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Sample records for stage t3 rectal

  1. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

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    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A. [Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion in predicting early distant metastasis in patients with stage T3 rectal cancer based on rectal MRI

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    Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University Health system, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute of Gastroenterology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Jae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion (MVI) in predicting early distant metastasis developed within 1 year of diagnosis of T3 rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Sixty-five patients with T3 rectal cancer (early metastasis, n = 28; non-metastasis, n = 37) were enrolled in this study. Early distant metastases developed in 28 patients (liver, n = 15; lung, n = 9; both, n = 4). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for early distant metastasis. In univariate analysis, tumour location, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), MRI-detected MVI, and mesorectal fat infiltration (MFI) (odds ratio [OR], 4.533, 9.583, 5.539, 27.046, and 5.539, respectively) were associated with early distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MVI (OR, 29.949; P < 0.002) and LVI (OR, 6.684; P = 0.033) were independent factors for early distant metastasis. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MVI (94.59 %, and 89.47 %, respectively) were significantly higher than those of LVI (64.86 %, and 61.76 %), but sensitivity and negative predictive value were not significantly different between MVI (60.71 %, and 76.09 %) and LVI (75.00 %, and 77.42 %). While sensitivity of MRI-detected MVI was equal to that of CEA in predicting early distant metastasis from T3 rectal cancer, specificity and PPV may be improved by assessing MVI. (orig.)

  3. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  4. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  5. Clinical and endorectal ultrasound staging of circumferential rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Farmer, K.C.; Chapple, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Circumferential rectal cancers present at a more advanced stage than those located in a single quadrant. Although accurate staging is an important aspect of the preoperative management of the patient with a rectal cancer, the clinical and radiological staging of this subgroup of rectal cancer patients has been poorly studied. All patients with a rectal cancer were assessed clinically (by digital rectal examination and rigid sigmoidoscopy) before the radiological assessment by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS). Data collected included tumour height (distance from anal verge in centimetre) and tumour type (circumferential or non-circumferential). Radiological tumour staging was with the TNM system. Fifty-nine subjects (33 men, 26 women; median age 65 years (range 38-86 years)) were identified with a circumferential rectal cancer. Mean height of the cancer was 8 - 0.4 cm (standard error of the mean; range 2-13 cm). Forty-two cancers were palpable, and 17 cancers were impalpable. All cancers assessed clinically as circumferential were confirmed as circumferential on ERUS scanning. Tumour stage as assessed by ERUS was either T3 (n = 57) or T4 (n = 2). Nodal status was NO (n = 29) and N1 (n = 30). All rectal cancers assessed as circumferential on clinical examination have an ERUS stage of T3 or greater.

  6. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  7. Intrarectal ultrasound accuracy in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallone, G.; Della Vecchia, A.; Di Capua, V.; Rengo, C.; Spirito, M.; Romano, G.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were evaluated of endorectal ultrasound in assessing the local extension of rectal carcinomas. The study population consisted of 50 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer. A CT scan was also performed on 45 patients, and the results were then compared to post-operative histologic findings. Endorectal US allowed the correct staging of 39/45 tumors (86.6%), with 1 false positive (overstaging T1 as T2), and 5 false negatives (understaging 3xT3 as T2; 2xT4 as T3). CT allowed the correct staging of 37/45 tumors (82.2%), with 5 false positives (overstaging T1 as T2) and 3 false negatives (understaging T3 as T2). Our results prove endorectal US to be a reliable method for the local staging of rectal cancers, limited to mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the rectal wall (T1 and T2 tumors). CT does not allow proper evaluation of T1 and T2 tumors, but provides with a better assessment of tumors (T3 and T4). Both C and endorectal US should, therefore, be used as complementary diagnostic techniques for an accurate evaluation of the local extension of lower rectal cancers

  8. Could a wait and see policy be justified in T3/4 rectal cancers after chemo-radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Robert; Harrison, Mark; Glynne-Jones, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard when MRI staging demonstrates threatened surgical margins in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Interest in non-surgical management of LARC as an alternative to a resection has been provoked by published excellent long-term outcomes of patients who achieve clinical complete responses (cCR) after CRT. The present retrospective study aimed to determine whether similar rates of local disease control are seen in a UK cancer centre in patients with T3-4 tumours, who obtained a cCR after preoperative CRT, but did not undergo surgery. Method. The outcome and treatment details of 266 patients who underwent CRT for clinically staged T3-4 rectal adenocarcinomas between 1993 and 2005 were reviewed. Results. Fifty-eight patients did not proceed to surgery, 10 of whom were identified as having a cCR. Six of these 10 patients subsequently developed intrapelvic recurrent disease with a median time to local progression of 20 months. Local relapse preceded the development of metastatic disease or occurred simultaneously. No patients underwent salvage resection. Conclusion. CRT alone in cT3/T4 rectal cancers has a high rate of local relapse even after cCR. Delaying or avoiding surgery might be appropriate for cT1 or cT2 tumours, or elderly and frail patients with co-morbidity, but these results do not support the current uncritical move to extrapolate this approach to all surgically fit patients with rectal cancer

  9. Local radiological staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common malignancy with a highly variable outcome. Local recurrence is dependent upon tumour stage and surgical technique. The role of pre-operative imaging is to determine which patients may be safely managed by surgery alone and which need additional therapy in order to facilitate surgery and improve outcome. This decision depends on the distinction between those with early and advanced disease. While trans-rectal ultrasound has traditionally been used to answer this question, a role for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly argued. This review will focus on the treatment options for rectal cancer and the clinical questions that subsequently arise for the radiologist to answer

  10. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  11. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  12. Pre-operative radio-chemo-thermotherapy for advanced (T3-4) and/or recurrent rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gremmler, M.; Rau, B.; Loeffel, J.; Gellermann, J.; Stahl, H.; Vogl, T.; Riess, H.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that pre-operative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer can increase resectability and local control (T4 stages), and might facilitate sphincter-preserving surgery (T3 stages). However, response rates are still unsatisfactory for radiotherapy alone, and are only slightly better for radio-chemotherapy. Radiofrequency hyperthermia has now achieved a technical stage already suitable for treating this tumor entity effectively in clinical practice. Therefore, a trimodal pre-operative approach for T3-4 rectal carcinomas has been investigated in a phase I/II study. Materials and Methods: A phase I/II study was conducted on 30 pts with advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer. (7(30)) pts had recurrences, (9(30)) uT3, (14(30)) T4-stage of the primary. Initial tumor stage was assessed by endosonography, CT and occasionally MRI (T1-w ± Echovist, T2-w, proton density). Radiotherapy was delivered in prone position using a belly-board, three-field technique, standard blocks, 5x1.8 → 45 Gy in 5 weeks. In parallel, 5-FU (300-350 mg/kg, dose escalation) and folinic acid (50 mg) on days 1-5 and days 22-28. Regional hyperthermia was administered using the annular phased array applicator SIGMA-60 once a week. Index temperatures T x were deduced from thermal mapping scans in endocavitary/intratumoral catheters. Re-staging was done by endosonography and CT. Four weeks after radiotherapy, surgery was performed with preference to continence preserving operations. If the tumor remained unresectable, a boost to a total tumor dose of 60 Gy was claimed. Results: (7(30)) pts (23%) did not undergo resection because their tumors remained technically non-resectable: 4 pts with persistent local control of 12-18 mts, 2 pts with progressive disease, 1 pt with too short observation time. (23(30)) pts underwent surgery: only 1 R2-resection, 22 R0-resections. The patho-histological analysis documented 4 CR (17%) at the primary tumor, 12 PR

  13. The location of locoregional recurrence in pathologic T3N0, non-irradiated lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Keum, Ki Chang; Rhee, Woo Joong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Ji; Choi, Seo Hee; Nam, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the patterns of locoregional recurrence of pathologic T3N0 (pT3N0) lower rectal cancer omitting postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and explore the potential of modification of a RT field. From Jan 2003 to Nov 2011, 35 patients omitting preoperative or postoperative RT for pT3N0 lower rectal cancer were included. We defined the lower rectal cancer as the tumor with the inferior margin located below the virtual line-a convergent level between rectal wall and levator ani muscle. All patients had radiologic examinations for recurrence evaluation during the follow-up duration. The median follow-up duration was 66.4 months (range, 1.4 to 126.1 months). Eight (22.9%) of the 35 patients had recurrence. Three (8.6%) was local recurrence (LR) only, 3 (8.6%) was distant metastasis (DM) only, and 2 (5.7%) was LR with DM. All LR were located at primary tumor sites. The overall survival rate, LR-free survival rate, and DM-free survival rate at 5 years was 79.8%, 83%, and 87%, respectively. All LR developed from tumors over 5 cm. However, there was no statistical significance (p = 0.065). There was no other risk factor for LR. Even though the patients included in this study had pathologically favorable pT3N0 rectal cancer, LR developed in 14.3% of patients. Most of the LR was located at primary tumor sites prior to surgery. Based on these findings, it might seem reasonable to consider postoperative RT with a smaller radiation field to the primary tumor site rather than the conventional whole pelvic irradiation.

  14. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Praeoperatives Staging des Rektumkarzinoms

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    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wiech, T. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  15. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  16. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients...... and overestimation resulted in 9 of 74. The figures for digital examination were 5 of 18 and 20 of 76, respectively. Penetration of the rectal wall was correctly identified in 56 of 61 patients by digital examination and in 59 of 61 by TRUS. Specimens without penetration of the rectal wall were identified in 26...

  17. Effect of preoperative treatment strategies on the outcome of patients with clinical T3, non-metastasized rectal cancer: A comparison between Dutch and Canadian expert centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; Vermeer, T A; van den Broek, C B M; Vuong, T; Bastiaannet, E; Azoulay, L; Dekkers, O M; Niazi, T; van den Berg, H A; Rutten, H J T; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-08-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) appears to be associated with less treatment-related toxicity compared with external beam radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. The present study compared the effect of preoperative treatment strategies on overall survival, cancer-specific deaths, and local recurrences between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different preoperative treatment strategies. We included 145 Dutch and 141 Canadian patients with cT3, non-metastasized rectal cancer. All patients from Canada were preoperatively treated with HDRBT. The preoperative treatment strategy for Dutch patients consisted of either no preoperative treatment, short-course radiotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing overall survival. We adjusted for age, cN stage, (y)pT stage, comorbidity, and type of surgery. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were cancer-specific deaths and local recurrences. Five-year overall survival was 70.9% (95% CI 62.6%-77.7%) in Dutch patients compared with 86.9% (80.1%-91.6%) in Canadian patients, resulting in an adjusted HR of 0.70 (95% CI 0.39-1.26; p = 0.233). Of 145 Dutch patients, 6.9% (95% CI 2.8%-11.0%) had a local recurrence and 17.9% (95% CI 11.7%-24.2%) patients died of rectal cancer, compared with 4.3% (95% CI 0.9%-7.5%) local recurrences and 10.6% (95% CI 5.5%-15.7%) rectal cancer deaths out of 141 Canadian patients. We did not detect statistically significant differences in overall survival between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different treatment strategies. This finding needs to be further investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic value of multidetector row CT in rectal cancer staging: comparison of multiplanar and axial images with histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.; Verma, R.; Rajesh, A.; Richards, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is widely used for rectal cancer staging, many centres in the UK perform computed tomography (CT) for staging rectal cancer at present. Furthermore in a small proportion of cases contraindications to MR imaging may lead to staging using CT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of current generation multidetector row CT (MDCT) in local staging of rectal cancer. In particular the accuracy of multiplanar (MPR) versus axial images in the staging of rectal cancer was assessed. Material and methods: Sixty-nine consecutive patients were identified who had undergone staging of rectal cancer on CT. The imaging data were reviewed as axial images and then as MPR images (coronal and sagittal) perpendicular and parallel to the tumour axis. CT staging on axial and MPR images was then compared to histopathological staging. Results: MPR images detected more T4 and T3 stage tumours than axial images alone. The overall accuracy of T-staging on MPR images was 87.1% versus 73.0% for axial images alone. The overall accuracy of N staging on MPR versus axial images was 84.8% versus 70.7%. There was a statistically significant difference in the staging of T3 tumours between MPR and axial images (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Multidetector row CT has high accuracy for local staging of rectal cancer. Addition of MPR images to standard axial images provides higher accuracy rates for T and N staging of rectal cancer than axial images alone

  19. Prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages on locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Bixiu; Zhang, Luning; Wang, Chengtao; Huang, Rong; Peng, Haihua; Zhang, Tian; Dong, Jun; Xiao, Weiwei; Zeng, Zhifan; Liu, Mengzhong; Gao, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and total mesorectal excision. 210 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (cT3-4 or cN+) treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Treatment outcomes were compared according to clinical and pathological stage. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) among patients with different clinical stage and pathological stage after neo-CRT. The median follow-up time was 47 months (range, 14–98 months). Clinical T stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.042) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.014) while clinical N stage was not associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.440), 5 year DFS (p = 0.711). Pathological T stage was associate with 5 year OS (p = 0.001) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.046); and N stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.001), 5 year DFS (p = 0.002). The pathological stage was further classified into three groups: ypT0–2N0 in 91 patients (43.3 %), ypT3–4N0 in 69 patients (32.9 %) and ypT0–4N+ in 50 patients (23.8 %). While pathological stage (ypT0–2 vs ypT3–4N0 vs ypT0–4N+) was associated with 5 year OS (87.9 %, 75.5 %, 56.7 %, p = 0.000), 5 year DFS (74.5 %, 77.4 %, 50.5 %, p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage was an independent prognostic factor for patients 5 year DFS. Pathological stage is strongly associated with treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision, which may be used as guidance for further individualized treatment

  20. Multimodal imaging evaluation in staging of rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common cancer and a major cause of mortality in Western countries. Accurate staging is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategies and planning appropriate surgical procedures to control rectal cancer. Endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) is suitable for assessing the extent of tumor invasion, particularly in early-stage or superficial rectal cancer cases. In advanced cases with distant metastases, computed tomography (CT) is the primary approach used to evaluate the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to assess preoperative staging and the circumferential resection margin involvement, which assists in evaluating a patient’s risk of recurrence and their optimal therapeutic strategy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT may be useful in detecting occult synchronous tumors or metastases at the time of initial presentation. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains a challenge with all modalities because it is difficult to reliably differentiate between the tumor mass and other radiation-induced changes in the images. EUS does not appear to have a useful role in post-therapeutic response assessments. Although CT is most commonly used to evaluate treatment responses, its utility for identifying and following-up metastatic lesions is limited. Preoperative high-resolution MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging, and/or PET-CT could provide valuable prognostic information for rectal cancer patients with locally advanced disease receiving preoperative CRT. Based on these results, we conclude that a combination of multimodal imaging methods should be used to precisely assess the restaging of rectal cancer following CRT. PMID:24764662

  1. Esophageal motion characteristics in thoracic esophageal cancer: Impact of clinical stage T4 versus stages T1-T3

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    Yuta Kobayashi, MS

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The EM and the ITV margins in cT4 were significantly smaller than those in cT1-T3. The NM and the ITV margins of abdominal LNs were much larger than those of cervicothoracic LNs and the esophagus. In clinical radiation therapy planning for esophageal cancer, we should take cT stage into consideration.

