9–16). Conclusions There is basis for improvement of CT-based preoperative staging of patients with colorectal cancer. Supplementary modalities may be needed for correct staging of patients preoperatively, especially...

  15. Health insurance and stage at diagnosis of laryngeal cancer: does insurance type predict stage at diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amy Y; Schrag, Nicole M; Halpern, Michael; Stewart, Andrew; Ward, Elizabeth M

    2007-08-01

    To examine whether patients with no insurance or Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced-stage laryngeal cancer. Retrospective cohort study from the National Cancer Database, 1996-2003. Hospital-based practice. Patients with known insurance status diagnosed as having invasive laryngeal cancer at Commission on Cancer facilities (N = 61 131) were included. Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression models analyzed the likelihood of presenting at a more advanced stage. Overall stage of laryngeal cancer (early vs advanced) and tumor size (T stage) at diagnosis. Patients with advanced-stage laryngeal cancer at diagnosis were more likely to be uninsured (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-2.15) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 2.21-2.61) compared with those with private insurance. Similarly, patients were most likely to present with the largest tumors (T4 disease) if they were uninsured (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 2.60-3.28) or covered by Medicaid (OR, 3.97; 95% CI, 3.56-4.34). Patients who were black, between ages 18 and 56 years, and who resided in zip codes with low proportions of high school graduates or low median household incomes were also more likely to be diagnosed as having advanced disease and/or larger tumors. Individuals lacking insurance or having Medicaid are at greatest risk for presenting with advanced laryngeal cancer. Results for the Medicaid group may be influenced by the postdiagnosis enrollment of uninsured patients. It is important to consider the impact of insurance coverage on stage at diagnosis and associated morbidity, mortality, quality of life, and costs.

  16. Identification of the TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator in various stages of colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-KHAYAL, KHAYAL; ABDULLA, MAHA; AL-OBEED, OMAR; KATTAN, WAEL AL; ZUBAIDI, AHMAD; VAALI-MOHAMMED, MANSOOR-ALI; ALSHEIKH, ABDULMALIK; AHMAD, REHAN

    2016-01-01

    The TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) is a p53 target gene known to regulate glycolysis by acting as fructose bis-phosphatase (FBPase) and modulate reactive oxygen species. TIGAR expression has been implicated in oncogenesis and progression of several human cancers. However, TIGAR expression is not known in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC). There is an increase in the colorectal cancer incidence in Saudi Arabia. We sought to analyze TIGAR expression in this ethnic group. The aim of this study was to investigate the TIGAR expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients from Saudi Arabia. Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 22 matched colorectal tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. TIGAR expression was examined in TMA slide using immunohistochemistry. TIGAR mRNA was determined in 14 matched tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue. TIGAR protein expression was also examined in CRC tumor tissues and cell lines. Statistical analyses (t-test) were applied to evaluate the significance of TIGAR expression. TIGAR mRNA level was upregulated significantly in stage II (pcolorectal cancer. Strong TIGAR positive staining was found in 68% (15/22) of the tumor samples with nuclear localization. TIGAR staining was found to be significantly increased in early stage (stage I and II) CRC (pcolorectal cancer tissues and CRC cell lines. These findings indicate that TIGAR is highly expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in colorectal cancer with prominent nuclear localization. TIGAR expression may be used as a bio-marker for detection of colorectal cancer and can be used as a target for developing therapeutics for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26675982

  17. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy After Mastectomy in Preventing Recurrence in Patients With Stage IIa-IIIa Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Medullary Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  18. Radiological staging of ovarian cancer: imaging findings and contribution of CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Universitaetsinstitut fuer Radiodiagnostik, Salzburg (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal among the gynecologic malignancies with approximately 70% of patients presenting with advanced tumor stage. The prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer is directly related to the tumor stage and residual tumor burden after cytoreductive surgery. Exploratory laparotomy has been the cornerstone in the management of ovarian cancer, as it offers staging and tumor debulking. Understaging at initial laparotomy, however, is a problem in up to 30%, mainly due to insufficient technique and unexpected peritoneal spread outside the pelvis. Sites difficult to assess intraoperatively including the posterior aspect of the liver and the dome of the diaphragm can be well demonstrated with multiplanar imaging. CT and alternatively MRI have been accepted as adjunct imaging modalities for preoperative staging ovarian cancer. Of these, multidetector CT is the imaging modality of choice for staging ovarian cancer. In a multidisciplinary team approach patient management may be guided towards an individualized treatment plan. The contribution of imaging includes (1) surgery planning including referral practice, (2) selection of candidates for primary chemotherapy by demonstration of non (optimally) resectable disease, and (3) tissue sampling in peritoneal carcinomatosis. (orig.)

  19. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: neoadjuvant pathologic staging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, T W; Lerut, T E M R; Orringer, M B; Chen, L-Q; Hofstetter, W L; Smithers, B M; Rusch, V W; van Lanschot, J; Chen, K N; Davies, A R; D'Journo, X B; Kesler, K A; Luketich, J D; Ferguson, M K; Räsänen, J V; van Hillegersberg, R; Fang, W; Durand, L; Allum, W H; Cecconello, I; Cerfolio, R J; Pera, M; Griffin, S M; Burger, R; Liu, J-F; Allen, M S; Law, S; Watson, T J; Darling, G E; Scott, W J; Duranceau, A; Denlinger, C E; Schipper, P H; Ishwaran, H; Apperson-Hansen, C; DiPaola, L M; Semple, M E; Blackstone, E H

    2016-10-01

    To address uncertainty of whether pathologic stage groupings after neoadjuvant therapy (ypTNM) for esophageal cancer share prognostic implications with pathologic groupings after esophagectomy alone (pTNM), we report data-simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival-for pathologically staged cancers after neoadjuvant therapy from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted data using variables with standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 7,773 pathologically staged neoadjuvant patients, 2,045 had squamous cell carcinoma, 5,686 adenocarcinoma, 31 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 11 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (61 years) men (83%) with normal (40%) or overweight (35%) body mass index, 0-1 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (96%), and a history of smoking (69%). Cancers were ypT0 (20%), ypT1 (13%), ypT2 (18%), ypT3 (44%), ypN0 (55%), ypM0 (94%), and G2-G3 (72%); most involved the distal esophagus (80%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for yp categories was unequally depressed, more for earlier categories than later, compared with equivalent categories from prior WECC data for esophagectomy-alone patients. Thus, survival of patients with ypT0-2N0M0 cancers was intermediate and similar regardless of ypT; survival for ypN+ cancers was poor. Because prognoses for ypTNM and pTNM categories are dissimilar, prognostication should be based on separate ypTNM categories and groupings. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient, cancer, and treatment characteristics and should direct 9th edition data collection. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  20. Melanoma staging: Evidence-based changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Scolyer, Richard A; Hess, Kenneth R; Sondak, Vernon K; Long, Georgina V; Ross, Merrick I; Lazar, Alexander J; Faries, Mark B; Kirkwood, John M; McArthur, Grant A; Haydu, Lauren E; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Flaherty, Keith T; Balch, Charles M; Thompson, John F

    2017-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE To update the melanoma staging system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) a large database was assembled comprising >46,000 patients from 10 centers worldwide with stages I, II, and III melanoma diagnosed since 1998. Based on analyses of this new database, the existing seventh edition AJCC stage IV database, and contemporary clinical trial data, the AJCC Melanoma Expert Panel introduced several important changes to the Tumor, Nodes, Metastasis (TNM) classification and stage grouping criteria. Key changes in the eighth edition AJCC Cancer Staging Manual include: 1) tumor thickness measurements to be recorded to the nearest 0.1 mm, not 0.01 mm; 2) definitions of T1a and T1b are revised (T1a, melanoma staging system will guide patient treatment, provide better prognostic estimates, and refine stratification of patients entering clinical trials. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:472-492. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlBazzaz Pishtewan H

    2009-01-01

    The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations. (author)

  2. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  3. Application of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT in diagnosing and staging gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wenzhou; Yu Jieping; Li Jun; Liu Changsheng; Zheng Xiaohua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore helical CT characteristics of gastric cancer and evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced helical hydro-CT(HHCT)in staging gastric cancer. Methods: The CT images of S0 patients with gastric cancer were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with pathologic findings at surgery. All patients were preoperatively imaged by plain and contrast-enhanced HHCT 30 rain after drinking S00-1000 ml water. Peristalsis was minimized by intravenously administered spasmolytics. Results: The characteristic findings of gastric carcer on CT images were focal or diffuse mural thickening, soft tissue masses, cancerous ulcers, stenosis of stomach, infiltration to adjacent tissues, lymph node metastasis and distant metastases. Strong contrast enhancement of the gastric wall was firmly related to gastric carcer. The foci of gastric carcer mainly located at the gastric cardia and gastric antrum, and became more prominent in contrast-enhanced HHCT than in plain HHCT.The accurate rate of contrast-enhanced HHCT for staging gastric carcer was 86% (43/50), and the detection rate of lymph node metastases by CT was 60% (12/20). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced HHCT is a reliable method for diagnosing and staging gastric carcer. It is a useful guide for surgeons to plan the best treatment for patients with gastric cancer. (authors)

  4. Anti-Cancer Drug Validation: the Contribution of Tissue Engineered Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana R; Lima, Daniela; Reis, Rui L; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Correlo, Vitor M

    2017-06-01

    Drug toxicity frequently goes concealed until clinical trials stage, which is the most challenging, dangerous and expensive stage of drug development. Both the cultures of cancer cells in traditional 2D assays and animal studies have limitations that cannot ever be unraveled by improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. Considering the NCI60, a panel of 60 cancer cell lines representative of 9 different cancer types: leukemia, lung, colorectal, central nervous system (CNS), melanoma, ovarian, renal, prostate and breast, we propose to review current "state of art" on the 9 cancer types specifically addressing the 3D tissue models that have been developed and used in drug discovery processes as an alternative to complement their study.

  5. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  6. Augmenter of liver regeneration gene expression in human colon cancer cell lines and clinical tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzidou, Elisavet; Mantzourani, Marina; Giaginis, Constantinos; Giagini, Athina; Patsouris, Efstratios; Kouraklis, Gregory; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is an hepatotrophic factor responsible for the increased regenerative capacity of mammalian liver and ALR gene expression has been well-documented in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples. The present study aimed to quantify and evaluate ALR gene expression in human colon cancer cell lines and tissue samples. Total RNA was isolated from 6 colorectal cancer cell lines and 23 primary colorectal tumors, cDNA was prepared and ALR mRNA expression analysis was performed using quantitative real-time PCR. ALR mRNA expression was confirmed in all 6 colorectal cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, DLD-1, RKO, COLO-205 and HTC-116) and an epithelial one (WISH). DLD-1 cell line showed the highest ALR mRNA levels, followed by RKO, COLO-205, HCT-116, SW480, SW620 and WISH cell lines. ALR gene expression levels were detected in all cancer tissue samples (N=23), being significantly increased in well/moderately compared to poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.0208). ALR gene expression levels were increased in Dukes' stage A/B compared to stage C tumors, at a non significant level (p=0.2842). ALR mRNA levels were slightly higher in colon cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-neoplastic ones (N=19), at a non significant level (p=0.2122). The present study verified for the first time the ALR gene expression in both human colon cancer cell lines and clinical samples. Enhanced ALR gene expression was negatively correlated with advanced histopathological grade and stage in both colon cancer cell lines and human tissue samples, implicating ALR participation at the early stage of colon malignant progression.

  7. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  8. Treatment Choices for Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  9. Lymphadenectomy in surgical stage I epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svolgaard, Olivia; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Nielsen, Marie Louise S

    2014-01-01

    2005-2011. SAMPLE: All women registered in the nationwide Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database from 1 January 2005 to 1 May 2011, presenting with a tumor macroscopically confined to the ovary without visible evidence of abdominal spread at the time of the initial exploration (surgical stage I). METHOD......: Descriptive and survival analyses of data from Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The annual proportion of women with surgical stage I disease who received lymphadenectomy and the survival in the two groups. RESULTS: Of 2361 women with epithelial ovarian cancer, 627 were identified...... with surgical stage I. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 216 women (34%) of whom 13 (6%) had lymph node metastases. At 5-year follow up 85% remained alive in the lymphadenectomy group compared with 80% in the control group (p = 0.064). The lymphadenectomy fraction increased from 24% in 2005 to 55% in 2011. When...

  10. The development of common data elements for a multi-institute prostate cancer tissue bank: The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamed Jonathan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is a consortium of four geographically dispersed institutions that are funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI to provide clinically annotated prostate cancer tissue samples to researchers. To facilitate this effort, it was critical to arrive at agreed upon common data elements (CDEs that could be used to collect demographic, pathologic, treatment and clinical outcome data. Methods The CPCTR investigators convened a CDE curation subcommittee to develop and implement CDEs for the annotation of collected prostate tissues. The draft CDEs were refined and progressively annotated to make them ISO 11179 compliant. The CDEs were implemented in the CPCTR database and tested using software query tools developed by the investigators. Results By collaborative consensus the CPCTR CDE subcommittee developed 145 data elements to annotate the tissue samples collected. These included for each case: 1 demographic data, 2 clinical history, 3 pathology specimen level elements to describe the staging, grading and other characteristics of individual surgical pathology cases, 4 tissue block level annotation critical to managing a virtual inventory of cases and facilitating case selection, and 5 clinical outcome data including treatment, recurrence and vital status. These elements have been used successfully to respond to over 60 requests by end-users for tissue, including paraffin blocks from cases with 5 to 10 years of follow up, tissue microarrays (TMAs, as well as frozen tissue collected prospectively for genomic profiling and genetic studies. The CPCTR CDEs have been fully implemented in two major tissue banks and have been shared with dozens of other tissue banking efforts. Conclusion The freely available CDEs developed by the CPCTR are robust, based on "best practices" for tissue resources, and are ISO 11179 compliant. The process for CDE development described in this

  11. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B; Mortensen, Jann

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has become a widely used technology for preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCT) have established its efficacy over conventional staging, but no studies have assessed its cost......-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional workup for preoperative staging of NSCLC. METHODS: The study was conducted alongside an RCT in which 189 patients were allocated to conventional staging (n = 91) or conventional staging + PET/CT (n = 98...... perspective, the cost-effectiveness of PET/CT for staging NSCLC seems to depend on the willingness to pay in order to avoid a futile thoracotomy. However, given that four outliers in terms of extreme comorbidity were all randomized to the PET/CT arm, there is uncertainty about the conclusion. When hospital...

  12. On adequate treatment for stage 1 cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkviani, L.I.; Kharaishvili, Ts.N.

    1985-01-01

    Expansive extirpation of the uterus was performed in 726 cases of stage TIbNXMO cervical cancer. 19.3% of 600 cases of pTIb cancer showed metastatic involvement of lymph nodes. Metastases into regional lymph nodes were found to be resistant to preoperative large-fraction irradiation. The long-term results of treatment of 484 patients with pTIbNOMO cervical cancer receiving 3 different treatment modalities (operation alone, surgery+preoperative irradiation and surgery+postoperative distant irradiation) did not show any significant difference. Complications and relapse were rarer in patients who received surgery only. Therefore, expansive extirpation of the uterus unaccompanied by distant radiotherapy should be a Method of choice in treatment of stage I cervical cancer (pTIbNOMO)

  13. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  14. Surgical staging identified false HPV-negative cases in a large series of invasive cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Liebrich, Clemens; Luyten, Alexander; Zander, Martina; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We examined a large series of biopsy-proven invasive cervical cancers with surgical staging and HPV re-testing to estimate the relevance of HPV-negative cervical cancers in a Caucasian population. We prospectively collected smears from 371 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of cervical cancer for HC2 testing of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). In HC2-negative cases, smears and paraffin embedded tissue blocks underwent additional HPV genotyping. HC2 tests showed 31/371 cases (8.8%) had negative findings. Surgical staging showed that 21/31 HC2-negative cases (68%) were not cervical cancer. Overall, 340/350 cases of primary cervical cancer confirmed by surgical staging tested HC2 positive (97.2%). Non-high-risk HPV subtypes were detected in five cases (one HPV-53, one HPV-70, and three HPV-73) and high-risk subtypes in four patients with HC2-negative cervical cancer (two HPV 16 and two HPV-18). The remaining case, a primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the uterine cervix, tested negative for HPV-DNA with all tests. The main explanation for HPV-negative cervical cancer was a false diagnosis, followed by cancers associated with non-HR-HPV types, and false-negative HR-HPV results. Truly HPV negative seem to be very rare in Caucasian populations. Retrospective analyses without surgical staging may overestimate the proportion of HPV negative cervical cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis: is travel time important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Goldberg, Daniel W; Sherman, Recinda; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have produced inconsistent results in their examination of the potential association between proximity to healthcare or mammography facilities and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Using a multistate dataset, we re-examine this issue by investigating whether travel time to a patient's diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility impacts breast cancer stage at diagnosis. We studied 161,619 women 40 years and older diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from ten state population based cancer registries in the United States. For each woman, we calculated travel time to their diagnosing facility and nearest mammography facility. Logistic multilevel models of late versus early stage were fitted, and odds ratios were calculated for travel times, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, census tract poverty, rural/urban residence, health insurance, and state random effects. Seventy-six percent of women in the study lived less than 20 min from their diagnosing facility, and 93 percent lived less than 20 min from the nearest mammography facility. Late stage at diagnosis was not associated with increasing travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility. Diagnosis age under 50, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, high census tract poverty, and no health insurance were all significantly associated with late stage at diagnosis. Travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility was not a determinant of late stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, and better geographic proximity did not assure more favorable stage distributions. Other factors beyond geographic proximity that can affect access should be evaluated more closely, including facility capacity, insurance acceptance, public transportation, and travel costs.

  16. Relapse and Mortality Risk of Stage I Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florvall, Cecilia; Frederiksen, Peder; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    by a factor 2.0 for NSTC and 1.5 for STC. CONCLUSIONS: - The fact that few relapses occur 5 years after diagnosis is an important finding for risk assessment in life insurance. It makes it possible to insure men diagnosed with stage I TC, who have not experienced relapse 5 years after diagnosis, on normal......OBJECTIVES: - To assess the medical insurance risk for patients with stage I testicular cancer (TC), by calculating the overall mortality risk with and without relapse, and compare it to men from the Danish population. BACKGROUND: - Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in young males...

  17. Optimal cost-effective staging evaluations in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Gregory L; Soderdahl, Douglas W; Hernandez, Javier

    2007-05-01

    A new diagnosis of prostate cancer presents to both the patient and physician questions regarding the best approach for further assessing the extent of disease prior to selecting a treatment strategy. In addition to the initial clinical data such as serum prostate-specific antigen level, findings on digital rectal examination, and core biopsy Gleason score, several procedures and imaging modalities are available to further stage newly diagnosed prostate cancer. A substantial percentage of the cost of managing prostate cancer is directly related to staging evaluations. Often, staging evaluations are performed that have limited test performance characteristics, subject the patient to unnecessary morbidity, or simply do not provide additional useful clinical information. It is important that the physician be familiar with the indications for the available staging modalities as well as the test performance characteristics in order to proceed appropriately and in an economically judicious fashion. This paper reviews the literature on this topic and summarizes previous experiences with procedures and imaging modalities for staging newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

  18. ESUR guidelines: ovarian cancer staging and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Sala, Evis [University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kinkel, Karen [Geneva University Hospital, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland); Spencer, John A. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Guidelines for ovarian cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 12 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. Computed tomography (CT) with coverage of the base of the lungs to the inguinal region is regarded as the imaging technique of choice for preoperative staging. Critical diagnostic criteria are presented and the basis for a structured report for preoperative staging is outlined. Following primary treatment for ovarian cancer, clinical assessment and CA-125 are routinely used to monitor patients. For suspected recurrence, CT remains the imaging modality of choice, with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT emerging as the optimal imaging technique for suspected recurrence, particularly in patients with negative CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and detection of recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  19. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer: A Clinical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarkatt, Joseph; Joseph, Joe; Kurniali, Peter C; Al-Janadi, Anas; Hrinczenko, Borys

    2017-04-01

    The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy can be challenging. Although the benefit of treatment is clear in most patients with stage III disease, the decision to provide chemotherapy after surgical resection in stage II disease must be made on an individual basis. Several trials have demonstrated the small but absolute benefits of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer for disease-free survival and overall survival. In an attempt to better understand the role of chemotherapy, several studies were performed that identified high-risk characteristics that can be used prognostically and predictively to aid in the clinical decision making process. ASCO, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the European Society of Medical Oncology have published guidelines describing these high-risk characteristics. Since then, several other molecular markers have emerged that may offer more information on a given patient's risk for recurrence. The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer must be made on an individual basis, considering the risks and benefits of treatment. In this short review, we will present the available evidence and offer possible directions for future study.

  20. Incorporating Tumor Characteristics to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Breast Cancer Staging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Clarke, Christina A; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Hunt, Kelly K; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-11-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) breast cancer staging system provides important prognostic information. The recently published eighth edition incorporates biological markers and recommends the use of a complex "prognostic stage." In this study, we assessed the relationship between stage, breast cancer subtype, grade, and outcome in a large population-based cohort and evaluated a risk score system incorporating tumor characteristic to the AJCC anatomic staging system. Patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer stage I-IV between 2005-2008 were identified in the California Cancer Registry. For patients with stage I-III disease, pathologic stage was recorded. For patients with stage IV disease, clinical stage was utilized. Five-year breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) rates were determined for each potential tumor size-node involvement-metastases (TNM) combination according to breast cancer subtype. A risk score point-based system using grade, estrogen receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status was designed to complement the anatomic AJCC staging system. Survival probabilities between groups were compared using log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models were used. Among 43,938 patients, we observed differences in 5-year BCSS and OS for each TNM combination according to breast cancer subtype. The most favorable outcomes were seen for hormone receptor-positive tumors followed closely by HER2-positive tumors, with the worst outcomes observed for triple negative breast cancer. Our risk score system separated patients into four risk groups within each stage category (all p  system incorporates biological factors into the AJCC anatomic staging system, providing accurate prognostic information. This study demonstrates that stage, but also breast cancer subtype and grade, define prognosis in a large population of breast cancer patients. It shows that a point-based risk score system that incorporates

  1. Evaluation of trace element concentration in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of human stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzadi, Shadi; Sheikhesmaili, Farshad; Rahehagh, Ramesh; Parhizkar, Baran; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Loqmani, Hozan; Shahmoradi, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Maleki, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    Gastric cancer has a high mortality rate in west of Iran. Various environmental elements are proposed as cancer risk factors including trace elements. Trace elements can induce initiation or progression of carcinogenesis via oxidative stress and DNA injury. The aim of this study was to measure and compare some trace element concentration (Ca, Cu, Fe, As, Mg, Ni, Cd and Cr) in gastric cancer tissues and normal tissues. For this purpose, 35 patients with gastric cancer and 30 without any cancer were biopsied. Biopsies were taken from cancerous tissue and non-cancerous tissue of gastric cancer patients and gastric tissue of normal patients. The analysis of trace elements was performed using Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Data analysis was carried out using SPSS and STATA 12 software. The research found that the concentrations of Fe, Mg, and As were higher in cancerous tissues compared with non-cancerous tissues whereas Cr, Cu, Ca, and Ni concentrations were higher in non-cancerous tissues of cancerous patients. When comparisons were made for cancer and normal samples, copper was the only metal, which was significantly higher in cancerous samples (p elements may have carcinogenic effects, although further study is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Second primary cancer in irradiated stage I testicular seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, M.E. (Northern Israel Oncology Center, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)); Steiner, M. (Northern Israel Oncology Center, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)); Lachter, J. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, The Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine,Technicon-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel)); Kessel, I. (Rand Clinic, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy); Moskovitz, B. (Dept. of Urology, Bnai-Zion Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)); Kuten, A. (Northern Israel Oncology Center, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel))

    1993-11-01

    The incidence of second primary cancer (SPC) was determined in 64 irradiated stage I testicular seminoma patients, treated and followed at the Northern Israel Oncology Center from 1968 to 1988. Seven (11%) patients developed a total of eight second cancers. The cumulative risk for developing second primary cancer at ten, 15 and 20 years following the diagnosis of seminoma was 2.5%, 5.1% and 8.9%, respectively. Two patients developed SPC within the radiation field (urinary bladder, sigmoid colon) and four patients outside the radiation field (bronchogenic cancer, thymoma, malignant melanoma, thyroid cancer). In two patients, who developed lung cancer and testicular seminoma, respectively, scatter dose from the main radiation field could not be excluded as one of the factors contributing to the SPC. Three patients died as a direct result of their SPC. It is concluded that there is a low, but significant risk of solid SPC among patients apparently cured of early stage seminoma. It will be important in future surveillance studies of stage I seminoma to assess the risk of SPC in the non-irradiated patients. (orig.)

  3. The provisional matrix: setting the stage for tissue repair outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Thomas H; Engler, Adam J

    2017-07-01

    Since its conceptualization in the 1980s, the provisional matrix has often been characterized as a simple fibrin-containing scaffold for wound healing that supports the nascent blood clot and is functionally distinct from the basement membrane. However subsequent advances have shown that this matrix is far from passive, with distinct compositional differences as the wound matures, and providing an active role for wound remodeling. Here we review the stages of this matrix, provide an update on the state of our understanding of provisional matrix, and present some of the outstanding issues related to the provisional matrix, its components, and their assembly and use in vivo. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Risk Factors for Complications Differ Between Stages of Tissue-Expander Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovecchio, Francis; Jordan, Sumanas W; Lim, Seokchun; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y S

    2015-09-01

    Tissue-expander (TE) placement followed by implant exchange is currently the most popular method of breast reconstruction. There is a relative paucity of data demonstrating patient factors that predict complications specifically by stage of surgery. The present study attempts to determine what complications are most likely to occur at each stage and how the risk factors for complications vary by stage of reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed on all 1275 patients who had TEs placed by the 2 senior authors between 2004 and 2013. Complication rates were determined at each stage of reconstruction, and these rates were further compared between patients who had pre-stage I radiation, post-stage I radiation, and no radiation exposure. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of complications at each stage of reconstruction. A total of 1639 consecutive TEs were placed by the senior authors during the study period. The overall rate for experiencing a complication at any stage of surgery was 17%. Complications occurred at uniformly higher rates during stage I for all complications (92% stage I vs 7% stage II vs 1% stage III, P higher intraoperative percent fill (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.7-6.3). Post-stage I radiation was the only independent risk factor for a stage II complication (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.4-15.2). Complications occur at higher rates after stage I than after stage II, and as expected, stage III complications are exceedingly rare. Risk factors for stage I complications are different from risk factors for stage II complications. Body mass index and smoking are associated with complications at stage I, but do not predict complications at stage II surgery. The stratification of risk factors by stage of surgery will help surgeons and patients better manage both risk and expectations.

  5. High clusterin expression correlates with a poor outcome in stage II colorectal cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-02-01

    The role of clusterin in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. Overexpression of cytoplasmic clusterin has been studied in aggressive colon tumors; however, no correlation between clusterin expression and survival in colorectal cancer has been identified to date. We assessed levels of clusterin expression in a group of stage II colorectal cancer patients to assess its utility as a prognostic marker. The study included 251 patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry done and correlated with clinical features and long term outcome. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used with terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling probes and clusterin antibody to assess the degree of co localization. Percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining was higher in tumor compared with nonadjacent normal mucosa (P < 0.001). Within the stromal compartment, percentage cytoplamic staining and intensity was lower in tumor tissue compared with normal nonadjacent mucosa (P < or = 0.001). Survival was significantly associated with percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining (P < 0.001), epithelial cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001), percentage stromal cytoplasmic staining (P = 0.002), and stromal cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001). Clusterin levels are associated with poor survival in stage II colorectal cancer.

  6. Expression of CD40 and CD40L in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Its Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To study expression of CD40 and CD40L in gastric cancer tissue we assessed gastric cancer patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University and control subjects. Gastric cancer and normal (from around tumours tissue samples were obtained from patients. Venous blood samples (gastric cancer and ulcer groups were drawn on the morning of the day before surgery for the measurement of peripheral sCD40L. The expression of CD40 in gastric carcinoma specimens was examined immuno-histochemically. The clinicopathological factors, including age, sex, tumor size, gross appearance, degree of cellular differentiation, histological classification, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage were analyzed according to the different expression of CD40. The results indicated a high CD40 expression in gastric cancer tissues. This positive expression of CD40 revealed a significant (P < 0.05 correlation with lymphatic metastasis and tumor TNM stage in gastric cancer patients. It is concluded that higher CD40 expression existed in expanding type tumors and could play an important role in clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer patients.

  7. The Perspectives of Haematological Cancer Patients on Tissue Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turon, Heidi; Waller, Amy; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Boyes, Allison; Fleming, Jennifer; Marlton, Paula; Harrison, Simon J; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A high level of support for tissue banking has been identified amongst both the general public and patients. However, much debate remains about the regulatory framework of tissue banks. This study explored the views of haematological cancer patients regarding tissue banking and how tissue banks should operate. Haematological cancer patients from three outpatient clinics in Australia completed a questionnaire examining their preferences for tissue banking as well as items about their sociodemographic characteristics, disease and treatment history. The majority of participants (95%) reported being willing to allow their leftover tissue to be used for medical research. Three quarters (76%) supported the idea of their medical record being linked to their tissue sample, and 77% preferred a blanket (one-off) consent model for future research use of their tissue sample. Only 57 (27%) participants had been asked to give a tissue sample for research, 98% of whom gave permission. The majority of haematological cancer patients are willing to donate their leftover tissue to a tissue bank and have their medical records linked to tissue samples and prefer a one-off consent process. These novel data from potential donors inform the debate about how tissue banks might operate. Strategic Research Partnership Grant from the Cancer Council NSW to the Newcastle Cancer Control Collaborative (New-3C) and infrastructure funding from the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI). A.W. is supported by an Australian Research Council DECRA fellowship (DE150101262). T.C.M. was supported by a Leukaemia Foundation of Queensland Post-Doctoral Fellowship. A.B. is supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1073317) and Cancer Institute NSW (13/ECF/1-37) Early Career Fellowships.

  8. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  9. Modern Soft Tissue Pathology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book comprehensively covers modern soft tissue pathology and includes both tumors and non-neoplastic entities. Soft tissues make up a large bulk of the human body, and they are susceptible to a wide range of diseases. Many soft-tissue tumors are biologically very aggressive, and the chance of them metastasizing to vital organs is quite high. In recent years, the outlook for soft-tissue cancers has brightened dramatically due to the increased accuracy of the pathologist's tools.

  10. Identification of potential tissue-specific cancer biomarkers and development of cancer versus normal genomic classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Akram; Biegert, Greyson; Adamec, Jiri; Helikar, Tomáš

    2017-10-17

    Machine learning techniques for cancer prediction and biomarker discovery can hasten cancer detection and significantly improve prognosis. Recent "OMICS" studies which include a variety of cancer and normal tissue samples along with machine learning approaches have the potential to further accelerate such discovery. To demonstrate this potential, 2,175 gene expression samples from nine tissue types were obtained to identify gene sets whose expression is characteristic of each cancer class. Using random forests classification and ten-fold cross-validation, we developed nine single-tissue classifiers, two multi-tissue cancer-versus-normal classifiers, and one multi-tissue normal classifier. Given a sample of a specified tissue type, the single-tissue models classified samples as cancer or normal with a testing accuracy between 85.29% and 100%. Given a sample of non-specific tissue type, the multi-tissue bi-class model classified the sample as cancer versus normal with a testing accuracy of 97.89%. Given a sample of non-specific tissue type, the multi-tissue multi-class model classified the sample as cancer versus normal and as a specific tissue type with a testing accuracy of 97.43%. Given a normal sample of any of the nine tissue types, the multi-tissue normal model classified the sample as a particular tissue type with a testing accuracy of 97.35%. The machine learning classifiers developed in this study identify potential cancer biomarkers with sensitivity and specificity that exceed those of existing biomarkers and pointed to pathways that are critical to tissue-specific tumor development. This study demonstrates the feasibility of predicting the tissue origin of carcinoma in the context of multiple cancer classes.