  2. Preoperative staging and treatment options in T1 rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Endreseth, Birger H; Isaksen, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    . Results. Local treatment of T1 cancers combined with close follow-up, early salvage surgery or later radical resection of local recurrences or with chemo-radiation may lead to fewer severe complications and comparable, or even better, long-term survival. Accurate preoperative staging and careful selection...... of patients for local or non-operative treatment are mandatory. As preoperative staging, at present, is not sufficiently accurate, strategies for completion, salvage or rescue surgery is important, and must be accepted by the patient before local treatment for cure is initiated. Recommendations......Background. Major rectal resection for T1 rectal cancer offers more than 95% cancer specific five-year survival to patients surviving the first 30 days after surgery. A significant further improvement by development of the surgical technique may not be possible. Improvements in the total survival...

  3. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage II and III rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Song Yongwen; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao; Qian Tunan; Li Yexiong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, compared with surgery alone for rectal cancer. Methods: From January 1994 to October 1997, 192 patients with stage II or III rectal cancer were treated by radical resection and postoperative radiotherapy (Group S + R) and 51 patients with the same stage lesions underwent surgery alone (Group S). The median dose of radiation was 50(32-62) Gy. Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank test were used for analysis. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 60.3% and 58.3%, respectively. The overall 5-year survival rate was 59.4% in Group S + R and 64.7% in Group S, and the 5-year disease-free survival rates were 57.0% and 66.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences between either group (P=0.601 and P=0.424). The disease-free survival was not significantly prolonged in Group S + R as compared with that of Group S. The local recurrence rate was evidently reduced in Group S + R (15.8% v 26.8%, P=0.043). Conclusion: Local recurrence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rectal cancer. Postoperative radiotherapy, though reduces the incidence of local recurrence, does not improve the survival in the treatment of stage II and III diseases

  4. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  5. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara; Ferri, Mario; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra; Ziparo, Vincenzo; David, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting

  6. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ferri, Mario [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Pilozzi, Emanuela [Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ziparo, Vincenzo [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); David, Vincenzo [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting.

  7. Complete pathological response (ypT0N0M0) after preoperative chemotherapy alone for stage IV rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiken, Surennaidoo P; Toso, Christian; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Thomopoulos, Theodoros; Roth, Arnaud; Mentha, Gilles; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2014-01-17

    Complete pathological response occurs in 10-20% of patients with rectal cancer who are treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy prior to pelvic surgery. The possibility that complete pathological response of rectal cancer can also occur with neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (without radiation) is an intriguing hypothesis. A 66-year old man presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum with nine liver metastases (T3N1M1). He was included in a reverse treatment, aiming at first downsizing the liver metastases by chemotherapy, and subsequently performing the liver surgery prior to the rectum resection. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted in a combination of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, irinotecan, leucovorin and bevacizumab (OCFL-B). After a right portal embolization, an extended right liver lobectomy was performed. On the final histopathological analysis, all lesions were fibrotic, devoid of any viable cancer cells. One month after liver surgery, the rectoscopic examination showed a near-total response of the primary rectal adenocarcinoma, which convinced the colorectal surgeon to perform the low anterior resection without preoperative radiation therapy. Macroscopically, a fibrous scar was observed at the level of the previously documented tumour, and the histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal any malignant cells in the rectal wall as well as in the mesorectum. All 15 resected lymph nodes were free of tumour, and the final tumour stage was ypT0N0M0. Clinical outcome was excellent, and the patient is currently alive 5 years after the first surgery without evidence of recurrence. The presented patient with stage IV rectal cancer and liver metastases was in a unique situation linked to its inclusion in a reversed treatment and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone. The observed achievement of a complete pathological response after chemotherapy should promote the design of prospective randomized studies to evaluate the benefits of chemotherapy

  8. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy mapped by lymphoscintigraphy for rectal adenocarcinoma staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, C.A.; Araujo, I.; Lopes, A.

    2010-01-01

    The good prognosis of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy has raised the question of whether total mesorectal excision is suitable for adequate staging of rectal adenocarcinoma patients. The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of dye and probe detection of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes and to define the upstaging impact of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy in rectal adenocarcinoma patients. Ninety-seven rectal adenocarcinoma patients were submitted to total mesorectal excision and retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Lymphoscintigraphy using technetium-99 m-phytate and patent blue was performed to detect blue and/or radioactive retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes which were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically with a step-sectioning technique. Mesorectal mean node count was 11.5 and retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic node was 11.7. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy identified metastases in 17.5%, upstaging 8.2%. Variables related to metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes were the following: Stage III in total mesorectal excision specimens (P<0.04), pT3/pT4 tumors (P=0.047), high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (P=0.014) and large tumors (P=0.03). Marker migration to retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes occurred in 37.1%, upstaging 11.1%. The markers' accuracy in the detection of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes was 100%. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy detected an important rate of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes (RLPN), resulting in upstaging. When markers migrated, they were able to detect RLPN metastases. The use of markers should be improved in the identification of RLPN metastases for selective indication of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. (author)

  9. Influence of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy on the Surgical Strategy According to the Clinical T Stage of Patients With Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic responses and changes to surgical strategies following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in rectal cancer patients according to their clinical T stage (cT). The use of PCRT has recently been extended to less advanced disease. The authors enrolled 650 patients with cT2 to 4 mid and low rectal cancer who received both PCRT and surgical resection. The rate of total regression and the proportion of local excision were compared according to the cT category. The 3-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was compared using the log-rank test according to patient cT category, pathologic stage, and type of surgical treatment. Patients with cT2 were older (P = 0.001), predominately female (P = 0.028), and had low-lying rectal cancer (P = 0.008). Pathologic total regression was achieved most frequently in cT2 patients (54% of cT2 versus 17.6% of cT3 versus 8.2% of cT4; P rectal cancer, optimal surgical treatment may be achieved with the tailored use of PCRT. PMID:26717384

  10. A systematic approach to the interpretation of preoperative staging MRI for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Swift, Robert I; Blomqvist, Lennart; Brown, Gina

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an aid to the systematic evaluation of MRI in staging rectal cancer. MRI has been shown to be an effective tool for the accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer. In the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Rectal Cancer European Equivalence Study (MERCURY), imaging workshops were held for participating radiologists to ensure standardization of scan acquisition techniques and interpretation of the images. In this article, we report how the information was obtained and give examples of the images and how they are interpreted, with the aim of providing a systematic approach to the reporting process.

  11. Can we eliminate neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in favor of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy for select stage II/III rectal adenocarcinomas: Analysis of the National Cancer Data base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Patel, Kirtesh; Zhong, Jim; Steuer, Conor E; Kooby, David A; Russell, Maria C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Landry, Jerome C

    2017-03-01

    Stage II and III rectal cancers have been effectively treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) followed by definitive resection. Advancements in surgical technique and systemic therapy have prompted investigation of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy (NMAC) regimens with the elimination of radiation (RT). The objective of the current study was to investigate factors that predict for the use of NCRT versus NMAC and compare outcomes using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for select stage II and III rectal cancers. In the NCDB, 21,707 patients from 2004 through 2012 with clinical T2N1 (cT2N1), cT3N0, or cT3N1 rectal cancers were identified who had received NCRT or NMAC followed by low anterior resection. Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and Cox-proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted along with propensity score matching analysis to reduce treatment selection bias. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS) rate was 75% for patients who received NCRT versus 67.2% for those who received NMAC (P elimination of neoadjuvant RT for select patients with stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma was associated with worse OS and should not be recommended outside of a clinical trial. Cancer 2017;123:783-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  13. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  14. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  16. Preliminary results of pre-operative 5-FU, low dose leucovorin (LV), and concurrent radiation therapy (RT) for resectable T3 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grann, Alison; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Saltz, Leonard; Kelsen, David P.; Kemeny, Nancy; Ilson, David; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.; Bass, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report the downstaging, acute toxicity, and preliminary local control and survival of pre-op 5-FU, low dose LV, and concurrent RT followed by post-op LV/5-FU for pts with clinically resectable, T3 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 32 pts (M:26, F:6) were prospectively treated from 12/91-8/95. Eligibility criteria included adequate hematologic indicies, primary adenocarcinoma limited to the pelvis, and T3 disease confirmed by transrectal ultrasound. Twenty five pts were considered clinically to require an APR on initial (pre-treatment) assessment by their operating surgeon. The median age was 56 (range: 24-80), and the median distance from the anal verge was 5.0cm (range: 3-9cm). Pts received 2 monthly cycles (bolus daily X 5) of LV (20mg/m2) and 5-FU (325mg/m2), beginning concurrently with day 1 of RT, followed by surgery 4-5 weeks later. RT included 4680 cGy to the pelvis followed by a boost to 5040 cGy. Post-operatively, pts received a median of 2 monthly cycles (range: 0-10 cycles) of LV (20 mg/m2) and 5-FU (425mg/m2). A toxicity assessment was performed at each visit using the NCI toxicity criteria modified for gastrointestinal toxicity. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 3-48 months). All 32 patients were included in the analysis of toxicity, sphincter preservation, and downstaging. Analysis of patterns of failure and survival was limited to the 15 pts who had a minimum follow-up of 1yr or developed failure prior to 1 yr. For this subset the median follow-up was 24 months (range: 3-48 months). RESULTS: During the pre-op segment, individual grade 3+ acute toxicities were; diarrhea: 16%, bowel movements: 16%, leukopenia: 12%. The incidence of total toxicity was 25% ((8(32))). The median nadir counts were; WBC: 2.9 (range: 1.7-5.6), HGB: 12.4 (range: 7.1-15.0), and PLT (X1000): 161 (range: 113-237). The pathologic complete response rate was 9% ((3(32))). An additional 13% ((4(32))) had negative lymph nodes and 1-2 microscopic

  17. Practice patterns and long-term survival for early-stage rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Sanoff, Hanna K; Penn, Dolly C; Meyers, Michael O; Tepper, Joel E

    2013-12-01

    Standard of care treatment for most stage I rectal cancers is total mesorectal excision (TME). Given the morbidity associated with TME, local excision (LE) for early-stage rectal cancer has been explored. This study examines practice patterns and overall survival (OS) for early-stage rectal cancer. All patients in the National Cancer Data Base diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1998 to 2010 were initially included. Use of LE versus proctectomy and use of adjuvant radiation therapy were compared over time. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare OS based on treatment. LE was used to treat 46.5% of patients with T1 and 16.8% with T2 tumors. Use of LE increased steadily over time (P OS than those treated with proctectomy alone or multimodality therapy. Guideline-concordant adoption of LE for treatment of low-risk stage I rectal cancer is increasing. However, use of LE is also increasing for higher-risk rectal cancers that do not meet guideline criteria for LE. Treatment with LE alone is associated with poorer long-term OS. Additional studies are warranted to understand the factors driving increased use of LE.

  18. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-01-01

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation's radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  19. Social inequalities in stage at diagnosis of rectal but not in colonic cancer: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B L; Osler, M; Harling, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We investigated stage at diagnosis in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) among 15 274 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 1996-2004 nationwide in Denmark. The effect of SES on the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis was analysed using logistic regression models....... A reduction in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis was seen in elderly rectal cancer patients with high income, living in owner-occupied housing and living with a partner. Among younger rectal cancer patients, a reduced risk was seen in those having long education. No social gradient was found...... among colon cancer patients. The social gradient found in rectal cancer patients was significantly different from the lack of association found among colon cancer patients. There are socioeconomic inequalities in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis of a rectal, but not a colonic, cancer...

  20. Treatment outcomes regarding the addition of targeted agents in the therapeutic portfolio for stage II-III rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Tung; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Huang, John; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2017-11-24

    To evaluate the impact of targeted agents in stage II-III rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). A retrospective study was performed in 124 consecutive patients with clinically T 3 N 0-2 M 0 -staged rectal cancer incorporating targeted agents in CCRT. Pathologic complete response was detected in 34.2% (n=26) of bevacizumab+FOLFOX-treated patients (n=76), which was significantly higher (p=0.019, post-hoc statistical power =35.87%) than that (n=10, 20.8%) of the cetuximab+FOLFOX-treated patients (n=48). Patients receiving cetuximab+FOLFOX therapy tended to develop severe liver toxicity (91.7%, n=44 versus 17.1%, n=13, panalysis within bevacizumab+FOLFOX-treated patients with either wild-type (n=36) or mutant (n=40) K-ras status indicated K-ras status did not significantly influence the treatment outcomes. The addition of bevacizumab instead of cetuximab to FOLFOX in the neoadjuvant settings for T 3 N 0-2 M 0 -staged rectal cancer could induce a promising rate of pathologic complete response and lesser hepatotoxicity.

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologic stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Ten-year update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy (RT) following radical prostatectomy (RP) in a group of patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 adenocarcinoma of the prostate followed for a median of 10 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 1983, 159 patients underwent RP for newly diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the prostate and were found to have pathologic Stage T3/4 tumors. Forty-six received adjuvant RT and 113 did not. Radiotherapy usually consisted of 45-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to the prostate bed of 10-15 Gy, to a total dose of 55-65 Gy. Patients were analyzed with respect to survival, disease-free survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastases. A rising prostate-specific antigen in the absence of other evidence of relapse was scored as a separate category of recurrence. Results: Both groups of patients have been followed for a median of 10 years. The actuarial survival at 10 and 15 years was 62% and 62% for the RT group compared to 52% and 37%, respectively, for the RP group (p = 0.18). The disease-free survival for the RT group was 55% and 48% at 10 and 15 years, respectively, compared to 37% and 33% for the RP group (p = 0.16). Similarly, there was no difference in the rate of distant metastases between the two groups. In contrast, the local relapse rate was significantly reduced by the addition of postoperative radiotherapy. The actuarial local control rate at 10 and 15 years was 92% and 82%, respectively, for the RT group vs. 60% and 53% for the RP group (p 0.002). Conclusions: While postoperative pelvic RT significantly improves local control compared to RP alone for pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer, it has no impact on distant metastases and consequently does not improve survival. These data are consistent with the conclusion that many patients with pathologic Stage T3/4 prostate cancer have occult metastases at presentation and will not be cured by local therapies alone

  2. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer.

  3. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer

  4. Rectal Tumour Staging with Endorectal Ultrasound: Is There Any Difference between Western and Eastern European Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábián, Anna; Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Milassin, Ágnes; Rutka, Mariann; Tiszlavicz, László; Wittmann, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Szepes, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rectal tumour management depends highly on locoregional extension. Rectal endoscopic ultrasound (ERUS) is a good alternative to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, in Hungary only a small amount of rectal tumours is examined with ERUS. Methods. Our retrospective study (2006-2012) evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of ERUS and compares the results, the first data from Central Europe, with those from Western Europe. The effect of neoadjuvant therapy, rectal probe type, and investigator's experience were also assessed. Results. 311 of the 647 ERUS assessed locoregional extension. Histological comparison was available in 177 cases: 67 patients underwent surgery alone; 110 received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT); ERUS preceded CRT in 77 and followed it in 33 patients. T-staging was accurate in 72% of primarily operated patients. N-staging was less accurate (62%). CRT impaired staging accuracy (64% and 59% for T- and N-staging). Rigid probes were more accurate (79%). At least 30 examinations are needed to master the technique. Conclusions. The sensitivity of ERUS complies with the literature. ERUS is easy to learn and more accurate in early stages but unnecessary for restaging after CRT. Staging accuracy is similar in Western and Central Europe, although the number of examinations should be increased.

  5. Multi-parametric MRI of rectal cancer – Do quantitative functional MR measurements correlate with radiologic and pathologic tumor stages?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Pilz, L.R.; Morelli, J.N.; Hausmann, D.; Doyon, F.; Hofheinz, R.; Kienle, P.; Post, S.; Michaely, H.J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Dinter, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, to evaluate, whether functional rectal MRI techniques can be analyzed in a reproducible manner by different readers and second, to assess whether different clinical and pathologic T and N stages can be differentiated by functional MRI measurements. Materials and methods: 54 patients (38 men, 16 female; mean age 63.2 ± 12.2 years) with pathologically proven rectal cancer were included in this retrospective IRB-approved study. All patients were referred for a multi-parametric MRI protocol on a 3 Tesla MR-system, consisting of a high-resolution, axial T2 TSE sequence, DWI and perfusion imaging (plasma flow –s PF Tumor ) prior to any treatment. Two experienced radiologists evaluated the MRI measurements, blinded to clinical data and outcome. Inter-reader correlation and the association of functional MRI parameters with c- and p-staging were analyzed. Results: The inter-reader correlation for lymph node (ρ 0.76–0.94; p < 0.0002) and primary tumor (ρ 0.78–0.92; p < 0.0001) apparent diffusion coefficient and plasma flow (PF) values was good to very good. PF Tumor values decreased with cT stage with significant differences identified between cT2 and cT3 tumors (229 versus 107.6 ml/100 ml/min; p = 0.05). ADC Tumor values did not differ significantly. No substantial discrepancies in lymph node ADC Ln values or short axis diameter were found among cN1-3 stages, whereas PF Ln values were distinct between cN1 versus cN2 stages (p = 0.03). In the patients without neoadjuvant RCT no statistically significant differences in the assessed functional parameters on the basis of pathologic stage were found. Conclusion: This study illustrates that ADC as well as MR perfusion values can be analyzed with good interobserver agreement in patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, MR perfusion parameters may allow accurate differentiation of tumor stages. Both findings suggest that functional MRI parameters may help to discriminate

  6. Radical prostatectomy and postoperative irradiation in patients with pathological stage C (T3) carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Lieskovsky, Gary; Langholz, Bryan; Formenti, Silvia; Baert, Luc; Streeter, Oscar; Skinner, Donald G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common human cancer of internal organs. Radical surgery is regarded by many to be the treatment of choice for capsule confined disease. Since accurate preoperative assessment of tumor stage is difficult to define, many patients are subsequently found to have pathological stage C (T3) disease. These patients should be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A group of 201 PS C (T3) unselected patients, treated with radical prostatectomy and limited pelvic lymphadenectomy, received postoperative irradiation to the prostate bed. This radiotherapy was given between 42-90 days after surgery and consisted of a median dose of 48 Gy. Patient survival, disease free survival, time to clinical and chemical relapse and the incidence of local and systemic relapse were analyzed. The influence of multiple parameters on the treatment outcome including patient age, treatment period, clinical stage, pathological stage, Gleason's score, prostate specific antigen (PSA), radiotherapy techniques and radiation dose were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 15 years, with a median of 5 years. Results: The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival was 92% and 83% (median > 10 years), respectively and the 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (clinical and PSA) was 67% and 53% (median > 10 years), respectively. A total of 61 (30%) patients had a recurrence, including 23 (11%) patients who had clinical and 38 (19%) who had PSA recurrence. Of the 23 patients with clinical recurrence, 10 (5%) had local recurrence, including two patients who had local and systemic recurrence. Pathological stage and Gleason's score were independently predictive of recurrence (each with p 25 ng/ml) was also an important independent factor predicting tumor recurrence, p = 0.05. All other investigated parameters were not significant in predicting tumor recurrence. This treatment program was very well

  7. A randomised trial of preoperative radiotherapy for stage T3 adenocarcinoma of rectum (TROG 01.04): a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngan, S.; Fisher, R.; McKay, M.J.; McClure, B.; Burmeister, B.H.; Schache, D.; Joseph, D.; Solomon, M.; Ackland, S.P.; Goldstein, D.; McLachlan, S.; Dhillon, H.; Thompson, P.

    2003-01-01

    To provide a progress report of the conduct of the randomised trial TROG 01.04. This is a randomised Australian and New Zealand multi-centre trial of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer currently being conducted under the auspices of Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group, Colorectal Surgical Society of Australasia, and Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The trial comprises two studies, each with its own main objective. These objectives are, in patients with T3 clinically resectable carcinoma of the rectum, to demonstrate that (Study 1) the local recurrence rate in patients treated with a long course (LC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU is lower than that in patients treated with a short course (SC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with early surgery; and (Study 2) the local recurrence rate in patients given pre-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is lower than that in patients treated with initial surgery. Over 150 patients have been accrued from 21 centres in the first 21 months. All patients were enrolled on Study 1, SC versus LC pre-operative radiotherapy. Study 2 has enrolled no patients in 15 months and has been discontinued. There was no obvious difference in rates of serious adverse events of SC and LC. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee is monitoring these and other aspects of the trial. The trial of SC versus LC is progressing well: such a trial is clearly feasible in Australia and New Zealand. It is however not feasible to compare initial surgery with preoperative radiotherapy

  8. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva José Hyppolito da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preservation of the anal sphincter in surgery for cancer of the distal rectum in an attempt to avoid colostomy has been a main concern of colorectal surgeons. Various proposed procedures contradict oncological principles, especially with respect to pelvic lymphadenectomy. Therefore, prior knowledge of pelvic lymph node involvement is an important factor in choosing the operative technique, i.e., radical or conservative resection. Introduction of ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance have made preoperative study of the area possible. Nevertheless, these resources offer information of an anatomical nature only. Lymphoscintigraphy enables the morphological and functional evaluation of the pelvic area and contributes toward complementing the data obtained with the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective study is twofold: to standardize the lymphoscintigraphy technique and to use it to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctologic diseases. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: Sixty patients with various coloproctologic diseases were studied prospectively. Ages ranged from 21 to 96 years (average, 51 and median, 55 years. Twenty-six patients were male and 34 were female. Thirty patients had carcinoma of the distal rectum as diagnosed by proctologic and anatomic-pathologic examinations, 20 patients had hemorrhoids, 5 had chagasic megacolon, 2 had diverticular disease, 2 had neoplasm of the right colon, and 1 had ulcerative colitis as diagnosed by proctologic exam and/or enema. The lymphoscintigraphy method consisted of injecting 0.25 mL of a dextran solution marked with radioactive technetium-99m into the right and left sides of the perianal region and obtaining images with a gamma camera. The results were analyzed statistically with a confidence level of 95% (P < .05 using the following statistical techniques: arithmetic and medium average, Fisher exact test, chi-square test

  9. Posttreatment TNM staging is a prognostic indicator of survival and recurrence in tethered or fixed rectal carcinoma after preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.P.; Wong, Alfred; Jenken, Daryl; Heine, John; Buie, Donald; Johnson, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of the posttreatment TNM stage as a predictor of outcome in locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Between 1993 and 2000, 128 patients with tethered (103) or fixed (25) rectal cancers were treated with 50 Gy preoperative pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil infusion (20 mg/kg/d) and leucovorin (200 mg/m 2 /d) chemotherapy on Days 1-4 and 22-25 and a single bolus mitomycin C injection (8 mg/m 2 ) on Day 1. Of the 128 patients, 111 had Stage T3 and 17 Stage T4 according to the rectal ultrasound or CT findings and clinical evaluation. All 128 patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Postoperatively, the disease stage was determined according to the surgical and pathologic findings using the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system. Results: Of the 128 patients, 32 had postchemoradiotherapy (pCR) Stage 0 (T0N0M0), 37 pCR Stage I, 26 pCR Stage II, 28 pCR Stage III, and 5 pCR Stage IV disease. Of the 128 patients, 79 had pCR Stage T0-T2, 35 pCR Stage T3, and 14 pCR Stage T4. The rate of T stage downstaging was 66% (84 of 128). Of the 128 patients, 25% achieved a pathologic complete response, and 31 (24%) had positive nodal disease. Lymphovascular or perineural invasion was found in 13 patients (10%). The 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 88% for pCR Stage I, 74% for pCR Stage II, 44% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p = 0.0000059). The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 80% for pCR Stage I, 72% for pCR Stage II, 42% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p < 0.000001). In univariate analysis, the pretreatment tumor status (fixed vs. tethered tumors), the pCR TNM stage, T stage downstaging, pathologic T4 tumors, node-positive disease after chemoradiotherapy, and lymphovascular or perineural invasion were statistically significant

  10. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  11. Fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells according to differentiation stage and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong-Il; Ko, Hee-Chul; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Min; Hong, Youn-Suk; Lee, Nam-Ho; Kim, Se-Jae

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fucoxanthin enhances 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at an early stage. → Fucoxanthin inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at intermediate and late stages. → Fucoxanthin attenuates glucose uptake by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IRS in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. → Fucoxanthin exerts its anti-obesity effect by inhibiting the differentiation of adipocytes at both intermediate and late stages, as well as glucose uptake in mature adipocytes. -- Abstract: Progression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation is divided into early (days 0-2, D0-D2), intermediate (days 2-4, D2-D4), and late stages (day 4 onwards, D4-). In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoxanthin, isolated from the edible brown seaweed Petalonia binghamiae, on adipogenesis during the three differentiation stages of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When fucoxanthin was applied during the early stage of differentiation (D0-D2), it promoted 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, fucoxanthin increased protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and aP2, and adiponectin mRNA expression, in a dose-dependent manner. However, it reduced the expression of PPARγ, C/EBPα, and SREBP1c during the intermediate (D2-D4) and late stages (D4-D7) of differentiation. It also inhibited the uptake of glucose in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes by reducing the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). These results suggest that fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells of different differentiation stages and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes.