  11. Health and Recovery Program in Increasing Physical Activity Level in Stage IA-IIIA Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Cancer Survivor; Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7

  12. Expression of the phosphorylated MEK5 protein is associated with TNM staging of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of MEK5 in many cancers is associated with carcinogenesis through aberrant cell proliferation. In this study, we determined the level of phosphorylated MEK5 (pMEK5 expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC tissues and correlated it with clinicopathologic data. Methods pMEK5 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA containing 335 clinicopathologic characterized CRC cases and 80 cases of nontumor colorectal tissues. pMEK5 expression of 19 cases of primary CRC lesions and paired with normal mucosa was examined by Western blotting. The relationship between pMEK5 expression in CRC and clinicopathologic parameters, and the association of pMEK5 expression with CRC survival were analyzed respectively. Results pMEK5 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues (185 out of 335, 55.2% than in normal tissues (6 out of 80, 7.5%; P P = 0.001, lymph node metastasis (P P P P P = 0.002 and 5-year overall survival rate (P P = 0.139; OS: P = 0.071. Conclusions pMEK5 expression is correlated with the staging of CRC and its expression might be helpful to the TNM staging system of CRC.

  13. Regulatory manual for staging of cancer by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solorzano Marin, Jose Reinaldo

    2008-01-01

    The exact level for staging and making decisions about therapy that will be applied to cancer patients at the Servicio de Radiologia e Imagenes Medicas has been important for the Hospital Calderon Guardia. A template of report or manual has been suggested, with the information necessary for staging a particular type of cancer by analyzing the tomography of the patient. The TNM International System has been used to design the template of report, with a specific technical language and terminology unified theme for the oncologist and radiologist. This system is abstracted in the sixth edition of oncological staging manual of the American Joint Committee and its atlas; resources already acquired, and the helical CT scanner. The experience of the radiologist is critical, because he will be responsible to fill the document. [es

  14. New procedures. Comprehensive staging of lung cancer by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintze, C.; Dinkel, J.; Biederer, J.; Heussel, C.P.; Puderbach, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer staging according to the TNM system is based on morphological assessment of the primary cancer, lymph nodes and metastases. All aspects of this important oncological classification are measurable with MRI. Pulmonary nodules can be detected at the clinically relevant size of 4-5 mm in diameter. The extent of mediastinal, hilar and supraclavicular lymph node affection can be assessed at the same time. The predominant metastatic spread to the adrenal glands and spine can be detected in coronal orientation during dedicated MRI of the lungs. Search focused whole body MRI completes the staging. Various additional MR imaging techniques provide further functional and clinically relevant information during a single examination. In the oncological context the most important techniques are imaging of perfusion and tumor motion. Functional MRI of the lungs complements the pure staging and improves surgical approaches and radiotherapy planning. (orig.) [de

  15. YKL-40 tissue expression and plasma levels in patients with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid V S; Ringsholt, Merete; Høgdall, Claus K

    2009-01-01

    survival. The aim of the study was to determine the expression of YKL-40 in tumor tissue and plasma in patients with borderline ovarian tumor or epithelial ovarian cancer (OC), and investigate prognostic value of this marker. METHODS: YKL-40 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry...... in tissue arrays from 181 borderline tumors and 473 OC. Plasma YKL-40 was determined by ELISA in preoperative samples from 19 patients with borderline tumor and 76 OC patients. RESULTS: YKL-40 protein expression was found in cancer cells, tumor associated macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells. The tumor...... stage, age and radicality after primary surgery as variables, showed that elevated plasma YKL-40 was associated with a shorter survival (HR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.40-3.25, p = 0.0004). CONCLUSION: YKL-40 in OC tissue and plasma are related to stage and histology, but only plasma YKL-40 is a prognostic...

  16. A novel prognostic index in colorectal cancer defined by serum carcinoembryonic antigen and plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J.; Christensen, Ib J.; Brunner, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of stage-independent prognostic markers may play a significant role in future selection for adjuvant treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to assess the combination of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and plasma tissue...

  17. Monitoring different stages of breast cancer using tumour markers CA 15-3, CEA and TPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    2004-01-01

    % of the patients receiving first-line chemotherapy (cohort B). Trials are necessary to determine whether tumour marker-guided therapy has any prognostic impact. The data suggest that tumour marker information may be used to stop ineffective treatments and reduce unnecessary adverse effects.......The ability of the tumour markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), and Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (TPA) to signal progression in breast cancer patients was investigated in this study. Marker interpretation considered the analytical variation, intra......-individual biological variation, and the rate of increase. Patient cohorts were as follows: (A) 90 stage II breast cancer patients who were monitored postoperatively, (B) 204 recurrent breast cancer patients who were monitored during first-line chemotherapy, and (C) 112 patients who were monitored during the time...

  18. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer: value in primary staging and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Heinisch, M.; Rechberger, E.; Kurz, F.; Klug, R.; Aufschnaiter, M; Hammer, J.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is a encouraging imaging techniques allowing a highly sensitive whole-body search for malignant foci detected by their increased glucose metabolism compared with benign tissues. Several studies are now available that indicate its added value for diagnosis and staging of colorectal cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in 20-30 % of patients who undergo fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedures. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is also useful in monitoring radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  19. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, A.; Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A.; Bankart, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) and in differentiating organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ-confined (≥T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ confined (≥T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  20. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, A., E-mail: arajesh27@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Bankart, M.J.G. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) and in differentiating organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ-confined ({>=}T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ confined ({>=}T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  1. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  2. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Ko, Eun Sook; Yi, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results

  3. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  4. Tumor Staging and HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekindt, Claus; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    The current TNM staging for oropharyngeal cancer (OSCC) was designed empirically for non-HPV-related disease. Emerging evidence suggests it is unsuited for Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related OSCC. Patients with HPV-positive tumors have improved prognosis, despite presenting at advanced stages. These shortcomings of the current staging system have been identified in single- and multi-institutional trials. Patients with HPV related OSCC typically present with advanced N-stages leading to higher stage groupings. A rarity of stages I and II therefore represents the nature of HPV-related OSCC. Concerning prognosis of the patients, N-category and extracapsular spread seem to be of minor importance, whereas advanced T-stages result in unfavourable outcome. Anatomical staging therefore has been implied into different proposals to prognostic risk classifications in HPV-related disease as an additive compound. Prognostic risk groupings are further enhanced by incorporating non-anatomical factors. To summarize, it can be suggested that the current TNM system alone has little prognostic value in HPV-related OSCC.

  5. Clinical Significance of IGFBP-3 Methylation in Patients with Early Stage Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Tae Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional protein that inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Hypermethylation of the promoter represses expression of the IGFBP-3 gene. We undertook this study to assess the impact of IGFBP-3 methylation on survival of early stage gastric cancer patients. METHODS: Of the 482 tissue samples from gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery, IGFBP-3 methylation was tested in 138 patients with stage IB/II gastric cancer. We also analyzed IGFBP-3 methylation in 26 gastric cancer cell lines. IGFBP-3 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. Statistical analyses, all two-sided, were performed to investigate the prognostic effects of methylation status of the IGFBP-3 promoter on various clinical parameters. RESULTS: Hypermethylation of IGFBP-3 was observed in 26 (19% of the 138 stage IB/II gastric cancer patients. Clinicopathological factors such as age, Lauren classification, sex, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, and histologic grade did not show a statistically significant association with the methylation status of the IGFBP-3 promoter. Patients with a hypermethylated IGFBP-3 promoter had similar 8-year disease-free survival compared with those without a hypermethylated IGFBP-3 promoter (73% vs 75%, P = .78. In subgroup analyses, females, but not males, seemed to have poorer prognosis for DFS and OS in the subset of patients with IGFBP-3 methylation as compared with those without IGFBP-3 methylation (8-year DFS: 55.6% vs 71.6%, P = .3694 and 8-year overall survival: 55.6% vs 68.4%, P = .491, respectively even with no statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The status of IGFBP-3 methylation as measured by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction proposed the modest role for predicting survival in specific subgroups of patients with early-stage gastric cancer who undergo curative surgery. However, this needs further investigation.

  6. Effect of implant vs. tissue reconstruction on cancer specific survival varies by axillary lymph node status in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ouyang

    Full Text Available To compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS between patients who underwent tissue or implant reconstruction after mastectomy.We used the database from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER registries and compared the BCSS between patients who underwent tissue and implant reconstruction after mastectomy. Cox-regression models were fitted, adjusting for known clinicopathological features. The interaction between the reconstruction types (tissue/implant and nodal status (N-stage was investigated.A total of 6,426 patients with a median age of 50 years were included. With a median follow up of 100 months, the 10-year cumulative BCSS and non-BCSS were 85.1% and 95.4%, respectively. Patients who underwent tissue reconstruction had tumors with a higher T-stage, N-stage, and tumor grade and tended to be ER/PR-negative compared to those who received implant reconstruction. In univariate analysis, implant-reconstruction was associated with a 2.4% increase (P = 0.003 in the BCSS compared with tissue-reconstruction. After adjusting for significant risk factors of the BCSS (suggested by univariate analysis and stratifying based on the N-stage, there was only an association between the reconstruction type and the BCSS for the N2-3 patients (10-year BCSS of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction: 68.7% and 59.0%, P = 0.004. The 10-year BCSS rates of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction were 91.7% and 91.8% in N0 patients (P>0.05 and 84.5% and 84.4% in N1 patients (P>0.05, respectively.The implant (vs. tissue reconstruction after mastectomy was associated with an improved BCSS in N2-3 breast cancer patients but not in N0-1 patients. A well-designed, prospective study is needed to further confirm these findings.

  7. [Complications of surgical stage of treatment in patients with cancer of cervix uteri stage IIB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanivs'ka, A Ie

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 127 patients, suffering cervix uteri cancer stage IIB in period of 1998 - 2012 yrs, were analyzed. Complications of surgical stage of the combined treatment have had occurred in 40.9% patients, including 40.5% patients, to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was conducted and in 41.5%--radiation therapy (RTH). The main postoperative complications--retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts--were revealed in 35.4% patients. The factors, raising the risk of postoperative complications occurrence, are following: the primary tumor spreading, metastatic affection of lymphatic nodes of pelvic cavity, preoperative conduction of RTH or chemotherapy.

  8. Local staging of sigmoid colon cancer using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An accurate radiological staging of colon cancer is crucial to select patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PURPOSE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer, poor...... prognostic factors, and the inter-observer variation of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using 1.5 T MRI with high resolution T2-weighted (T2W) imaging, DWI, and no contrast enhancement, 35 patients with sigmoid colon cancer were...... the measured mean ADC values were below 1.0 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s with an intra-class correlation coefficient in T3cd-T4 tumors of 0.85. CONCLUSION: Preoperative MRI can identify locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer and has potential as the imaging of choice to select patients for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Initial...

  9. An elemental correlation study in cancerous breast tissue by total reflection x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, U; Braziewicz, J; Banaś, D; Kubala-Kukuś, A; Góźdź, S; Pajek, M; Smok, J; Urbaniak, A

    1997-01-01

    The total reflection x-ray fluorescence method (TRXRF) has been employed to determine of P, S, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, and Pb concentration in the benign breast tumor tissue from 68 women and in the cancerous breast tissue from 26 women. Concentrations of most of elements show enhancement in cancerous breast tissue. Examined elements compete for binding sites in the cell, change its enzymatic activity, and exert direct or indirect action on the carcinogenic process accelerating the growth of tumors. Inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by variation in trace element concentrations results in immunological breakdown of the body system. An attempt has been made to correlate measured trace element concentrations with the clinical stage of cancer. Physical bases of used analytical method, experimental setup, and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  10. Multiparametric MRI in detection and staging of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    the aggressiveness and stage of the cancer. Scientific work supports the rapidly growing use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) as the most sensitive and specific imaging tool for detection, lesion characterisation and staging of PCa. However, the experience with mp-MRI in PCa management...... in Denmark has been very limited. Therefore, we carried out this PhD project based on three original studies to evaluate the use of mp-MRI in detection, assessment of biological aggression and staging of PCa in a Danish setup with limited experience in mp-MRI prostate diagnostics. The aim was to assess......, and all lesions were evaluated according to the PIRADS classification and the extracapsular extension (ECE) risk scoring from the ESUR MR prostate guidelines. The images were evaluated by two readers with different experience in mp-MRI interpretation. An mp-MRI T-stage (cTMRI) and an ECE risk score were...

  11. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  12. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  13. Treatment of stage I and II ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Koji; Okada, Etsuko; Numoto, Atsuo; Nakazuma, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    74 cases of primary ovarian cancer treated here previously were classified into three groups, no residual (corresponding to Stage Ia, Ib), cell residual (Ic-IIc) and mass residual (III,IV), and prognoses were compared. The 5 year survival rates were 83.3%, 29.4% and 12.6% respectively. In Stage I and II cases, almost all of the tumor mass would be removed by operation. Therefore the target of postoperative treatment should be the residual cancer as cell units spread widely throughout the abdominal cavity. For this purpose, IPCP. has been performed on 35 cases of Stage I and II since 1977. The 3 year survival rate for this series is as good as 88.6%, and the sites of recurrence were localized in the small pelvic cavity adjacent to the Douglas pouch in 5 out of 6 relapsed cases. This fact suggests that IPCP is capable of controlling the cancer cells in the upper abdominal cavity, but still insufficient to control them in the pelvic cavity where deeper invasion is suspected. In order to improve the local control ability, utilization of the uterus as the applicator for prophylactic intracavitary irradiation came to be considered. The spread of cancer to the uterus was found in 5 out of 38 cases in Stage I and II(13.2%), but silent invasion was found in only one case. These results suggests that the utilization of the uterus as the applicator for prophylactic intracavitary irradiation would be feasible if no macroscopical cancer extention to the uterus exists and the uterus is suitable for application. Several combinations with Tandem and Ovoid have been tested and an adequate method has been proposed. (author)

  14. Breast tissue, oral and urinary microbiomes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hannah; Altemus, Jessica; Niazi, Farshad; Green, Holly; Calhoun, Benjamin C; Sturgis, Charles; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Eng, Charis

    2017-10-20

    It has long been proposed that the gut microbiome contributes to breast carcinogenesis by modifying systemic estrogen levels. This is often cited as a possible mechanism linking breast cancer and high-fat, low-fiber diets as well as antibiotic exposure, associations previously identified in population-based studies. More recently, a distinct microbiome has been identified within breast milk and tissue, but few studies have characterized differences in the breast tissue microbiota of patients with and without cancer, and none have investigated distant body-site microbiomes outside of the gut. We hypothesize that cancerous breast tissue is associated with a microbiomic profile distinct from that of benign breast tissue, and that microbiomes of more distant sites, the oral cavity and urinary tract, will reflect dysbiosis as well. Fifty-seven women with invasive breast cancer undergoing mastectomy and 21 healthy women undergoing cosmetic breast surgery were enrolled. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified from urine, oral rinse and surgically collected breast tissue, sequenced, and processed through a QIIME-based bioinformatics pipeline. Cancer patient breast tissue microbiomes clustered significantly differently from non-cancer patients ( p =0.03), largely driven by decreased relative abundance of Methylobacterium in cancer patients (median 0.10 vs. 0.24, p =0.03). There were no significant differences in oral rinse samples. Differences in urinary microbiomes were largely explained by menopausal status, with peri/postmenopausal women showing decreased levels of Lactobacillus . Independent of menopausal status, however, cancer patients had increased levels of gram-positive organisms including Corynebacterium ( p <0.01), Staphylococcus ( p =0.02) , Actinomyces ( p <0.01), and Propionibacteriaceae ( p <0.01). Our observations suggest that the local breast microbiota differ in patients with and without breast cancer. Cancer patient urinary microbiomes were

  15. Multimodal imaging evaluation in staging of rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common cancer and a major cause of mortality in Western countries. Accurate staging is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategies and planning appropriate surgical procedures to control rectal cancer. Endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) is suitable for assessing the extent of tumor invasion, particularly in early-stage or superficial rectal cancer cases. In advanced cases with distant metastases, computed tomography (CT) is the primary approach used to evaluate the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to assess preoperative staging and the circumferential resection margin involvement, which assists in evaluating a patient’s risk of recurrence and their optimal therapeutic strategy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT may be useful in detecting occult synchronous tumors or metastases at the time of initial presentation. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains a challenge with all modalities because it is difficult to reliably differentiate between the tumor mass and other radiation-induced changes in the images. EUS does not appear to have a useful role in post-therapeutic response assessments. Although CT is most commonly used to evaluate treatment responses, its utility for identifying and following-up metastatic lesions is limited. Preoperative high-resolution MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging, and/or PET-CT could provide valuable prognostic information for rectal cancer patients with locally advanced disease receiving preoperative CRT. Based on these results, we conclude that a combination of multimodal imaging methods should be used to precisely assess the restaging of rectal cancer following CRT. PMID:24764662

  16. Multigene methylation analysis for detection and staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokida, Hideki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Urakami, Shinji; Igawa, Mikio; Ogishima, Tatsuya; Li, Long-Cheng; Kawahara, Motoshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kane, Christopher J; Carroll, Peter R; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2005-09-15

    Aberrant gene promoter methylation profiles have been well-studied in human prostate cancer. Therefore, we rationalize that multigene methylation analysis could be useful as a diagnostic biomarker. We hypothesize that a new method of multigene methylation analysis could be a good diagnostic and staging biomarker for prostate cancer. To test our hypothesis, prostate cancer samples (170) and benign prostatic hyperplasia samples (69) were examined by methylation-specific PCR for three genes: adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1), and multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). The methylation status of representative samples was confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis. We further investigated whether methylation score (M score) can be used as a diagnostic and staging biomarker for prostate cancer. The M score of each sample was calculated as the sum of the corresponding log hazard ratio coefficients derived from multivariate logistic regression analysis of methylation status of various genes for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. The optimal sensitivity and specificity of the M score for diagnosis and for staging of prostate cancer was determined by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A pairwise comparison was employed to test for significance using the area under the ROC curve analysis. For each clinicopathologic finding, the association with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free probability was determined using Kaplan-Meier curves and a log-rank test was used to determine significance. The relationship between M score and clinicopathologic findings was analyzed by either the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, or the Spearman rank correlation test. The frequency of positive methylation-specific PCR bands for APC, GSTP1, and MDR1 genes in prostate cancer samples was 64.1%, 54.0%, and 55.3%, respectively. In benign prostatic hyperplasia samples, it was 8.7%, 5.8%, and 11.6%, respectively. There

  17. Surgery in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1999-01-01

    The role of surgery in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial. Surgery has several potential advantages because it may reduce the frequency of local relapses, it does not impede the intensity of chemotherapy, it does not affect the bone marrow, and surgical staging may be of prognostic...... significance. Several smaller retrospective studies which focus on surgery alone, surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or chemotherapy followed by adjuvant surgery have been reported. Five-year survival data have ranged from 10-50% according to stage, both T-status and nodal status appearing...

  18. Interleukin-6 blockade attenuates lung cancer tissue construction integrated by cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Koyanagi-Aoi, Michiyo; Otani, Kyoko; Zen, Yoh; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Aoi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we successfully generated lung cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cells by introducing a small set of transcription factors into a lung cancer cell line. In addition to properties that are conventionally referred to as CSC properties, the lung induced CSCs exhibited the ability to form lung cancer-like tissues in vitro with vascular cells and mesenchymal stem cells, which showed structures and immunohistological patterns that were similar to human lung cancer tissues. We named ...

  19. Towards optimal cancer treatment: The IAEA’s new smartphone app for cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Miklos; Yusuf, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Identifying cancer stages quickly and accurately will become easier for healthcare professionals in developing countries, thanks to an IAEA-developed smartphone app launched in September 2015 during the IAEA’s 59th General Conference. Staging cancer is a complex process, involving the integration of the results of a wide range of tests. Based on this diagnosis, physicians decide on whether surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy or any other form of treatment is most appropriate.

  20. The safety of transplanting cryopreserved ovarian tissue in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mikkel; Greve, Tine; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of frozen/thawed ovarian tissue from patients with a malignant condition is associated with a risk of re-introduction of the disease as the tissue usually is removed before anti-cancer therapy and may thus contain malignant cells. We review studies investigating the presence...... of malignant cells in cryopreserved ovarian tissue from patients with malignant disease and based on the strength of the evidence, recommendations for transplantations are proposed....

  1. Human Microbiome Fusobacterium Nucleatum in Esophageal Cancer Tissue Is Associated with Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Kensuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Mima, Kosuke; Miyake, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Sawayama, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yoichi; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-11-15

    Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) is a component of the human microbiome that primarily inhabits the oral cavity. It causes periodontal disease and has also been implicated in the development of human cancers. Although there are several reports of the relationship between F. nucleatum and the clinical outcome in human cancers, its prognostic significance in esophageal cancer remains unclear. We quantified F. nucleatum DNA in 325 resected esophageal cancer specimens by qPCR. Significant pathways in F. nucleatum-positive esophageal cancer tissues were identified by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis using microarray data. Esophageal cancer tissues contained significantly more F. nucleatum DNA than matched normal esophageal mucosa (P = 0.021; n = 60). F. nucleatum DNA was detected in 74 of 325 cases (23%). F. nucleatum DNA positivity was significantly associated with tumor stage, but not with sex, age, performance status, tobacco use, alcohol use, histology, tumor location, or preoperative treatment. F. nucleatum DNA positivity was also significantly associated with cancer-specific survival [log-rank P = 0.0039; univariate HR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-3.23; P = 0.0068; multivariate HR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.06-2.94; P = 0.031]. The top-ranked KEGG pathway in F. nucleatum-positive tissues was "cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction." A significant relationship between F. nucleatum and the chemokine CCL20 was validated by IHC. F. nucleatum in esophageal cancer tissues was associated with shorter survival, suggesting a potential role as a prognostic biomarker. F. nucleatum might also contribute to aggressive tumor behavior through activation of chemokines, such as CCL20. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5574-81. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Miscellaneous syndromes and their management: occult breast cancer, breast cancer in pregnancy, male breast cancer, surgery in stage IV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfry, Alfred John

    2013-04-01

    Surgical therapy for occult breast cancer has traditionally centered on mastectomy; however, breast conservation with whole breast radiotherapy followed by axillary lymph node dissection has shown equivalent results. Patients with breast cancer in pregnancy can be safely and effectively treated; given a patient's pregnancy trimester and stage of breast cancer, a clinician must be able to guide therapy accordingly. Male breast cancer risk factors show strong association with BRCA2 mutations, as well as Klinefelter syndrome. Several retrospective trials of surgical therapy in stage IV breast cancer have associated a survival advantage with primary site tumor extirpation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer stage, comorbidity, and socioeconomic differences in the effect of cancer on labour market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielen, Karsten; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Andersen, Ingelise

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Socioeconomic inequality in return to work after cancer treatment and rehabilitation have been documented, but less is known about its causes. This paper investigates the role played by breast cancer stage at diagnosis and comorbidity. METHODS: We used the comprehensive Danish Cancer...... employment, and a considerable amount of the educational effect is mediated by comorbidity and pre-cancer labour market participation and income. CONCLUSION: The result of the study is negative in the sense that the stronger effect of breast cancer on employment among low-educated compared to highly educated...

  4. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  5. Clinical study on N0-stage tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruoka, Yasubumi; Ando, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Makoto; Sangu, Yoshikuni; Ogiuchi, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the cases of N0-stage tongue cancer patients treated at the Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, between January 1980 and December 2000. Primary tongue cancers were treated by surgery (52%) and radiotherapy (48%). In principle, we did not perform elective neck dissection for N0-stage necks. Instead, a policy of careful observation was adopted for the management of N0-stage necks in patients with tongue cancer, and a radical neck dissection or modified radical neck dissection was performed in the event of a secondary neck metastasis. A local recurrence was confirmed in 25 patients. Twenty of the 25 local recurrences were successfully controlled by a therapy. The incidence of secondary neck metastasis was 4/46 (8%) for T1 patients, 21/48 (45%) for T2 patients, and 9/15 (60%) for T3/T4 patients. Overall, secondary neck metastases occurred in 34 out of 109 (32%) patients, and eventually 12 patients died from uncontrolled tumors. As for the distribution of involved lymph nodes, level I to level III nodes were involved in 30 (88%) patients, and level IV nodes were involved in 4 patients. (author)

  6. Intrarectal ultrasound accuracy in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallone, G.; Della Vecchia, A.; Di Capua, V.; Rengo, C.; Spirito, M.; Romano, G.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were evaluated of endorectal ultrasound in assessing the local extension of rectal carcinomas. The study population consisted of 50 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer. A CT scan was also performed on 45 patients, and the results were then compared to post-operative histologic findings. Endorectal US allowed the correct staging of 39/45 tumors (86.6%), with 1 false positive (overstaging T1 as T2), and 5 false negatives (understaging 3xT3 as T2; 2xT4 as T3). CT allowed the correct staging of 37/45 tumors (82.2%), with 5 false positives (overstaging T1 as T2) and 3 false negatives (understaging T3 as T2). Our results prove endorectal US to be a reliable method for the local staging of rectal cancers, limited to mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the rectal wall (T1 and T2 tumors). CT does not allow proper evaluation of T1 and T2 tumors, but provides with a better assessment of tumors (T3 and T4). Both C and endorectal US should, therefore, be used as complementary diagnostic techniques for an accurate evaluation of the local extension of lower rectal cancers

  7. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Validity of the stage of lung cancer in records of the Maastricht Cancer Registry, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Leo J.; Langendijk, JA; Jager, JJ; vandenBrandt, PA

    Information collected in a clinical study on a random sample of 99 patients with inoperable lung cancer, treated with radiotherapy, was compared to the staging information in the Maastricht cancer registry. Validity of sex (0% disagreements), date of birth (0%), histology (1% major disagreements)

  9. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  10. Late stage and grave prognosis of esophageal cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nun-Anan, Pongjarat; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the major health concerns in Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand. However, only a limited number of studies have been reported from this region. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical characteristics and survival rate of esophageal cancer in Thailand. Clinical information, histological features and endoscopic findings were collected from a tertiary care center in central region of Thailand between September 2011- November 2014 and reviewed. A total of 64 esophageal cancer patients including 58 men and 6 women with mean age of 62.6 years were enrolled. Common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (74%), dyspepsia (10%) and hematemesis (8%). Mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 72 days. Esophageal stenosis with contact bleeding was the most common endoscopic finding (55.6%). The location of cancer was found in proximal (16%), middle (50%) and distal (34%) esophagus. Squamous cell carcinoma was far more common histology than adenocarcinoma (84.2% vs 10.5%). However, esophageal adenocarcinoma was significantly more common than squamous cell carcinoma in distal area of esophagus (100% vs 22.9%; p=0.0001, OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.1-2.2). Esophageal cancer stages 3 and 4 accounted for 35.2% and 59.3% respectively. Overall 2-year survival rate was 20% and only 16% in metastatic patients. Most esophageal cancer patients in Thailand have squamous cell carcinoma and nearly all present at advanced stage with a grave prognosis. Screening of high risk individuals and early detection might be important keys to improve the survival rate and treatment outcome in Thailand.

  11. A 2-stage ovarian cancer screening strategy using the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) identifies early-stage incident cancers and demonstrates high positive predictive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Karen H; Skates, Steven; Hernandez, Mary A; Bedi, Deepak; Bevers, Therese; Leeds, Leroy; Moore, Richard; Granai, Cornelius; Harris, Steven; Newland, William; Adeyinka, Olasunkanmi; Geffen, Jeremy; Deavers, Michael T; Sun, Charlotte C; Horick, Nora; Fritsche, Herbert; Bast, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    A 2-stage ovarian cancer screening strategy was evaluated that incorporates change of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) levels over time and age to estimate risk of ovarian cancer. Women with high-risk scores were referred for transvaginal ultrasound (TVS). A single-arm, prospective study of postmenopausal women was conducted. Participants underwent an annual CA125 blood test. Based on the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) result, women were triaged to next annual CA125 test (low risk), repeat CA125 test in 3 months (intermediate risk), or TVS and referral to a gynecologic oncologist (high risk). A total of 4051 women participated over 11 years. The average annual rate of referral to a CA125 test in 3 months was 5.8%, and the average annual referral rate to TVS and review by a gynecologic oncologist was 0.9%. Ten women underwent surgery on the basis of TVS, with 4 invasive ovarian cancers (1 with stage IA disease, 2 with stage IC disease, and 1 with stage IIB disease), 2 ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (both stage IA), 1 endometrial cancer (stage I), and 3 benign ovarian tumors, providing a positive predictive value of 40% (95% confidence interval = 12.2%, 73.8%) for detecting invasive ovarian cancer. The specificity was 99.9% (95% confidence interval = 99.7%, 100%). All 4 women with invasive ovarian cancer were enrolled in the study for at least 3 years with low-risk annual CA125 test values prior to rising CA125 levels. ROCA followed by TVS demonstrated excellent specificity and positive predictive value in a population of US women at average risk for ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  12. TCM tongue diagnosis index of early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Lun-Chien; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Yi-Jing; Natsagdorj, Sainbuyan; Chiang, John Y

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates discriminating tongue features to distinguish between early stage breast cancer (BC) patients and non-breast cancer individuals through non-invasive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) tongue diagnosis. The tongue features for 67 patients with 0 and 1 stages of BC, and 70 non-breast cancer individuals are extracted by the automatic tongue diagnosis system (ATDS). A total of nine tongue features, namely, tongue color, tongue quality, tongue fissure, tongue fur, red dot, ecchymosis, tooth mark, saliva, and tongue shape are identified for each tongue. Features extracted are further sub-divided according to the areas located, i.e., spleen-stomach, liver-gall-left, liver-gall-right, kidney, and heart-lung areas. This study focuses on deriving significant tongue features (ptongue fur (p=0.024), maximum covering area of tongue fur (p=0.009), thin tongue fur (p=0.009), the average area of red dot (p=0.049), the maximum area of red dot (p=0.009), red dot in the spleen-stomach area (p=0.000), and red dot in the heart-lung area (p=0.000) demonstrate significant differences. The data collected are further classified into two groups. The training group consists of 57 early-stage BC patients and 60 non-breast cancer individuals, while the testing group is composed of 10 early-stage BC patients and 10 non-breast cancer individuals. The logistic regression by utilizing these 7 tongue features with significant differences in Mann-Whitney test as factors is performed. In order to reduce the number of tongue features employed in prediction, tongue features with the least amount of significant difference, namely, maximum area of red dot and average area of red dot, are removed progressively. The tongue features of the testing group are employed in the aforementioned three models to test the power of significant tongue features identified in predicting early-stage BC. An accuracy of 80%, 80% and 90% is reached on non-breast cancer individuals by applying the 7, 6

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  14. Is axillary sonographic staging less accurate in invasive lobular breast cancer than in ductal breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaye, Prashant; Chhatani, Sharmila; Porter, Gareth; Steel, Jim; Doyle, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether axillary sonography is less accurate in invasive lobular breast cancer than in ductal breast cancer. Patients with invasive breast cancer were retrospectively identified from histologic records from 2010 to 2012. Staging axillary sonograms from 96 patients with primary breast cancer in each of 2 subgroups, invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), were reviewed. Preoperative sonographically guided 14-gauge core biopsy was performed on morphologically abnormal lymph nodes. Thirty-one of 96 patients (32%) in each subgroup were node positive on final postoperative histopathologic analysis. Axillary staging sensitivity was 17 of 31 patients (54%) in the IDC subgroup and 15 of 31(48%) in the ILC subgroup. Further analysis of the data showed no statistically significant differences between these subgroups. We found that there was no statistically significant difference in the accuracy of axillary sonographic staging between ILC and IDC. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. [Positron emission tomography/computed tomography for lung cancer staging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladrón de Guevara H, David; Furnaro L, Francisca; Yévenes A, Sebastián; Clavero R, José Miguel; Lazo P, David; Rodríguez D, Patricio; Piottante B, Antonio; Pefaur D, Raúl; Pardo B, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT (Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography) is widely used in nodal and metastatic staging of lung cancer patients. To analyze PET/CT detection of metastatic disease in patients with lung cancer. We reviewed retrospectively F18Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans performed between December 2008 and December 2013. We selected 143 patients aged 30 to 92 years (63% males) with confirmed lung cancer referred for staging, with no previous treatment. We reviewed whole body PET/CT and brain magnetic resonance images. SUVmax (Standardized Uptake Value maximum) of primary pulmonary lesion, hilar/mediastinal nodes, and distant metastases were calculated. Histological types encountered were adenocarcinoma in 55%, squamous-cell in 15%, small-cell in 8%, large-cell in 6% and adeno-squamous in 2%. In 22 cases (15%) histology was not available. Nodal involvement was observed in 60% of patients (44% hilar and 48% mediastinal). Skip metastases (mediastinal involvement without hilum involvement) were encountered in 17% of cases, and were significantly more common among high uptake lung tumors (p < 0.01). Best SUVmax cut-off for node involvement was 4.4 for hilum and 4.0 for mediastinum (sensibility: 86.4%, specificity: 99.8%). Sixty six patients (46.2%) showed distant metastases on PET/CT. The most common metastases were osseous in 22%, adrenal in 16%, hepatic in14%, pulmonary in 14% and cerebral in 12%. PET/CT detected a second unexpected synchronic cancer in eight patients (6%). PET/CT is accurate for nodal staging using an uptake index as SUVmax. Distant metastases are common, especially in bone, adrenal glands and liver.