  12. Endoscopic Criteria for Evaluating Tumor Stage after Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Su; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Byung Chang; Hong, Chang Won; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Ju; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Local excision may be an another option for selected patients with markedly down-staged rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and proper evaluation of post-CRT tumor stage (ypT) is essential prior to local excision of these tumors. This study was designed to determine the correlations between endoscopic findings and ypT of rectal cancer. In this study, 481 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgical resection between 2004 and 2013 at a single institution were evaluated retrospectively. Pathological good response (p-GR) was defined as ypT ≤ 1, and pathological minimal or no response (p-MR) as ypT ≥ 2. The patients were randomly classified according to two groups, a testing (n=193) and a validation (n=288) group. Endoscopic criteria were determined from endoscopic findings and ypT in the testing group and used in classifying patients in the validation group as achieving or not achieving p-GR. Based on findings in the testing group, the endoscopic criteria for p-GR included scarring, telangiectasia, and erythema, whereas criteria for p-MR included nodules, ulcers, strictures, and remnant tumors. In the validation group, the kappa statistic was 0.965 (p < 0.001), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.362, 0.963, 0.654, and 0.885, respectively. The endoscopic criteria presented are easily applicable for evaluation of ypT after preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. These criteria may be used for selection of patients for local excision of down-staged rectal tumors, because patients with p-MR could be easily ruled out.

  13. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  14. Analysis of stage and clinical/prognostic factors for colon and rectal cancer from SEER registries: AJCC and collaborative stage data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Charlton, Mary E; Ruiz, Bernardo A; Karlitz, Jordan; Altekruse, Sean F; Ries, Lynn A G; Jessup, J Milburn

    2014-12-01

    The Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System enables multiple cancer registration programs to document anatomic and molecular pathology features that contribute to the Tumor (T), Node (N), Metastasis (M) - TNM - system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). This article highlights changes in CS for colon and rectal carcinomas as TNM moved from the AJCC 6th to the 7th editions. Data from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries were analyzed for the years 2004-2010, which included 191,361colon and 73,341 rectal carcinomas. Overall, the incidence of colon and rectal cancers declined, with the greatest decrease in stage 0. The AJCC's 7th edition introduction of changes in the subcategorization of T4, N1, and N2 caused shifting within stage groups in 25,577 colon and 10,150 rectal cancers diagnosed in 2010. Several site-specific factors (SSFs) introduced in the 7th edition had interesting findings: 1) approximately 10% of colon and rectal cancers had tumor deposits - about 30%-40% occurred without lymph node metastases, which resulted in 2.5% of colon and 3.3% of rectal cases becoming N1c (stage III A/B) in the AJCC 7th edition; 2) 10% of colon and 12% of rectal cases had circumferential radial margins Cancer Society.

  15. Direct lymphography and lower mesentericography - possibilities and limits in determining the localization, stage and operability of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viyachki, I.; Todorova, L.

    1976-01-01

    The indications for direct lymphography and lower mesentericography in determining the localization, stage and operability of rectal cancer are discussed in detail. Direct lymphography was attempted in 23 and lower selective mesentericography in 12 patients with rectal cancer. Essential is only the positive result, although it indicates an advanced malignant process. Lower mesentericography, especially the selective one, furnishes valuable information on the localization and stage of rectal cancer, and hence on its operability. Major importance is attached to the combined use of the two methods. They may thus complement one another in the diagnosis of the early stages of rectal cancer and may be helpful in the search of early recurrences after radical treatment. (author)

  16. Down stage and long term results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer: a cooperative clinical trial of 6 institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiandong; Wang Qi; Du Tonghai; Cai Youhong; Cao Xiude; Guo Xueheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the down stage effect and long-term results of preoperative chemora-diotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods: From Jan. 1989 to Jul 1999, 103 patients suffering from lower rectal carcinoma were treated. Criteria entry: 1. Distance between anal verge and centre of tumor 4-8 cm(median 6.2 cm), 2. Uncertainty in decision of preservation of anus before admission, 3. Lesion belonged to locally advanced type, 4. definitive pathology, clinical stage and presence of objective observation of tumor extent, 5. Performance status proposed by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, 6. Age 2 , calcium folinate 200 mg/ session, iv, totally 5 day). Operation was done 29-58 days (median 38 days) after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Surgery: 53 patients received the anal preserving operation of anterior resection; 50 patients were treated by Mile's operation. Postoperation chemotherapy- a total of 34 patients received postoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for liver or bony metastasis. 88.3% of patients had complete data of follow-up. Results: The 5-year survival rate, disease-free survival rate for group A and group B were 64.2% and 43.7%, 52.8% and 31.6%, respectively, (P 0.05), 25.5% and 48.5% (P<0.05), respectively. The preoperative clinical stages were: T2 10, T3 31 and T4 12. The postoperative pathological stages were: T0N0 7, T1N0 10, T2N0 14, T3N0 13, T4N0 3, T2N1 5 and T3N11. The pathological response rate after surgery in Group A was 13.2%. All patients in Group A were able to retain the sphincter though 29.3% had various degrees of malfunctions in bowel movement and/or urination. The difference incurred by postoperative chemotherapy/or radiotherapy was insignificant. Conclusions: Showing obvious down stage effect, the preoperative chemoradiotherapy can improve the 5-year survival and disease-free survival, and offer more chance to preserve the sphincter function in locally advanced lower rectal cancer

  17. Can histopathologic assessment of circumferential margin after preoperative pelvic chemoradiotherapy for T3-T4 rectal cancer predict for 3-year disease-free survival?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawdsley, Suzannah; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Grainger, Juliet; Richman, Paul; Makris, Andreas; Harrison, Mark; Ashford, Richard; Harrison, Richard A.; Osborne, Melanie; Livingstone, Jeremy I.; MacDonald, Peter; Mitchell, Ian C.; Meyrick-Thomas, John; Northover, John; Windsor, Alastair; Novell, Richard; Wallace, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to determine the impact of a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) (R1-R2) and pathologic downstaging on local recurrence and survival in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT using low-dose folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil. CRT was followed 6-12 weeks later by surgical excision. The CRM rate and incidence, site, and pattern of local and systemic recurrences were recorded. The median follow-up was 25 months. Results: The overall median survival was 37 months, with a 5-year overall survival rate of 34%. Of the 150 patients, 122 underwent curative resection; 12% had a complete pathologic response, and downstaging to pT1-T2 occurred in an additional 16%. A negative CRM (R0) was achieved in 65% overall (98 of 150). Local recurrence occurred in 10% of those with R0 resection and 62% of those with R1-R2 resections. Distant metastases occurred in 29% of those with R0 resections and 75% of those with R1-R2 resections. The 3-year disease-free and 3-year overall survival rate was 9% and 25% and 52% and 64%, respectively, for patients with and without a histologically positive CRM. Conclusion: After 5-fluorouracil-based CRT, a positive CRM predicted for a high risk of subsequent local recurrence and a 3-year disease-free survival rate of only 9%. For this reason, the CRM should be considered a major prognostic factor and should be validated in future trials as an early alternative clinical endpoint

  18. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  20. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  1. Cell-free DNA levels and correlation to stage and outcome following treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Wettergren, Yvonne; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Taflin, Helena; Gustavson, Bengt; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm

    2017-11-01

    Accurate staging of rectal cancer remains essential for optimal patient selection for combined modality treatment, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. We aimed at examining the correlation of cell free DNA with the pathologic stage and subsequent risk of recurrence for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. We examined 75 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Blood samples for translational use were drawn prior to rectal surgery. The level of cell free DNA was quantified by digital droplet PCR and expressed as copy number of beta 2 microglobulin. We found a median level of cell free DNA in the AJCC stages I-III of 3100, 8300, and 10,700 copies/mL respectively. For patients with 12 sampled lymph nodes or above, the median level of cell free DNA were 2400 copies/mL and 4400 copies/mL (p = 0.04) for node negative and node positive disease respectively. The median follow-up was 39 months and 11 recurrences were detected (15%). The median level for patients with recurrent disease was 13,000 copies/mL compared to 5200 copies/mL for non-recurrent patients (p = 0.08). We have demonstrated a correlation between the level of total cell free DNA and the pathologic stage and nodal involvement. Furthermore, we have found a trend towards a correlation with the risk of recurrence following resection of localized rectal cancer.

  2. MRI and endosonography in preoperative staging of advanced rectal carcinomas after hypothermoradiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Pegios, W.; Huenerbein, M.; Vogl, T.J.; Hidajat, N.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.; Rau, B.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of staging of endorectal sonography (ES) and body coil MRI after preoperative hyperthermoradiochemotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Prospective analysis of MRI and ES in 30 patients after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy and correlation with histopathological patterns. Results: T-staging by MRI was correct in 47% and by ES in 53% of the cases. Despite similar accuracy of staging in T 0 - and T 1 -tumours, we found different accuracies concerning T 2 -tumour staging about 63% versus 73% (MRI/ES), concerning perirectal infiltration 70% for both techniques, concerning invasion of adjacent organs 90% versus 87%, and concerning lymph node metastases without respect to the N-stage 63% versus 63%. Conclusion: Both imaging modalities provide useful information for operation planning despite limited accuracy after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy. The body coil MRI does not seem to be severely inferior to ES in posttherapeutic staging, despite better contour line imaging by ES. With respect to the determination of invasion of other organs, MRI seems to be more useful. (orig.) [de

  3. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the loco-regional staging of patients with rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Pietro; de Bellis, Mario; D’Angelo, Valentina; Delrio, Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; Di Girolamo, Elena; Rossi, Giovanni Battista; Rega, Daniela; Tracey, Maura Claire; Tempesta, Alfonso Mario

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of rectal cancer (RC) is strictly related to both T and N stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. RC staging is crucial for choosing the best multimodal therapy: patients with high risk locally advanced RC (LARC) undergo surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (NAT); those with low risk LARC are operated on after a preoperative short-course radiation therapy; finally, surgery alone is recommended only for early RC. Several imaging methods are used for staging patients with RC: computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS is highly accurate for the loco-regional staging of RC, since it is capable to evaluate precisely the mural infiltration of the tumor (T), especially in early RC. On the other hand, EUS is less accurate in restaging RC after NAT and before surgery. Finally, EUS is indicated for follow-up of patients operated on for RC, where there is a need for the surveillance of the anastomosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact of EUS on the management of patients with RC, evaluating its role in both preoperative staging and follow-up of patients after surgery. PMID:26140096

  5. Diffusion MRI for rectal cancer staging: ADC measurements before and after ultrasonographic gel lumen distension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmucci, S., E-mail: spalmucci@sirm.org; Piccoli, M.; Piana, S.; Foti, P.V.; Siverino, R.O.A.; Mauro, L.A.; Milone, P.; Ettorre, G.C.

    2017-01-15

    Objectives: To compare Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measurements in rectal neoplastic lesions before and after lumen distension obtained with sonography transmission gel. Methods: From January 2014 to July 2016, 25 patients (average age 63.7, range 41–85, 18 males) were studied for pre-treatment rectal cancer staging using a 1.5 T MRI. Diffusion MRI was obtained using echo-planar imaging with b = 800 value; all patients were studied acquiring diffusion sequences with and without rectal lumen distension obtained using sonography transmission gel. In both diffusion sequences, two blinded readers calculated border ADC values and small ADC values, drawing regions of interest respectively along tumour borders and far from tumour borders. Mean ADC values among readers − for each type of ADC measurement − were compared using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. Correlation was assessed using Pearson analysis. Results: Border ADC mean value for diffusion MR sequences without endorectal contrast was 1.122 mm{sup 2}/sec, with 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.02–1.22; using gel lumen distension, higher border ADC mean value of 1.269 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 1.16–1.38) was obtained. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test revealed statistical difference (p < 0.01); a strong Pearson correlation was reported, with r value of 0.69. Small-ADC mean value was 1.038 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 0.91–1.16) for diffusion sequences acquired without endorectal distension and 1.127 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 0.98–1.27) for diffusion sequences obtained after endorectal gel lumen distension. Wilcoxon analysis did not show statistical difference (p = 0.13). A very strong positive correlation was observed, with r value of 0.81. Conclusions: ADC measurements are slightly higher using endorectal sonographic transmission gel; ROI should be traced far from tumour borders, to minimize gel filled-pixel along the interface between lumen and lesion. Further studies are needed to

  6. Diffusion MRI for rectal cancer staging: ADC measurements before and after ultrasonographic gel lumen distension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmucci, S.; Piccoli, M.; Piana, S.; Foti, P.V.; Siverino, R.O.A.; Mauro, L.A.; Milone, P.; Ettorre, G.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measurements in rectal neoplastic lesions before and after lumen distension obtained with sonography transmission gel. Methods: From January 2014 to July 2016, 25 patients (average age 63.7, range 41–85, 18 males) were studied for pre-treatment rectal cancer staging using a 1.5 T MRI. Diffusion MRI was obtained using echo-planar imaging with b = 800 value; all patients were studied acquiring diffusion sequences with and without rectal lumen distension obtained using sonography transmission gel. In both diffusion sequences, two blinded readers calculated border ADC values and small ADC values, drawing regions of interest respectively along tumour borders and far from tumour borders. Mean ADC values among readers − for each type of ADC measurement − were compared using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. Correlation was assessed using Pearson analysis. Results: Border ADC mean value for diffusion MR sequences without endorectal contrast was 1.122 mm 2 /sec, with 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.02–1.22; using gel lumen distension, higher border ADC mean value of 1.269 mm 2 /s (95% CI = 1.16–1.38) was obtained. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test revealed statistical difference (p < 0.01); a strong Pearson correlation was reported, with r value of 0.69. Small-ADC mean value was 1.038 mm 2 /s (95% CI = 0.91–1.16) for diffusion sequences acquired without endorectal distension and 1.127 mm 2 /s (95% CI = 0.98–1.27) for diffusion sequences obtained after endorectal gel lumen distension. Wilcoxon analysis did not show statistical difference (p = 0.13). A very strong positive correlation was observed, with r value of 0.81. Conclusions: ADC measurements are slightly higher using endorectal sonographic transmission gel; ROI should be traced far from tumour borders, to minimize gel filled-pixel along the interface between lumen and lesion. Further studies are needed to investigate better