  16. Cytoreductive surgery for stage IV epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, R Y; Zhang, Z Y; Cai, S M; Li, Z T; Chen, J; Tang, M Q; Liu, Q

    1999-12-01

    We tried to determine the role of cytoreductive surgery for stage IV epithelial ovarian cancer and in what conditions this surgical procedure could carry the best benefits. From January 1986 to December 1997, seventy-one of 73 patients with stage IV epithelial ovarian cancer who were treated in Cancer Hospital of Shanghai Medical University were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical information including age, grade, histology, presence of ascites, size of residual disease, site of extra-abdominal metastasis, whether initially presenting as metastatic disease or not, neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, platinum-based chemotherapy and second-line chemotherapy was obtained. Survival was calculated by life-table and survival curves were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method with differences in survival estimated by log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were identified by Cox's proportional hazards regression model. The median age of the patients' population was 54 years (range 22-82), median follow-up time was 12 months (range 3 to 130) and estimated 5-year survival rate 6.1%. Thirty out of 71 (42.3%) patients were successfully debulked (< or = 1 cm) at the time of initial surgery. There was a significant difference in five-year survival rate between patients optimally (14.1%) vs suboptimally (0%) cytoreduced, with an estimated median survival in the optimal group of 23 months vs 9 months in the suboptimal group (P=0.0001, long-rank test). When the variables were factorized, only in patients with malignant pleural effusion or positive supraclavicular lymph nodes, optimal cytoreduction could get the greatest benefits. Multivariate analysis revealed that the size of residual disease and ascites were independent factors of survival. However, only ascites was the prognostic factor of progression-free survival. Optimal cytoreductive surgery is an important determinant of survival in women with stage IV epithelial ovarian cancer, mainly in those with malignant pleural effusion

  17. Tissue-specificity of proteoglycans expression in different cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Suhovskih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proteoglycans (PGs are complex glycosylated molecules playing an important role in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signaling. Expression of PGs and their expression pattern change considerably during malignant transformation of mammalian cells and tissues.Objective. The aim of our work was to investigate tissue-specificity of main PGs expression (glypican-1, perlecan, syndecan-1, aggrecan, versican, CSPG4/NG2, brevican, decorin, lumican in normal cells (fibroblasts and normal epithelial prostate cells PNT2 and in different human cancer cell lines (prostate, breast, lung, brain, kidney. Expression patterns of main PGs were determined in these cells using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunocytochemical staining.Results. It was shown that fibroblasts actively expressed PGs, and PNT2 cells had lower (5–6-fold expression levels of a limited set of PG. In different cancer cell lines, overall transcriptional activities of PGs varied up to 10-fold, although their expression patterns had tissue-specific properties (for example, expression of syndecan-1 is more specific for prostate cancer cells, while perlecan is typical for lung cancer cell lines.Conclusions. Along with this, variability of the PG expression patterns in cell lines of the same tissue of origin was shown, suggesting a possible contribution of the variable PGs expression to intratumoural heterogeneity of cancer cells and their potential as perspective biomarker (s for personalised cancer diagnostics.

  18. Interleukin-6 stimulates aerobic glycolysis by regulating PFKFB3 at early stage of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhang, Yongxian; Zhuang, Qiulin; Han, Yusong; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a well-known etiological factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and cancer cells are known to preferentially metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis. However, the connection between chronic inflammation and aerobic glycolysis in the development of CRC is largely unexplored. The present study investigated whether interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, promotes the development of CRC by regulating the aerobic glycolysis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. In colitis-associated CRC mouse, anti-IL-6 receptor antibody treatment reduced the incidence of CRC and decreased the expression of key genes in aerobic glycolysis, whereas the plasma concentrations of glucose and lactate were not affected. Consistently, IL-6 treatment stimulated aerobic glycolysis, upregulated key genes in aerobic glycolysis and promoted cell proliferation and migration in SW480 and SW1116 CRC cells. 6-phoshofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3) was the most downregulated gene by anti-IL-6 receptor antibody in colorectal adenoma tissues. Further analysis in human samples revealed overexpression of PFKFB3 in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues, which was also associated with lymph node metastasis, intravascular cancer embolus and TNM stage. In addition, the effect of IL-6 on CRC cells can be abolished by knocking down PRKFB3 through siRNA transfection. Our data suggest that chronic inflammation promotes the development of CRC by stimulating aerobic glycolysis and IL-6 is functioning, at least partly, through regulating PFKFB3 at early stage of CRC.

  19. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Samuel J; Thomas, Gareth J

    2017-08-01

    Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of 'non-animal human tissue' models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Circulating mutational portrait of cancer: manifestation of aggressive clonal events in both early and late stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumors residing in tissues and organs leave footprints in circulation through circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor DNAs (ctDNA. Characterization of the ctDNA portraits and comparison with tumor DNA mutational portraits may reveal clinically actionable information on solid tumors that is traditionally achieved through more invasive approaches. Methods We isolated ctDNAs from plasma of patients of 103 lung cancer and 74 other solid tumors of different tissue origins. Deep sequencing using the Guardant360 test was performed to identify mutations in 73 clinically actionable genes, and the results were associated with clinical characteristics of the patient. The mutation profiles of 37 lung cancer cases with paired ctDNA and tumor genomic DNA sequencing were used to evaluate clonal representation of tumor in circulation. Five lung cancer cases with longitudinal ctDNA sampling were monitored for cancer progression or response to treatments. Results Mutations in TP53, EGFR, and KRAS genes are most prevalent in our cohort. Mutation rates of ctDNA are similar in early (I and II and late stage (III and IV cancers. Mutation in DNA repair genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATM are found in 18.1% (32/177 of cases. Patients with higher mutation rates had significantly higher mortality rates. Lung cancer of never smokers exhibited significantly higher ctDNA mutation rates as well as higher EGFR and ERBB2 mutations than ever smokers. Comparative analysis of ctDNA and tumor DNA mutation data from the same patients showed that key driver mutations could be detected in plasma even when they were present at a minor clonal population in the tumor. Mutations of key genes found in the tumor tissue could remain in circulation even after frontline radiotherapy and chemotherapy suggesting these mutations represented resistance mechanisms. Longitudinal sampling of five lung cancer cases showed distinct changes in ctDNA mutation portraits that

  1. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Does stage of cancer, comorbidity or lifestyle factors explain educational differences in survival after endometrial cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Ulla Holten; Ibfelt, Else; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have documented an association between socioeconomic position and survival from gynaecological cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association between level of education and survival after endometrial cancer among...... Danish women; and whether differences in stage at diagnosis and comorbidity contribute to the educational differences in survival. Methods: Women with endometrial cancer diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 were identified in the Danish Gynaecological Cancer Database, with information on clinical...... characteristics, surgery, body mass index (BMI) and smoking status. Information on highest attained education, cohabitation and comorbidity was obtained from nationwide administrative registries. Logistic regression models were used to determine the association between level of education and cancer stage and Cox...

  3. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  4. Computed tomography in the staging of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Myung Hyun; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Kim, Soon Yong

    1988-01-01

    As a screening technique or for preoperative staging of the colorectal cancer, the usefulness or role of CT still remains controversial. The study included retrospective analysis of 40 cases proven colorectal cancer during last 2 years. The results were as follows: 1. The age of patients ranged from 22 to 74 years, 5th and 6th decades were over the half (52.5%) of the cases. 2. Rectum and sigmoid colon were the most frequently involved regions (23 cases, 57.5%). Other areas were 9 cases of transverse colon and each 4 cases of ascending and descending colon. 3. In every cases, the primary tumor was identified on CT as wall thickening. Diffuse wall thickening type was noted in 32 of 40 (80%) cases. Remaining were each 4 cases of focal wall thickening type and discrete mass type. 4. Directly invaded organs were uterus (2 cases) and jejunum (1 case). 10 patients had distant metastasis, and the liver were most frequent organ of involvement (9 of 10 cases). 5. Among 40 cases, 34 cases were pathologically staged following surgery. CT results were compared and correlated with modified Duke's classification. CT correctly staged 19 (55.9%) and understaged 14 (41.2%) of 34 cases. 6. For the evaluation of local extension, CT accuracy was 73.5% with 75% sensitivity and 50% specificity. 7. For the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis, CT accuracy was 82.4% with 70% sensitivity and 100% specificity.

  5. Staged Soft Tissue Reconstruction Following Sarcoma Excision with Anticipated Large Cutaneous Defects: An Oncologically Safe Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Geoffrey W; Kuzon, William M.; Hasen, Jill M; Biermann, J. Sybil

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that select patients undergoing planned soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision with anticipated skin and soft tissue deficits could be treated with a two stage surgical procedure which would allow some flexibility in coverage options while not significantly increasing local recurrence rate or wound complication rate. Methods A retrospective review was undertaken in a series of consecutive patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up treated by a single orthopedic oncologist and a single reconstructive plastic surgeon who were managed with a staged approach STS excision and reconstruction. Results There were 73 patients identified over a ten-year period that underwent staged STS excision and soft tissue reconstruction. There were 12 (16%) initial positive margins resected to negative final margins, and a variety of coverage procedures performed. Wound complication rate was 21%. Local recurrence rate was 11%. Conclusion Staged STS excision and reconstruction is an acceptable tool in the armamentarium of the orthopedic oncologist for managing major soft tissue deficits without an increase in local recurrence rates. PMID:27528845

  6. Alterations in the Immune Cell Composition in Premalignant Breast Tissue that Precede Breast Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnim, Amy C; Hoskin, Tanya L; Arshad, Muhammad; Frost, Marlene H; Winham, Stacey J; Brahmbhatt, Rushin A; Pena, Alvaro; Carter, Jodi M; Stallings-Mann, Melody L; Murphy, Linda M; Miller, Erin E; Denison, Lori A; Vachon, Celine M; Knutson, Keith L; Radisky, Derek C; Visscher, Daniel W

    2017-07-15

    Purpose: Little is known about the role of the immune system in the earliest stages of breast carcinogenesis. We studied quantitative differences in immune cell types between breast tissues from normal donors and those from women with benign breast disease (BBD). Experimental Design: A breast tissue matched case-control study was created from donors to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank (KTB) and from women diagnosed with BBD at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) who either subsequently developed cancer (BBD cases) or remained cancer-free (BBD controls). Serial tissue sections underwent immunostaining and digital quantification of cell number per mm 2 for CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, CD20 + B cells, and CD68 + macrophages and quantification of positive pixel measure for CD11c (dendritic cells). Results: In 94 age-matched triplets, BBD lobules showed greater densities of CD8 + T cells, CD11c + dendritic cells, CD20 + B cells, and CD68 + macrophages compared with KTB normals. Relative to BBD controls, BBD cases had lower CD20 + cell density ( P = 0.04). Nearly 42% of BBD cases had no CD20 + B cells in evaluated lobules compared with 28% of BBD controls ( P = 0.02). The absence of CD20 + cells versus the presence in all lobules showed an adjusted OR of 5.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.4-23.1) for subsequent breast cancer risk. Conclusions: Elevated infiltration of both innate and adaptive immune effectors in BBD tissues suggests an immunogenic microenvironment. The reduced B-cell infiltration in women with later breast cancer suggests a role for B cells in preventing disease progression and as a possible biomarker for breast cancer risk. Clin Cancer Res; 23(14); 3945-52. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Elevated levels of circulating IL-7 and IL-15 in patients with early stage prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmann Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation has been suggested to favour prostate cancer (PCA development. Interleukins (IL represent essential inflammation mediators. IL-2, IL-7, IL-15 and IL-21, sharing a common receptor γ chain (c-γ, control T lymphocyte homeostasis and proliferation and play major roles in regulating cancer-immune system interactions. We evaluated local IL-2, IL-7, IL-15 and IL-21 gene expression in prostate tissues from patients with early stage PCA or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. As control, we used IL-6 gene, encoding an IL involved in PCA progression. IL-6, IL-7 and IL-15 titres were also measured in patients' sera. Methods Eighty patients with BPH and 79 with early (1 to 2c stage PCA were enrolled. Gene expression in prostate tissues was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Serum IL concentrations and acute phase protein titres were evaluated by ELISA. Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and χ2 tests were used to compare IL gene expression and serum titers in the two groups of patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were constructed to evaluate the possibility to distinguish sera from different groups of patients based on IL titers. Results IL-2 and IL-21 gene expression was comparably detectable, with low frequency and at low extents, in PCA and BPH tissues. In contrast, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-15 genes were expressed more frequently (p Conclusions Expression IL-7 and IL-15 genes in prostate tissues and corresponding serum titres are significantly increased in patients with early stage PCA as compared with patients with BPH.

  8. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. Low copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) predicts worse prognosis in early-stage laryngeal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Siwen; Qu, Yiping; Wei, Jing; Shao, Yuan; Yang, Qi; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-02-05

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number have been widely reported in various human cancers, and been considered to be an important hallmark of cancers. However, little is known about the value of copy number variations of mtDNA in the prognostic evaluation of laryngeal cancer. Using real-time quantitative PCR method, we investigated mtDNA copy number in a cohort of laryngeal cancers (n =204) and normal laryngeal tissues (n =40), and explored the association of variable mtDNA copy number with clinical outcomes of laryngeal cancer patients. Our data showed that the relative mean mtDNA content was higher in the laryngeal cancer patients (11.91 ± 4.35 copies) than the control subjects (4.72 ± 0.70 copies). Moreover, we found that mtDNA content was negatively associated with cigarette smoking (pack-years), tumor invasion, and TNM stage. Notably, variable mtDNA content did not affect overall survival of laryngeal cancer patients. However, when the patients were categorized into early-stage and late-stage tumor groups according to TNM stage, we found that low mtDNA content was strongly associated with poor survival in the former, but not in the latter. The present study demonstrated that low mtDNA content was strongly correlated with some of clinicopathological characteristics, such as cigarette smoking, tumor invasion and TNM stage. In addition, we found a strong link between low mtDNA content and worse survival of the patients with early-stage tumors. Taken together, low copy number of mtDNA may be a useful poor prognostic factor for early-stage laryngeal cancer patients. The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1841771572115955.

  10. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  11. Analysis of neurotransmitter tissue content of Drosophila melanogaster in different life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-21

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Schrohl; Sørensen, Nanna Møller

    2005-01-01

    Whether patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer are offered adjuvant systemic therapy following surgical removal of the tumor is based on prognosis. Prognosis is estimated in every patient using established prognostic variables. Unfortunately, when using the currently available prognostic...... parameters a significant proportion of patients are over-treated. Thus, in order to improve stratification of breast cancer patients, additional prognostic factors need to be identified. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is one of the promising candidates for new prognostic markers in breast...... cancer, as a number of studies have demonstrated an association between high tumor-tissue levels of TIMP-1 mRNA as well as TIMP-1 protein and a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. TIMP-1 is a member of the TIMP family, currently comprising four members (TIMP-1-4), and its main function...

  13. Limitations of tissue micro array in Duke's B colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brunner, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Tissue micro array (TMA) is widely used in cancer research in search of new predictive and prognostic markers. Colon cancer is known to be heterogeneous and the present study addresses some methodological aspects using cores of different size and analysing markers with different cellular...... distribution. We selected 61 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks representing patients diagnosed with Dukes B colon cancer. Two 1 mm and two 2 mm cores were taken from both the centre and the invasive front of the tumour respectively. The immunostaining included MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, p53, COX-2, TIMP and Betacatenin...... moderate to high agreement (kappa = 0.54-0.9) whereas TIMP-1 had the lowest score (kappa 0.19-0.25). The application of TMA in Dukes B colon cancer has several pitfalls and depends substantially on the immunohistochemical marker in question. Therefore a validation study seems justified before applying...

  14. Prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of MIB-1 (Ki-67) in Danish ovarian cancer patients. From the 'MALOVA' ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression of MIB-1 (Ki-67) in tumour tissues from 808 patients with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate, whether MIB-1 (Ki-67) tissue expression levels correlate with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of the dise......The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression of MIB-1 (Ki-67) in tumour tissues from 808 patients with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate, whether MIB-1 (Ki-67) tissue expression levels correlate with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis...... of the disease. Using tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the MIB-1 (Ki-67) expression levels in tissues from 202 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (177 stage I, 5 stage II, 19 stage III, 1 stage IV) and 606 ovarian cancer (OC) patients (177 stage I, 64 stage II, 311 stage III, 54 stage IV). Using a 10...... different distribution of MIB-1 (Ki-67) positive and negative tumours were found in adenocarcinoma NOS, serous adenocarcinomas, mucinous adenocarcinomas, endometrioid adenocarcinomas, non-epithelial and clear-cell carcinomas (p = 0.016). Univariate Kaplan-Meier survival analysis performed on all OC cases...

  15. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala-Kukus, A. E-mail: akuku@pu.kielce.pl; Braziewicz, J.; Banas, D.; Majewska, U.; Gozdz, S.; Urbaniak, A

    1999-04-02

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  16. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubala-Kukus, A.; Braziewicz, J.; Banas, D.; Majewska, U.; Gozdz, S.; Urbaniak, A.

    1999-01-01

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described

  17. Expression of cystatin C in clinical human colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Yousif; Sebzda, Tadeusz; Warwas, Maria; Kopec, Wieslaw; Ziólkowska, Jolanta; Siewinski, Maciej

    2005-01-01

    We studied the relation between the antipapain activity of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPI) and immunohistochemical staining for cystatin C, using anti-chicken cystatin antibodies, in the colorectal cancer tissues. In primary tumour tissues immuno-peroxidase reactivity was present in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface membranes. Sections of non malignant tissues showed no staining. The percentages of positive staining were greater for adenocarcinoma than carcinoma,100% and 77% respectively. Antipapain activity which was increased in malignant tissues in comparison to control, rose successively from well differentiated carcinomas through moderately to poor differentiated. Invasive adenocarcinomas had higher antipapain activity than noninvasive ones. The results indicated that immunohistochemical detection of cystatin using anti-chicken cystatin antibodies could be useful in studying the prognostic significance of cystatin C expression in colorectal cancer.

  18. Late Relapses in Stage I Testicular Cancer Patients on Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comprehensive data on late relapse (LR) and very LR (VLR) in patients with clinical stage I (CS-1) testicular cancer followed on surveillance are missing. These data are essential for planning optimal follow-up. OBJECTIVE: Assess incidence and outcome of LR (>2 yr) and VLR (>5 yr...... Cancer (DaTeCa) database. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We estimated survival and relapse probabilities and compared the results using log-rank tests and Cox regression analyses. We compared differences in patient characteristics by using χ(2), Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests...... when comparing the LR(VLR) and ER patients by log-rank, but Cox regression adjusted for age showed a significant effect of time to relapse on survival for seminoma patients. Apart from significantly more ER nonseminoma patients with elevated human chorionic gonadotropin at relapse, there were...

  19. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  20. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Paul D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy. The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. Methods We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Results Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17% contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Conclusion Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with

  1. [Rectal cancer - local staging and imaging under neoadjuvant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, M

    2012-06-01

    Rectal cancer restaging after neoadjuvant therapy is based on two principles: an anatomic definition of the tumor allowing surgical planning and prognostic stage grouping. Emerging data suggest that reassessment using a combination of different imaging modalities may help to provide valuable prognostic information before definitive surgery. Perfusion computed tomography (CT) may provide special information regarding tumor vascularity. Evaluation of therapy response, especially of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is necessary for surgical planning. For local staging high-resolution and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be of high diagnostic accuracy. The M status should be assessed using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) while lymph node evaluation requires either magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning.

  2. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Jackson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of ‘non-animal human tissue’ models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models.

  3. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergomas, Francesca; Grizzi, Fabio; Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha; Laghi, Luigi; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21 + follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response

  4. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  5. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  6. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemik, Ozgur; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Sümer, Aziz; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Adas, Mine; Begenik, Huseyin; Hasirci, Ismail; Yilmaz, Ozkan; Purisa, Sevim; Kisli, Erol; Tuzun, Sefa; Kotan, Cetin

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the levels of preoperative serum matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in gastric cancer. METHODS: One hundred gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy were enrolled in this study. The serum concentrations of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 in these patients and in fifty healthy controls were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Higher serum MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were observed in patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Serum MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were positively associated with morphological appearance, tumor size, depth of wall invasion, lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, perineural invasion, and pathological stage. They were not significantly associated with age, gender, tumor location, or histological type. CONCLUSION: Increased MMP-1 and TIMP-1 were associated with gastric cancer. Although these markers are not good markers for diagnosis, these markers show in advanced gastric cancer. PMID:21547130

  7. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  8. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: implementation by the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir Rajiv

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue Microarrays (TMAs have emerged as a powerful tool for examining the distribution of marker molecules in hundreds of different tissues displayed on a single slide. TMAs have been used successfully to validate candidate molecules discovered in gene array experiments. Like gene expression studies, TMA experiments are data intensive, requiring substantial information to interpret, replicate or validate. Recently, an open access Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification has been released that allows TMA data to be organized in a self-describing XML document annotated with well-defined common data elements. While this specification provides sufficient information for the reproduction of the experiment by outside research groups, its initial description did not contain instructions or examples of actual implementations, and no implementation studies have been published. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the TMA Data Exchange Specification is implemented in a prostate cancer TMA. Results The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is funded by the National Cancer Institute to provide researchers with samples of prostate cancer annotated with demographic and clinical data. The CPCTR now offers prostate cancer TMAs and has implemented a TMA database conforming to the new open access Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification. The bulk of the TMA database consists of clinical and demographic data elements for 299 patient samples. These data elements were extracted from an Excel database using a transformative Perl script. The Perl script and the TMA database are open access documents distributed with this manuscript. Conclusions TMA databases conforming to the Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification can be merged with other TMA files, expanded through the addition of data elements, or linked to data contained in external biological databases. This article describes an open access

  9. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: implementation by the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jules J; Datta, Milton; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Melamed, Jonathan; Orenstein, Jan; Dobbin, Kevin; Patel, Ashok; Dhir, Rajiv; Becich, Michael J

    2004-02-27

    Tissue Microarrays (TMAs) have emerged as a powerful tool for examining the distribution of marker molecules in hundreds of different tissues displayed on a single slide. TMAs have been used successfully to validate candidate molecules discovered in gene array experiments. Like gene expression studies, TMA experiments are data intensive, requiring substantial information to interpret, replicate or validate. Recently, an open access Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification has been released that allows TMA data to be organized in a self-describing XML document annotated with well-defined common data elements. While this specification provides sufficient information for the reproduction of the experiment by outside research groups, its initial description did not contain instructions or examples of actual implementations, and no implementation studies have been published. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the TMA Data Exchange Specification is implemented in a prostate cancer TMA. The Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) is funded by the National Cancer Institute to provide researchers with samples of prostate cancer annotated with demographic and clinical data. The CPCTR now offers prostate cancer TMAs and has implemented a TMA database conforming to the new open access Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification. The bulk of the TMA database consists of clinical and demographic data elements for 299 patient samples. These data elements were extracted from an Excel database using a transformative Perl script. The Perl script and the TMA database are open access documents distributed with this manuscript. TMA databases conforming to the Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification can be merged with other TMA files, expanded through the addition of data elements, or linked to data contained in external biological databases. This article describes an open access implementation of the TMA Data Exchange Specification and provides

  10. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  11. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  12. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The prognostic staging system proposed in the AJCC 8th edition refines the anatomic stage group in Luminal B HER2-negative breast cancer and will lead to a more personalized approach to breast cancer treatment.

  13. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  14. Stomach Cancer: Interconnection between the Redox State, Activity of MMP-2, MMP-9 and Stage of Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, Anatoly P; Ganusevich, Irina I; Gafurov, Marat R; Lukin, Sergey M; Sidorik, Evgeny P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species can lead to the destruction of extracellular matrix facilitating tumor progression. ROS can activate matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), damage DNA and RNA. Therefore, the levels of MMP, ROS and RNS can serve as additional prognostic markers and for the estimation of the effectiveness of tumor therapy. Concerning gastric cancer, the prognostic role of MMP, its connection with the cancer staging remains controversial and correlations between the activity of MMP with the ROS and RNS levels are insufficiently confirmed. Superoxide generation rates, nitric oxide (NO) levels, concentrations of active forms of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor and adjacent tissues of patients with stomach cancer at different disease stages were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) including spin-trapping and polyacrylamide gel zymography. It is shown that the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissue correlate with the superoxide radicals generation rate and NO levels (r = 0.48÷0.67, p tumor tissues and superoxide radical generation rates correlate positively with the stage of regional dissemination (r = 0.45 and 0.37, correspondingly, p stomach cancer (r = 0.58; p < 0.05). Additionally, the feasibility of ESR to locally determine oxidative stress is demonstrated.

  15. Global metabolic reprogramming of colorectal cancer occurs at adenoma stage and is induced by MYC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Yachida, Shinichi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Oshima, Minoru; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Akamoto, Shintaro; Tabata, Sho; Saitoh, Kaori; Kato, Keiko; Sato, Saya; Igarashi, Kaori; Aizawa, Yumi; Kajino-Sakamoto, Rie; Kojima, Yasushi; Fujishita, Teruaki; Enomoto, Ayame; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Okano, Keiichi; Tomita, Masaru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Shinji; Aoki, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells alter their metabolism for the production of precursors of macromolecules. However, the control mechanisms underlying this reprogramming are poorly understood. Here we show that metabolic reprogramming of colorectal cancer is caused chiefly by aberrant MYC expression. Multiomics-based analyses of paired normal and tumor tissues from 275 patients with colorectal cancer revealed that metabolic alterations occur at the adenoma stage of carcinogenesis, in a manner not associated with specific gene mutations involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. MYC expression induced at least 215 metabolic reactions by changing the expression levels of 121 metabolic genes and 39 transporter genes. Further, MYC negatively regulated the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and maintenance but positively regulated genes involved in DNA and histone methylation. Knockdown of MYC in colorectal cancer cells reset the altered metabolism and suppressed cell growth. Moreover, inhibition of MYC target pyrimidine synthesis genes such as CAD, UMPS, and CTPS blocked cell growth, and thus are potential targets for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:28847964

  16. Staging N0 Oral Cancer: Lymphoscintigraphy and Conventional Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, J.B.; Soerensen, J.A.; Grupe, P.; Karstoft, J.; Krogdahl, A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1 and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by a gamma probe and Patent Blue. Palpation, Doppler ultrasonography, MRI, and sentinel lymph node biopsy were compared to a combination of histopathology and follow-up. Diagnostic testing was performed using the x2 test. RESULTS: Histopathological examination revealed metastatic spread to the neck in 14 of 40 patients. One patient had bilateral neck disease. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography were performed in 80 neck sides of 40 patients and MRI in 70 neck sides (5 patients were claustrophobic). SN revealed suspicious lymph nodes in 12 necks, ultrasonography in 23 necks, and MRI in 9 necks. The positive predictive value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 100%, ultrasonography 57%, and MRI 56%. The respective negative predictive values were 96%, 96%, and 85%. The sensitivity of sentinel lymph node biopsy 80% was comparable to ultrasonography 87%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and Doppler ultrasonography may further improve staging. MRI and simple palpation results were poor

  17. Assessment of the prognostic value of the 8th AJCC staging system for patients with clinically staged prostate cancer; A time to sub-classify stage IV?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    Full Text Available The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging system (8th edition for prostate cancer has been published. The current study seeks to validate the prognostic performance of the changes in the new system among clinically staged prostate cancer patients registered within the surveillance, epidemiology and end results (SEER database.SEER database (2004-2014 has been accessed through SEER*Stat program and AJCC 7th and 8th edition stages were calculated utilizing T, N and M stages as well as baseline prostatic specific antigen (PSA and grade group. Cancer-specific and overall survival analyses according to 6th, 7th and 8th editions were conducted through Kaplan-Meier analysis. Moreover, multivariate analysis was conducted through a Cox proportional hazard model.A total of 110499 patients with prostate cancer were identified in the period from 2004-2014.For cancer- specific survival according to 8th AJCC, all pair wise P values for comparison were significant (<0.01 except for stage IIA vs. IIB; while for overall survival according to 8th AJCC, all pair wise P values for comparison were significant (<0.02 except for stage IIIA vs. IIIB. Results of c-index assessment for cancer-specific survival for the three AJCC editions were as follows: c-index for AJCC 6th edition was 0.816; c-index for AJCC 7th edition was 0.897; c-index for AJCC 8th edition was 0.907. For stage IVB prostate cancer (i.e.M1 disease, further sub-staging was proposed according to M1 sub-stage (i.e. M1a, M1b and M1c. Pair wise comparison between these proposed sub-stages was conducted for both cancer-specific and overall survival. For both cancer-specific and overall survival, all pair wise P values for comparisons were <0.0001.Compared to older staging systems (6th and 7th, the 8th system is more discriminatory. Further sub-classification of stage IV disease is suggested.

  18. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Renal cell cancer stage migration: analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Christopher J; Mallin, Katherine; Ritchey, Jamie; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Carroll, Peter R

    2008-07-01

    Evidence exists to suggest a pattern of increasing early diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the study was to analyze patterns of disease presentation and outcome of RCC by AJCC stage using data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) over a 12-year period. The NCDB was queried for adults diagnosed between 1993 and 2004 presenting with ICD-O-2 of 3 renal cell tumors arising in the kidney. Cases were classified by demographics, 2002 AJCC stage (6th edition), and histology. The Cochran-Armitage Test for Trend was used to determine statistical significance of trends over time. Cox regression multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the impact of stage and histology on relative survival. SPSS 14.0 was used for analyses. Between 1993 and 2004 a total of 205,963 patients from the NCDB fit our case definition of RCC. Comparisons between 1993 and 2004 data show an increase in stage I disease and decrease in stage II, III, and IV disease (P < or = .001). The size of stage I tumors also decreased from a mean of 4.1 cm in 1993 to 3.6 cm in 2003. In multivariate analysis, stage, but not histology, predicted relative survival. A 3.3% increase in survival was found for patients diagnosed in 1998 compared with patients diagnosed in 1993. A greater proportion of newly diagnosed patients with RCC currently present with stage I disease compared with earlier years. Stage predicts relative survival for patients with kidney cancer. More recently diagnosed patients have improved relative survival. (Copyright) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  20. [Expression of NF-E1b in colorectal cancer tissues and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Chen, Lei; Di, Jiabo; Wang, Zaozao; Wang, Aidong; Wu, Wei; Wu, Fan; Jiang, Beihai; Su, Xiangqian

    2016-06-01

    To explore the expression of NF-E1b in colorectal cancer tissues and its association with various clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of the patients. Clinicopathological and follow-up data of 168 colorectal cancer patients undergoing radical operation at Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed, including 96 males and 72 females, with mean age of (57.8±11.2) years. The expression of NF-E1b protein was detected in samples of 168 resected colorectal cancer tissues and 45 adjacent non-cancerous tissues by immunohistochemistry. The expression rates of NF-E1b were compared among different clinicopathological features. Moreover, the association between NF-E1b expression and prognosis was analyzed. The expression of NF-E1b protein located mainly in cytoplasm. Positive rate of NF-E1b expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was 17.8% (8/45), which was obviously lower than 67.9%(114/168) of cancer tissues with significant difference (χ(2)=36.376, P=0.000). Clinicopathological parameters analysis suggested that the expression level of NF-E1b in cancer tissues was associated with age (χ(2)=4.862, P=0.030), TNM staging (χ(2)=10.969, P=0.002), lymph node metastasis (χ(2)=7.390, P=0.008) and distal metastasis (χ(2)=17.887, P=0.000). The median follow-up time was 23(1-77) months. The overall 5-year survival of this cohort was 33.3%. Colorectal cancer patients with high levels of NF-E1b expression showed a worse overall survival compared with those with low levels of NF-E1b expression (18.4% vs. 56.6%, P=0.000). Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that tumor location (P=0.034), tumor size (P=0.003), TNM staging (P=0.000), depth of tumor invasion (P=0.009), lymph node metastasis (P=0.000), distant metastasis (P=0.000) and NF-E1b expression level (P=0.001) were associated with the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis

  1. Earlier stages of colorectal cancer detected with immunochemical faecal occult blood tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, L. G. M.; van Rijn, A. F.; van Munster, I. P.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.; Fockens, P.; Laheij, R. J. F.; Dekker, E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of colorectal cancer screening is to improve prognosis by the detection of early cancer and precursor stages. We compared the stage distribution of asymptomatic colorectal cancer patients detected by a positive immunochemical or guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (FOBT) with

  2. A humanised tissue-engineered bone model allows species-specific breast cancer-related bone metastasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quent, Vmc; Taubenberger, A V; Reichert, J C; Martine, L C; Clements, J A; Hutmacher, D W; Loessner, D

    2018-02-01

    Bone metastases frequently occur in the advanced stages of breast cancer. At this stage, the disease is deemed incurable. To date, the mechanisms of breast cancer-related metastasis to bone are poorly understood. This may be attributed to the lack of appropriate animal models to investigate the complex cancer cell-bone interactions. In this study, two established tissue-engineered bone constructs (TEBCs) were applied to a breast cancer-related metastasis model. A cylindrical medical-grade polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate scaffold produced by fused deposition modelling (scaffold 1) was compared with a tubular calcium phosphate-coated polycaprolactone scaffold fabricated by solution electrospinning (scaffold 2) for their potential to generate ectopic humanised bone in NOD/SCID mice. While scaffold 1 was found not suitable to generate a sufficient amount of ectopic bone tissue due to poor ectopic integration, scaffold 2 showed excellent integration into the host tissue, leading to bone formation. To mimic breast cancer cell colonisation to the bone, MDA-MB-231, SUM1315, and MDA-MB-231BO breast cancer cells were cultured in polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels and implanted adjacent to the TEBCs. Histological analysis indicated that the breast cancer cells induced an osteoclastic reaction in the TEBCs, demonstrating analogies to breast cancer-related bone metastasis seen in patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ovaries, through the fallopian tubes, to the uterus. Cancer sometimes begins at the end of the fallopian ... into stage IIA and stage IIB. Stage IIA : Cancer has spread from where it first formed to the uterus and/or the fallopian tubes and/or the ...

  4. Do Hospital Characteristics Influence Cancer-Specific Survival for Early Stage Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Chen, Yingjia; Cooke, David T; Perry, Andrew; Canter, Robert J; Cress, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of oncologic outcomes is of paramount importance in the care of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sought to evaluate the relationship of hospital volume for lobectomy on cancer-specific survival in NSCLC patients treated in California, as well as the influence of Committee on Cancer (CoC) accreditation. Methods The California Cancer Registry was queried from 2004–2011 for cases of Stage I NSCLC and 8,345 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was used to determine prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival. Results 7,587 patients were treated surgically. CoC accreditation was not significant for cancer-specific survival, but treatment in high volume centers was associated with longer survival when compared to low and medium volume centers (HR 1.77, 1.474–2.141 and HR 1.23, 1.058–1.438). Conclusions These data suggest that surgical treatment in high volume hospitals is associated with longer cancer-specific survival for early-stage NSCLC, but that CoC accreditation is not. PMID:26193801

  5. Multiplex zymography captures stage-specific activity profiles of cathepsins K, L, and S in human breast, lung, and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Platt, Manu O

    2011-07-14

    Cathepsins K, L, and S are cysteine proteases upregulated in cancer and proteolyze extracellular matrix to facilitate metastasis, but difficulty distinguishing specific cathepsin activity in complex tissue extracts confounds scientific studies and employing them for use in clinical diagnoses. Here, we have developed multiplex cathepsin zymography to profile cathepsins K, L, and S activity in 10 μg human breast, lung, and cervical tumors by exploiting unique electrophoretic mobility and renaturation properties. Frozen breast, lung, and cervix cancer tissue lysates and normal organ tissue lysates from the same human patients were obtained (28 breast tissues, 23 lung tissues, and 23 cervix tissues), minced and homogenized prior to loading for cathepsin gelatin zymography to determine enzymatic activity. Cleared bands of cathepsin activity were identified and validated in tumor extracts and detected organ- and stage-specific differences in activity. Cathepsin K was unique compared to cathepsins L and S. It was significantly higher for all cancers even at the earliest stage tested (stage I for lung and cervix (n = 6, p zymography, yielded 100% sensitivity and specificity for 20 breast tissue samples tested (10 normal; 10 tumor) in part due to the consistent absence of cathepsin K in normal breast tissue across all patients. To summarize, this sensitive assay provides quantitative outputs of cathepsins K, L, and S activities from mere micrograms of tissue and has potential use as a supplement to histological methods of clinical diagnoses of biopsied human tissue.

  6. The National Cancer Data Base report on recent hospital cancer program progress toward complete American Joint Committee on Cancer/TNM staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, I D; Phillips, J L; Menck, H R; Murphy, G P; Winchester, D P

    1997-12-15

    American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging procedures were first published in 1977. Since 1991 the Commission on Cancer (COC) has required AJCC staging of all nonpediatric cancers. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) encouraged recording of AJCC staging through analyses of selected aspects of staging completeness. We reviewed the trend toward the adoption of routine AJCC staging by hospitals for the 5-year period 1990-1994. NCDB reports for nearly 2 million stageable cancers diagnosed from 1990 through 1994 were examined with emphasis on the hospital cancer program environment. Staging was complete if the hospital submitted stage codes for > or =90% of stageable cases or absent if stage codes were submitted for <5%. Hospitals were classified by ownership and type of cancer program. Regional staging practices also were reviewed. Overall staging increased from 78% to 88%, with increases for every site except carcinomas of the skin, cancers of the extrahepatic bile ducts and urethra, melanoma of the eyelid, and retinoblastoma The percent of hospitals staging completely increased from 49% to 61%, and the percent not routinely staging decreased from 6% to 3%. Complete staging increased in all hospital categories except For-Profit. The trend toward complete staging was uneven among states and regions. Hospital staging policies were affected by activities of the AJCC, COC, NCDB, clinical protocol procedures, and state policies. The varied completeness of staging at the hospital level by state, region, and type of hospital indicates that the adoption of routine staging is ongoing.

  7. Outcome of fertility preserving surgery in early stage ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, I.; Ramzy, S.; Mohamed, A.; Abd-Allah, M.; Saber, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of fertility preserving surgery in treatment of patients with stage I A, G1 or G2 ovarian carcinoma without adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: From 2006 to 2008, a prospective non-randomized study recruited 150 women, with suspicious early malignant ovarian mass. Results: Among the 150 explored patients, only 43 (28.6%) patients underwent exploration. Only 32/150 (21.3%) patients had proven stage IA, either G1 or G2, epithelial ovarian cancer. Among the 32 patients, 22 (68.7%) patients were nullipara while 10 (32.1%) had one child. All patients had unilateral tumors; 26 (81.25%) patients had G1 and 6 (18.75%) patients had G2 tumors; 24/32 (75.0%) tumors were serous, 6/32 (18.7%) were mucinous and 2/32 (6.2%) were endometrioid, and none was clear cell type. The median follow up period was 58.5 months (ranged: 48- 72 months). Two patients (6.7%) were lost during follow up; data will be presented for the remaining 30 patients. One patient, at 27th month of follow up, had open abdominal exploration to investigate abnormal pelvic mass on routine ultrasound follow up examination. Frozen section revealed recurrent invasive mucinous tumor. She underwent radical surgery with pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, and remained free of disease, for the remaining 29 months of the follow up period. Neither distant metastases nor mortality were reported among our patients.Conclusion: Fertility preserving surgery can be considered a safe treatment strategy in patients with stage IA, G1 of (32 ovarian carcinoma Conclusion: Fertility preserving surgery can be considered a safe treatment strategy in patients with stage IA, G1 of G2 ovarian carcinoma

  8. Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Margin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  9. Staging of endometrial cancer with MRI: Guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinkel, K. [Geneva University Hospital and Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Chene-Bougeries/Geneva (Switzerland); Clinique des Grangettes, Institut de radiologie, Chene-Bougerie/Geneva (Switzerland); Forstner, R. [LandesklinikenSalzburg, Zentralroentgeninstitut, Salzburg (Austria); Danza, F.M. [Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Dipartimento di Bioimmagini e scienze radiologiche, Rome (Italy); Oleaga, L. [Hospital Clinic, Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Cunha, T.M. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Barentsz, J.O. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Balleyguier, C. [Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Brkljacic, B. [University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zagreb (Croatia); University of Zagreb, Medical School, Zagreb (Croatia); Spencer, J.A. [St James' s Institute of Oncology, Department of Clinical Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to define guidelines for endometrial cancer staging with MRI. The technique included critical review and expert consensus of MRI protocols by the female imaging subcommittee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology, from ten European institutions, and published literature between 1999 and 2008. The results indicated that high field MRI should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine body) of the pelvic content. High-resolution post-contrast images acquired at 2 min {+-} 30 s after intravenous contrast injection are suggested to be optimal for the diagnosis of myometrial invasion. If cervical invasion is suspected, additional slice orientation perpendicular to the axis of the endocervical channel is recommended. Due to the limited sensitivity of MRI to detect lymph node metastasis without lymph node-specific contrast agents, retroperitoneal lymph node screening with pre-contrast sequences up to the level of the kidneys is optional. The likelihood of lymph node invasion and the need for staging lymphadenectomy are also indicated by high-grade histology at endometrial tissue sampling and by deep myometrial or cervical invasion detected by MRI. In conclusion, expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  10. Differential expression of the UGT1A family of genes in stomach cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Beyhan; Yumrutas, Onder; Bozgeyik, Esra; Borazan, Ersin; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Oztuzcu, Serdar

    2015-08-01

    Uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are the key players in the biotransformation of drugs, xenobiotics, and endogenous compounds. Particularly, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) participates in a wide range of biological and pharmacological processes and plays a critical role in the conjugation of endogenous and exogenous components. Thirteen alternative splicing products were produced from UGT1A gene locus designated as UGT1A1 and UGT1A3-10. A growing amount of evidence suggests that they have important roles in the carcinogenesis which is well documented by colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer studies. Here, we report differential expressions of UGT1A genes in normal and tumor tissues of stomach cancer patients. Total numbers of 49 patients were enrolled for this study, and expression analysis of UGT1A genes was evaluated by the real-time PCR method. Accordingly, UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 were found to be upregulated, and UGT1A3, UGT1A5, UGT1A7, and UGT1A9 were downregulated in stomach tumors. No expression changes were observed in UGT1A4. Also, UGT1A6 transcription variants were significantly upregulated in stomach cancer tissues compared to normal stomach tissue. Additionally, UGT1A7 gene showed highest expression in both normal and tumoral tissues, and interestingly, UGT1A7 gene expression was significantly reduced in stage II patients as compared to other patients. In conclusion, UGT1A genes are differentially expressed in normal and tumoral stomach tissues and expression changes of these genes may affect the development and progression of various types of cancer including the cancer of the stomach.

  11. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    1999-01-01

    Overall peritumoural inflammatory cell infiltration is a prognostic variable in solid tumours, but the survival-related impact of the individual cell types within the infiltrate has still not been fully evaluated and compared with the conventional disease classification. In the present study......, the prognostic value of individual white cell counts in the peritumoural inflammatory infiltrate in colorectal cancer was assessed. Intra-operative tumour tissue samples from 584 patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer were included. None of the patients received pre- or post...... to dichotomize the cell counts with respect to survival. The median observation period was 61 (49-75) months. In a multivariate analysis including Dukes' stage, gender, age, peri-operative blood transfusion, tumour location, and counts of specific inflammatory cells, only advanced Dukes' stage ( p

  12. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Clinical research on the expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues and its transfer promoting role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Jun Shu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissue, and to explore its correlation with the clinical and pathological characteristics and its role in promoting the tumor invasion and metastasis. Methods: A total of 102 specimens from the patients with colon cancer who were admitted in the General Surgery Department of our hospital for resection from April, 2013 to October, 2015 were included in the study; meanwhile, 35 colorectal adenoma specimens, and 137 normal colon tissue specimens were collected. The immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of Lgr5. Results: The positive rate of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues (62.75% was significantly higher than that in the adenoma tissues (28.57% and normal tissues (16.06%. The positive expression of Lgr5 in the colon cancer tissues was associated with the adenocarcinoma differentiation degree, Dukes staging, lymphatic metastasis, and distant metastasis. Meanwhile, it was found by the Logistic regression that the adenocarcinoma differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis, and distant metastasis were the independent predictive factors for the positive expression of Lgr5. Conclusions: The increasement of Lgr5 expression is probably involved in the formation, differentiation, invasion, and metastasis of colon cancer; therefore, Lgr5 is expected to be a new therapeutic target aiming at colon cancer stem cells.

  14. Expression of interleukin 1β in gastric cancer tissue and its effects on gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shenglu Yin, Chao Lan, Hui Pei, Zhiqiang ZhuEmergency Center Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: This study detected the expression level of IL-1β in gastric cancer tissue and paracarcinoma tissue, and also analyzed its relationship with clinical and pathological features, so as to explore the expression of IL-1β in gastric cancer tissue and its effect on gastric cancer. A total of 70 fresh primary gastric cancer tumors and corresponding paracarcinoma tissues away from the tumor-incision edge (≥5 cm were selected from the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from January to December 2014. Total protein concentration was extracted from tissues with radioimmunoprecipitation assay lysis buffer, and IL-1β content in tissues was detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ratio of cell cytokine content and protein concentration was considered as the relative content of cytokines, and the relationship between relative content of cytokines and clinical data was analyzed. Results indicated that the differences in content of IL-1β in gastric cancer tissues and paracarcinoma tissues had no statistical significance, but the content of IL-1β would rise as tumor size was enlarged, based upon analysis (2.9<4.2 ng/g, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Furthermore, IL-1β content decreased along with differentiation degree and infiltration depth (3.21<4.15 ng/g, 3.06<3.45 ng/g, but the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Therefore, it can be concluded that IL-1β plays an important role in the occurrence and development of gastric cancer and promotes the treatment of gastric cancer to some extent.Keywords: interleukin cytokines, paracarcinoma tissues, Helicobacter pylori, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

  15. Bmi-1 promotes invasion and metastasis, and its elevated expression is correlated with an advanced stage of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background B-lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region-1 (Bmi-1) acts as an oncogene in various tumors, and its overexpression correlates with a poor outcome in several human cancers. Ectopic expression of Bmi-1 can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and enhance the motility and invasiveness of human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NPECs), whereas silencing endogenous Bmi-1 expression can reverse EMT and reduce the metastatic potential of nasopharyngeal cancer cells (NPCs). Mouse xenograft studies indicate that coexpression of Bmi-1 and H-Ras in breast cancer cells can induce an aggressive and metastatic phenotype with an unusual occurrence of brain metastasis; although, Bmi-1 overexpression did not result in oncogenic transformation of MCF-10A cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of Bmi-1-mediated progression and the metastasis of breast cancer are not fully elucidated at this time. Results Bmi-1 expression is more pronouncedly increased in primary cancer tissues compared to matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High Bmi-1 expression is correlated with advanced clinicopathologic classifications (T, N, and M) and clinical stages. Furthermore, a high level of Bmi-1 indicates an unfavorable overall survival and serves as a high risk marker for breast cancer. In addition, inverse transcriptional expression levels of Bmi-1 and E-cadherin are detected between the primary cancer tissues and the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Higher Bmi-1 levels are found in the cancer tissue, whereas the paired adjacent non-cancer tissue shows higher E-cadherin levels. Overexpression of Bmi-1 increases the motility and invasive properties of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells, which is concurrent with the increased expression of mesenchymal markers, the decreased expression of epithelial markers, the stabilization of Snail and the dysregulation of the Akt/GSK3β pathway. Consistent with these observations, the repression of Bmi

  16. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A. [Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria pretreatment staging of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Catherine; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Jones, Bronwyn; Katz, Douglas S; Lalani, Tasneem; Miller, Frank H; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Tulchinsky, Mark; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy

    2012-11-01

    Because virtually all patients with colonic cancer will undergo some form of surgical therapy, the role of preoperative imaging is directed at determining the presence or absence of synchronous carcinomas or adenomas and local or distant metastases. In contrast, preoperative staging for rectal carcinoma has significant therapeutic implications and will direct the use of radiation therapy, surgical excision, or chemotherapy. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is recommended for the initial evaluation for the preoperative assessment of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Although the overall accuracy of CT varies directly with the stage of colorectal carcinoma, CT can accurately assess the presence of metastatic disease. MRI using endorectal coils can accurately assess the depth of bowel wall penetration of rectal carcinomas. Phased-array coils provide additional information about lymph node involvement. Adding diffusion-weighted imaging to conventional MRI yields better diagnostic accuracy than conventional MRI alone. Transrectal ultrasound can distinguish layers within the rectal wall and provides accurate assessment of the depth of tumor penetration and perirectal spread, and PET and PET/CT have been shown to alter therapy in almost one-third of patients with advanced primary rectal cancer. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    OpenAIRE

    Sroufe, Rameses; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternativ...

  19. An iPSC Line from Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Undergoes Early to Invasive Stages of Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsun Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC carries a dismal prognosis and lacks a human cell model of early disease progression. When human PDAC cells are injected into immunodeficient mice, they generate advanced-stage cancer. We hypothesized that if human PDAC cells were converted to pluripotency and then allowed to differentiate back into pancreatic tissue, they might undergo early stages of cancer. Although most induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines were not of the expected cancer genotype, one PDAC line, 10–22 cells, when injected into immunodeficient mice, generated pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN precursors to PDAC that progressed to the invasive stage. The PanIN-like cells secrete or release proteins from many genes that are known to be expressed in human pancreatic cancer progression and that predicted an HNF4α network in intermediate-stage lesions. Thus, rare events allow iPSC technology to provide a live human cell model of early pancreatic cancer and insights into disease progression.

  20. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamed Jonathan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA. The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a

  1. Prediction of survival in patients with Stage IV kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Mirilenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of treatment was evaluated and the predictors of adjusted survival (AS were identified in patients with disseminated kidney cancer treated at the Republican Research and Practical Center for Oncology and Medical Radiology in 1999 to 2011 (A.E. Okeanov, P.I. Moiseev, L.F. Levin. Malignant tumors in Belarus, 2001–2012. Edited by O.G. Sukonko. Seven factors (regional lymph node metastases; distant bone metastases; a high-grade tumor; sarcomatous tumor differentiation; hemoglobin levels of < 125 g/l in women and < 150 g/l in men; an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 40 mm/h; palliative surgery were found to have an independent, unfavorable impact on AS. A multidimensional model was built to define what risk group low (no more than 2 poor factors, moderate (3–4 poor factors, and high (more than 4 poor factors the patients with Stage IV kidney cancer belonged to. In these groups, the median survival was 34.7, 17.2, and 4.0 months and 3-year AS rates were 48.6, 24.6, and 3.2 %, respectively. 

  2. Key Role of DAMP in Inflammation, Cancer, and Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Franco; Altamura, Simona; Frosali, Simona; Conti, Pio

    2016-05-01

    This review aimed to take stock of the current status of research on damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) protein. We discuss the Janus-faced role of DAMP molecules in inflammation, cancer, and tissue repair. The high-mobility group box (HMGB)-1 and adenosine triphosphate proteins are well-known DAMP molecules and have been primarily associated with inflammation. However, as we shall see, recent data have linked these molecules to tissue repair. HMGB1 is associated with cancer-related inflammation. It activates nuclear factor kB, which is involved in cancer regulation via its receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. Proinflammatory activity and tissue repair may lead to pharmacologic intervention, by blocking DAMP RAGE and Toll like receptor 2 and 4 role in inflammation and by increasing their concentration in tissue repair, respectively. We conducted a MEDLINE search for articles pertaining to the various issues related to DAMP, and we discuss the most relevant articles especially (ie, not only those published in journals with a higher impact factor). A cluster of remarkable articles on DAMP have appeared in the literature in recent years. Regarding inflammation, several strategies have been proposed to target HMGB1, from antibodies to recombinant box A, which interacts with RAGE, competing with the full molecule. In tissue repair, it was reported that the overexpression of HMGB1 or the administration of exogenous HMGB1 significantly increased the number of vessels and promoted recovery in skin-wound, ischemic injury. Due to the bivalent nature of DAMP, it is often difficult to explain the relative role of DAMP in inflammation versus its role in tissue repair. However, this point is crucial as DAMP-related treatments move into clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  4. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    as an oral contraceptive [6, 7]. Recently, its anti- cancer activity has been reported against advanced breast cancer [8] and head and neck squamous...Award Number: W81XWH-141-0154 TITLE: “A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0154 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  6. The Linkage between Breast Cancer, Hypoxia, and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K. Rausch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe development of breast cancer cells is linked to hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α influences metastasis through neovascularization. Hypoxia seems to decrease the responsiveness to hormonal treatment due to loss of estrogen receptors (ERs. Obesity is discussed to increase hypoxia in adipocytes, which promotes a favorable environment for tumor cells in mammary fat tissue, whereas, tumor cells profit from good oxygen supply and are influenced by its deprivation as target regions within tumors show. This review gives an overview of the current state on research of hypoxia and breast cancer in human adipose tissue.MethodsA systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed (2000–2016 by applying hypoxia and/or adipocytes and breast cancer as keywords. Review articles were excluded as well as languages other than English or German. There was no restriction regarding the study design or type of breast cancer. A total of 35 papers were found. Eight studies were excluded due to missing at least two of the three keywords. One paper was removed due to Russian language, and one was dismissed due to lack of adherence. Seven papers were identified as reviews. After applying exclusion criteria, 18 articles were eligible for inclusion.ResultsTwo articles describe the impairment of mammary epithelial cell polarization through hypoxic preconditioning. A high amount of adipocytes enhances cancer progression due to the increased expression of HIF-1α which causes the loss of ER α protein as stated in four articles. Four articles analyzed that increased activation of HIF’s induces a series of transcriptions resulting in tumor angiogenesis. HIF inhibition, especially when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy, holds strong potential for tumor suppression as stated in further four articles. In two articles there is evidence of a strong connection between hypoxia, oxidative stress and a poor prognosis for breast cancer via HIF regulated

  7. Treatment outcome of 40 patients with early stage nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Li Yexiong; Liu Qingfeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features and prognosis of patients with stage I E /II E nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Methods: Between 2000 and 2006, 40 patients with previously untreated nongrastric MALT lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. The primary site of lymphoma was the intestinal tract in 10 patients, the orbit in 9, the thyroid in 8, the lung in 5, the Waldeyer ring in 2, and the others organs in 6. At diagnosis, 27 patients had stage I E , and 13 had stage II E disease. Seventeen patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, 18 with chemotherapy without radiotherapy, and 5 with surgery alone. The median age was 54 years. The ratio of male to female was 2: 1. Results: With a median follow-up of 58 months, the estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 86% and 82%, respectively. The 5-year OS and PFS rates were 92% and 85% for stage I E , 76% and 82% for stage II E disease, respectively (χ 2 =3.66, P =0. 060; χ 2 =1.04, P=0. 300). The 5-year OS and PFS rates were both 100% for patients with MALT lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa. None of the 17 patients with radiotherapy had locoregional relapse, whereas 3 of 23 (13%) patients without radiotherapy had locoregional relapse. Conclusions: Patients with stage I E nongastric MALT lymphoma have a favorable prognosis. Radiotherapy is still a standard care for early stage disease. The treatment outcome of patients with MALT lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa is even better. (authors)

  8. The Influence of Social Determinants on Late Stage Breast Cancer for Women in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Melody L

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common diagnosed cancer in women exacting an emotional and economic hardship for them and their families. There are no known causes of breast cancer, but there are certain genetic, social, and environment risk factors that pre-dispose women to this disease. Also, diagnosis at later stages of disease has been shown to have adverse outcomes for many as compared to early stages. The social determinants researched to examine their influence on breast cancer outcomes were race, health insurance, and income. The results of this study confirmed that race and health insurance were the two major factors that negatively impacted stages of breast cancer diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that social determinants have on stage of breast cancer diagnoses. This research focused on three social determinants that research demonstrated had an influence on stages of breast cancer diagnoses (race, income, and lack of health insurance). Bivariate analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between race and income, race and health insurance, and race and stage of diagnosis. The findings confirmed what was suspected for Mississippians; more African Americans had lower incomes, had less health insurance coverage, and were diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer disease. Only race and health insurance directly affected late stage diagnosis in analyses for this study. The influence of income on stage of breast cancer diagnosis was not statistically significant. The results of these analyses demonstrated that African American women in Mississippi were disproportionately diagnosed at late stage breast cancer as opposed to early stage. An individual cannot alter the genetic factor of race, but some of the disparate health outcomes that appear to be associated with race may be behavioral or socio-economically based and can be addressed, which could impact health outcomes. Adequate health insurance could positively impact

  9. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiel Beijer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT. Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and socalled brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity.

  10. Preoperative Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Levels as a Prognostic Marker for Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kemik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF can provide prognostic information independent of carcinoembryonic antigen levels in patients undergoing curative surgery. Methods Serum samples were collected from 158 patients with colorectal cancer and from 100 controls. Serum and tissue levels of VEGF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum VEGF levels in colorectal cancer patients were compared with those in healthy controls, and we retrospectively assessed the association between serum VEGF levels and clinicopathologic findings and survival. Results VEGF expression was significantly higher in colorectal cancer tissue compared with nontumor tissue. Mean serum VEGF levels in patients were significantly higher than those in controls, and significantly higher in patients with large tumors, lymph node involvement, and distant metastases. Conclusion Elevated serum VEGF was significantly associated with poor survival, but was only an independent risk factor for poor survival in Stage II and/or III disease. Elevated serum VEGF is significantly associated with development of colorectal cancer, and lymph or distant invasive phenotypes and survival, especially in Stage II and III patients.

  11. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart; Holm, Torbjorn; Glimelius, Bengt; Loerinc, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion

  12. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: erik.rollven@ki.se; Holm, Torbjorn [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Loerinc, Esther [Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Solna, Sweden (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion.

  13. High levels of microRNA-21 in the stroma of colorectal cancers predict short disease-free survival in stage II colon cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jørgensen, Stine; Fog, Jacob Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all patients with stage II colorectal cancer will experience recurrent disease and subsequently die within 5 years. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is upregulated in several cancer types and has been associated with survival in colon cancer. In the present study we developed a robust...... in situ hybridization assay using high-affinity Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes that specifically detect miR-21 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. The expression of miR-21 was analyzed by in situ hybridization on 130 stage II colon and 67 stage II rectal cancer specimens. The mi...... relative to the nuclear density (TBR) obtained using a red nuclear stain. High TBR (and TB) estimates of miR-21 expression correlated significantly with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004, HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.06-1.55) in the stage II colon cancer patient group, whereas no significant correlation...

  14. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine

    2017-03-01

    were employed. We have demonstrated that UHR OCT images can produce images with better feature delineation compared with images produced by 1,300 nm OCT system. UHR OCT images of a variety of tissue types found in human breast tissue were presented. With a limited number of datasets, we showed that both OCT systems can achieve a good accuracy in identifying adipose tissue. Classification in UHR OCT images achieved higher sensitivity (94%) and specificity (93%) of adipose tissue than the sensitivity (91%) and specificity (76%) in 1,300 nm OCT images. In IDC classification, similarly, we achieved better results with UHR OCT images, featured an overall accuracy of 84%, sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 71% in this preliminary study. In this study, we provided UHR OCT images of different normal and malignant breast tissue types, and qualitatively and quantitatively studied the texture and optical features from OCT images of human breast tissue at different resolutions. We developed an automated approach to differentiate adipose tissue, fibrous stroma, and IDC within human breast tissues. Our work may open the door toward automatic intraoperative OCT evaluation of early-stage breast cancer. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:258-269, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Marion A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThere are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome.METHODSWe obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case–control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se.RESULTSPatients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 µg/g vs. 111 µg/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 µg/g vs. 346 µg/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 µg/g vs. 0.439 µg/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 µg/g vs. 1.58 µg/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively).CONCLUSIONSThere is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. 

  16. Association between in vivo iododeoxyuridine labeling, MIB-1 expression, malignancy grade and clinical stage in human prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, M; Høyer, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1998-01-01

    Large variability in the biological behavior of prostate cancer makes prognostic markers important. The extent of tumor cell proliferation has been suggested as an important predictor of clinical outcome. Fifty-five patients suspected of having or with previously diagnosed prostate cancer were...... proliferation rates measured by in vivo IdUrd labeling and MIB-1 expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors. Good correlations were also found between S-phase fraction, MIB-1 expression, clinical stage and malignancy grade. These results make larger retrospective studies on archival tissue meaningful....

  17. The relation between lymph node status and survival in Stage I-III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J.; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study involved a large nationwide Danish cohort to evaluate the hypothesis that a high lymph node harvest has a positive effect on survival in curative resected Stage I-III colon cancer and a low lymph node ratio has a positive effect on survival in Stage III colon cancer. Method......: Analysis of overall survival was conducted using a nationwide Danish cohort of patients treated with curative resection of Stage I-III colon cancer. All 8901 patients in Denmark diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and treated with curative resection in the period 2003-2008 were identified from...... independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High lymph node count was associated with improved overall survival in colon cancer. Lymph node ratio was superior to N-stage in differentiating overall survival in Stage III colon cancer. Stage migration was observed....