  7. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  8. Incidental pT2-T3 gallbladder cancer after a cholecystectomy: outcome of staging at 3 months prior to a radical resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausania, Fabio; Tsirlis, Theodoris; White, Steven A; French, Jeremy J; Jaques, Bryon C; Charnley, Richard M; Manas, Derek M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with incidental pT2-T3 gallbladder cancer (IGC) after a cholecystectomy may benefit from a radical re-resection although their optimal treatment strategy is not well defined. In this Unit, such patients undergo delayed staging at 3 months after a cholecystectomy to assess the evidence of a residual tumour, extra hepatic spread and the biological behaviour of the tumour. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients who had delayed staging at 3 months after a cholecystectomy. Methods From July 2003 to July 2011, 56 patients with T2-T3 gallbladder cancer were referred to this Unit of which 49 were diagnosed incidentally on histology after a cholecystectomy. All 49 patients underwent delayed pre-operative staging using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) followed selectively by laparoscopy at 3 months after a cholecystectomy. Data were collected from a prospectively held database. The peri-operative and long-term outcomes of patients were analysed. SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results There were 38 pT2 and 11 pT3 tumours. After delayed staging, 24/49 (49%) patients underwent a radical resection, 24/49 (49%) were found to be inoperable on pre-operative assessment and 1/49 (2%) patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy and were found to be unresectable. The overall median survival from referral was 20.7 months (54.8 months for the group who had a radical re-resection versus 9.7 months for the group who had unresectable disease, P < 0.001). These results compare favourably with the reported outcome of fast-track management for incidental pT2-T3 gallbladder cancer from other major series in the literature. Conclusion Delayed staging in patients with incidental T2-T3 gallbladder cancer after a cholecystectomy is a useful strategy to select patients who will benefit from a resection and avoid unnecessary major surgery. PMID:23458168

  9. Clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of the staging of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Orita, Kunzo

    1987-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative clinical staging of rectal cancer was prospectively studied in 28 patients with macroscopically proven cancer. The CT studies were based on the previously established CT diagnostic criteria for wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastases (N factor), and liver metastases (H factor). When macroscopic findings were used as the standard, the accuracy of CT was 61 % for S factor, 32 % for N factor, and 86 % for H factor. Using histological findings as the standard, the accuracy was 48 % for S factor and 16 % for N factor. Overall, CT had a high accuracy for H factor in all sites of cancer (75 % in the rectosigmoid, 86 % in the area above the peritoneal reflection, and 90 % in the area below the peritoneal reflection). For the other S and N factors, CT seemed to be of limited value in the preoperative diagnosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Theobromine inhibits differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells during the early stage of adipogenesis via AMPK and MAPK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeon Jeong; Koo, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Kang, Se Chan; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is characterized by hypertrophy and/or by the differentiation or adipogenesis of pre-existing adipocytes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of theobromine, a type of alkaloid in cocoa, on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and its mechanisms of action. Theobromine inhibited the accumulation of lipid droplets, the expression of PPARγ and C/EBPα, and the mRNA expression of aP2 and leptin. The inhibition of adipogenic differentiation by theobromine occurred primarily in the early stages of differentiation. In addition, theobromine arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and regulated the expressions of CDK2, p27, and p21. Theobromine treatment increased AMPK phosphorylation and knockdown of AMPKα1/α2 prevented the ability of theobromine to inhibit PPARγ expression in the differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. Theobromine reduced the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK. Moreover, the secretion and the mRNA level of TNF-α and IL-6 were inhibited by theobromine treatment. These data suggest that theobromine inhibits adipocyte differentiation during the early stages of adipogenesis by regulating the expression of PPARγ and C/EBPα through the AMPK and ERK/JNK signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

  11. Performance of gadofosveset-enhanced MRI for staging rectal cancer nodes: can the initial promising results be reproduced?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique; Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cappendijk, Vincent C. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, ' s Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Oliveira, Pedro [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Porto (Portugal); Lammering, Guido [Maastro Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    A previous study showed promising results for gadofosveset-trisodium as a lymph node magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively confirm the diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer in a second patient cohort. Seventy-one rectal cancer patients were prospectively included, of whom 13 (group I) underwent a primary staging gadofosveset MRI (1.5-T) followed by surgery (± preoperative 5 x 5 Gy) and 58 (group II) underwent both primary staging and restaging gadofosveset MRI after a long course of chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Nodal status was scored as (y)cN0 or (y)cN+ by two independent readers (R1, R2) with different experience levels. Results were correlated with histology on a node-by-node basis. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were 94 %, 79 % and 0.89 for the more experienced R1 and 50 %, 83 % and 0.74 for the non-experienced R2. R2's performance improved considerably after a learning curve, to an AUC of 0.83. Misinterpretations mainly occurred in nodes located in the superior mesorectum, nodes located in between vessels and nodes containing micrometastases. This prospective study confirms the good diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer. (orig.)

  12. A multigene prognostic assay for selection of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with T3, stage II colon cancer: impact on quality-adjusted life expectancy and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, John; Lyman, Gary H; Chien, Rebecca; Meropol, Neal J

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding appropriate and affordable use of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer (T3, proficient DNA mismatch repair). This study aimed to estimate the effectiveness and costs from a US societal perspective of a multigene recurrence score (RS) assay for patients recently diagnosed with stage II colon cancer (T3, proficient DNA mismatch repair) eligible for adjuvant chemotherapy. RS was compared with guideline-recommended clinicopathological factors (tumor stage, lymph nodes examined, tumor grade, and lymphovascular invasion) by using a state-transition (Markov) lifetime model. Data were obtained from published literature, a randomized controlled trial (QUick And Simple And Reliable) of adjuvant chemotherapy, and rates of chemotherapy use from the National Cooperative Cancer Network Colon/Rectum Cancer Outcomes study. Life-years, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime costs were examined. The RS is projected to reduce adjuvant chemotherapy use by 17% compared with current treatment patterns and to increase quality-adjusted life expectancy by an average of 0.035 years. Direct medical costs are expected to decrease by an average of $2971 per patient. The assay was cost saving for all subgroups of patients stratified by clinicopathologic factors. The most influential variables affecting treatment decisions were projected years of life remaining, recurrence score, and patients' disutilities associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Use of the multigene RS to assess recurrence risk after surgery in stage II colon cancer (T3, proficient DNA mismatch repair) may reduce the use of adjuvant chemotherapy without decreasing quality-adjusted life expectancy and be cost saving from a societal perspective. These findings need to be validated in additional cohorts, including studies of clinical practice as assay use diffuses into nonacademic settings. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR

  13. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival and the decision to administer chemotherapy and/or metastasectomy after elective surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer. This was a nationwide, retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the National Patient Registry. Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered.

  14. Single-stage anterior high sacrectomy for locally recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawaz, Khaled; Khaled, Fawaz; Smith, Myles J; Moises, Cukier; Smith, Andrew J; Yee, Albert J M

    2014-03-01

    A review of prospectively collected data on a consecutive series of patients undergoing single-stage anterior high sacrectomy for locally recurrent rectal carcinoma (LRRC). To determine the clinical outcome of patients who underwent anterior high sacrectomy for LRRC. High sacrectomy for oncological resection remains technically challenging. Surgery has the potential to achieve cure in carefully selected patients. Complete (R0) tumor excision in LRRC may require sacrectomy. High sacral resections (S3 and above) typically require a combined anterior/supine and posterior/prone procedure. We investigated our experience performing single-stage anterior high sacrectomy for LRRC. A consecutive series of patients with LRRC without systemic metastases who underwent resection with curative intent requiring high sacrectomy were identified. A review of a prospectively maintained colorectal and spine cancer database data was performed. An oblique dome high sacral osteotomy was performed during a single-stage anterior procedure. Outcome measures included surgical resection margin status, hospital length of stay, postoperative complications, physical functioning status, and overall survival. Nineteen consecutive patients were treated between 2002 and 2011. High sacrectomy was performed at sacral level S1-S2 in 4 patients, S2-S3 in 9 patients, and through S3 in 6 patients. An R0 resection margin was achieved histologically in all 19 cases. There was 1 early (<30 d) postoperative death (1/19, 5%). At median follow-up of 38 months, 13 patients had no evidence of residual disease, 1 was alive with disease, and 4 had died of disease. Morbidities occurred in 15 of the 19 patients (79%). Although high sacrectomy may require a combined anterior and posterior surgical approach, our series demonstrates the feasibility of performing single-stage anterior high sacrectomy in LRRC, with acceptable risks and outcomes compared with the literature. The procedure described by us for LRRC lessens

  15. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation plus prostatectomy for stage T3 disease: lack of PSA-based benefit even among patients with negative lymphadenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyslop, T; Corn, B; Werner-Wasik, M; Gomella, L

    1995-07-01

    Objective: Urologists have attempted to treat stage T3 prostate cancer by neoadjuvant total androgen deprivation (TAD) and prostatectomy. This approach has been disappointing because of the inability of ultrasonography to predict pathological disease status and frequent upstaging due to nodal positivity. Moreover, no reports give PSA-based outcome data among patients treated with TAD and prostatectomy. We therefore instituted a pilot study for T3 disease based on non-invasive staging (endorectal coil MRI), mandatory negative laparoscopic nodal dissections prior to hormonal manipulation, and prostatectomy followed by pathological and PSA-based outcome determinations. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients had negative laparoscopic lymphadenectomy followed by 4 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (Lupron, Flutamide) prior to radical prostatectomy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed at the time of diagnosis and following hormonal treatment. Serum PSA was determined at 3 month intervals. Prostatectomy specimens were evaluated by 3 mm whole mount step sections. Results: Median age was 63 (range: 51-68). Karnofsky performance status was 90-100 in all patients. The median number of nodes sampled was 10 (range: 2-60). Prior to prostatectomy, downsizing was observed by MRI in 57% and biochemical response was documented in all patients. However, pathological downstaging to a lower state ({<=}T2c) was achieved in only 48%. The actuarial 3 year freedom from biochemical relapse was only 24%. Conclusion: Neither serum PSA response nor MRI downsizing predicted pathological disease status after pre-operative androgen deprivation. Even in the setting of pathologically negative lymph nodes, TAD decreased the pathological stage of disease in the minority of patients. The present approach appeared to offer no advantage when compared with PSA-based benchmarks achieved with conformal irradiation (Urology 45: 484, 1995) or TAD followed by external beam treatment (IJROBP 27: 246

  16. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation plus prostatectomy for stage T3 disease: lack of PSA-based benefit even among patients with negative lymphadenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyslop, T.; Corn, B.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Gomella, L.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Urologists have attempted to treat stage T3 prostate cancer by neoadjuvant total androgen deprivation (TAD) and prostatectomy. This approach has been disappointing because of the inability of ultrasonography to predict pathological disease status and frequent upstaging due to nodal positivity. Moreover, no reports give PSA-based outcome data among patients treated with TAD and prostatectomy. We therefore instituted a pilot study for T3 disease based on non-invasive staging (endorectal coil MRI), mandatory negative laparoscopic nodal dissections prior to hormonal manipulation, and prostatectomy followed by pathological and PSA-based outcome determinations. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients had negative laparoscopic lymphadenectomy followed by 4 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (Lupron, Flutamide) prior to radical prostatectomy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed at the time of diagnosis and following hormonal treatment. Serum PSA was determined at 3 month intervals. Prostatectomy specimens were evaluated by 3 mm whole mount step sections. Results: Median age was 63 (range: 51-68). Karnofsky performance status was 90-100 in all patients. The median number of nodes sampled was 10 (range: 2-60). Prior to prostatectomy, downsizing was observed by MRI in 57% and biochemical response was documented in all patients. However, pathological downstaging to a lower state (≤T2c) was achieved in only 48%. The actuarial 3 year freedom from biochemical relapse was only 24%. Conclusion: Neither serum PSA response nor MRI downsizing predicted pathological disease status after pre-operative androgen deprivation. Even in the setting of pathologically negative lymph nodes, TAD decreased the pathological stage of disease in the minority of patients. The present approach appeared to offer no advantage when compared with PSA-based benchmarks achieved with conformal irradiation (Urology 45: 484, 1995) or TAD followed by external beam treatment (IJROBP 27: 246

  17. Improving staging accuracy in colon and rectal cancer by sentinel lymph node mapping: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zaag, E. S.; Buskens, C. J.; Kooij, N.; Akol, H.; Peters, H. M.; Bouma, W. H.; Bemelman, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare the predictive value of sentinel lymph node (SN) mapping between patients with colon and rectal cancer. Patients and methods: An ex vivo SN procedure was performed in 100 patients with colon and 32 patients with rectal cancer. If the sentinel node was negative, immunohistochemical

  18. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Haas-Kock, Danielle F.M. de; Beukema, Jannet C.; Neelis, Karen J.; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H.; Linden, Yvette van der; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; Herk, Marcel B. van; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. Methods and materials: The CTV’s for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. Results: The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p < 0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p = 0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. Conclusions: The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement.