  18. Personalizing breast cancer staging by the inclusion of ER, PR, and HER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Sanjay P; Ray, Partha S; Sim, Myung-Shin; Ye, Xing; Shamonki, Jaime M; Cui, Xiaojiang; Giuliano, Armando E

    2014-02-01

    Nonanatomic factors, such as histologic grade and biomarkers, can guide breast cancer management but are not included in the current TNM staging system. To use as an example the triple-negative phenotype (TNP) defined by the absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) to examine whether such inclusion improves the prognostic accuracy of TNM staging for breast cancer. Women diagnosed with primary invasive ductal breast cancer from January 1, 1991, through December 31, 2008, were identified from a prospective institutional database. Excluded were patients who received neoadjuvant therapy, those whose staging information was incomplete, or those whose tumor lacked ER, PR, and HER2 data. Breast cancers were categorized by TNM stage and by the presence or absence of TNP. Overall survival at 5 years. Database review identified 1842 consecutive eligible patients with breast cancer. When patients were stratified by TNM stage, overall survival curves for those with TNP breast cancer matched those for patients whose non-TNP breast cancer was 1 TNM stage higher. Multivariable analysis showed that TNP status was a powerful prognostic variable, and the likelihood ratio test revealed that the prognostic accuracy of the TNM staging system that incorporated TNP was superior to the current TNM staging system (Pcompression by 15%. The internationally recognized and easily reproducible examination of ER, PR, and HER2 status exemplifies how nonanatomic factors can improve the prognostic accuracy of breast cancer staging.

  19. Gene expression profiling of prostate tissue identifies chromatin regulation as a potential link between obesity and lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebot, Ericka M; Gerke, Travis; Labbé, David P; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Zadra, Giorgia; Rider, Jennifer R; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Wilson, Kathryn M; Kelly, Rachel S; Shui, Irene M; Loda, Massimo; Kantoff, Philip W; Finn, Stephen; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Brown, Myles; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A

    2017-11-01

    Obese men are at higher risk of advanced prostate cancer and cancer-specific mortality; however, the biology underlying this association remains unclear. This study examined gene expression profiles of prostate tissue to identify biological processes differentially expressed by obesity status and lethal prostate cancer. Gene expression profiling was performed on tumor (n = 402) and adjacent normal (n = 200) prostate tissue from participants in 2 prospective cohorts who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1982 to 2005. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from the questionnaire immediately preceding cancer diagnosis. Men were followed for metastases or prostate cancer-specific death (lethal disease) through 2011. Gene Ontology biological processes differentially expressed by BMI were identified using gene set enrichment analysis. Pathway scores were computed by averaging the signal intensities of member genes. Odds ratios (ORs) for lethal prostate cancer were estimated with logistic regression. Among 402 men, 48% were healthy weight, 31% were overweight, and 21% were very overweight/obese. Fifteen gene sets were enriched in tumor tissue, but not normal tissue, of very overweight/obese men versus healthy-weight men; 5 of these were related to chromatin modification and remodeling (false-discovery rate 7, 41% vs 17%; P = 2 × 10 -4 ) and an increased risk of lethal disease that was independent of grade and stage (OR, 5.26; 95% confidence interval, 2.37-12.25). This study improves our understanding of the biology of aggressive prostate cancer and identifies a potential mechanistic link between obesity and prostate cancer death that warrants further study. Cancer 2017;123:4130-4138. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Interleukin-6 blockade attenuates lung cancer tissue construction integrated by cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Koyanagi-Aoi, Michiyo; Otani, Kyoko; Zen, Yoh; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Aoi, Takashi

    2017-09-26

    In the present study, we successfully generated lung cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cells by introducing a small set of transcription factors into a lung cancer cell line. In addition to properties that are conventionally referred to as CSC properties, the lung induced CSCs exhibited the ability to form lung cancer-like tissues in vitro with vascular cells and mesenchymal stem cells, which showed structures and immunohistological patterns that were similar to human lung cancer tissues. We named them "lung cancer organoids". We found that interleukin-6 (IL-6), which was expressed in the lung induced CSCs, facilitates the formation of lung cancer organoids via the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells into alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-positive cells. Interestingly, the combination of anti-IL-6 antibody and cisplatin could destroy the lung cancer organoids, while cisplatin alone could not. Furthermore, IL-6 mRNA-positive cancer cells were found in clinical lung cancer samples. These results suggest that IL-6 could be a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  1. Is thrombocytosis a valid indicator of advanced stage and high mortality of gynecological cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Eskelund, Christian W.; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Thrombocytosis has been associated with higher stage and mortality of cancer, however, the evidence is conflicting. We examined the stage distribution and prognosis of gynecologic cancer according to levels of prediagnostic platelet count. Methods: In a primary care resource with blood...... may have an important role in diagnosis and post-diagnostic control of gynecological cancer.......Objective: Thrombocytosis has been associated with higher stage and mortality of cancer, however, the evidence is conflicting. We examined the stage distribution and prognosis of gynecologic cancer according to levels of prediagnostic platelet count. Methods: In a primary care resource with blood...... cell counts from more than 500,000 individuals, we identified 581 women with a primary diagnosis of gynecological cancer. We divided the pre-diagnostic mean platelet count derived from the 3-year period prior to cancer diagnosis into three categories of thrombocytosis (no, 150–400 × 109 /L; mild, N400...

  2. Label-free tissue scanner for colorectal cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E.; Sridharan, Shamira; Liang, Jon; Luo, Zelun; Han, Kevin; Macias, Virgilia; Shah, Anish; Patel, Roshan; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Guzman, Grace; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    The current practice of surgical pathology relies on external contrast agents to reveal tissue architecture, which is then qualitatively examined by a trained pathologist. The diagnosis is based on the comparison with standardized empirical, qualitative assessments of limited objectivity. We propose an approach to pathology based on interferometric imaging of "unstained" biopsies, which provides unique capabilities for quantitative diagnosis and automation. We developed a label-free tissue scanner based on "quantitative phase imaging," which maps out optical path length at each point in the field of view and, thus, yields images that are sensitive to the "nanoscale" tissue architecture. Unlike analysis of stained tissue, which is qualitative in nature and affected by color balance, staining strength and imaging conditions, optical path length measurements are intrinsically quantitative, i.e., images can be compared across different instruments and clinical sites. These critical features allow us to automate the diagnosis process. We paired our interferometric optical system with highly parallelized, dedicated software algorithms for data acquisition, allowing us to image at a throughput comparable to that of commercial tissue scanners while maintaining the nanoscale sensitivity to morphology. Based on the measured phase information, we implemented software tools for autofocusing during imaging, as well as image archiving and data access. To illustrate the potential of our technology for large volume pathology screening, we established an "intrinsic marker" for colorectal disease that detects tissue with dysplasia or colorectal cancer and flags specific areas for further examination, potentially improving the efficiency of existing pathology workflows.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound for staging of colonic cancer proximal to the rectum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of colonic cancer patients is highly dependent on the depth of tumor invasion (T-stage) as well as the extension of lymph node involvement (N-stage). We aimed to systematically review the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for staging of colonic cancer......, and EMBASE. RESULTS: Six studies were identified comparing EUS staging of colonic cancer to histopathology. The pooled-staging sensitivity and specificity were 0.90 and 0.98 for T1 tumors, 0.67 and 0.96 for T2 tumors, and 0.97 and 0.83 for T3/T4 tumors, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for N...... + disease were 0.59 and 0.78, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: EUS is a feasible method for T-staging of cancers of the colon proximal to the rectum. The accuracy of lymph node staging needs to be verified by prospective multicenter studies including larger patient populations....

  4. Expression profiling of cervical cancers in Indian women at different stages to identify gene signatures during progression of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Mulherkar, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with developing countries accounting for >80% of the disease burden. Although in the West, active screening has been instrumental in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, disease management is hampered due to lack of biomarkers for disease progression and defined therapeutic targets. Here we carried out gene expression profiling of 29 cervical cancer tissues from Indian women, spanning International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages of the disease from early lesion (IA and IIA) to progressive stages (IIB and IIIA–B), and identified distinct gene expression signatures. Overall, metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer and signaling pathways were found to be significantly upregulated, while focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and WNT signaling were downregulated. Additionally, we identified candidate biomarkers of disease progression such as SPP1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), STK17A, and DUSP1 among others that were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the samples used for microarray studies as well in an independent set of 34 additional samples. Integrative analysis of our results with other cervical cancer profiling studies could facilitate the development of multiplex diagnostic markers of cervical cancer progression

  5. Heterogeneous response of adipose tissue to cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Bertevello

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia causes disruption of lipid metabolism. Since it has been well established that the various adipose tissue depots demonstrate different responses to stimuli, we assessed the effect of cachexia on some biochemical and morphological parameters of adipocytes obtained from the mesenteric (MES, retroperitoneal (RPAT, and epididymal (EAT adipose tissues of rats bearing Walker 256 carcinosarcoma, compared with controls. Relative weight and total fat content of tissues did not differ between tumor-bearing rats and controls, but fatty acid composition was modified by cachexia. Adipocyte dimensions were increased in MES and RPAT from tumor-bearing rats, but not in EAT, in relation to control. Ultrastructural alterations were observed in the adipocytes of tumor-bearing rat RPAT (membrane projections and EAT (nuclear bodies.

  6. Tissue- and stage-dependent dosage compensation on the Neo-X chromosome in drosophila pseudoobscura

    KAUST Repository

    Nozawa, Masafumi

    2013-12-03

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation (DC) is widely accepted in various organisms. This concept is mostly supported by comparisons of gene expression between chromosomes and between sexes. However, genes on the X chromosome and autosomes are mostly not homologous, and the average gene expression level on these chromosomes may not be the same even under DC, which complicates comparisons between chromosomes. Many genes with sex-biased expression also make comparisons between sexes difficult. To overcome these issues, we investigated DC by comparing the expression of neo-X-linked genes in Drosophila pseudoobscura with those of their autosomal orthologs in other Drosophila species. The ratio of the former to the latter in males would be 1 under DC, whereas it becomes 0.5 without DC. We found that the ratio was ∼0.85 for adult whole bodies, indicating that the DC is incomplete on the neo-X chromosome in adults as a whole. The ratio (∼0.90) was also significantly less than 1 for adult bodies without gonads, whereas it was ∼1.0 for adult heads. These results indicate that DC varies among tissues. Our sliding-window analysis of the ratio also revealed that the upregulation of neo-X-linked genes in males occurred chromosome wide in all tissues analyzed, indicating global upregulation mechanisms. However, we found that gene functions also affected the levels of DC. Furthermore, most of the genes recently moved to the X were already under DC at the larval stage but not at the adult stage. These results suggest that DC in Drosophila species operates in a tissue/stage-dependent manner. © 2013 The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of tall fescue ESTs representing different abiotic stresses, tissue types and developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xuechun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb is a major cool season forage and turf grass species grown in the temperate regions of the world. In this paper we report the generation of a tall fescue expressed sequence tag (EST database developed from nine cDNA libraries representing tissues from different plant organs, developmental stages, and abiotic stress factors. The results of inter-library and library-specific in silico expression analyses of these ESTs are also reported. Results A total of 41,516 ESTs were generated from nine cDNA libraries of tall fescue representing tissues from different plant organs, developmental stages, and abiotic stress conditions. The Festuca Gene Index (FaGI has been established. To date, this represents the first publicly available tall fescue EST database. In silico gene expression studies using these ESTs were performed to understand stress responses in tall fescue. A large number of ESTs of known stress response gene were identified from stressed tissue libraries. These ESTs represent gene homologues of heat-shock and oxidative stress proteins, and various transcription factor protein families. Highly expressed ESTs representing genes of unknown functions were also identified in the stressed tissue libraries. Conclusion FaGI provides a useful resource for genomics studies of tall fescue and other closely related forage and turf grass species. Comparative genomic analyses between tall fescue and other grass species, including ryegrasses (Lolium sp., meadow fescue (F. pratensis and tetraploid fescue (F. arundinacea var glaucescens will benefit from this database. These ESTs are an excellent resource for the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP PCR-based molecular markers.

  8. [Endocrinology of cancer and age: early and late stages of ontogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, L M

    2017-01-01

    Processes important for hormone-mediated carcinogenesis are present on different, even very early, ontogenesis stages. Early shifts in hormone-metabolic status often display opposite correlations with the risk of most common age-associated non-communicable pathologies (namely, hormone-dependent cancers and cardiovascular diseases). Additional known contradiction is the raise of reproductive system tumors incidence in the age associated with lower production of mitogenic hormones. Consequently, one should take into account production of steroids in target tissues themselves, recognize the importance of progenotoxic effect, which, apart from mitogenic function, is characteristic for estrogens and their derivatives, as well as the role of endocrine-genotoxic switchings forming so called basic triad, which is born under the influence of age-associated endocrine shifts and environmental factors. Aside from steroids-related system of increased cancer risk, attention should be paid to non-steroid ones (in particular insulin resistance- and inflammatory cytokines-associated), with their close connection to immune system functional state, low-grade chronic inflammation, obesity phenotype, and pro-/anti-inflammatory lipid factors ratio. In total, it confirms and importance of timely preventive interventions on both ontogenesis stages, early and late ones, which are often separated by several decades.

  9. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage 0 Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Laryngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA

  10. Treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer in a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Shaun; Persad, Kamleish; Qiao, Xian; Guarino, Michael; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients diagnosed at stage IIIA have been analyzed in many studies, which generally involve patients younger and healthier than the average patient with this disease. To analyze demographics and treatment outcomes in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC at a community cancer center. We reviewed charts of 226 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC from January 2003 to December 2008 treated at our community cancer center. Results Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Study design was retrospective and some medical records were not available. However, this population is likely representative of patients treated in similar settings. In our population, advanced age and male gender were associated with lower median survival. Responses to concurrent and sequential chemoradiation seemed to differ based on age group, which may be useful as a prognostic guideline for similar populations. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  11. Transrectal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of rectal cancer. Effect of experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren R; Sørensen, Torben; Jakobsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of experience on preoperative staging of rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2002 to May 2006, 134 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven rectal cancer were examined with a 1....... In addition to this supervision, the person responsible for staging should be trained through a defined training programme....

  12. Down-staging of breast cancer in the pre-screening era ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to investigate the stage of breast cancer at first diagnosis and assess possible determinants of late-stage presentation. A consecutive series of women with newly diagnosed breast cancer at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH), Soweto, South Africa were analysed. We retrospectively reviewed ...

  13. Seven prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of st...

  14. Validation of existing prognostic models in patients with early-stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; van der Velden, Jacobus; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schilthuis, Marten S.; van der Steeg, Jan Willem; Burger, Matthé P. M.; Buist, Marrije R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Models that predict survival and recurrence in patients with early-stage cervical cancer are important tools in patient management, We validated 12 existing prognostic models in an independent population of patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Materials and Methods. We searched the

  15. Comparative trace elemental analysis of cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectal cancer patients using PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Raju, G. J.; Sarita, P.; Murthy, K. S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), an accelerator based analytical technique has been employed in this work for the analysis of trace elements in the cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectal cancer patients. A beam of 3 MeV protons generated from 3 MV Pelletron accelerator at the Ion Beam Laboratory of Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India was used as projectile to excite the atoms present in the tissues samples. PIXE technique, with its capability to detect simultaneously several elements present at very low concentrations, offers an excellent tool for trace element analysis. The characteristic X-rays emitted by the samples were recorded by a high resolution Si (Li) detector. On the basis of the PIXE spectrum obtained for each sample, the elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Br were identified and their relative concentrations were estimated in the cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectum. The levels of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and As were higher (p cancer tissues relative to the normal tissues. The alterations in the levels of the trace elements observed in the present work are discussed in this paper with respect to their potential role in the initiation, promotion and inhibition of cancer of the rectum.

  16. Breast cancer prevention with Morinda citrifolia (noni at the initiation stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian-Ying Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: It has been reported that noni has multiple health benefits for over 2000 years. In this study, the cancer preventive effects of Tahitian noni® juice (TNJ at the initiation stage on DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female SD rats was investigated.Objective: We took advantage of the DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenic model to study the preventive effects of TNJ at the initiation stage of mammary carcinogenesis in female SD rats by using clinical observation, pathological examination, and 32P-postlabeling assay.Methods: One hundred and sixty female SD rats were divided into eight groups with 20 rats in each group. Three doses of TNJ or placebo was given to the animals at the age of 35 days until the end of the experiment. When the animals were 55 days old, 25 mg/kg DMBA was fed to the animals in the DMBA group, placebo, and TNJ groups. The 20 rats were kept at age-matched controls. Palpable tumors were examined twice a week after DMBA administration in each group by an experienced professional. The size of tumor was measured by a graduated caliper. A piece of tumor, vascularization area, and mammary glands in the thoracic and abdomen areas of each rat were dissected respectively and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for light microscope examination. The DMBA-DNA adduct formation in mammary tissues was detected by 32P-postlabeling assay.Results: The tumor latency in TNJ groups was delayed about 60-90 days when compared with positive controls. The number of palpable tumors per group was significantly reduced by 73%, 72% and 80% in 3%, 5%, and 10% TNJ groups respectively when compared with positive controls at the end of 330 days after DMBA administration. The number of palpable tumors in the placebo groups was slightly reduced in the early stage, but much less than that in the TNJ groups. The multiplicity and malignancy of lesions were significantly reduced and the survival rate of animals in the TNJ groups was

  17. The Effect of National Cancer Screening on Disparity Reduction in Cancer Stage at Diagnosis by Income Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Min Jung

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer is an effective and efficient cancer management strategy. In South Korea, the National Health Insurance administers the National Cancer Screening Program to its beneficiaries. We examined the impact of the National Cancer Screening Program on socioeconomic disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis.Cancer patients registered in the Korean Central Cancer Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 with a diagnosis of gastric cancer (n = 22,470, colon cancer (n = 16,323, breast cancer (n = 10,076, or uterine cervical cancer (n = 2,447 were included. Income level was divided into three groups according to their monthly contribution of National Health Insurance. We employed absolute (age-standardized prevalence rate, slope index of inequality and relative (relative index of inequality measures to separately examine social disparities among participants and non-participants of the National Cancer Screening Program in terms of the early-stage rate.Age-standardized prevalence rates of early-stage by income group were always higher in participants than in non-participants. Furthermore, the age-standardized prevalence rate of early-stage in the low income group of the participants was also higher than that of the high income group of the non-participants. The sizes of disparities (both slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality are smaller in participants compared to non-participants.National Cancer Screening Program participation reduced income disparity in cancer stage at diagnosis. Population-based cancer screening programs can be used as an effective measure to reduce income disparity in cancer care.

  18. Laparoscopic ultrasonography--a method for staging of upper gastrointestinal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durup Scheel-Hincke, J; Mortensen, M B; Pless, T

    1999-01-01

    Laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) is a method that can be useful in the staging of upper gastrointestinal cancer. Dedicated transducers are available, and preliminary studies have proposed indications for the use of LUS staging of hepatic, esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer disease....... In the staging and resectability assessment of upper gastrointestinal cancer LUS seems to provide important additional information thus avoiding futile laparotomies in non-resectable patients. This short review summarizes some of the most relevant references concerning the use of LUS in upper gastrointestinal...... tract cancer....

  19. Impact of HLA-E gene polymorphism on HLA-E expression in tumor cells and prognosis in patients with stage III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Zi-Jun; Ling, Jia-Yu; Cai, Yue; Luo, Wen-Biao; He, You-Jian

    2013-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune mechanisms. However, it is unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between HLA-E gene polymorphisms and HLA-E expression in tumor tissue and determine the effects on clinical outcome of patients with stage III colorectal cancer. Two hundred thirty patients with stage III colorectal cancer were enrolled. HLA-E expression was detected in patient-derived tumor tissues with immunohistochemistry. HLA-E gene alleles in tumor tissues were detected with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method. In colorectal cancer tissue and in the normal tissue adjacent to the tumor, the HLA-E expression rates were 72.2 and 15.1 %, respectively (P HLA-E exhibited disease-free survival of 55.3, 72.9, and 72.1 %, respectively. Patients with HLA-E overexpression exhibited the lowest long-term survival rate. No relationship was observed between the type of HLA-E gene polymorphism and its expression level in tumor tissues; moreover, no polymorphisms appeared to affect the long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer. The type of HLA-E polymorphism did not have an impact on HLA-E expression in tumors or the prognosis in patients with stage III colorectal cancer. However, the level of HLA-E expression in tumor tissue strongly predicted long-term survival in these patients.

  20. Double immunohistochemistry enhances detection of lymphatic and venous invasion in early-stage colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervine, A J; McBride, H A; Kelly, P J; Loughrey, M B

    2015-09-01

    Lymphatic invasion (LI) and venous invasion (VI) are regarded as important risk factors of nodal disease in early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) but with variable reporting and poor distinction of these parameters in previous studies. This study examines the application of a double immunohistochemistry (D-IHC) method to help detect and distinguish LI and VI, in comparison with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, in a clinical series of cases of stage pT1 CRC. The aims were to demonstrate feasibility of this methodology in routine practice and compare rates of LI and VI reporting with and without D-IHC application. D-IHC utilising CAM5.2 with the endothelial marker CD34 and with the specific lymphatic endothelial marker D2-40 was performed on parallel sections from single representative paraffin tissue blocks in 28 cases of stage pT1 CRC from routine clinical practice. D-IHC significantly increased rates of both LI and VI reporting, from 14.3 to 35.7 % and from 14.3 to 28.6 %, respectively. The D-IHC methodology described is technically feasible in routine practice and potentially offers a more sensitive and robust assay for detection and distinction of LI and VI in early CRC pathology reporting. The reproducibility and clinical significance of enhanced LI and VI detection by this method and the relative importance of LI and VI in this clinical setting require further study.

  1. B3GNT3 Expression Is a Novel Marker Correlated with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Clinical Outcome in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chunhao; Song, Libing; Zhang, Yanna

    2015-01-01

    Background The β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-3 gene (B3GNT3) encodes a member of the B3GNT family that functions as the backbone structure of dimeric sialyl-Lewis A and is involved in L-selectin ligand biosynthesis, lymphocyte homing and lymphocyte trafficking. B3GNT3 has been implicated as an important element in the development of certain cancers. However, the characteristics of B3GNT3 in the development and progression of cancer remain largely unknown. Thus, our study aimed to investigate the expression pattern and the prognostic value of B3GNT3 in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Methods The mRNA and protein levels of B3GNT3 expression were examined in eight cervical cancer cell lines and ten paired cervical cancer tumors, using real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to analyze B3GNT3 protein expression in paraffin-embedded tissues from 196 early-stage cervical cancer patients. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the association between B3GNT3 expression scores and clinical parameters, as well as patient survival. Results B3GNT3 expression was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines and lesions compared with normal cells and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues. In the 196 cases of tested early-stage cervical cancer samples, the B3GNT3 protein level was positively correlated with high risk TYPES of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection (P = 0.026), FIGO stage (P cervical cancer patients. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that elevated B3GNT3 expression is associated with pelvic lymph node metastasis and poor outcome in early-stage cervical cancer patients. B3GNT3 may be a novel prognostic marker and therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26709519

  2. Use of non-selective β-blockers is associated with decreased tumor proliferative indices in early stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alexa; Amaya, Clarissa N; Belmont, Andres; Diab, Nabih; Trevino, Richard; Villanueva, Geri; Rains, Steven; Sanchez, Luis A; Badri, Nabeel; Otoukesh, Salman; Khammanivong, Ali; Liss, Danielle; Baca, Sarah T; Aguilera, Renato J; Dickerson, Erin B; Torabi, Alireza; Dwivedi, Alok K; Abbas, Aamer; Chambers, Karinn; Bryan, Brad A; Nahleh, Zeina

    2017-01-24

    Previous studies suggest beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonists (β-blockers) decrease breast cancer progression, tumor metastasis, and patient mortality; however the mechanism for this is unknown. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal and malignant breast tissue revealed overexpression of β1-AR and β3-AR in breast cancer. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 404 breast cancer patients was performed to determine the effect of β-blocker usage on tumor proliferation. Our analysis revealed that non-selective β-blockers, but not selective β-blockers, reduced tumor proliferation by 66% (p breast cancer compared to non-users. We tested the efficacy of propranolol on an early stage breast cancer patient, and quantified the tumor proliferative index before and after treatment, revealing a propranolol-mediated 23% reduction (p = 0.02) in Ki67 positive tumor cells over a three-week period. The anti-proliferative effects of β-blockers were measured in a panel of breast cancer lines, demonstrating that mammary epithelial cells were resistant to propranolol, and that most breast cancer cell lines displayed dose dependent viability decreases following treatment. Selective β-blockers alone or in combination were not as effective as propranolol at reducing breast cancer cell proliferation. Molecular analysis revealed that propranolol treatment of the SK-BR-3 breast cancer line, which showed high sensitivity to beta blockade, led to a reduction in Ki67 protein expression, decreased phosphorylation of the mitogenic signaling regulators p44/42 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK, and CREB, increased phosphorylation of the cell survival/apoptosis regulators AKT, p53, and GSK3β. In conclusion, use of non-selective β-blockers in patients with early stage breast cancer may lead to decreased tumor proliferation.

  3. Ocular adnexal lymphoma staging and treatment: American Joint Committee on Cancer versus Ann Arbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Gerardo F; Finger, Paul T; Maher, Elizabeth; Della Rocca, David; Della Rocca, Robert; Lelli, Gary J; Milman, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic utility of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL).
 A multicenter, consecutive case series of patients with biopsy-proven conjunctival, orbit, eyelid, or lacrimal gland/sac lymphoma was performed. The electronic pathology and clinical records were reviewed for new or recurrent cases of ocular adnexal lymphoma. The main outcome measures included pathology and clinical staging (AJCC and Ann Arbor systems), treatment, and recurrence (local and systemic). Statistical analysis included demographic evaluations and the Kaplan-Meier survival probability method.
 Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue were the most common (n=60/83, 72%). The most common Ann Arbor clinical stages were IE (76%) followed by IIE (17%) and IIIE (7%). Pathology identified 13 cases (15%) that were upstaged to group IV (p=0.017). Similarly, AJCC clinical stages were cT1NOMO (21.7%), cT2NOMO (44.6%), cT3N0M0 (5%), and cT4NOMO (2.4%). Local control was achieved in 75% of treated patients. There were 19 local recurrences from which 14 (74%) belonged to the non-radiation treatment groups. Lower-risk groups (T1 and T2 without lymph node involvement or metastatic disease of AJCC and IE of Ann Arbor) had longer disease-free survival than the higher-risk groups (AJCC T1, T2 with nodal involvement or metastatic disease, T3, and T4 as well as Ann Arbor II, III, and IV). The overall mean follow-up was 43.3 months (range 6-274).
 Regardless of stage, recurrence and disease-free survival were more closely related to treatment and histopathology rather than tumor size or site-specific location.

  4. Immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer biomarker phosphorylation requires controlled tissue fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey P Theiss

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated signaling molecules are biomarkers of cancer pathophysiology and resistance to therapy, but because phosphoprotein analytes are often labile, poorly controlled clinical laboratory practices could prevent translation of research findings in this area from the bench to the bedside. We therefore compared multiple biomarker and phosphoprotein immunohistochemistry (IHC results in 23 clinical colorectal carcinoma samples after either a novel, rapid tissue fixation protocol or a standard tissue fixation protocol employed by clinical laboratories, and we also investigated the effect of a defined post-operative "cold" ischemia period on these IHC results. We found that a one-hour cold ischemia interval, allowed by ASCO/CAP guidelines for certain cancer biomarker assays, is highly deleterious to certain phosphoprotein analytes, specifically the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR, but shorter ischemic intervals (less than 17 minutes facilitate preservation of phosphoproteins. Second, we found that a rapid 4-hour, two temperature, formalin fixation yielded superior staining in several cases with select markers (pEGFR, pBAD, pAKT compared to a standard overnight room temperature fixation protocol, despite taking less time. These findings indicate that the future research and clinical utilities of phosphoprotein IHC for assessing colorectal carcinoma pathophysiology absolutely depend upon attention to preanalytical factors and rigorously controlled tissue fixation protocols.

  5. Immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer biomarker phosphorylation requires controlled tissue fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Abbey P; Chafin, David; Bauer, Daniel R; Grogan, Thomas M; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylated signaling molecules are biomarkers of cancer pathophysiology and resistance to therapy, but because phosphoprotein analytes are often labile, poorly controlled clinical laboratory practices could prevent translation of research findings in this area from the bench to the bedside. We therefore compared multiple biomarker and phosphoprotein immunohistochemistry (IHC) results in 23 clinical colorectal carcinoma samples after either a novel, rapid tissue fixation protocol or a standard tissue fixation protocol employed by clinical laboratories, and we also investigated the effect of a defined post-operative "cold" ischemia period on these IHC results. We found that a one-hour cold ischemia interval, allowed by ASCO/CAP guidelines for certain cancer biomarker assays, is highly deleterious to certain phosphoprotein analytes, specifically the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR), but shorter ischemic intervals (less than 17 minutes) facilitate preservation of phosphoproteins. Second, we found that a rapid 4-hour, two temperature, formalin fixation yielded superior staining in several cases with select markers (pEGFR, pBAD, pAKT) compared to a standard overnight room temperature fixation protocol, despite taking less time. These findings indicate that the future research and clinical utilities of phosphoprotein IHC for assessing colorectal carcinoma pathophysiology absolutely depend upon attention to preanalytical factors and rigorously controlled tissue fixation protocols.

  6. Transcriptomic comparison of primary bovine horn core carcinoma culture and parental tissue at early stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharadindu Shil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Squamous cell carcinoma or SCC of horn in bovines (bovine horn core carcinoma frequently observed in Bos indicus affecting almost 1% of cattle population. Freshly isolated primary epithelial cells may be closely related to the malignant epithelial cells of the tumor. Comparison of gene expression in between horn’s SCC tissue and its early passage primary culture using next generation sequencing was the aim of this study. Materials and Methods: Whole transcriptome sequencing of horn’s SCC tissue and its early passage cells using Ion Torrent PGM were done. Comparative expression and analysis of different genes and pathways related to cancer and biological processes associated with malignancy, proliferating capacity, differentiation, apoptosis, senescence, adhesion, cohesion, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and metabolic pathways were identified. Results: Up-regulated genes in SCC of horn’s early passage cells were involved in transporter activity, catalytic activity, nucleic acid binding transcription factor activity, biogenesis, cellular processes, biological regulation and localization and the down-regulated genes mainly were involved in focal adhesion, extracellular matrix receptor interaction and spliceosome activity. Conclusion: The experiment revealed similar transcriptomic nature of horn’s SCC tissue and its early passage cells.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of reproductive tissue and intrauterine developmental stages of the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yineng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tsetse flies, vectors of African trypanosomes, undergo viviparous reproduction (the deposition of live offspring. This reproductive strategy results in a large maternal investment and the deposition of a small number of progeny during a female's lifespan. The reproductive biology of tsetse has been studied on a physiological level; however the molecular analysis of tsetse reproduction requires deeper investigation. To build a foundation from which to base molecular studies of tsetse reproduction, a cDNA library was generated from female tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans reproductive tissues and the intrauterine developmental stages. 3438 expressed sequence tags were sequenced and analyzed. Results Analysis of a nonredundant catalogue of 1391 contigs resulted in 520 predicted proteins. 475 of these proteins were full length. We predict that 412 of these represent cytoplasmic proteins while 57 are secreted. Comparison of these proteins with other tissue specific tsetse cDNA libraries (salivary gland, fat body/milk gland, and midgut identified 51 that are unique to the reproductive/immature cDNA library. 11 unique proteins were homologus to uncharacterized putative proteins within the NR database suggesting the identification of novel genes associated with reproductive functions in other insects (hypothetical conserved. The analysis also yielded seven putative proteins without significant homology to sequences present in the public database (unknown genes. These proteins may represent unique functions associated with tsetse's viviparous reproductive cycle. RT-PCR analysis of hypothetical conserved and unknown contigs was performed to determine basic tissue and stage specificity of the expression of these genes. Conclusion This paper identifies 51 putative proteins specific to a tsetse reproductive/immature EST library. 11 of these proteins correspond to hypothetical conserved genes and 7 proteins are tsetse specific.

  8. Favorable outcomes of radiotherapy for early-stage mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Natsuo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Takada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) for early-stage mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Materials and methods: Patients with stage ΙE (n = 48) and stage ΠE (n = 2) MALT lymphoma treated with RT were reviewed. The primary tumor originated in the stomach in 20 patients, in the orbit in 9 patients, in the conjunctiva or eyelid and the parotid glands in 6 patients each, and 9 patients in the others. The median total RT dose was 32 Gy (range, 25.6-50 Gy). The median follow-up time was 50 months. Results: Although disease did not recur in the RT field in any patient regardless of the total dose, disease recurred outside the RT field in the seven patients. As all recurrences were localized, salvage RT was performed for each recurrence and achieved complete response without recurrence in the field. The 5-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 96.6%, 100%, and 82.2%, respectively. Conclusions: A total dose of 25-30 Gy is appropriate for local control of MALT lymphoma. RT is also an effective salvage therapy in cases of localized recurrence

  9. Role of MMP-12 on tissue remodeling at early stage of radiation-induced pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Song Liangwen; Diao Ruiying; Wang Shaoxia; Xu Xinping; Luo Qingliang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of MMP-12 on tissue remodeling at early stage of radiation- induced pulmonary injury. Methods: Wistar rats irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays to the whole lungs were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4 weeks. MMP-12 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12 activities were determined by zymography. The degradation and collapse of elastin were determined by tissue elastin particular staining; the 'cross talking' phenomenon between alveolar type II cells and mesenchymal cells was observed under electron microscope; the expression of TGF-β1 and TNF-α in BALF was detected by ELISA. The expression of α-SMA was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: The mRNA expression of MMP-12 displayed a significant elevation at 1, 2, 4 weeks after irradiation. MMP-12 activity increased at 2, 4 weeks after irradiation. Elastin began to degrade and collapse at 1 week, which became worst 4 weeks after irradiation. The cross talking phenomenon was found under electron microscope. The expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α and α-SMA was increased gradually as time elapse after irradiation. Conclusions: 60 Co γ-ray irradiation can promote pulmonary MMP-12 expression, initiate pulmonary tissue remodeling by degradation of elastin, and make the pulmonary injury develop towards pulmonary fibrosis eventually. (authors)

  10. FDG PET/CT in Initial Staging of Adult Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roberge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue sarcomas spread predominantly to the lung and it is unclear how often FDG-PET scans will detect metastases not already obvious by chest CT scan or clinical examination. Adult limb and body wall soft-tissue sarcoma cases were identified retrospectively. Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, GIST, desmoid tumors, visceral tumors, bone tumors, and retroperitoneal sarcomas were excluded as were patients imaged for followup, response assessment, or recurrence. All patients had a diagnostic chest CT scan. 109 patients met these criteria, 87% of which had intermediate or high-grade tumors. The most common pathological diagnoses were leiomyosarcoma (17%, liposarcoma (17%, and undifferentiated or pleomorphic sarcoma (16%. 98% of previously unresected primary tumors were FDG avid. PET scans were negative for distant disease in 91/109 cases. The negative predictive value was 89%. Fourteen PET scans were positive. Of these, 6 patients were already known to have metastases, 3 were false positives, and 5 represented new findings of metastasis (positive predictive value 79%. In total, 5 patients were upstaged by FDG-PET (4.5%. Although PET scans may be of use in specific circumstances, routine use of FDG PET imaging as part of the initial staging of soft-tissue sarcomas was unlikely to alter management in our series.

  11. Immediate two-stage tissue expander vs single-stage direct-to-implant breast reconstruction: two case reports of identical twins with BRCA 2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Porčnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the best aesthetic result after immediate implant-based breast reconstruction, all the advantages and disadvantages of two-stage tissue expander and single-stage direct-to-implant breast reconstruction should be considered. Decision about the type of implant-based reconstruction is based on the consultations outcomes after multidisciplinary team meeting of breast and reconstructive specialist, but patients own wishes should be prioritised.

  12. The analysis of volatile organic compounds biomarkers for lung cancer in exhaled breath, tissues and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishan; Hu, Yanjie; Wang, Di; Yu, Kai; Wang, Ling; Zou, Yingchang; Zhao, Cong; Zhang, Xuanlang; Wang, Ping; Ying, Kejing

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) biomarkers in breath provide a novel, noninvasive and quick approach to diagnosis lung cancer. The aim of the proposed study was to investigate the VOCs biomarkers in exhaled breath for lung cancer. The VOCs in exhaled breath of 88 lung cancer patients, 70 lung benign disease and 85 healthy people were analyzed by Solid Phase Micro Extraction - Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). Three types of lung cancer cells and 18 lung cancer patients' tissues were cultured in vitro. The VOCs in the headspace of these cultivations were analyzed as an evidence of production mechanism of the VOCs in breath. Three lung cancer diagnosis models were constructed respectively in exhaled breath samples using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Leave one out cross validation was employed to evaluate these models. 23 VOCs, whose areas under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) > 0.60 and p < 0.01, were confirmed as the VOCs biomarkers for lung cancer. Three diagnostic models based on 23 VOCs could easily discriminate lung cancer patients from controls with 96.47% sensitivity and 97.47% specificity. However, the discrimination between early stage and later stage lung cancer was not very obvious.

  13. DNA methylation combinations in adjacent normal colon tissue predict cancer recurrence: evidence from a clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Chun Kuan

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has suggested the requirement for further stratification of patients in the same tumor stage according to molecular factors. We evaluate the combination of cancer stage and DNA methylation status as an indicator of the risk of recurrence and mortality among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC. A cohort study of 215 patients with CRC (mean age 64.32 years; 50.5% of men from Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan examined the association between cancer stage and risk of CRC recurrence and mortality. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze patient methylation status and clinical information at study entry, and their associations with CRC recurrence and mortality during follow-up. The advanced stage patients with p16, hMLH1, and MGMT methylation were associated with higher risk of CRC recurrence compared with the local stage patients with unmethylation status in tumor tissues, with adjusted hazard ratios (HRs (95% confidence interval [CI] of 9.64 (2.92-31.81, 8.29 (3.40-20.22, and 11.83 (3.49-40.12, respectively. When analyzing normal tissues, we observed similar risk of CRC recurrence with adjusted HRs (95% CI of 10.85 (4.06-28.96, 9.04 (3.79-21.54, and 12.61 (4.90-32.44, respectively. For combined analyses, the risk of recurrence in the patients in advanced stage with DNA methylation in both normal and tumor tissues, compared with local stage with unmethylation, was increased with adjusted HR (95% CI of 9.37 (3.36-26.09. In the advanced stage patients, methylation status and tissue subtype were associated with increased risk of 5-year cumulative CRC recurrence (p < 0.001. This study demonstrates that clustering DNA methylation status according to cancer stage and tissue subtype is critical for the assessment of risk of recurrence in CRC patients and also indicated an underlying mechanism.

  14. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 2 in Plasma from Healthy Donors and Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M B; Stephens, R W; Brünner, Nils

    2005-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 is a highly conserved molecule, which binds both active and latent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. TIMP-2 is also involved in the activation of MMP-2 on the cell surface. A quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established...... from healthy donors. The median values were determined as 163 ng/ml (n = 186) with a range of 109-253 ng/ml for EDTA plasma and 139 ng/ml (n = 77) with a range of 95-223 ng/ml for citrate plasma. The TIMP-2 concentration in citrate plasma from 15 patients with advanced, stage IV breast cancer had...... a median value of 160 ng/ml, only slightly higher but statistically distinguishable from the level found in citrate plasma from the healthy donors. In addition, the TIMP-2 concentration in EDTA plasma from colorectal cancer patients revealed a significantly higher level in plasma from patients with Dukes...

  16. [Interrelations of cancer of hormone dependent tissues and other non-infectious diseases: aging aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteĭn, L M

    2009-01-01

    The group of main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) includes cardio- and cerebrovascular pathology, cancer, chronic nonspecific respiratory states, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, unipolar depression, obesity, etc. Tumors of hormone dependent tissues compose about 35-45% of the whole cancer morbidity. The attempts to understand place of these tumors among other NCDs and analyze their interrelationships with regard to age and aging represent a vital task of contemporary oncoendocrinology. On the ground of accumulated data one can conclude that although principal NCDs are diagnosed mainly in the course of second half of human life, the maturing of their hormonal and metabolic bases is extended in time, rather often starts several decades before clinical appearance and demonstrates diverse character of the associations with different constituents of this group of diseases. As a result it may give rise for the absence of parallelism in age-specific incidence of several main NCDs, especially at concluding stages of ontogenesis.

  17. Cancer survival trends in Osaka, Japan: the influence of age and stage at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuri; Ohno, Yuko; Rachet, Bernard; Coleman, Michel P; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Oshima, Akira

    2007-06-01

    Five-year survival is an important index for evaluating the overall effectiveness of cancer diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to monitor trends in 5-year cancer survival in Osaka, Japan, during 1975-94, with adjustment for trends in age and stage at diagnosis. Five-year crude survival was estimated for cancers of the stomach (39,697 patients), lung (17,400 patients) and breast (11,988 women) in four consecutive 5-year periods, with adjustment for age and/or stage, using the age and stage distribution of cases diagnosed during 1975-79 as standard weights. We estimated the impact of adjusting for either age or stage alone by their proportionate impact on the trend in fully (age- and stage-) adjusted survival. The absolute increase in unadjusted 5-year survival over 20 years was about 20% for stomach cancer, 14% for breast cancer and 5% for lung cancer. Lack of age adjustment would have caused proportionate under-estimation of these trends by 13-14% (stomach), 7% (breast), 14% (lung, men) and 4% (lung, women). Lack of adjustment for the trend toward earlier stage would have caused proportionate over-estimation (152%, men: 133%, women) of stomach cancer survival trends, which seemed more influenced by earlier diagnosis than more effective treatment. For breast cancer, the 31% over-estimation of trend from lack of stage adjustment suggests the impact of earlier diagnosis, while the improvement of survival after additional adjustment for age may be due to more effective treatment. Failure to adjust for stage led to a proportionate 21% under-estimation of lung cancer survival trends for men, and 4% over-estimation for women. This study confirms the importance of adjusting for trends in age and stage distribution when evaluating time trends in cancer survival.

  18. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases

  19. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki, E-mail: mejina@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Section of Oncopathology and Regenerative Biology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases.

  20. Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67.

  1. Stage at presentation of breast cancer in Luanda, Angola - a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Miguel, Fernando; Freitas, Helga; Tavares, António; Pangui, Salvador; Castro, Clara; Lacerda, Gonçalo Forjaz; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2015-10-15

    It is expected that, by 2020, 15 million new cases of cancer will occur every year in the world, one million of them in Africa. Knowledge of cancer trends in African countries is far from adequate, and improvements in cancer prevention efforts are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to characterize breast cancer clinically and pathologically at presentation in Luanda, Angola; we additionally provide quality information that will be useful for breast cancer care planning in the country. Data on breast cancer cases were retrieved from the Angolan Institute of Cancer Control, from 2006 to 2014. For women diagnosed in 2009 (5-years of follow-up), demographic, clinical and pathological information, at presentation, was collected, namely age at diagnosis, parity, methods used for pathological diagnoses, tumor pathological characteristics, stage of disease and treatment. Descriptive statistics were performed. The median age of women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 was 47 years old (range 25-89). The most frequent clinical presentation was breast swelling with axillary lymph nodes metastasis (44.9 %), followed by a mass larger than 5 cm (14.2 %) and lump (12.9 %). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the main histologic type (81.8 %). Only 10.1 % of cancer cases had a well differentiated histological grade. Cancers were diagnosed mostly at advanced stages (66.7 % in stage III and 11.1 % in stage IV). In this study, breast cancer was diagnosed at a very advanced stage. Although it reports data from a single cancer center in Luanda, Angola it reinforces the need for early diagnosis and increasing awareness. According to the main challenges related to breast cancer diagnosis and treatment herein presented, we propose a realistic framework that would allow for the implementation of a breast cancer care program, built under a strong network based on cooperation, teaching, audit, good practices and the organization of health services. Angola needs urgently a program for

  2. Disparities in Cancer Incidence, Stage, and Mortality at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Travis P.; Chang, Yuchiao; Porneala, Bianca C.; Bharel, Monica; Singer, Daniel E.; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Homeless people have a high burden of cancer risk factors and suboptimal rates of cancer screening, but the epidemiology of cancer has not been well described in this population. We assessed cancer incidence, stage, and mortality in homeless adults relative to general population standards. Methods We cross-linked a cohort of 28,033 adults seen at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program in 2003–2008 to Massachusetts cancer registry and vital registry records. We calculated age-standardized cancer incidence and mortality ratios (SIRs and SMRs). We examined tobacco use among incident cases and estimated smoking-attributable fractions. Trend tests were used to compare cancer stage distributions with those in Massachusetts adults. Analyses were conducted in 2012–2015. Results During 90,450 person-years of observation, there were 361 incident cancers (SIR=1.13, 95% CI=1.02, 1.25) and 168 cancer deaths (SMR=1.88, 95% CI=1.61, 2.19) among men, and 98 incident cancers (SIR=0.93, 95% CI=0.76, 1.14) and 38 cancer deaths (SMR=1.61, 95% CI=1.14, 2.20) among women. For both sexes, bronchus and lung cancer was the leading type of incident cancer and cancer death, exceeding Massachusetts estimates more than twofold. Oropharyngeal and liver cancer cases and deaths occurred in excess among men, whereas cervical cancer cases and deaths occurred in excess among women. About one third of incident cancers were smoking-attributable. Colorectal, female breast, and oropharyngeal cancers were diagnosed at more-advanced stages than in Massachusetts adults. Conclusions Efforts to reduce cancer disparities in homeless people should include addressing tobacco use and enhancing participation in evidence-based screening. PMID:26143955

  3. [The number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the peripheral blood and tumor tissues in patients with gastric cancer and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Rui; Wang, Feng; Gao, Tengfei; Wen, Wen; Lu, Binfeng; Zhu, Yibei; Zhang, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in peripheral blood, tumor tissue and para-tumor normal tissues in patients with gastric cancer in an attempt to explore the relationship between MDSCs expression and clinicopathologic characteristics. Peripheral blood was collected from 62 gastric cancer patients and 20 healthy volunteers (HC group). Gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 12 of the 62 gastric cancer patients. HLA-DR⁻ CD33⁺ CD11b⁺ MDSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Student's t-test, One-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test were used to explore the correlation between MDSCs expression in peripheral blood and the depth of tumor invasion, degree of differentiation, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis. Compare with the HC group, the number of MDSCs in peripheral blood of newly-diagnosed gastric cancer patients was higher (Pblood of gastric cancer patients was significantly associated with the depth of invasion, degree of differentiation, TNM stage and lymph node metastasis (Ptissues was obviously higher than that of the adjacent tissues in the same patient. The number of MDSCs in peripheral blood from recurrent/metastasis group was obviously higher than that from non-recurrent/metastasis group (Pblood was higher in patients with gastric cancer. MDSCs expression in peripheral blood of gastric cancer patients was closely associated with tumor malignant degree and tumor recurrence/metastasis.

  4. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C.J.A.; Nagy, A.; Douillard, J.Y.; Figer, A.; Skovsgaard, T.; Monson, J.; Barone, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Riess, H.; Moylan, E.; Jones, D.; Dethling, J.; Colman, J.; Coward, L.; MacGregor, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a

  5. Edrecolomab alone or in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer: a randomised study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Nagy, Attila; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Figer, Arie; Skovsgaard, Torben; Monson, John; Barone, Carlo; Fountzilas, George; Riess, Hanno; Moylan, Eugene; Jones, Delyth; Dethling, Juergen; Colman, Jessica; Coward, Lorna; Macgregor, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Edrecolomab is a murine monoclonal antibody to the cell-surface glycoprotein 17-1A, which is expressed on epithelial tissues and on various carcinomas. Preliminary data suggested that it might be of use in the adjuvant treatment of patients with resected stage III colon cancer. We did a randomised

  6. A staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Akula, Sreenivasa Rao; Krishna Reddy, V. Vamsi; Sankar, V. Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic zone restoration is a challenging aspect in implant dentistry because of two critical factors such as level of bone support and soft tissue dimensions. Preservation of healthy peri-implant tissues is of primary importance for ensuring better esthetics over an extended period. The aim of the present case-series was to evaluate a new staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissues. Four subjects scheduled for e...

  7. A comparison of different non-invasive screening methods in the diagnosis of stage T1 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, W.; Euller, A.; Pfersmann, C.; Bernaschek, G.; Breitenecker, G.

    1984-01-01

    52 women with stage T 1 breast cancer were investigated by thermography, mammography and ultrasound and the results compared with the patients age, histological tumour type and the degree of malignancy. The best results were achieved by mammography (sensitivity: 85%). In tumours with a large amount of connective tissue (scirrhous or invasive lobular cancer) sensitivity rose to 94%, whilst in tumours with little connective tissue (solid, medullary, adenomatous and papillary) sensitivity decreased to 69%. The respective values for thermographic sensitivity were 44% and 77% and for ultrasound sensitivity in palpable tumours 85% and 65%, respectively. On mammography 3 carcinomas were not recognized, all three in younger patients; on thermography also three false negative results were obtained, but all in older patients. The sensitivity of thermography increases in parallel with increasing degree of tumour malignancy. Whilst ultrasound is a valuable aid for differential diagnosis in palpable tumours only, screening results can evidently be improved by a combination of thermography and mammography. (Author)

  8. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ling; Li, Jiang-Hong; Ye, Jing-Ming; Duan, Xue-Ning; Cheng, Yuan-Jia; Xin, Ling; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of tumor biology suggests that breast cancer is a group of diseases with different intrinsic molecular subtypes. Anatomic staging system alone is insufficient to provide future outcome information. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) expert panel updated the 8th edition of the staging manual with prognostic stage groups by incorporating biomarkers into the anatomic stage groups. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the data from our center in ...

  9. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Piva, Francesco; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Lezoche, Giovanni; Del Prete, Michela; Bittoni, Alessandro; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Cecchini, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario; Bearzi, Italo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B) with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58%) relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months). Twelve (19%) and 50 (81%) patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296). Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  10. Cancer stem cell gene profile as predictor of relapse in high risk stage II and stage III, radically resected colon cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Giampieri

    Full Text Available Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58% relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63-86.5 months. Twelve (19% and 50 (81% patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p=0.0296. Among of all genes tested, those with the higher "weight" in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients.

  11. Coping with early stage breast cancer: examining the influence of personality traits and interpersonal closeness

    OpenAIRE

    Saita, Emanuela; Acquati, Chiara; Kayser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the influence of personality traits and close relationships on the coping style of women with breast cancer. A sample of seventy-two Italian patients receiving treatment for early stage breast cancer was recruited. Participants completed questionnaires measuring personality traits (Interpersonal Adaptation Questionnaire), interpersonal closeness (Inclusion of the Other in the Self Scale), and adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale). We hypothesized tha...

  12. Nivolumab and Plinabulin in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV, Recurrent, or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    ALK Gene Translocation; EGFR Activating Mutation; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; ROS1 Gene Translocation; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  13. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  14. Study on the change of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Qiong Luo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study and observe the change status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: A total of 72 patients with cervical cancer in our hospital from February 2014 to September 2015 were selected as the observation group, 72 healthy women at the same period were selected as the control group, then the HPV DNA virus content and constitution, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of two groups were analyzed and compared, and the detection results of observation group with stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ of cervical cancer were compared. Results: The rates of HPV DNA virus content and >500 in the observation group were all higher than those of control group, the circulating blood and tissue miR-21 were all higher than those of control group, while the circulating blood and tissue miR-126, miR-143 and miR-145 were all lower than those of control group, and the detection results of observation group with stage Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ of cervical cancer all had obvious differences, the differences were all significant. Conclusion: The changes of the status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer are great, and the influence of cervical cancer stage for the detection results are great, so it has active guiding significance for the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  15. Clinical significance of Fusobacterium nucleatum, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cell markers in stage III/IV colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan X

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Xuebing Yan,1,* Liguo Liu,2,* Hao Li,1,* Huanlong Qin,1 Zhenliang Sun1,3 1Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 2Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, 3Central Laboratory, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, South Campus, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is a common digestive malignancy and emerging studies have closely linked its initiation and development with gut microbiota changes. Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn has been recently identified as a pathogenic bacteria for CRC; however, its prognostic significance for patients is poorly investigated and is less for patients within late stage. Therefore, in this study, we made efforts to analyze its level and prognostic significance in a retrospective cohort of 280 stage III/IV CRC patients. We found that the Fn level was abnormally high in tumor tissues and correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis status, and distant metastasis. We also identified it as an independent adverse prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival (CSS and disease-free survival (DFS. The following subgroup analysis indicated that Fn level could stratify CSS and DFS in stage IIIB/C and IV patients but failed in stage IIIA patients. In addition, stage III/IV patients with low Fn level were found to benefit more from adjuvant chemotherapy than those with high Fn level, in terms of DFS. Finally, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers (E-cadherin and N-cadherin and cancer stem cell (CSC markers (Nanog, Oct-4, and Sox-2 in CRC tissues. The results indicated that N-cadherin, Nanog, Oct-4, and Sox-2 were adverse prognostic factors in these patients, while the opposite was true for E-cadherin. More importantly, expression of E

  16. Tissue and stage-specific distribution of Wolbachia in Brugia malayi.

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    Kerstin Fischer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most filarial parasite species contain Wolbachia, obligatory bacterial endosymbionts that are crucial for filarial development and reproduction. They are targets for alternative chemotherapy, but their role in the biology of filarial nematodes is not well understood. Light microscopy provides important information on morphology, localization and potential function of these bacteria. Surprisingly, immunohistology and in situ hybridization techniques have not been widely used to monitor Wolbachia distribution during the filarial life cycle. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein and in situ hybridization targeting Wolbachia 16S rRNA were used to monitor Wolbachia during the life cycle of B. malayi. In microfilariae and vector stage larvae only a few cells contain Wolbachia. In contrast, large numbers of Wolbachia were detected in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, but no endobacteria were detected in the genital primordium. In young adult worms (5 weeks p.i., a massive expansion of Wolbachia was observed in the lateral chords adjacent to ovaries or testis, but no endobacteria were detected in the growth zone of the ovaries, uterus, the growth zone of the testis or the vas deferens. Confocal laser scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous Wolbachia are aligned towards the developing ovaries and single endobacteria were detected in the germline. In inseminated females (8 weeks p.i. Wolbachia were observed in the ovaries, embryos and in decreasing numbers in the lateral chords. In young males Wolbachia were found in distinct zones of the testis and in large numbers in the lateral chords in the vicinity of testicular tissue but never in mature spermatids or spermatozoa. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistology and in situ hybridization show distinct tissue and stage specific distribution patterns for Wolbachia in B. malayi. Extensive multiplication of Wolbachia occurs in the

  17. Cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction-Major changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas W; Gress, Donna M; Patil, Deepa T; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Kelsen, David P; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-07-08

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE New to the eighth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual for epithelial cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction are separate, temporally related cancer classifications: 1) before treatment decision (clinical); 2) after esophagectomy alone (pathologic); and 3) after preresection therapy followed by esophagectomy (postneoadjuvant pathologic). The addition of clinical and postneoadjuvant pathologic stage groupings was driven by a lack of correspondence of survival, and thus prognosis, between both clinical and postneoadjuvant pathologic cancer categories (facts about the cancer) and pathologic categories. This was revealed by a machine-learning analysis of 6-continent data from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration, with consensus of the AJCC Upper GI Expert Panel. Survival is markedly affected by histopathologic cell type (squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) in clinically and pathologically staged patients, requiring separate stage grouping for each cell type. However, postneoadjuvant pathologic stage groups are identical. For the future, more refined and granular data are needed. This requires: 1) more accurate clinical staging; 2) innovative solutions to pathologic staging challenges in endoscopically resected cancers; 3) integration of genomics into staging; and 4) precision cancer care with targeted therapy. It is the responsibility of the oncology team to accurately determine and record registry data, which requires eliminating both common errors and those related to incompleteness and inconsistency. Despite the new complexity of eighth edition staging of cancers of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction, these key concepts and new directions will facilitate precision cancer care. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:304-317. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Stage dependent expression and tumor suppressive function of FAM134B (JK1) in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Wahab, Riajul; Smith, Robert A; Qiao, Bin; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate sub-cellular location, differential expression in different cancer stages and functional role of FAM134B in colon cancer development. FAM134B expression was studied and quantified at protein and mRNA levels in cell lines using immunocytochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR. In vitro functional assays and an in vivo xenotransplantation mouse models were used to investigate the molecular role of FAM134B in cancer cell biology in response to FAM134B silencing with shRNA lentiviral particles. FAM134B protein was noted in both cytoplasm and nuclei of cancer cells. In cancer cells derived from stage IV colon cancer, FAM134B expression was remarkably reduced when compared to non-cancer colon cells and cancer cells derived from stage II colon cancer. FAM134B knockdown significantly (P colon cancer cells following lentiviral transfection. Furthermore, FAM134B suppression significantly increased (34-52%; P cancer suppressor gene in colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diagnostic value of computed tomography in the colon cancer; In terms of the staging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Mi; Moon, Jang Ho; Lee, Dong Joong; Choi, Chul Soon; Kang, Ik Won; Chung, Soo Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sub

    1989-01-01

    The CT findings of thirty-three patients with proven colon cancer were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. The accuracy for detecting pericolic fat invasion on CT was 81%. 2. The accuracy for detecting lymph node involvement on CT was 67%. 3. The overall accuracy for staging of colon cancer on CT was 64%(67% for stage A, 30% for stage B, 60% for stage C, 100% for stage D). 4. The overall detection rate of mass on CT was 80%(89% for rectum, 100% for rectosigmoid colon and sigmoid colon, 30% for ascending and transverse colon). 5. The CT is useful, noninvasive technique for assessing extension and staging of colon cancer

  20. Current status of PET in breast cancer imaging, staging, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, R L

    2001-07-01

    The exact roles of PET in the imaging management of patients with known or suspected breast cancer are still in evolution. For assessing primary lesions, it is sometimes possible with PET to detect cancers occult on standard methods. This could be useful in high-risk patient populations, but in dense breasts, background FDG uptake is often higher than in women with fatty breasts, making identification of lesions primary breast disease would seem better addressed by biopsy. With a positive predictive value of FDG PET for cancer over 96%, any FDG-avid breast lesion is highly suspicious and merits biopsy. Although PET in theory should be useful for depicting multifocal disease before surgery, the limitations in detecting small lesions in the breast limit the contribution of PET at present. It is most likely that PET will have a greater role in depicting primary breast lesions as dedicated PET imaging devices for the breast evolve. For axillary and internal mammary nodal staging, results with FDG PET are variable. Small nodal metastases setting is not known, nor is there consensus on how identifying internal mammary node metastases will change treatment. Based on the available data, for pT1 breast lesions, PET, if negative, is not an adequate replacement for sentinel node surgery or axillary dissection. Results from the multicenter trial will be of great interest. Clearly PET can stage metastatic disease well. Bone scans with 18F- are exquisitely sensitive for metastases, and FDG is also very good. However, FDG PET can miss some blastic metastases to bone so at present FDG is not capable of excluding the presence of bone metastases. PET seems very well suited to detecting recurrences in soft tissues and the brachial plexus region in particular. The utility of PET in planning the treatment of individual patients appears promising. Although results must be confirmed in larger studies, it appears safe to conclude that failure of a chemotherapy regimen to decrease FDG

  1. A Benchmark for Comparing Precision Medicine Methods in Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis using Tissue Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ching; Calista, Evelyne; Zhou, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Suzuki, Ryohei; Komura, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2017-12-23

    The aim of precision medicine is to harness new knowledge and technology to optimize the timing and targeting of interventions for maximal therapeutic benefit. This study explores the possibility of building AI models without precise pixel-level annotation in prediction of the tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, Lymph node metastasis, cancer stage and BRAF mutation in thyroid cancer diagnosis, providing the patients' background information, histopathological and immunohistochemical tissue images. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic patient diagnosis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2017 - A Grand Challenge for Tissue Microarray Analysis in Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis. Here, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the data repository of tissue microarrays, the creation of the clinical diagnosis classification data repository of thyroid cancer, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, three automatic methods for predictions of the five clinical outcomes have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic patient diagnosis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/˜cvmi/ISBI2017/). cweiwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  3. Soluble HLA-G is a differential prognostic marker in sequential colorectal cancer disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Chandra; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Stubbs, Richard S; Hardingham, Jennifer E; Hewett, Peter J; Maddern, Guy J; Hauben, Ehud

    2017-06-01

    The expression of HLA-G by tumour cells is an established mechanism to escape recognition and immune mediated destruction, allowing tumour survival, growth and metastasis. However, the prognostic value of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) remains unknown. Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of colorectal cancer (CRC) found in 10 to 15% of patients, which has long been associated with poor response to treatment. To investigate the prognostic value of plasma sHLA-G levels in CRC patients, preoperative plasma sHLA-G levels were determined by ELISA in CRC patients (n = 133). In addition, the local expression of HLA-G in tumour biopsies was assessed using tissue microarray analysis (n = 255). Within the high 33rd percentile of sHLA-G levels (265-890 U/mL; n = 44) we observed higher frequency of MC patients (p = 0.012; Chi-square), and higher sHLA-G levels in patients with vascular invasion (p = 0.035; two-tailed t-test). Moreover, MC patients had significantly higher sHLA-G levels compared to those with adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (p = 0.036; two-tailed t-test). Surprisingly, while stage II patients showed negative correlation between sHLA-G levels and liver metastasis free survival (LMFS) (p = 0.041; R = -0.321), in stage III patients high sHLA-G levels were associated with significantly longer LMFS (p = 0.002), and sHLA-G levels displayed positive correlation with LMFS (p = 0.006; R = 0.409). High HLA-G expression in tumours was associated with poor cancer specific overall survival in stage II to III (p = 0.01), and with shorter LMFS in stage II patients (p = 0.004). Our findings reveal that sHLA-G levels are associated with distinct progression patterns in consecutive disease stages, indicating a potential value as surrogate marker in the differential prognosis of CRC. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-05-28

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images, as compared to the

  5. Implementation of tissue microarrays technique for cancer research in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lahera-Sánchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The tissue microarray (TMA technique is based on making cylindrical cores from paraffin donor blocks and transfer to a single recipient block. The TMA has revolutionized the field of pathology for the possibility to evaluate multiple samples in one slide. There is no precedent of this subject in Cuba, so the objective of this research was to implement the TMA technique. The concordance of the results obtained by complete section and the TMA were evaluated for this purpose, in the evaluation of the estrogen receptors (ER, progesterone (PR and epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER2 in samples of breast cancer. Forty-five paraffin-embedded samples from women diagnosed with breast cancer at the Institute of Oncology in 2012 were studied. Two TMA blocks were constructed, and subsequently the expression of markers ER, PR and HER2 was determined by immunohistochemistry, in the complete section of tissue and in the TMA. Kappa index was used for concordance analysis. A good concordance was obtained for all three markers (ER k=0.8272; PR k=0.793 and HER2 k=0.716. This study constitutes the first report on the TMA technique in Cuba and shows that it is a valuable tool, suggesting its potential use in translational research and clinical trials on vaccines.