  20. Patient outcomes of monotherapy with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for stage T2 or T3 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Fukushima, Shoko; Abe, Osamu; Saito, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a treatment option for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are medically unable to tolerate surgery and who are not amenable to treatment with stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of 3D-CRT as a monotherapy in patients with localized stage T2 or T3 NSCLC. This retrospective study consisted of 29 patients (20 males) aged 56–89 years (median, 76 years) with histologically confirmed NSCLC who underwent 3D-CRT between 2005 and 2014. The median duration of patient observation was 17.0 months (range, 1.0–64.0 months). Complete and partial responses occurred in 13.8 and 44.8 % of patients, respectively, and the overall response rate was 58.2 %. Meanwhile, the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 65.8 and 33.8 %, respectively. In T2 NSCLC, the median survival time (MST) was 12 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 62.4 and 21.4 %, respectively. In T3 NSCLC, the MST was 17 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 72.9 and 48.6 %, respectively. Severe toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3) were not observed. The mean biologically effective dose required to improve local control exceeded 80 Gy (range, 67.2–96.0 Gy). These findings support a role for 3D-CRT as a treatment option for patients who refuse or could not tolerate surgical therapy with early-stage NSCLC. Although this was a small, retrospective study, it may form the basis for future, larger controlled studies on 3D-CRT as a monotherapy for NSCLC

  1. Carcinoma microsatellite instability status as a predictor of benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Sun, Yan; Huang, Xin-En; Yu, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Jian-Nong; Zhou, Xin; Li, Dong-Zheng; Guan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancers with high microsatellite-instable have clinical and pathological features that differentiate them from microsatellite-stable or low- frequency carcinomas, which was studied rarely in stage II rectal cancer, promoting the present investigation of the usefulness of microsatellite-instability status as a predictor of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil in stage II rectal cancer. Data of 460 patients who underwent primary anterior resection with a double stapling technique for rectal carcinoma at a single institution from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively collected. All patients experienced a total mesorectal excision (TME) operation. Survival analysis were analyzed using the Cox regression method. Five-year rate of disease-free survival (DFS) was noted in 390 (84.8%) of 460 patients with stage II rectal cancer. Of 460 tissue specimens, 97 (21.1%) exhibited high-frequency microsatellite instability. Median age of the patients was 65 (50-71) and 185 (40.2%) were male. After univariate and multivariate analysis, microsatellite instability (p= 0.001), female sex (pchemotherapy (pchemotherapy, those cancers displaying high-frequency microsatellite instability had a better 5-year rate of DFS than tumors exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability (HR, 13.61 [95% CI, 1.88 to 99.28]; p= 0.010), while in 259 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, there was no DFS difference between the two groups (p= 0.145). Furthermore, patients exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability who received adjuvant chemotherapy had a better 5-year rate of DFS than patients did not (HR, 5.16 [95% CI, 2.90 to 9.18]; pchemotherapy and gender. Fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy benefits patients of stage II rectal cancer with microsatellite-stable or low microsatellite-instable, but not those with high microsatellite- instable. Additionally, free of adjuvant chemotherapy, carcinomas with high microsatellite

  2. International preoperative rectal cancer management: staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and impact of multidisciplinary teams.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Augestad, Knut M

    2010-11-01

    Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates.

  3. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient’s quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist’s role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients’ life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  4. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-07-22

    High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient's quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist's role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients' life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer.

  5. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  7. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  8. 15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvester, John E.; Grimm, Peter D.; Blasko, John C.; Millar, Jeremy; Orio, Peter F.; Skoglund, Scott; Galbreath, Robert W.; Merrick, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I 125 or Pd 103 brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I 125 or Pd 103 brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts

  9. Determinants of morbidity and survival after elective non-curative resection of stage IV colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Axel; Füessl, Kathrin E; Seeliger, Hendrik; Eichhorn, Martin E; Müller, Mario H; Rentsch, Markus; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Angele, Martin K; Kreis, Martin E; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2009-09-01

    The benefit of elective primary tumor resection for non-curable stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) remains largely undefined. We wanted to identify risk factors for postoperative complications and short survival. Using a prospective database, we analyzed potential risk factors in 233 patients, who were electively operated for non-curable stage IV CRC between 1996 and 2002. Patients with recurrent tumors, resectable metastases, emergency operations, and non-resective surgery were excluded. Risk factors for increased postoperative morbidity and limited postoperative survival were identified by multivariate analyses. Patients with colon cancer (CC = 156) and rectal cancer (RC = 77) were comparable with regard to age, sex, comorbidity, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, hepatic spread, tumor grade, resection margins, 30-day mortality (CC 5.1%, RC 3.9%) and postoperative chemotherapy. pT4 tumors, carcinomatosis, and non-anatomical resections were more common in colon cancer patients, whereas enterostomies (CC 1.3%, RC 67.5%, p 50%, and comorbidity >1 organ. Prognostic factors for limited postoperative survival were hepatic tumor load >50%, pT4 tumors, lymphatic spread, R1-2 resection, and lack of chemotherapy. Palliative resection is associated with a particularly unfavorable outcome in rectal cancer patients presenting with a locally advanced tumor (pT4, expected R2 resection) or an extensive comorbidity, and in all CRC patients who show a hepatic tumor load >50%. For such patients, surgery might be contraindicated unless the tumor is immediately life-threatening.

  10. Anorectal Function and Quality of Life in Patients With Early Stage Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation and Local Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Patricio B; Renfro, Lindsay A; Carrero, Xiomara W; Shi, Qian; Strombom, Paul L; Chow, Oliver; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about anorectal function and quality of life after chemoradiation followed by local excision, which is an alternative to total mesorectal excision for selected patients with early rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess anorectal function and health-related quality of life of patients with T2N0 rectal cancer who were treated with an alternative approach. This was a prospective, phase II trial. The study was multicentric (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group trial Z6041). Patients with stage cT2N0 rectal adenocarcinomas were treated with an oxaliplatin/capecitabine-based chemoradiation regimen followed by local excision. Anorectal function and quality of life were assessed at enrollment and 1 year postoperatively with the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal Questionnaire. Results were compared, and multivariable analysis was performed to identify predictors of outcome. Seventy-one patients (98%) were evaluated at enrollment and 66 (92%) at 1 year. Compared with baseline, no significant differences were found on Fecal Incontinence Severity Index scores at 1 year. Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life results were significantly worse in the lifestyle (p Cancer Therapy overall score, but the physical well-being subscale was significantly worse and emotional well-being was improved after surgery. Treatment with the original chemoradiation regimen predicted worse depression/self-perception and embarrassment scores in the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life, and male sex was predictive of worse scores in the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy overall score and trial outcome index. Small sample size, relatively short follow-up, and absence of information before cancer diagnosis were study limitations. Chemoradiation followed by local excision had minimal impact on anorectal function 1 year after surgery. Overall quality of

  11. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Michiaki; Kameoka, Shingo; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Izumi, Kiminari; Miyazaki, Kaname; Hamano, Kyoichi; Kouno, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To clarify the usefulness and limitations of CT and MRI in preoperative assessment of the wall invasion of rectal cancer, we compared the results of CT and MRI with the histopathological findings, classifying tumors by the region and site in 34 patients with rectal cancer. Subjects were patients preoperatively examined by MRI and CT. Overall, the percent of cases with the extent of invasion accurately assessed by MRI was 88.2%, and that by CT was 64.7%. In all instances of wrong assessment, the extent of invasion was overestimated. The accurate assessment rate was significantly higher for MRI than for CT. After classification by the region, the accurate assessment rate at Rs was low as 50% for both MRI and CT because slices were not perpendicular to the tumor. The accurate assessment rate was 100% for MRI and 82% for CT at Ra, and respectively 94% and 59% at Rb. The majority of tumors at Ra or Rb centering on the lateral wall of the rectum were accurately assessed either by MRI or CT. With tumors at Ra or Rb (particularly Rb) centering on the anterior or posterior wall, CT frequently failed to identify the extent of invasion accurately, so that MRI seemed more suitable for these tumors. (author)

  12. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Factors on prognosis in patients of stage pT3N0M0 thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after two-field esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: For patients of pT3N0M0 thoracic ESCC, the independent factors were the site of a lesion for OS and PFS, Hb levels, small LN in CT, and number of removed LN for OS. The value of postoperative adjuvant therapy need be further proved.

  14. Whole-body MR imaging versus sequential multimodal diagnostic algorithm for staging patients with rectal cancer. Cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppertz, A.; Charite Universitaetsklinikum Berlin; Schmidt, M.; Schoeffski, O.; Wagner, M.; Asbach, P.; Maurer, M.H.; Puettcher, O.; Strassburg, J.; Stoeckmann, F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the direct costs of two diagnostic algorithms for pretherapeutic TNM staging of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: In a study including 33 patients (mean age: 62.5 years), the direct fixed and variable costs of a sequential multimodal algorithm (rectoscopy, endoscopic and abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, thoracic/abdominal CT in the case of positive findings in abdominal ultrasound or chest X-ray) were compared to those of a novel algorithm of rectoscopy followed by MRI using a whole-body scanner. MRI included T 2w sequences of the rectum, 3D T 1w sequences of the liver and chest after bolus injection of gadoxetic acid, and delayed phases of the liver. The personnel work times, material items, and work processes were tracked to the nearest minute by interviewing those responsible for the process (surgeon, gastroenterologist, two radiologists). The costs of labor and materials were determined from personnel reimbursement data and hospital accounting records. Fixed costs were determined from vendor pricing. Results: The mean MRI time was 55 min. CT was performed in 19 / 33 patients (57 %) causing an additional day of hospitalization (costs 374 Euro). The costs for equipment and material were higher for MRI compared to sequential algorithm (equipment 116 vs. 30 Euro; material 159 vs. 60 Euro per patient). The personnel costs were markedly lower for MRI (436 vs. 732 Euro per patient). Altogether, the absolute cost advantage of MRI was 31.3 % (711 vs. 1035 Euro for sequential algorithm). Conclusion: Substantial savings are achievable with the use of whole-body MRI for the preoperative TNM staging of patients with rectal cancer. (orig.)

  15. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  16. Adjuvant post-operative radiotherapy vs radiotherapy plus 5-FU and levamisole in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer. A phase III randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafiero, F.; Gipponi, M.; Di Somma, C. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Geneo (Italy). Istituto di Oncologia Clinica] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Loco-regional and distant relapses contribute to impair the outcome of rectal cancer patients. As to the former, either pre-or post-operative radiation therapy (RT) significantly reduce loco-regional recurrence; post-operative chemotherapy (CT), alone or in different combinations with RT, is effective in improving both disease-free survival and survival. However, many drawbacks still exist regarding the method of RT delivery as well as the toxicity of combination adjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this trial is to assess the effectiveness and toxicity of adjuvant post-operative RT vs combined RT and CT (5-FU plus levamisole) in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer (pT3-4, pN0, M0; pT1-4, pN1-3, M0). The primary endpoint is overall survival; secondary endpoints are disease-free survival rate of loco-regional recurrence, and treatment-related toxicity/morbidity. (author).

  17. Continuously moving table MRI with sliding multislice for rectal cancer staging: Image quality and lesion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Tobias; Ludwig, Ute; Pache, Gregor; Fautz, Hans-Peter; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Schaefer, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine image quality and lesion detection of sliding multislice (SMS), a recently developed moving table MRI technique, in patients with rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven paired SMS (Avanto, Siemens Medical Solutions) and MDCT (Sensation 64, Siemens Medical Solutions) examinations of abdomen and pelvis were performed in patients with rectal cancer and compared for detection of liver, lymph node and bone metastases by two independent observers. A contrast-enhanced, fat saturated 2D gradient echo sequence (TE, 2.0 ms; TR, 102 ms; slice, 5 mm) was acquired with SMS and a standard contrast-enhanced protocol (100 ml 2.5 ml/s; slice, 5 mm) was used for abdominal MDCT. Standard of reference consisted of a consensus evaluation of SMS, MDCT, and all available follow-up examinations after a period of 6 months. Artifact burden and image quality of SMS was assessed in comparison to stationary gradient echo sequences obtained in an age-matched group of 27 patients. Results: Whereas SMS achieved a mean quality score of 3.65 (scale, 0-4) for the liver, representing very good diagnostic properties, strong breathing artifacts in the intestinal region were observed in 19 cases by both observers. The retroperitoneum still achieved a mean quality score of 3.52, although breathing artifacts were noted in 12 and 15 cases (observers 1 and 2, respectively). The sensitivities of SMS to detect hepatic metastases were 91.2% and 94.1% for both observers, respectively, compared to 98.5%/98.5% for MDCT. The sensitivities for lymph node metastases were 87.5%/81.3% for SMS compared to 78.1%/81.3% for MDCT. The sensitivities for bone metastases were 91.7%/100% for SMS compared to 8.3%/16.7% for MDCT. Conclusion: With slightly reduced image quality in the intestinal region, SMS exhibits equal detection of lymph node and liver metastases compared to MDCT. SMS MRI proved to be superior to MDCT in detection of bone metastases.

  18. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were ≤40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  19. Rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossati, V; Antognoni, P; Villa, E and others

    1985-01-01

    Records of 135 patients with rectal carcinoma were reviewed and correlations between survival rate, extent of tumor and radiotherapy were investigated. The survival rate at 5 years was 16% for C Astler Coller's stage patients and without metastases, but the prognosis was much less favourable for advanced tumors and/or subjects with distant metastases. Preliminary results of another series of patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are discussed.

  20. Non-enhanced CT versus contrast-enhanced CT in integrated PET/CT studies for nodal staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Maeda, Tetsuo; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyake, Mototaka; Arai, Yasuaki; Kim, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of non-enhanced CT and contrast-enhanced CT in integrated PET/CT studies for preoperative nodal staging of rectal cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed in 53 patients with pathologically proven rectal cancer who had been referred for preoperative staging. All patients underwent integrated PET/CT consisting of non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT followed by whole-body fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) PET. Both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two observers in consensus. The reference standard was histopathologic results. For nodal staging of rectal cancer, we compared diagnostic accuracy on a per-patient basis between the two modalities. Nodal staging was correctly determined with non-enhanced studies in 37 patients (70%) and with contrast-enhanced studies in 42 patients (79%). On a per-patient basis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of regional lymph node staging were 85%, 68%, 83%, 72%, and 79%, respectively, with contrast-enhanced studies, and 85%, 42%, 73%, 62%, and 70%, respectively, with non-enhanced studies. The difference in the accuracy of nodal staging between the two modalities was not significant (p = 0.063). Compared with non-enhanced studies, contrast-enhanced studies determined more correctly the status of pararectal lymph nodes (p 0.002), internal iliac lymph nodes (p = 0.004), and obturator lymph nodes (p < 0.0001). Contrast-enhanced PET/CT is superior to non-enhanced PET/CT for precise definition of regional nodal status in rectal cancer. (orig.)

  1. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival....... PATIENTS: Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were...... the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. RESULTS: Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon...

  2. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI

  3. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  4. Urethral duplication II-A Y type with rectal urethra: ASTRA approach and tunica vaginalis flap for first stage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Antonio; Rondon, Atila; Bacelar, Herick; Ottoni, Sergio; Liguori, Riberto; Garrone, Gilmar; Ortiz, Valdemar

    2012-01-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly affecting mainly boys. Generally, the duplication develops on the sagittal plane; the accessory urethra may run dorsally or ventrally to the orthotopic one. We present a patient with urethral duplication in which the orthotopic urethra was patent in the penile segment but atresic in the bulbar and prostatic segment. The patient had urinary flow from the rectum and the ectopic urethra could be well identified by anal examination. Age at surgery was 13 months. The procedure consisted of an ASTRA (anterior sagittal trans-ano-rectal) approach for dividing the urethra and rectum and was successful to move the urethra up to the perineal area. The rectum was reconstructed and the patient placed into a lithotomy position. A urethral catheter inserted in the penile urethra oriented us were the atresic urethra in bulbar area started. The scrotum was opened in the middle and the distance between the two urethral stumps proximal and distal defined the extension of no urethral tissue that consisted of 5 cm. We opened the right scrotal space and a tunica vaginalis flap was obtained and attached to the bulbar tissue for a two-stage urethroplasty strategy. Patient had a nice healing and the tunica vaginalis was nicely incorporated to the adjacent tissue, having the two urethral stumps well delineated. ASTRA approach in combination with a two-stage urethroplasty with tunica vaginalis dorsal flap proved to be an excellent combination for a rare case of urethral Y duplication having the main urethra into the rectum.

  5. Urethral duplication II-A Y type with rectal urethra: ASTRA approach and tunica vaginalis flap for first stage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Macedo Jr

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly affecting mainly boys. Generally, the duplication develops on the sagittal plane; the accessory urethra may run dorsally or ventrally to the orthotopic one. We present a patient with urethral duplication in which the orthotopic urethra was patent in the penile segment but atresic in the bulbar and prostatic segment. The patient had urinary flow from the rectum and the ectopic urethra could be well identified by anal examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Age at surgery was 13 months. The procedure consisted of an ASTRA (anterior sagittal trans-ano-rectal approach for dividing the urethra and rectum and was successful to move the urethra up to the perineal area. The rectum was reconstructed and the patient placed into a lithotomy position. A urethral catheter inserted in the penile urethra oriented us were the atresic urethra in bulbar area started. The scrotum was opened in the middle and the distance between the two urethral stumps proximal and distal defined the extension of no urethral tissue that consisted of 5 cm. We opened the right scrotal space and a tunica vaginalis flap was obtained and attached to the bulbar tissue for a two-stage urethroplasty strategy. RESULTS: Patient had a nice healing and the tunica vaginalis was nicely incorporated to the adjacent tissue, having the two urethral stumps well delineated. CONCLUSIONS: ASTRA approach in combination with a two-stage urethroplasty with tunica vaginalis dorsal flap proved to be an excellent combination for a rare case of urethral Y duplication having the main urethra into the rectum.

  6. Safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil after mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection for stage iii lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Satoru; Souda, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Takahari, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yuji; Takii, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for stage III lower rectal cancer worldwide. However, in Japan, the standard treatment is TME with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection (LPLD) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. We examined the safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (modified FOLFOX6) after TME with LPLD. This retrospective study included 33 patients who received modified FOLFOX6 after TME with LPLD for stage III lower rectal cancer. The overall completion rate of 12 cycles of adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was 76%. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in eight patients (24%). Sensory neuropathy was observed in 32 patients (97%) with 4 (12%) having a grade 3 event. The disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 45% at 3 years. Adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was feasible in patients with stage III lower rectal cancer after TME with LPLD. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  8. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  9. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-03-01

    Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 306 patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer were enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of CRM involvement. The overall rate of CRM involvement was found to be 16.0%. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), stage higher than T3, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation and non-sphincter preserving proctectomy (NSPP) were risk factors for CRM involvement. Male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), advanced T stage, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation, and NSPP are significant risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Given that postoperative chemoradiotherapy is recommended for patients with a positive CRM, further oncologic studies are warranted to ascertain which patients with these risk factors would require adjuvant therapy.

  10. Rectal Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ball”. Rectal prolapse may be confused with significant hemorrhoid disease and can even be confusing at times ... and treating this problem. A = Rectal Prolapse B = Hemorrhoids Once a prolapse is apparent, fecal incontinence (inability ...

  11. Hydrocortisone Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also used to relieve itching and swelling from hemorrhoids and other rectal problems. Hydrocortisone is in a ... may improve within 5 to 7 days.For hemorrhoids, hydrocortisone rectal cream usually is used in adults ...

  12. Bisacodyl Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisac-Evac® Suppositories ... Dulcolax® Suppositories ... Rectal bisacodyl comes as a suppository and enema to use rectally. It is usually used at the time that a bowel movement is desired. The suppositories usually ...

  13. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative staging of rectal adenocarcinoma: Experience from a regional Australian cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rohen; Ung, Kim Ann; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal treatment pathway in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma relies on accurate locoregional staging. This study aims to assess the accuracy of staging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in particular, its accuracy in differentiating patients with early stage disease from those with more advanced disease who benefit from a different treatment approach. Patients who were staged with MRI and received surgery as the first line of treatment for biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified. Comparison was made between the clinical stage on MRI and the pathological stage of the surgical specimen. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of MRI was assessed. In all, 58 eligible patients were identified. In 31% of patients, the extent of disease was underrepresented on preoperative MRI. Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of anorectal MRI in detecting stage II/III disease status in this cohort was 59, 71 and 62%, respectively. MRI underestimated the pathological stage in many patients in this series who may have benefited from the addition of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to their management. This study supports further refinement of preoperative staging and demonstrates that impressive results from highly controlled settings may be difficult to reproduce in community practice. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. KRAS Mutant Status, p16 and β-catenin Expression May Predict Local Recurrence in Patients Who Underwent Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEMS) for Stage I Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Moorhead, Jane; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Bjarnason, Ingvar; Haji, Amyn; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2016-10-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is emerging as an alternative treatment for rectal cancer Stage I. There remains a risk of local recurrence. The Aim of the study was to study the effect of biomarkers in local recurrence for Stage I rectal cancer following TEMS plus or minus radiotherapy. This is a case control study where we compared 10 early rectal cancers that had recurred, against 19 cases with no recurrence, total 29 patients (age=28.25-86.87, mean age=67.92 years, SD=14.91, Male, N=18, Female, N=11). All patients underwent TEMS for radiological Stage I rectal cancer (yT1N0M0 or yT2N0M0) established with combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endorectal ultrasound. We prospectively collected all data on tumour histology, morphological features, as well as follow-up parameters. Molecular analysis was performed to identify their status on BRAF, KRAS, p16 O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and β-catenin. Out of 29 specimens analyzed, 19 were KRAS wild type (65.9%) and 10 mutant (34.5%). Recurrence of the tumour was noted in 10 cases (34.5%) from which 60% were pT1 (N=6) and 40% pT2 (N=4). There was a statistically significant association between KRAS mutant status and local recurrence (N=6, p=0.037). P16 expression greater than 5% (mean=10.8%, min=0, max=95) is linked with earlier recurrence within 11.70 months (N=7, p=0.004). Membranous β-catenin expression (N=12, 48%) was also related with KRAS mutant status (p=0.006) but not with survival (p>0.05). BRAF gene was found to be wild type in all cases tested (N=23). KRAS/p16/β-catenin could be used as a combined biomarker for prediction of local recurrence and stratification of the risk for further surgery. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  16. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  17. Polymorphisms in folate-metabolizing enzymes and response to 5-fluorouracil among patients with stage II or III rectal cancer (INT-0144; SWOG 9304).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M; Rankin, Cathryn; Toriola, Adetunji T; Makar, Karen W; Altug-Teber, Özge; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Holmes, Rebecca S; Smalley, Stephen R; Blanke, Charles D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-11-01

    Recurrence and toxicity occur commonly among patients with rectal cancer who are treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The authors hypothesized that genetic variation in folate-metabolizing genes could play a role in interindividual variability. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the associations between genetic variants in folate-metabolizing genes and clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. The authors investigated 8 functionally significant polymorphisms in 6 genes (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR] [C677T, A1298C], SLC19A1 [G80A], SHMT1 [C1420T], dihydrofolate reductase [DHFR] [Del19bp], TS 1494del,and TSER) involved in folate metabolism in 745 patients with TNM stage II or III rectal cancer enrolled in a phase 3 adjuvant clinical trial of 3 regimens of 5-FU and radiotherapy (INT-0144 and SWOG 9304). There were no statistically significant associations noted between polymorphisms in any of the genes and overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity in the overall analyses. Nevertheless, there was a trend toward worse DFS among patients with the variant allele of MTHFR C677T compared with wild-type, particularly in treatment arm 2, in which patients with the MTHFR C677T TT genotype had worse overall survival (hazards ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.93 [P = .03]) and DFS (hazards ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.03 [P = .02]) compared with those with homozygous wild-type. In addition, there was a trend toward reduced hematological toxicity among patients with variants of SLC19A1 G80A in treatment arm 1 (P for trend, .06) and reduced esophagitis/stomatitis noted among patients with variants of TSER in treatment arm 3 (P for trend, .06). Genetic variability in folate-metabolizing enzymes was found to be associated only to a limited degree with clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. The severity of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications related to fraction size in irradiation treatment of carcinoma cervix stage III B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, S.M.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications was carried out of the 203 patients with stage III B carcinoma of uterine cervix, treated using radiation therapy alone during January 1979 to December 1983. The patients were treated with a combination of external irradiation and single intracavitary insertion. External irradiation was randomised to one of the four different fractionation regimes having dose per fraction of 2 Gy, 3 Gy, 4 Gy and 5.4 Gy, delivering with five fractions/week, three fractions/week, two fractions/week and one fraction/week, respectively. The total doses in four different regimens were adjusted using the TDF model. There were 39 cases of late radiation induced rectal and recto-sigmoid complications. The complication rate was correlated with the dose per fraction and TDFs delivered in each regimen. The complication rate of 8.2% for 2 Gy per fraction was increased to 33.33% for 5.4 Gy per fraction. It was found that there is strong correlation (P [de

  19. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  20. Mesalamine Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal mesalamine comes as a suppository and an enema to use in the rectum. The suppository and the enema are usually used once a day at bedtime. ... rectal mesalamine without talking to your doctor.Mesalamine suppositories and enemas may stain clothing and other fabrics, ...

  1. Analysis of the prognostic factors for low rectal cancer with the pT1-2NxM0 stage after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-mao; Ma, Chao; Sun, Da-yong; Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the factors influencing local recurrence and survival for low rectal cancer with pT1-2NxM0 stage after an abdominoperineal resection (APR). Data of 429 patients confirmed to have pT1-2NxM0 after APR were reviewed. The recurrence rate in patients with intraoperative perforation, less than 12 lymph nodes (LNs) harvested, T2 staging, and positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) was 25.1, 19.9, 9.5, and 26.1% compared with 6.9, 7.0, 0, and 5.8% in patients with no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. The 5-year survival rate in patients with age of at least 70, perforation, less than 12 LNs harvested, T2, and positive CRM was 71.1, 60.8, 58.8, 69.9, and 46.0%, but 73.4, 73.5, 73.8, 89.4, and 75.0% in patients with age less than 70, no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. Meanwhile, patients with N0, N1, and N2 had a survival rate of 90.7, 69.9, and 63.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that perforation (PCRM status (P=0.002) were associated with local recurrence, whereas age of the patients (P=0.023), N staging (PCRM status (P=0.004) were associated with survival. APR was affected by patients' age, operation performer, perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status. Perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors for recurrence; meanwhile, age of the patients, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors influencing survival.