  6. Efficacies of 125I seed implantation in advanced stage central lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianguo; An Liqing; Cheng Jinguang; Zhang Yufen; Guo Xiaokui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the temporal curative effect of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer. Methods: 125 I seed was implanted in 56 patients confirmed advanced stage central type lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope and all cases were fellow up in certain duration to explore their efficacies and the adverse reaction. Results: Total efficient rate was 76.78% in 56 patients. Lung reexpanded rate was 90.90%. Conclusion: The therapy of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer is safe and available. (authors)

  7. Geographic and Demographic Disparities in Late-stage Breast and Colorectal Cancer Diagnoses Across the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee R Mobley

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Problem: In 2009, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women, and colorectal cancer was the third most common cancer in both men and women. Currently, the majority of colorectal and almost 1/3 of breast cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage in the US, which results in higher morbidity and mortality than would obtain with earlier detection. The incidence of late-stage cancer diagnoses varies considerably across the US, and few analyses have examined the entire US.Purpose: Using the newly available US Cancer Statistics database representing 98% of the US population, we perform multilevel analysis of the incidence of late-stage cancer diagnoses and translate the findings via bivariate mapping, answering questions related to both Why and Where demographic and geographic disparities in these diagnoses are observed.Methods: To answer questions related to Why disparities are observed, we utilize a three-level, random-intercepts model including person-, local area-, and region- specific levels of influence. To answer questions related to Where disparities are observed, we generate county level robust predictions of late-stage cancer diagnosis rates and map them, contrasting counties ranked in the upper and lower quantiles of all county predicted rates. Bivariate maps are used to spatially translate the geographic variation among US counties in the distribution of both BC and CRC late-stage diagnoses.Conclusions: Empirical modeling results show demographic disparities, while the spatial translation of empirical results shows geographic disparities that may be quite useful for state cancer control planning. Late stage BC and CRC diagnosis rates are not spatially random, manifesting as place-specific patterns that compare counties in individual states to counties across all states. Providing a relative comparison that enables assessment of how results in one state compare with others, this paper is to be disseminated to all state cancer control

  8. CCR study: evidence for benefit of TARP vaccine for men with early stage prostate cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a pilot clinical trial found that TARP, or T-cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein, vaccination slowed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rise in the majority of patients with early stage prostate cancer.

  9. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  10. Time-Dependent Diffusion MRI in Cancer: Tissue Modeling and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Reynaud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC has been recognized as a useful and sensitive surrogate for cell density, paving the way for non-invasive tumor staging, and characterization of treatment efficacy in cancer. However, microstructural parameters, such as cell size, density and/or compartmental diffusivities affect diffusion in various fashions, making of conventional DWI a sensitive but non-specific probe into changes happening at cellular level. Alternatively, tissue complexity can be probed and quantified using the time dependence of diffusion metrics, sometimes also referred to as temporal diffusion spectroscopy when only using oscillating diffusion gradients. Time-dependent diffusion (TDD is emerging as a strong candidate for specific and non-invasive tumor characterization. Despite the lack of a general analytical solution for all diffusion times/frequencies, TDD can be probed in various regimes where systems simplify in order to extract relevant information about tissue microstructure. The fundamentals of TDD are first reviewed (a in the short time regime, disentangling structural and diffusive tissue properties, and (b near the tortuosity limit, assuming weakly heterogeneous media near infinitely long diffusion times. Focusing on cell bodies (as opposed to neuronal tracts, a simple but realistic model for intracellular diffusion can offer precious insight on diffusion inside biological systems, at all times. Based on this approach, the main three geometrical models implemented so far (IMPULSED, POMACE, VERDICT are reviewed. Their suitability to quantify cell size, intra- and extracellular spaces (ICS and ECS and diffusivities are assessed. The proper modeling of tissue membrane permeability—hardly a newcomer in the field, but lacking applications—and its impact on microstructural estimates are also considered. After discussing general issues with tissue modeling and microstructural parameter

  11. [Application of the 2007 lung cancer staging system by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Nan; Zheng, Qing-feng; Feng, Yuan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue

    2009-08-18

    To compare the prognoses of non-small cell lung cancer patients based respectively on the 6th-Edition Staging System for NSCLC (the 6th-Edition Staging System) and the new staging system by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) (new staging system). Data were collected from 136 operated NSCLC patients from Sep. 2003 through Oct. 2007. Those data were staged based respectively on the 6th-Edition Staging System and the new staging system. The 2-year no-recurrence survival rate was calculated, and life span was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method of SPSS 13.0 software. (1) In this series, using the 6th-Edition Staging System, there were 56, 23, 53 and 4 patients in stage I, stage II, stage III and stage IV respectively; using the new staging system, there were 50, 31, 54 and 1 patients in stage I, stage II, stage III and stage IV respectively. There were 6 patients in stage I according to the 6th-Edition Staging System who had become 6 patients in stage II according to the new staging system, 1 patient in stage II 1 in stage III, 3 patients in stage III 3 in stage II, 1 patient in stage III 1 in stage IV, and 4 patients in stage IV 4 in stage III. (2) According to the 6th-Edition Staging System, the 2-year no-recurrence survival rates for Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb,IIIa, IIIb and IV were 95.0%, 83.3%, 100.0%, 63.6%, 52.1%, 80.0% and 50.0% respectively, and according to the new staging system, the 2-year cumulative survival rates for I a, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb and IV were 95.5%, 89.3%, 68.4%, 63.6%, 52.8%, 50.0% and 0.0% respectively. After Chi square analysis, there was no distinguished difference between the 2 staging systems for the 2-year cumulative survival rate. (3) According to the 6th-Edition Staging System, the difference between the no-recurrence rate of stage I and stage II was not statistically significant (P = 0.232), and the difference between the no-recurrence rates of stage II and III was statistically significant(P = 0

  12. Tissue Factor promotes breast cancer stem cell activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Hudhaifah; Harrison, Hannah; Clarke, Robert; Landberg, Goran; Bundred, Nigel J; Versteeg, Henri H; Kirwan, Cliona C

    2017-04-18

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cells that can self-renew and initiate tumours. The clotting-initiating protein Tissue Factor (TF) promotes metastasis and may be overexpressed in cancer cells with increased CSC activity. We sought to determine whether TF promotes breast CSC activity in vitro using human breast cancer cell lines. TF expression was compared in anoikis-resistant (CSC-enriched) and unselected cells. In cells sorted into of TF-expressing and TF-negative (FACS), and in cells transfected to knockdown TF (siRNA) and overexpress TF (cDNA), CSC activity was compared by (i) mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) (ii) holoclone colony formation (Hc) and (iii) ALDH1 activity. TF expression was increased in anoikis-resistant and high ALDH1-activity T47D cells compared to unselected cells. FACS sorted TF-expressing T47Ds and TF-overexpressing MCF7s had increased CSC activity compared to TF-low cells. TF siRNA cells (MDAMB231,T47D) had reduced CSC activity compared to control cells. FVIIa increased MFE and ALDH1 in a dose-dependent manner (MDAMB231, T47D). The effects of FVIIa on MFE were abrogated by TF siRNA (T47D). Breast CSCs (in vitro) demonstrate increased activity when selected for high TF expression, when induced to overexpress TF, and when stimulated (with FVIIa). Targeting the TF pathway in vivo may abrogate CSC activity.

  13. Comparison of ultrasound and computed tomography in staging of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Bunzo

    1982-01-01

    Preoperative staging of bladder cancer is very important for decision of treating methods and prognostication. The present author used ultrasound via the abdominal wall in the diagnosis of 83 patients with bladder cancer. I estimated the extent of bladder tumor infiltration by ultrasound via the abdominal wall according to Shiraishi's criteria. Ultrasound scans, pelvic angiograms and CT scans were reviewed to determine their accuracy in staging of bladder tumors. Ultrasound scans were excellent in staging of non-infiltrated bladder tumors, while pelvic angiograms and CT scans were excellent in staging of infiltrated bladder tumors. (author)

  14. Colorectal cancers detected through screening are associated with lower stages and improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Osler, Merete; Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Population screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) using faecal occult blood test (FOBT) will be introduced in Denmark in 2014. Prior to the implementation of the screening programme, a feasibility study was performed in 2005-2006. In this paper, occurrences of colorectal cancer...... in the distribution of colon cancer stages and rectal cancer groups between the various screening categories were analysed through χ(2)-tests. Survival analysis with respect to screening groups was done by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-Mantel hazard ratios, and survival was corrected for lead time. RESULTS: Colon cancers...... detected through screening were diagnosed at significantly lower stages than among screening non-responders. There were relatively fewer locally advanced rectal cancers among patients diagnosed through positive FOBT than among non-responders. Survival among screening cancer patients was superior...

  15. Analysis of whole Breast Radiotherapy Methods for Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer after Conserving Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utehina, O.; Popovs, S.; Berzins, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. At present moment breast cancer in Latvia is at second place for whole population and at first place among women. In year 2004 there were 1012 new breast cancer cases discovered. There was growth in number of breast cancer patients from 58.6 per 100 000 inhabitants in 1995 to 80.4 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2004. This growth is primarily attributed to breast cancer screening program which is nowadays active in Latvia. Breast cancer is third death cause among cancers in Latvia, - in 1995 there where 27.4 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants and in 2004 - 36.2 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants. Due to screening program there is increasing number of patients with stage I and II breast cancer. In 2004 toe where 9884 women with breast cancer registered in Latvian Cancer Registry and among them 79 percent were presented as stage I or II. Breast conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy as standard part of it plays great role in breast cancer treatment in our Center. In year 2004 there were 103 breast conservative surgeries performed in our Center. Radiotherapy is a standard part of treatment in modem breast saving operations for early stage breast cancer, At present, only whole breast postoperative irradiation is performed in Latvia. For selected group of patients this treatment can be substituted with other radiotherapy methods in order to reduce acute reactions and/or late toxicity, maintaining the same tumor control. Aim of this work is to show that during whole breast irradiation dose maximum and tissue volume which receives doses more than 105% from prescribed dose, is linked with size of treated volume (treated volume - tissue volume receiving > 95% from prescribed dose), which is strictly linked with breast volume. Because of this for large breast volumes there is higher complication probability performing whole breast irradiation, and it seems to be meaningful to use Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy or Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for

  16. CT-based compartmental quantification of adipose tissue versus body metrics in colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nattenmueller, Johanna; Hoegenauer, Hanna; Grenacher, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Boehm, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia [Huntsman Cancer Institute, Department of Population Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Scherer, Dominique; Paskow, Michael; Gigic, Biljana; Schrotz-King, Petra [National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Division of Preventive Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    While obesity is considered a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC), there is increasing evidence that not simply body mass index (BMI) alone but specifically abdominal fat distribution is what matters. As part of the ColoCare study, this study measured the distribution of adipose tissue compartments in CRC patients and aimed to identify the body metric that best correlates with these measurements as a useful proxy for adipose tissue distribution. In 120 newly-diagnosed CRC patients who underwent multidetector computed tomography (CT), densitometric quantification of total (TFA), visceral (VFA), intraperitoneal (IFA), retroperitoneal (RFA), and subcutaneous fat area (SFA), as well as the M. erector spinae and psoas was performed to test the association with gender, age, tumor stage, metabolic equivalents, BMI, waist-to-height (WHtR) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). VFA was 28.8 % higher in men (p{sub VFA}<0.0001) and 30.5 % higher in patients older than 61 years (p{sub VFA}<0.0001). WHtR correlated best with all adipose tissue compartments (r{sub VFA}=0.69, r{sub TFA}=0.84, p<0.0001) and visceral-to-subcutaneous-fat-ratio (VFR, r{sub VFR}=0.22, p=<0.05). Patients with tumor stages III/IV showed significantly lower overall adipose tissue than I/II. Increased M. erector spinae mass was inversely correlated with all compartments. Densitometric quantification on CT is a highly reproducible and reliable method to show fat distribution across adipose tissue compartments. This distribution might be best reflected by WHtR, rather than by BMI or WHR. (orig.)

  17. Gene expression profile for predicting survival in advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer across two independent datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yoshihara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients are generally treated with platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy after primary debulking surgery. However, there is a wide range of outcomes for individual patients. Therefore, the clinicopathological factors alone are insufficient for predicting prognosis. Our aim is to identify a progression-free survival (PFS-related molecular profile for predicting survival of patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer tissues from 110 Japanese patients who underwent primary surgery and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. We selected 88 PFS-related genes by a univariate Cox model (p<0.01 and generated the prognostic index based on 88 PFS-related genes after adjustment of regression coefficients of the respective genes by ridge regression Cox model using 10-fold cross-validation. The prognostic index was independently associated with PFS time compared to other clinical factors in multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR, 3.72; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.66-5.43; p<0.0001]. In an external dataset, multivariate analysis revealed that this prognostic index was significantly correlated with PFS time (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.20-1.98; p = 0.0008. Furthermore, the correlation between the prognostic index and overall survival time was confirmed in the two independent external datasets (log rank test, p = 0.0010 and 0.0008. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The prognostic ability of our index based on the 88-gene expression profile in ridge regression Cox hazard model was shown to be independent of other clinical factors in predicting cancer prognosis across two distinct datasets. Further study will be necessary to improve predictive accuracy of the prognostic index toward clinical application for evaluation of the risk of recurrence in patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer.

  18. Value of preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan for judging TNM staging of gastric cancer as well as its relationship with tumor marker and proliferation molecule expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jun Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the value of preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan for judging TNM staging of gastric cancer as well as its relationship with tumor marker and proliferation molecule expression. Methods: A total of 135 patients with gastric cancer who received surgical resection in our hospital between May 2012 and October 2015 were selected as the research subjects, preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan was conducted to judge TNM staging, and serum was collected to determine the content of tumor markers; tumor tissue was collected after operation to determine the content of cytokines and pro-proliferation molecules. Results: CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM II, III and IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM I stage; CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM III and IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM II stage; CEA, CA199, CA153, CA125 and CA724 content in serum as well as TGFβ1, TGFβ2, VEGF, FGF2, PTP1B, PIK3CD, Survivin, Ezrin and YAP content in gastric cancer tissue of patients with TNM IV stage gastric cancer were significantly higher than those of patients with TNM III stage. Conclusions: TNM staging of gastric cancer decided by preoperative enhanced multi-slice spiral CT scan has good consistency with the content of tumor markers in serum and proliferation molecules in tumor lesion.

  19. Usefulness of CT in diagnosing and staging of kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batycka-Ugorska, I.

    1993-01-01

    Article presents 170 patients with suspected kidney cancer and applicability of CT in the diagnosis. According to author CT imaging is better than others (ultrasonography, urography) in assessment of the tumor development and detection of metastases to lymphatic nodes of abdomen and other organs. The method is compared with angiography in diagnosis of metastases of kidney cancer to veins

  20. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  1. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Local staging of prostate cancer with transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T; Nerstrom, H; Iversen, P

    1992-01-01

    localized disease defined by digital rectal examination, may be superior as the initial staging tool. We conclude that transrectal ultrasound has too low a specificity to upgrade the diagnostic results of digital rectal examination, but that it may be more useful as the primary staging tool and for guidance...

  3. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue.......The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  4. Radiation therapy in complex treatment for stage III breast cancer with reconstructive plastic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baknazarov, Z.P.; Aripkhodzhaeva, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Post-operative radiation therapy in patients with stage III breast cancer on the third month after reconstructive plastic surgery allows to eliminate scar deformities of the organ and does not aggravate the treatment results when compared with mastectomized patients.

  5. Deletion of Chromosome 4q Predicts Outcome in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. M. Brosens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around 30% of all stage II colon cancer patients will relapse and die of their disease. At present no objective parameters to identify high-risk stage II colon cancer patients, who will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, have been established. With traditional histopathological features definition of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients is inaccurate. Therefore more objective and robust markers for prediction of relapse are needed. DNA copy number aberrations have proven to be robust prognostic markers, but have not yet been investigated for this specific group of patients. The aim of the present study was to identify chromosomal aberrations that can predict relapse of tumor in patients with stage II colon cancer.

  6. Anxiety level of early- and late-stage prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Johanes

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: The MAX-PC anxiety score was significantly associated with the stage of prostate cancer. Furthermore, visual analogue scale pain score, PSA value, and number of bone metastatic lesions can also affect the MAX-PC anxiety score.

  7. A Treatment Stage Specific Approach to Improving Quality of Life for Women with Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avis, Nancy E; Miller, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on quality of life among women with ovarian cancer. The primary objective of the study is to identify the issues that are of greatest concern to women in each of three treatment stages...

  8. [Determination of volatile organic compounds in lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan-jie; Qiu, Yuan-hua; Chen, En-guo; Ying, Ke-jing; Yu, Jin; Wang, Ping

    2010-05-01

    To identify the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. The lung cancer tissue samples from 18 patients were cultured and 4 lung cell lines (A549, NCI-H446, SK-MES-1, BEAS-2B) were also included in the study. Air samples in the headspace of culture flasks were analyzed for VOCs with solid-phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique (SPME-GC/MS). Two kinds of VOCs 2-pentadecanone and nonadecane were detected in lung cancer cell lines A549, NCI-H446 and SK-MES-1. The concentration of 2-pentadecanone were (1.382 + or -0.171) X 10(-5)mg/L, (1.681 + or - 0.190) X 10(-4)mg/L and (2.835 + or - 0.401) X 10(-6)mg/L, respectively; the concentrations of nonadecane were (8.382 + or - 0.606 ) X 10(-6)mg/L, (1.845 + or - 0.130) X 10(-5)mg/L and (6.220 + or - 0.362) X 10(-6)mg/L), respectively. The eicosane was detected in A549 and NCI-H446 with the concentration of (8.313 + or - 1.130) X 10(-6)mg/L and (1.020 + or - 0.141) X 10(-5)mg/L), respectively. All the 3 VOCs were not detected in cell line BEAS-2B. The concentrations of 12 VOCs including decane, 2- pentadecanone, nonadecane and eicosane were high in 18 lung cancer tissue samples; the concentrations of 2-pentadecanone were 5.421 X 10(-6)mg/L-3.621 X 10(-5)mg/L,those of nonadecane were 5.805 X 10(-6)mg/L-1.830 X 10(-5)mg/L, those of eicosane were 2.730 X 10(-6)mg/L-2.343 X 10(-5)mg/L. There were no differences of VOCs levels among patients with different cancer differentiation (P>0.05). The concentration of eicosane in the non-squamous carcinoma was higher than that in squamous carcinoma, the same results were confirmed in the lung cancer cell lines. This study has identified VOCs produced by lung cancer tissue, which may support to use breath test as a complementary noninvasive diagnostic method for lung cancer.

  9. The effect of breast cancer on personal income three years after diagnosis by cancer stage and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingelise; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe; Thielen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    was based on information from Danish nationwide registers. A total of 7,372 women aged 30¿60 years diagnosed with BC, 48% with metastasis, were compared to 213,276 controls. Generalised linear models were used to estimate the effect of a cancer diagnosis on personal gross income three years after diagnosis......Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between stage of incident breast cancer (BC) and personal income three years after diagnosis. The analysis further considered whether the association differed among educational groups. Methods: The study......, stratified by education and stage of cancer. The models were adjusted for income two years prior to cancer diagnosis and demographic, geographic and co-morbidity covariates. Results: Adjusting for income two years prior to cancer diagnosis and other baseline covariates (see above), cancer had a minor effect...

  10. Colorectal cancers detected through screening are associated with lower stages and improved survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindebjerg, Jan; Osler, Merete; Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo

    2014-01-01

    in the feasibility study cohort were reviewed with respect to the effect of screening participation on stages and survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All cases of CRC in a feasibility study cohort diagnosed from the beginning of the study until two years after the study ended were identified. Differences...... in the distribution of colon cancer stages and rectal cancer groups between the various screening categories were analysed through χ(2)-tests. Survival analysis with respect to screening groups was done by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-Mantel hazard ratios, and survival was corrected for lead time. RESULTS: Colon cancers...... detected through screening were diagnosed at significantly lower stages than among screening non-responders. There were relatively fewer locally advanced rectal cancers among patients diagnosed through positive FOBT than among non-responders. Survival among screening cancer patients was superior...

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC ANTERIOR PELVIC EXENTERATION FOR STAGE IVa CERVICAL CANCER (A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Molchanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an increasing use of laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of gynecologic cancer. We aimed to analyze the feasibility of performing laparoscopic pelvic extentaration for stage IVa cervical cancer. Case report. We present the case of a 61-year-old patient diagnosed with stage IVa (T4N0M0 cervical cancer. The examination revealed cervical cancer invading the bladder wall and extending to the mouth of uretersю The patient underwent laparoscopy and bilateral uretherocutaneostomy as the first line treatment. When creatinine and urea blood levels were in the normal range, the patient underwent laparoscopic anterior pelvic exentaration as the second line treatment. After surgery the patient received pelvic external beam radiation therapy. The follow-up period was 6 months. Conclusion. We have shown the feasibility of performing laparoscopic anterior pelvic exenteration for stage IVa cervical cancer complicated by complete obstruction of one kidney and partial obstruction of another kidney

  12. The association between socioeconomic status and tumour stage at diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Camilla; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Nielsen, Thor Schütt Svane

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES) is a known predictor of survival for several cancers and it has been suggested that SES differences affecting tumour stage at diagnosis may be the most important explanatory factor for this. However, only a limited number of studies have investigated SES....... The observed socioeconomic difference in stage at diagnosis of ovarian cancer calls for further studies on how to reduce this diagnostic delay....

  13. Impact of Urban Neighborhood Disadvantage on Late Stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGuzman, Pam Baker; Cohn, Wendy F; Camacho, Fabian; Edwards, Brandy L; Sturz, Vanessa N; Schroen, Anneke T

    2017-04-01

    Research suggests that residents of inner-city urban neighborhoods have higher rates of late stage cancer diagnosis. Identifying urban neighborhoods with high rates of both concentrated disadvantage and late stage cancer diagnosis may assist health care providers to target screening interventions to reduce disparities. The purposes of this study were to (1) create an index to evaluate concentrated disadvantage (CD) using non-racial measures of poverty, (2) determine the impact of neighborhood CD on late stage breast cancer diagnosis in US cities, and (3) to understand the role of obesity on this relationship. We used census block group- (CBG) level poverty indicators from five Virginia cities to develop the index. Breast cancer cases of women aged 18-65 who lived in the five cities were identified from the 2000-2012 Virginia Cancer Registry. A logistic regression model with random intercept was used to evaluate the impact of disadvantage on late stage breast cancer diagnosis. CBG-level maps were developed to geographically identify neighborhoods with both high rates of CD and late breast cancer staging. Over 900 CBGs and 6000 breast cases were included. Global fit of the concentrated disadvantage model was acceptable. The effect of disadvantage on late stage was significant (OR = 1.0083, p = 0.032). Inner-city poverty impacts risk of late stage breast cancer diagnosis. Area-level obesity is highly correlated with neighborhood poverty (ρ = 0.74, p diagnosis for urban poor and for minorities living in these underserved neighborhoods, but more study is needed to understanding the complex relationship between concentrated neighborhood poverty, obesity, and late stage diagnosis.

  14. Combined endobronchial and oesophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Peter; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Colella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    New guidelines for combined endobronchial and oesophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic...... Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and oesophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence....

  15. CLINICAL STAGING OF CANCER OF THE PROSTATE DURING ITS PRIMARY BIOPSY

    OpenAIRE

    S. B. Petrov; S. A. Rakul; A. V. Zhivov; R. A. Eloyev; A. Yu. Plekhanov; P. V. Kharchenko

    2010-01-01

    Clinical staging of cancer is the important element of a diagnostic process that determines the nature and scope of therapeutic measures required for a patient. Objective: to assess the role of clinical, clinical laboratory, and morphological findings in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) and to analyze the pattern of its clinical stages in patients having different levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the results of digital rectal examination (DRE) and ultrasound study (USS...

  16. Prognostic importance of VEGF-A haplotype combinations in a stage II colon cancer population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, Sanne; Fredslund, Rikke; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients.......To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients....

  17. Treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer: What's trending?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Timothy L; Shah, Puja M; Samson, Pamela; Robinson, Clifford G; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2017-09-01

    Stage I non-small cell lung cancer traditionally is treated with lobectomy. Sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy provide alternative treatments for higher-risk groups. The purpose of this study was to determine the national treatment trends for stage I lung cancer. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer between 1998 and 2012. Patients were compared across treatment groups, and trends in treatment and disease were evaluated over the 15-year time period. The National Cancer Database contained 369,931 patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. After removing patients who received chemotherapy as a first course of treatment and patients with pathologic stage IV, 357,490 patients were analyzed. The first recorded cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy are in 2003 and rapidly increased to 6.6% (2063) of all patients treated in 2012. The number of diagnoses of stage I non-small cell lung cancer steadily increased over the 15-year period, whereas the rate of lobectomy decreased from 55% in 1998 to 50% in 2012 (P lung cancer cases continues to increase, lobectomy rates are decreasing while sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy rates are increasing. Although the increasing popularity of alternative therapies to lobectomy for treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer should allow more patients to undergo treatment, we did not observe this trend in the data. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The association between fatalistic beliefs and late stage at diagnosis of lung and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Liu, Michael Pang-Hsiang; Abel, Gary A.; Wardle, Jane; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatalistic beliefs may be implicated in longer help-seeking intervals, and consequently, greater risk of advanced stage at cancer diagnosis. Methods We examined associations between fatalism and stage at diagnosis in a population-based cohort of 4,319 U.S. patients with newly-diagnosed lung or colorectal cancer participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes and Research Surveillance (CanCORS) study. Fatalistic beliefs were assessed with an established measure. A fatalism score (range 4-16) was created by summing Likert-scale responses to four items. Cancer stage at diagnosis was abstracted from medical records by trained staff. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between fatalism score and advanced stage at diagnosis (IV vs I-III), adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Overall, 917 (21%) patients had stage IV cancers (lung: 28%, colorectal: 16%). The mean fatalism score was 10.7 (median=11, inter-quartile range 9-12). In adjusted analyses, a higher fatalism score was associated with greater odds of stage IV diagnosis (odds ratio per unit increase in fatalism=1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.08, p=0.003). Patients with the highest fatalism score had an adjusted 8.9% higher frequency of stage IV diagnosis compared with patients with the lowest score (25.4% vs. 16.5%). Discussion In this large and socioeconomically, geographically and ethnically diverse population of patients with lung and colorectal cancer, fatalistic beliefs were associated with higher risk of advanced stage at diagnosis. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm causation. Impact These findings support the value of incorporating information about the curability of early-stage cancers in public education campaigns. PMID:25650183

  19. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  20. [Breast cancer patient satisfaction with immediate two-stage implant-based breast reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coufal, O; Gabrielová, L; Justan, I; Zapletal, O; Selingerová, I; Krsička, P

    2014-01-01

    For most breast cancer patients in the Czech Republic, breast reconstruction is available only in a delayed manner. In the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (MMCI), suitable candidates are offered immediate breast reconstruction using tissue expander with later exchange to a permanent silicone implant. The aim of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with this type of reconstruction. Sixty-two women who had undergone surgery at the MMCI from 2007 through 2013 were sent a simple questionnaire developed by our working team. Fifty-seven patients completed the questionnaire. The data were evaluated by description methods and statistical tests. Patient response was 92%. The absolute majority of patients (56/57) would opt for this method again. The vast majority of patients (48/57) are generally satisfied with their reconstruction. Most women (8/14) younger than 50 years after the unilateral surgery would prefer synchronous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and bilateral reconstruction if they could choose again. After bilateral surgery, reconstructed breasts are more often regarded as a part of the patients body. Dressed women rate their look substantially better than when they are undressed. As for self-esteem, these women are feeling excellent or good. Their psychosocial well-being in common situations is predominantly excellent. Their sexual well-being is significantly worse, and almost half of these women indicate occasional pain in their reconstructed breasts. The patients emphasize the need for appropriate information before the surgery. Immediate two-stage implant-based breast reconstruction is a suitable option for some breast cancer patients. With regard to the less natural cosmetic result and feeling of the implant-reconstructed breast, appropriate selection of women for this type of surgery is necessary and potential candidates must be thoroughly informed in the preoperative setting.

  1. Microsatellite instability is associated with reduced disease specific survival in stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, H M; Ryan, E; Balasubramanian, I; Kennelly, R; Geraghty, R; Sclafani, F; Fennelly, D; McDermott, R; Ryan, E J; O'Donoghue, D; Hyland, J M P; Martin, S T; O'Connell, P R; Gibbons, D; Winter, Des; Sheahan, K

    2016-11-01

    Up to 15% of colorectal cancers exhibit microsatellite instability (MSI), where errors in replication go unchecked due to defects in the mismatch repair system. This study aimed to determine survival in a large single-centre series of 1250 consecutive colorectal cancers subjected to universal MSI testing. Clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer identified on prospectively maintained colorectal and pathology databases at St. Vincent's University Hospital from 2004 to May 2012 were examined. Mismatch repair (MMR) status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier curves, the log-rank test and Cox regression were used to associate survival with clinical and pathological characteristics. Of the 1250 colorectal cancers in the study period, 11% exhibited MSI (n = 138). Patients with MSI tumours had significantly lower rates of lymph node and distant metastases (MSI N+ rate: 24.8% compared with MSS N+ rate: 46.2%, p colon cancer. However, patients with Stage III MSI colon cancers had a worse DSS than those with MSS tumours. Stage III MSI tumours exhibited higher rates of lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion than Stage I/II MSI tumours. MSI is associated with a reduced risk of nodal and distant metastases, with an improved DSS in Stage I/II colon cancer. However, when MSI tumours progress to Stage III these patients had worse outcomes and pathological features. New strategies for this cohort of patients may be required to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC V6 and v7; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Staging by tomography: Lung, esophagus, mama and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation shows images of different types of cancer in the lung, esophagus, mama and pleura. The chest radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and PET CT contribute to detect the morphology, size, location, metastasize, malignant and benign nodules, lymph glands.

  4. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. From left to right: Weidong Li, principal investigator, China Academy of Chinese Medic

  5. Stage I Breast Cancer and Bone Mass in Older Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schneider, Diane

    2001-01-01

    The specific aims of the study are I) to assess the bone mineral density of women 65 years of age and older with breast cancer in comparison with the bone mineral density of same aged women with normal mammograms; 2...

  6. Stage 1 Breast Cancer and Bone Mass in Older Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schneider, Diane

    2002-01-01

    The specific aims of the study are 1) to assess the bone mineral density of women 65 years of age and older with breast cancer in comparison with the bone mineral density of same aged women with normal mammograms; 2...

  7. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; WT1 Positive

  8. Stem Cell Differentiation Stage Factors and Their Role in Triggering Symmetry Breaking Processes during Cancer Development: A Quantum Field Theory Model for Reprogramming Cancer Cells to Healthy Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biava, Pier Mario; Burigana, Fabio; Germano, Roberto; Kurian, Philip; Verzegnassi, Claudio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2017-09-20

    A long history of research has pursued the use of embryonic factors isolated during cell differentiation processes for the express purpose of transforming cancer cells back to healthy phenotypes. Recent results have clarified that the substances present at different stages of cell differentiation-which we call stem cell differentiation stage factors (SCDSFs)-are proteins with low molecular weight and nucleic acids that regulate genomic expression. The present review summarizes how these substances, taken at different stages of cellular maturation, are able to retard proliferation of many human tumor cell lines and thereby reprogram cancer cells to healthy phenotypes. The model presented here is a quantum field theory (QFT) model in which SCDSFs are able to trigger symmetry breaking processes during cancer development. These symmetry breaking processes, which lie at the root of many phenomena in elementary particle physics and condensed matter physics, govern the phase transitions of totipotent cells to higher degrees of diversity and order, resulting in cell differentiation. In cancers, which share many genomic and metabolic similarities with embryonic stem cells, stimulated re-differentiation often signifies the phenotypic reversion back to health and non-proliferation. In addition to acting on key components of the cellular cycle, SCDSFs are able to reprogram cancer cells by delicately influencing the cancer microenvironment, modulating the electrochemistry and thus the collective electrodynamic behaviors between dipole networks in biomacromolecules and the interstitial water field. Coherent effects in biological water, which are derived from a dissipative QFT framework, may offer new diagnostic and therapeutic targets at a systemic level, before tumor instantiation occurs in specific tissues or organs. Thus, by including the environment as an essential component of our model, we may push the prevailing paradigm of mutation-driven oncogenesis toward a closer

  9. Future strategies in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.G. van der; Witjes, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review new modalities in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of superficial and invasive bladder cancer are reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: Urinary markers still cannot replace cystoscopy in diagnosing bladder cancer. However, DNA micro-array has shown promise for diagnosis.

  10. Oral and pharyngeal cancer : Analysis of patient delay at different tumor stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouha, XDR; Tromp, DM; Hordijk, GJ; Winnubst, JAM; de Leeuw, JRJ

    2005-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to examine which factors are related to patient delay in a cohort of consecutive patients with pharyngeal cancer and oral cancer and to determine whether the different stages of patient delay (ie, appraisal, illness, behavioral, and scheduling) were related to

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadaban, Leigh; Rauscher, Garth; Aklilu, Mebea; Villenes, Dana; Freels, Sally; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-11-15

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colon cancer remains to be elucidated and its use varies between patients and institutions. Currently, clinical guidelines suggest discussing adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with high-risk stage II disease in the absence of conclusive randomized controlled trial data. To further investigate this relationship, the objective of the current study was to determine whether an association exists between overall survival (OS) and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients stratified by age and pathological risk features. Data from the National Cancer Data Base were analyzed for demographics, tumor characteristics, management, and survival of patients with stage II colon cancer who were diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with survival information through 2011. Pearson Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression were used to analyze disease and demographic data. Survival analysis was performed with the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Propensity score weighting was used to match cohorts. Among 153,110 patients with stage II colon cancer, predictors of receiving chemotherapy included age clinically relevant OS was associated with the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy in all patient subgroups regardless of high-risk tumor pathologic features (poor or undifferentiated histology, colon cancer evaluated to date, improved OS was found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy regardless of treatment regimen, patient age, or high-risk pathologic risk features. Cancer 2016;122:3277-3287. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Patients with old age or proximal tumors benefit from metabolic syndrome in early stage gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-li Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. METHODS: Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P=0.036. Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P=0.009 in multivariate analysis or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P=0.047 in multivariate analysis. No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P=0.052 in univariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors.

  13. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  14. Primary vaginal cancer: role of MRI in diagnosis, staging and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, J; Klopp, A H; Devine, C E; Sagebiel, T; Viswanathan, C; Bhosale, P R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoma of the vagina is rare, accounting for 1–3% of all gynaecological malignancies. MRI has an increasing role in diagnosis, staging, treatment and assessment of complications in gynaecologic malignancy. In this review, we illustrate the utility of MRI in patients with primary vaginal cancer and highlight key aspects of staging, treatment, recurrence and complications. PMID:25966291

  15. Segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy as treatment of stage II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Schlupp, W.R.; Cunha, L.S.M. da

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer with segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy has been described since decade 30. Many recent prospective and retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of this conservative management, particularly in stage I. There are still doubts in its use in stage II. (Author) [pt

  16. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact...... on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. LIMITATIONS: Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal...... cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered....

  17. The Presence of Telomere Fusion in Sporadic Colon Cancer Independently of Disease Stage, TP53/KRAS Mutation Status, Mean Telomere Length, and Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Tanaka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Defects in telomere maintenance can result in telomere fusions that likely play a causative role in carcinogenesis by promoting genomic instability. However, this proposition remains to be fully understood in human colon carcinogenesis. In the present study, the temporal sequence of telomere dysfunction dynamics was delineated by analyzing telomere fusion, telomere length, telomerase activity, hotspot mutations in KRAS or BRAF, and TP53 of tissue samples obtained from 18 colon cancer patients. Our results revealed that both the deficiency of p53 and the shortening of mean telomere length were not necessary for producing telomere fusions in colon tissue. In five cases, telomere fusion was observed even in tissue adjacent to cancerous lesions, suggesting that genomic instability is initiated in pathologically non-cancerous lesions. The extent of mean telomere attrition increased with lymph node invasiveness of tumors, implying that mean telomere shortening correlates with colon cancer progression. Telomerase activity was relatively higher in most cancer tissues containing mutation(s in KRAS or BRAF and/or TP53 compared to those without these hotspot mutations, suggesting that telomerase could become fully active at the late stage of colon cancer development. Interestingly, the majority of telomere fusion junctions in colon cancer appeared to be a chromatid-type containing chromosome 7q or 12q. In sum, this meticulous correlative study not only highlights the concept that telomere fusion is present in the early stages of cancer regardless of TP53/KRAS mutation status, mean telomere length, and telomerase activity, but also provides additional insights targeting key telomere fusion junctions which may have significant implications for colon cancer diagnoses.

  18. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  19. Should abdominal sequences be included in prostate cancer MR staging studies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, S.H., E-mail: sineadhmcevoy@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Lavelle, L.P.; Purcell, Y.M. [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Quinlan, D.M. [Department of Urology, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Skehan, S.J.; Collins, C.D.; McMahon, C.J. [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ESUR guideline that abdominal MR sequences are reserved for high-risk prostate cancer is tested. • Routine abdominal sequences are of low yield in prostate cancer MR staging. • Routine abdominal staging sequences frequently result in incidental findings. • Abdominal staging sequences should be reserved for high-risk prostate cancer cases. - Abstract: Objectives: Prostate cancer staging MR examinations commonly include abdominal sequences to assess for non-regional (common iliac or para-aortic) nodal metastasis. In our experience the diagnostic yield of this is limited, but incidental findings are frequent, often necessitating further investigations. The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic utility of abdominal sequences in routine prostate cancer MR staging studies. Methods: Findings on abdominal sequences of consecutive MRI prostate studies performed for staging newly diagnosed prostate cancer between September 2011 and September 2013 were reviewed with respect to adenopathy and additional incidental findings. Results were correlated with Gleason grade and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in each case. Results: 355 MRI prostate examinations were reviewed. 4 (1.1%) showed enlarged non-regional lymph nodes. Incidental findings were found in 82(23.1%) cases, neccessitating further investigation in 45 (12.7%) cases. Enlarged non-regional nodes were associated with higher PSA level and Gleason grade (p = 0.007, p = 0.005 respectively). With a combined threshold of PSA > 20 ng/mL and/or Gleason grade ≥8 the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 100, 60, 3 and 100% respectively for predicting the presence of non-regional adenopathy. Conclusions: Routine abdominal sequences are of very low yield in routine prostate cancer MR staging, frequently resulting in incidental findings requiring further work-up and should be reserved for high-risk cases. Our experience supports the use of an abdominal staging sequence in high

  20. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  1. Preoperative CA125 as a prognostic factor in stage I epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Høgdall, Estrid; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate preoperative CA125 as a prognostic factor in stage I epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Preoperative serum CA125 levels from 118 women with FIGO (International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics) stage I EOC were analysed and the prognostic value...... was evaluated and compared with other prognostic factors (age, grade, substages, histologic type). By the Kaplan-Meier estimate we demonstrated that patients with stage I EOC and preoperative serum CA125 levels preoperative serum...

  2. A comparative analysis of clinical and molecular factors with the stage of cervical cancer in a Brazilian cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio M Amaro-Filho

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Cell cycle protein expression plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cervical cancer. However, few studies have attempted to correlate the use of these biomarkers with the clinical progression of the tumor. OBJECTIVES: 1 To analyze the expression of Ki-67, p53 and p16(INK4a in cervical cancer, 2 to correlate the relative expression of these proteins as well as clinical parameters with the stage of disease, and 3 to determine the HPV DNA prevalence and subtype distribution. METHODS: Tissue Micro-Arrays (TMA from patients with invasive cervical cancer (ICC and controls were analyzed. HPV DNA detection was done by PCR and in situ hybridization. Ki-67, p53 and p16(INK4a were analyzed by immunohistochemistry; clinical data was derived from the chart review. RESULTS: Advanced tumor stage (III and IV was strongly associated (p55 years old, with more than four pregnancies and with the lack of formal education. HPV DNA was found in 94.3% of cases with the most prevalent types being HPV16 (67.5%, followed by HPV33 (12.0% and HPV35 (3.6%. High expression of Ki-67 and p16 was more common in the advanced FIGO stages (p = 0.023. Women with HPV16 tended to be younger (50.9 years; SE 1.9 compared to women with other types (59.9 years; SE 2.8. CONCLUSION: We found that Ki-67 and p16 expression were independently associated with the tumor stage. We also noted that about 1/3 of the cervical cancers in this Brazilian cohort were not associated with HPV types directly targeted by the current HPV vaccines.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Clinical and Molecular Factors with the Stage of Cervical Cancer in a Brazilian Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Filho, Sergio M.; Golub, Jonathan E.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Cunha, Cynthia B.; Levi, José E.; Villa, Luisa L.; Andrade, Cecília V.; Russomano, Fabio B.; Tristão, Aparecida; Pires, Andrea; Nicol, Alcina F.

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle protein expression plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cervical cancer. However, few studies have attempted to correlate the use of these biomarkers with the clinical progression of the tumor. Objectives 1) To analyze the expression of Ki-67, p53 and p16INK4a in cervical cancer, 2) to correlate the relative expression of these proteins as well as clinical parameters with the stage of disease, and 3) to determine the HPV DNA prevalence and subtype distribution. Methods Tissue Micro-Arrays (TMA) from patients with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and controls were analyzed. HPV DNA detection was done by PCR and in situ hybridization. Ki-67, p53 and p16INK4a were analyzed by immunohistochemistry; clinical data was derived from the chart review. Results Advanced tumor stage (III and IV) was strongly associated (p55 years old), with more than four pregnancies and with the lack of formal education. HPV DNA was found in 94.3% of cases with the most prevalent types being HPV16 (67.5%), followed by HPV33 (12.0%) and HPV35 (3.6%). High expression of Ki-67 and p16 was more common in the advanced FIGO stages (p = 0.023). Women with HPV16 tended to be younger (50.9 years; SE 1.9) compared to women with other types (59.9 years; SE 2.8). Conclusion We found that Ki-67 and p16 expression were independently associated with the tumor stage. We also noted that about 1/3 of the cervical cancers in this Brazilian cohort were not associated with HPV types directly targeted by the current HPV vaccines. PMID:23505442

  4. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binny Khandakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous ovarian cancer (SOC is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n=100 that were treated either conventionally (n=50 or with NACT (n=50, followed by surgery. In order to evaluate the expression of tissue biomarkers (p53, MIB1, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her-2/neu, E-cadherin, and Bcl2, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative scoring were done following morphological examination. Following NACT, significant differences in tumor histomorphology were observed as compared to the native neoplasms. MIB 1 was significantly lower in cases treated with NACT and survival outcome was significantly better in cases with low MIB 1. ER expression was associated with poor overall survival. No other marker displayed any significant difference in expression or correlation with survival between the two groups. Immunophenotype of SOC does not differ significantly in samples from cases treated with NACT, compared to upfront surgically treated cases. The proliferating capacity of the residual tumor cells is less, depicted by low mean MIB1 LI. MIB 1 and ER inversely correlate with survival.

  5. The Multidisciplinary Team Conference's Decision on M-Staging in Patients with Gastric- and Gastroesophageal Cancer is not Accurate without Staging Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandby, R B; Svendsen, L B; Fallentin, E; Egeland, C; Achiam, M P

    2016-06-01

    The implementation of the multidisciplinary team conference has been shown to improve treatment outcome for patients with gastric- and gastroesophageal cancer. Likewise, the staging laparoscopy has increased the detection of patients with disseminated disease, that is, patients who do not benefit from a surgical resection. The aim of this study was to compare the multidisciplinary team conference's decision in respect of M-staging with the findings of the following staging laparoscopy. Patients considered operable and resectable within the multidisciplinary team conference in the period 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient data were retrieved by searching for specific diagnosis and operation codes in the in-house system. The inclusion criteria were as follows: biopsy-verified cancer of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction or stomach, and no suspicion of peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastases on multidisciplinary team conference before staging laparoscopy. Furthermore, an evaluation with staging laparoscopy was required. In total, 222 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most cancers were located in the gastroesophageal junction, n = 171 (77.0%), and most common with adenocarcinoma histology, n = 196 (88.3%). The staging laparoscopy was M1-positive for peritoneal carcinomatosis in eight patients (16.7%) with gastric cancer versus nine patients (5.3%) with gastroesophageal junction cancer. Furthermore, liver metastases were evident in zero patients (0.0%) and four patients (2.3%) with gastric- and gastroesophageal junction cancer, respectively. The staging laparoscopy findings regarding peritoneal carcinomatosis were significantly different between gastric- and gastroesophageal junction cancers, p = 0.01. No significant differences were found regarding T-/N-stage or histological tumor characteristics between the positive- and negative-staging laparoscopy group. The M-staging of the multidisciplinary team conference without staging

  6. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhjem, Matthew C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic ± paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer

  7. SOX9 Expression Predicts Relapse of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression...... high levels of SOX9 of primary stage II colon tumors predict low riskof relapse whereas low levels of SOX9 predict high risk of relapse. SOX9 may have an important value as a biomarker when evaluating risk of relapse for personalized treatment....

  8. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Melatonin and cortisol serum levels in lung cancer patients at different stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Carughi, Stefano; De Cata, Angelo; La Viola, Marco; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    Numerous interactions exist among the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, mediated by neurotransmitters, hormones, and cytokines. Melatonin may modulate the integrated functions of a unique neuro-immune-endocrine system. Neoplastic diseases may be linked to progressive loss of integration among these systems. We investigated whether there are differences among healthy elderly people and elderly people suffering from lung cancer at different stages of disease in 24-hour melatonin and cortisol secretory profiles. In seventeen healthy subjects (mean age +/-S.E.: 68.8+/-1.92 years), seventeen patients with stage I and II lung cancer (mean age: 67.2+/-0.80), seventeen patients with stage III and IV lung cancer (mean age: 69.5+/-2.26), melatonin and cortisol serum levels were measured in blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours. The area under the curve (AUC) and the presence of circadian rhythmicity were evaluated. The circadian rhythm of melatonin was present in all the groups, but serum levels were decreased in the subjects suffering from lung cancer (Pcortisol serum levels were increased (not in a significant way), with a loss of the circadian rhythm of secretion. The melatonin/cortisol ratio was decreased in stage III and IV cancer patients (Pmelatonin secretion and altered cortisol secretion pattern with advancing stage of neoplastic disease may be an expression of a gradual alteration of the integrated function of the neuro-endocrine system in lung cancer patients.

  10. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  11. Centralized treatment of advanced stages of ovarian cancer improves survival: a nationwide Danish survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Høgdall, Claus; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This retrospective, nationwide, observational study was designed to compare treatment in tertiary referral centers vs. regional hospitals on overall survival for patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer. Material and methods. The study took place in all gynecological departments...... in Denmark, involving a total of 1,160 patients with stage IIIC or IV ovarian cancer. Data were extracted for 2,024 patients with all stages of ovarian cancer recorded in the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2008. The main outcome measure was overall survival....... Results. No difference was found between tertiary centers and regional hospitals with regard to age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score or comorbidity. Patients in regional hospitals had poorer Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, i.e.1.0 vs. 2.0 (p= 0...

  12. A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severi, Gianluca; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Muller, David C; Pedersen, John; Longano, Anthony; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Mills, John

    2014-01-01

    Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, “cases” (N = 83), were matched to “referents” (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14–5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41–6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage

  13. Staging of women with breast cancer after introduction of sentinel node guided axillary dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg

    2012-01-01

    Today, sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) has replaced axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) as standard procedure for staging of the axilla in the treatment of breast cancer. SLND can accurately stage the axilla by removing on average only two lymph nodes. Only in case of metastatic spread...... to sentinel nodes an ALND is offered. Removing fewer nodes has made more extensive histopathological examinations of the lymph nodes possible and as a consequence more metastases are found. This has resulted in stage migration. Based on data from the nationwide Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG......) database we have estimated the magnitude and therapeutic consequences of this stage migration in Denmark by comparing the distribution of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients operated in 1993-1996 and 2005-2008; before and after introducing SLND. The proportion of patients having macrometastases...

  14. Nbn and atm cooperate in a tissue and developmental stage-specific manner to prevent double strand breaks and apoptosis in developing brain and eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paulo M G; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Remus, Martina; Cavalheiro, Gabriel R; Gomes, Anielle L; Rocha-Martins, Maurício; Martins, Mauricio R; Frappart, Lucien; Reuss, David; McKinnon, Peter J; von Deimling, Andreas; Martins, Rodrigo A P; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Nibrin (NBN or NBS1) and ATM are key factors for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) signaling and repair. Mutations in NBN or ATM result in Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome and Ataxia telangiectasia. These syndromes share common features such as radiosensitivity, neurological developmental defects and cancer predisposition. However, the functional synergy of Nbn and Atm in different tissues and developmental stages is not yet understood. Here, we show in vivo consequences of conditional inactivation of both genes in neural stem/progenitor cells using Nestin-Cre mice. Genetic inactivation of Atm in the central nervous system of Nbn-deficient mice led to reduced life span and increased DSBs, resulting in increased apoptosis during neural development. Surprisingly, the increase of DSBs and apoptosis was found only in few tissues including cerebellum, ganglionic eminences and lens. In sharp contrast, we showed that apoptosis associated with Nbn deletion was prevented by simultaneous inactivation of Atm in developing retina. Therefore, we propose that Nbn and Atm collaborate to prevent DSB accumulation and apoptosis during development in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner.

  15. Local staging of prostate cancer with transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T; Nerstrom, H; Iversen, P

    1992-01-01

    ultrasound. Eleven of these papers reported on ultrasound findings in patients in whom digital rectal examination had defined localized disease. One paper compared ultrasound findings and digital rectal findings. One paper indicated that transrectal ultrasound, though not suited to patients with clinically...... localized disease defined by digital rectal examination, may be superior as the initial staging tool. We conclude that transrectal ultrasound has too low a specificity to upgrade the diagnostic results of digital rectal examination, but that it may be more useful as the primary staging tool and for guidance...

  16. Individual socioeconomic status and breast cancer diagnostic stages: a French case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Mattea; Trétarre, Brigitte; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Bessaoud, Faiza

    2016-06-01

    Health inequalities have increased over the last 30 years. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between low individual socioeconomic status and poor breast cancer prognosis. Our hypothesis was: low socioeconomic status patients have a higher risk of being diagnosed with late stage breast cancer than high socioeconomic status ones due to delayed diagnosis. We conducted a matched case-control study on 619 women with breast cancer, living in the Hérault, a French administrative area. Both Cases and Controls were recruited among invasive cases diagnosed in 2011 and 2012 and treated in Hérault care centers. Cases were defined as patients with advanced stages. Controls were composed of early stage patients. Individual socioeconomic status was assessed using a validated individual score adapted to the French population and health care system. We observed that low socioeconomic status patients have a 2-fold risk of having late stage breast cancer regardless of cancer characteristics and detection mode (screening vs. clinical signs). One reason explaining those results could be that low socioeconomic status patients have less regular follow-up which can lead to later and poorer diagnosis. Follow-up is improved for women with a better awareness of breast cancer. Health policy makers could reduce health inequalities by reducing the delay in breast cancer diagnosis for low socioeconomic status women. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Conservative treatment of early stage ovarian cancer: oncological and fertility outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapardiel, I; Diestro, M D; Aletti, G

    2014-04-01

    Ovarian cancer may appear in young women during their reproductive age. As a result of late childbearing nowadays, fertility preservation has become a major issue in young women with gynecological cancer. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on conservative treatment and fertility preservation of women affected of early stage epithelial ovarian cancer. A web-based search in Medline and CancerLit databases on conservative treatment for early stage ovarian cancer has been carried out. All relevant information has been collected and analyzed. Less than 40% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at early stages. Conservative treatment may be considered in young patients with a relapse rate that ranges from 9% to 29%, and a 5-year survival ranging from 83% to 100%. Recurrences in the controlateral ovary has been reported to be less than 5%, with most of these patients being alive after savage treatments. Moreover, it has been reported good fertility outcomes after conservative treatment with a successful conception rate that ranges from 60% to 100%, with an abortion rate under 30% in all series reported. Conservative treatment for early epithelial ovarian cancers could be a safe option for women younger than 40 years who wish to preserve their childbearing potential. We need a strict case selection such as FIGO stage I grade 1 and 2, although grade 3 cases could be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Breast cancer incidence, stage, treatment and survival in ethnic groups in South East England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, R H; Davies, E A; Møller, H

    2009-01-01

    Studies from the US have shown variations in breast cancer incidence, stage distribution, treatment and survival between ethnic groups. Data on 35 631 women diagnosed with breast cancer in South East England between 1998 and 2003 with self-assigned ethnicity information available were analysed. Results are reported for White, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Black Caribbean, Black African and Chinese women. Age-standardised breast cancer incidence rate ratios, patterns of stage of disease at diagnosis, treatment, overall and breast cancer-specific survival were examined. All ethnic groups studied had lower age-standardised breast cancer incidence rates than White women, with Bangladeshi women having the lowest rate ratio (0.23, 95% CI: 0.20–0.26). White women were the most likely to have a stage recorded at diagnosis (adjusted proportion 75%), and least likely to be diagnosed with metastatic disease (7%). Black African women were the least likely to have a record of cancer surgery (63%) or hormone therapy (32%), and most likely to receive chemotherapy (38%). After fully adjusting for age, socioeconomic deprivation, stage of disease and treatment received, there was no significant variation in breast cancer-specific survival. However, Black African women had significantly worse overall survival (hazard ratio 1.24, P=0.025). These findings suggest that a strategy of earlier detection should be pursued in Black and South Asian women. PMID:19127253

  19. Breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Meric, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K; Mirza, Attiqa N; Newman, Lisa A; Ames, Frederick C; Kuerer, Henry M; Ross, Merrick I; Feig, Barry; Babiera, Gildy; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Singletary, S Eva

    2002-11-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the role of breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a family history (FH) of breast cancer. Between 1970 and 1994, 1324 female patients with breast cancer were treated with breast-conservation therapy at our institution. From these, we identified 985 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer and who had available information on FH status. FH was considered positive in any patient who had a relative who had been previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Disease-specific survival was calculated from the date of initial diagnosis using the Kaplan-Meier method. The stage distribution for the 985 patients was as follows: 0 in 65 (7%), I in 500 (51%), and II in 420 (43%). The median age was 50 years (range, 21-88), with a median follow-up time of 8.8 years (range,.25-29). The median tumor size was 1.5 cm. FH was positive in 31%. There were no significant differences in locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-specific survival, or incidence of contralateral breast cancer in patients with a positive FH versus patients with a negative FH. Breast-conservation therapy is not contraindicated in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive FH.

  20. Evaluation of the diagnosis on staging of the bladder cancers by contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong; Xu Haiyan; Huan Haiming; Chen Yane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of the staging of the bladder cancers with the contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Methods: After rapid injection of the contrast agent SonoVue through the elbow vein, the staging of images was completed in 18 cases of bladder cancer. Results: The results of contrast-enhanced ultrasound were compared with post-operative pathological analysis, the rate of accuracy of diagnosis on T1, T2, T3 and T4 stage was 100%, 80%, 83% and 100% respectively. The accuracy made by new methods higher than those of other imaging examinations in T1 stage; the other stages were similar to those of other imaging examinations. Conclusion: The evaluation of Contrast-enhanced ultrasound on the staging of the bladder cancer is higher than that of the conventional ultrasound examination, while the observation of blood flow in the tumor can make accurate diagnosis and differential diagnosis, this method can be complement each other with CT and MRI to improve the rate of accuracy on the staging of bladder cancer. (authors)

  1. Comparison of Laparoscopy and Laparotomy in Surgical Staging of Apparent Early Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Qu, Hong; Liu, Chongdong; Wang, Shuzhen; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the safety and morbidity of laparoscopic versus laparotomic comprehensive staging of apparent early stage ovarian cancer. In this retrospective study, the outcomes of patients with apparent stage I ovarian cancer who underwent laparoscopic or laparotomic comprehensive surgical staging from January 2002 to January 2014 were evaluated. The long-term survival of patients with early ovarian cancer was compared. Forty-two patients were treated by laparoscopy, and 50 were treated by laparotomy. The median operative time was 200 minutes in the laparoscopy group and 240 minutes in the laparotomy group (P >0.05). The median length of hospital stay was 3 days in the laparoscopy group and 7 days in the laparotomy group (P laparoscopy and laparotomy groups. Laparoscopic and laparotomic comprehensive staging of early ovarian cancer were similar in terms of staging adequacy, accuracy and survival rate. Laparoscopic staging was associated with a significantly reduced hospital stay. Prospective randomized trials are required to evaluate the overall oncologic outcomes. PMID:27196468

  2. Characterizing viscoelastic properties of breast cancer tissue in a mouse model using indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Suhao; Zhao, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiayao; Zeng, Jianfeng; Chen, Shuangqing; Chen, Lei; Meng, You; Liu, Biao; Shan, Hong; Gao, Mingyuan; Feng, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancer forms affecting females worldwide. Characterizing the mechanical properties of breast cancer tissue is important for diagnosis and uncovering the mechanobiology mechanism. Although most of the studies were based on human cancer tissue, an animal model is still describable for preclinical analysis. Using a custom-build indentation device, we measured the viscoelastic properties of breast cancer tissue from 4T1 and SKBR3 cell lines. A total of 7 samples were tested for each cancer tissue using a mouse model. We observed that a viscoelastic model with 2-term Prony series could best describe the ramp and stress relaxation of the tissue. For long-term responses, the SKBR3 tissues were stiffer in the strain levels of 4-10%, while no significant differences were found for the instantaneous elastic modulus. We also found tissues from both cell lines appeared to be strain-independent for the instantaneous elastic modulus and for the long-term elastic modulus in the strain level of 4-10%. In addition, by inspecting the cellular morphological structure of the two tissues, we found that SKBR3 tissues had a larger volume ratio of nuclei and a smaller volume ratio of extracellular matrix (ECM). Compared with prior cellular mechanics studies, our results indicated that ECM could contribute to the stiffening the tissue-level behavior. The viscoelastic characterization of the breast cancer tissue contributed to the scarce animal model data and provided support for the linear viscoelastic model used for in vivo elastography studies. Results also supplied helpful information for modeling of the breast cancer tissue in the tissue and cellular levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of tissue factor in canine mammary tumours and correlation with grade, stage and markers of haemostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Eva Bartholin; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Tranholm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) expression in human cancers has been associated with a procoagulant state and facilitation of metastasis. This study was conducted in order to evaluate if TF was expressed in canine mammary tumours. Forty epithelial mammary tumours from 28 dogs were included. TF expression of t...

  4. [Expression and clinical significance of kisspeptin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in tissue of colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhui; Qi, Yuanling; Xu, Qian; Ren, Haipeng

    2016-03-01

    To detect the expression of kisspeptin-1 (KISS-1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tissue of colon cancer, and analyze the relativity between KISS-1, MMP-2, VEGF and pathological characteristics of colon cancer. A total of 60 colon cancer patients and 60 patients with benign colorectal disease who received surgical treatment in our hospital from January 2009 to June 2010 were selected as observation group and control group respectively. The cancer tissue samples and excision samples collected from them were used to detect KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF with immunohistochemistry. The positive rates of KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF were 31.7%, 58.3% and 78.3% in observation group, and 73.3%, 16.7% and 33.3% in control group. The positive rate of KISS-1 in observation group was lower than that in control group (χ(2)=23.489, Pcolon cancer (χ(2)=8.997, P=0.011; χ(2)=6.163, P=0.013; χ(2)=8.519, P=0.014; χ(2)=9.160, P=0.002; χ(2)=16.577, Pclinical stage of colon cancer and provide evidence for clinical diagnosis and prognosis prediction by detecting KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF.

  5. Cancer-specific Relationship Awareness, Relationship Communication, and Intimacy Among Couples Coping with Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon L; Siegel, Scott; Kashy, Deborah; Heckman, Carolyn J

    2014-05-01

    If couples can maintain normalcy and quality in their relationship during the cancer experience, they may experience greater relational intimacy. Cancer-specific relationship awareness, which is an attitude defined as partners focusing on the relationship and thinking about how they might maintain normalcy and cope with cancer as a couple or "team", is one factor that may help couples achieve this goal. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between cancer-specific relationship awareness, cancer-specific communication (i.e., talking about cancer's impact on the relationship, disclosure, and responsiveness to partner disclosure), and relationship intimacy and evaluate whether relationship communication mediated the association between relationship awareness and intimacy. Two hundred fifty four women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and their partners completed measures of cancer-specific relationship awareness, relationship talk, self-and perceived partner disclosure, perceived partner responsiveness, and relationship intimacy. Results indicated that patients and spouses who were higher in cancer-specific relationship awareness engaged in more relationship talk, reported higher levels of self-disclosure, and perceived that their partner disclosed more. Their partners reported that they were more responsive to disclosures. Relationship talk and perceived partner responsiveness mediated the association between cancer-specific relationship awareness and intimacy. Helping couples consider ways they can maintain normalcy and quality during the cancer experience and framing coping with cancer as a "team" effort may facilitate better communication and ultimately enhance relationship intimacy.

  6. Matrix-comparative genomic hybridization from multicenter formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissue blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köhne Claus-Henning

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genomic signatures of colorectal cancer for risk stratification requires the study of large series of cancer patients with an extensive clinical follow-up. Multicentric clinical studies represent an ideal source of well documented archived material for this type of analyses. Methods To verify if this material is technically suitable to perform matrix-CGH, we performed a pilot study using macrodissected 29 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples collected within the framework of the EORTC-GI/PETACC-2 trial for colorectal cancer. The scientific aim was to identify prognostic genomic signatures differentiating locally restricted (UICC stages II-III from systemically advanced (UICC stage IV colorectal tumours. Results The majority of archived tissue samples collected in the different centers was suitable to perform matrix-CGH. 5/7 advanced tumours displayed 13q-gain and 18q-loss. In locally restricted tumours, only 6/12 tumours showed a gain on 13q and 7/12 tumours showed a loss on 18q. Interphase-FISH and high-resolution array-mapping of the gain on 13q confirmed the validity of the array-data and narrowed the chromosomal interval containing potential oncogenes. Conclusion Archival, paraffin-embedded tissue samples collected in multicentric clinical trials are suitable for matrix-CGH analyses and allow the identification of prognostic signatures and aberrations harbouring potential new oncogenes.

  7. Disparity in Breast Cancer Late Stage at Diagnosis in Missouri: Does Rural Versus Urban Residence Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Faustine; Thompson, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that black women have a lower incidence of breast cancer compared to white women, black women experience higher death rates than any other group. We examined the stage of breast cancer presentation by race and geographic region using population-based breast cancer incidence in all 115 counties in the state of Missouri. We used 2003-2008 breast cancer incidence data from Missouri Cancer Registry and Research Center. County of residence was categorized as urban or rural using the rural-urban continuum code. We computed the conditional proportion of stage at diagnosis by race and metropolitan status and also used Pearson's chi-squared test with Yates' continuity correction to determine statistical significance of association. Results of the study indicate that a greater proportion of black women (38.8 %) compared to white women (30.2 %) were diagnosed with more advanced breast metastasis. Our results furt