  2. Appropriate customization of radiation therapy for stage II and III rectal cancer: Executive summary of an ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Karyn A; Patton, Caroline E; Fisher, George A; Hoffe, Sarah E; Haddock, Michael G; Parikh, Parag J; Kim, John; Baxter, Nancy N; Czito, Brian G; Hong, Theodore S; Herman, Joseph M; Crane, Christopher H; Hoffman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    To summarize results of a Clinical Practice Statement on radiation therapy for stage II-III rectal cancer, which addressed appropriate customization of (neo)adjuvant radiation therapy and use of non-surgical therapy for patients who are inoperable or refuse abdominoperineal resection. The RAND/University of California, Los Angeles, Appropriateness Method was applied to combine current evidence with multidisciplinary expert opinion. A systematic literature review was conducted and used by the expert panel to rate appropriateness of radiation therapy options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by median rating as Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate. In the neoadjuvant setting, chemoradiation was rated Appropriate and the ratings indicated short-course radiation therapy, chemotherapy alone, and no neoadjuvant therapy are potential options in selected patients. However, neoadjuvant endorectal brachytherapy was rated Rarely Appropriate. For adjuvant therapy, chemoradiation (plus ≥4 months of chemotherapy) was rated Appropriate and chemotherapy alone May Be Appropriate for most scenarios. For medically inoperable patients, definitive external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy alone were rated May Be Appropriate, whereas endorectal brachytherapy and chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy were possible approaches for some scenarios. The last option, definitive chemoradiation, was rated Appropriate to May Be Appropriate based on performance status. Finally, for patients with low-lying tumors refusing abdominoperineal resection, definitive chemoradiation alone, chemoradiation plus endorectal brachytherapy, and chemoradiation plus external beam radiation therapy were all rated Appropriate. This Clinical Practice Statement demonstrated the central role of radiation therapy in stage II-III rectal cancer management and evaluated ways to better individualize its use in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and definitive settings

  3. Treatment tactics in patient with rectal cancer complicating ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful treatment of a young patient with a 15-year anamnesis of ulcerative colitis, who has been diagnosed with rectal cancer, is presented in this case report. A non-standard surgical intervention has been performed following all principles of oncologic surgery. A subtotal colectomy has been performed with ultra-low anterior resection of rectum. Ascendoanal anastomosis has been performed forming the neo-rectum. There were no complications in postoperative period. Considering disease stage (T3N1M0 adjuvant XELOX was administered for 6 months along with 2 cycles of prophylactic treatment with 5-aminosalycilic acid. During 2-years follow-up there are no signs of rectal cancer and ulcerative colitis progression. After pelvic electrostimulation defecation frequency decreased to 3–4 times per day, a patient has complete social rehabilitation.

  4. Rectal bladder-type: ileum-sigma-rectum pouch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajka, K.; Mikszewicz, A.; Stachurski, L.; Perkowski, D.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a method of creating rectal bladder by using the proximal part of rectum, the distal part of sigma and a 40 cm long segment of detubularized ileum. Ureters were attached to the proximal end of ileal segment by Wallace-I technique. Initially the retrograde pyelonephritis was to be prevented by intussuscepting a 4 cm long part of the uretero-ilea anastomosis and by positioning isoperistaltically a 15-16 cm long part of the ileal segment. Because of the insufficiency of such a mechanism, in 4 latest cases the intussuscepted segment was increased to 8 cm. 8 patients suffering from stage T3a and T3b invasive carcinoma of the bladder were treated by this procedure. The ureteral stens were led out via the rectal tube. They were removed days after the operation. The whole post-operative period was uneventful. The patients were under close follow-up from 5 to 22 months. Three of them died due to a progression of the disease. All the patients had 3-4 watery stools a day and one at night. Check-ups performed three and six months after the operation revealed a proper out flow of contrast medium from kidneys and a reduction in the dilatation of ureters. In one case the kidney that failed to function before the procedure, restored its secretion afterwards. The contrast medium reached colon descendens only when more than 350 ml of it were infused into the rectal bladder. (author)

  5. Impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT on staging and irradiation of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskeviciute, Brigita; Boelling, Tobias; Brinkmann, Markus; Rudykina, Ganna; Ernst, Iris; Willich, Normann; Koenemann, Stefan; Stegger, Lars; Schober, Otmar; Weckesser, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on planning of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, a total of 36 patients with LARC underwent a retroprospective PET/CT study for radiotherapy-planning purposes. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in a retrospective analysis by a blinded reader. The hypothetical boost volume was defined primarily on CT alone, and afterwards on the fused PET/CT dataset. The CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs were quantitatively compared and percentage of overlap (OV%) was calculated and analyzed. The impact of PET/CT on radiation treatment planning and overall patient management was evaluated. PET/CT-GTVs were smaller than CT-GTVs (p < 0.05). PET/CT imaging resulted in a change of overall management for three patients (8 %). In 16 of 35 patients (46 %), PET/CT resulted in a need for modification of the usual target volumes (CT-PTV) because of detection of a geographic miss. FDG-PET/CT had significant impact on radiotherapy planning and overall treatment of patients with LARC. (orig.)

  6. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 ± 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 ± 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value

  7. Mesorectal Invasion Depth in Rectal Carcinoma Is Associated With Low Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo S; Loaeza-Belmont, Reynaldo; Gómez Álvarez, Miguel A; Vela-Sarmiento, Itzel; Aguilar-Romero, José M; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge A; Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A; Ruiz-García, Erika B; Maldonado-Martínez, Héctor A; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel

    2017-03-01

    Most cases of rectal cancer (RC) in our institution are in pathologic stage T3. They are a heterogeneous group but have been classified in a single-stage category. We performed the present study to validate the prognostic significance of the mesorectal extension depth (MED) in T3 RC measured in millimeters beyond the muscularis propria plane. We performed a retrospective analysis of 104 patients with T3 RC who had undergone curative surgery after a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy at a tertiary referral cancer hospital. The patients were grouped by MED (T3a,  5-10 mm; and T3d > 10 mm). The clinicopathologic data and disease-free survival were analyzed. The 5-year disease-free survival rate according to the T3 subclassification was 87.5% for those with T3a, 57.9% for T3b, 38.7% for T3c, and 40.3% for those with T3d tumors (P = .050). On univariate and multivariate analysis, the prognostic factors affecting survival were overall recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 3.670; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.710-7.837; P = .001), histologic grade (HR, 2.204; 95% CI, 1.156-4.199; P = .016), mesorectal invasion depth (HR, 1.885; 95% CI, 1.164-3.052; P = .010), and lymph node metastasis (HR, 1.211; 95% CI, 1.015-1.444; P = .033). MED is a significant prognostic factor in patients with T3 RC who have undergone neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, especially when the MED is > 5 mm. The MED could be as important as other clinicopathologic factors in predicting disease-specific survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [A Case of Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Oxaliplatin)and Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, Daichi; Morohashi, Hajime; Umetsu, Satoko; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Wakasa, Yusuke; Odagiri, Tadashi; Kimura, Toshirou; Suto, Akiko; Saito, Takeshi; Yoshida, Eri; Akasaka, Harue; Jin, Hiroyuki; Miura, Takuya; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC)(S-1 plus oxaliplatin)for rectal cancer. The patient was a 50-year-old man who had type 3 circumferential rectal cancer. An abdominal CT scan revealed locally advanced rectal cancer(cT3N2H0P0M0, cStage III b)with severe stenosis and oral-side intestinal dilatation. The patient was treated with NAC after loop-ileostomy. After 3 courses of chemotherapy, a CT scan revealed significant tumor reduction. Laparoscopic low anterior resection and bilateral lymph node dissection were performed 5 weeks after the last course of chemotherapy. The pathological diagnosis was a pathological complete response(no residual cancer cells). This case suggests that laparoscopic low anterior resection after NAC with S-1 plus oxaliplatin for locally advanced rectal cancer is a potentially effective procedure.

  9. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  10. Rectal duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni B

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are of a great rarity, particularly so in the rectum. Because of its rarity, the difficulty of making a correct diagnosis and of selection of proper approach for treatment, this entity bears a special significance. The present case report deals with a female newborn who presented with imperforate anus and a rectovestibular fistula and a mass prolapsing at the introitus. Complete excision of the mass was carried out through the perineal approach and the child then underwent, a PSARP for the correction of the rectal anomaly. Histology confirmed the mass to be a rectal duplication.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung [Dept. of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-01-01

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT

  13. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosing of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perczynski, W.; Walecki, J.; Schier, J.F.; Salamon, Z.

    1994-01-01

    MR has not yet come into widespread use for the staging of rectal cancer. However use of MR imaging in diagnosis of rectal cancer gains clinical acceptance. Use contrast media enables exact staging of rectal cancer. MR multiplaner and noninvasive imaging with excellent spatial and contrast resolution has rising popularity in diagnosis of rectal cancer, especially in cases where it is impossible to insert endorectal US-probe because of stenosis. (author)

  14. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Jennifer L., E-mail: peterson.jennifer2@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bernard, Johnny R. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southern Ohio Medical Center, Portsmouth, OH (United States); Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  15. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm 3 of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications

  16. Phase II trial evaluating the feasibility of interdigitating folfox with chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, M; Chander, S; McKendrick, J; MacKay, J R; Steel, M; Hicks, R; Heriot, A; Leong, T; Cooray, P; Jefford, M; Zalcberg, J; Bressel, M; McClure, B; Ngan, S Y

    2014-11-11

    Patients (pts) with metastatic rectal cancer and symptomatic primary, require local and systemic control. Chemotherapy used during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is adequate for radiosensitisation, but suboptimal for systemic control. The aim of this phase II study was to assess tolerability, local/systemic benefits, of a novel regimen delivering interdigitating intensive chemotherapy with radical CRT. Eligible pts had untreated synchronous symptomatic primary/metastatic rectal cancer. A total of 12 weeks of treatment with split-course pelvic CRT (total 50.4 Gy with concurrent oxaliplatin and 5-FU infusion) alternating with FOLFOX chemotherapy. All pts staged with CT, MRI and FDG-PET pre and post treatment. Twenty-six pts were treated. Rectal primary MRI stage: T3 81% and T4 15%. Liver metastases in 81%. Twenty-four pts (92%) completed the 12-week regimen. All patients received planned RT dose, and for both agents over 88% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity of >75%. Grade 3 toxicities: neutropenia 23%, diarrhoea 15%, and radiation skin reaction 12%. Grade 4 toxicity: neutropenia 15%. FDG-PET metabolic response rate for rectal primary 96%, and for metastatic disease 60%. Delivery of interdigitating chemotherapy with radical CRT was feasible to treat both primary and metastatic rectal cancer. High completion and response rates were encouraging.

  17. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  18. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  19. Pathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensignor, T; Brouquet, A; Dariane, C; Thirot-Bidault, A; Lazure, T; Julié, C; Nordlinger, B; Penna, C; Benoist, S

    2015-06-01

    Pathological response to chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is not well defined in rectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the objective pathological response to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation in middle or low locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Between 2008 and 2013, 22 patients with middle or low LARC (T3/4 and/or N+ and circumferential resection margin rectal resection after preoperative chemotherapy. The pathological response of rectal tumour was analysed according to the Rödel tumour regression grading (TRG) system. Predictive factors of objective pathological response (TRG 2-4) were analysed. All patients underwent rectal surgery after a median of six cycles of preoperative chemotherapy. Of these, 20 (91%) had sphincter saving surgery and an R0 resection. Twelve (55%) patients had an objective pathological response (TRG 2-4), including one complete response. Poor response (TRG 0-1) to chemotherapy was noted in 10 (45%) patients. In univariate analyses, none of the factors examined was found to be predictive of an objective pathological response to chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 37.2 months, none of the 22 patients experienced local recurrence. Of the 19 patients with Stage IV rectal cancer, 15 (79%) had liver surgery with curative intent. Preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is associated with objective pathological response and adequate local control in selected patients with LARC. Further prospective controlled studies will address the question of whether it can be used as a valuable alternative to radiochemotherapy in LARC. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Linfocintilografia pelvica. Contribuicao ao estadiamento pre-operatorio do cancer retal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-12-31

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation`s radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  1. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Linfocintilografia pelvica. Contribuicao ao estadiamento pre-operatorio do cancer retal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1997-12-31

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation`s radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  2. Potential of DNA methylation in rectal cancer as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Ruth; Pulverer, Walter; Diem, Martina; Spaller, Lisa; Woltering, Laura; Schreiber, Martin; Wolf, Brigitte; Sonntagbauer, Markus; Schröder, Fabian; Stift, Judith; Wrba, Fritz; Bergmann, Michael; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Egger, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aberrant DNA methylation is more prominent in proximal compared with distal colorectal cancers. Although a number of methylation markers were identified for colon cancer, yet few are available for rectal cancer. Methods: DNA methylation differences were assessed by a targeted DNA microarray for 360 marker candidates between 22 fresh frozen rectal tumour samples and 8 controls and validated by microfluidic high-throughput and methylation-sensitive qPCR in fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, respectively. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was assessed by MethyLight in FFPE material from 78 patients with pT2 and pT3 rectal adenocarcinoma. Results: We identified and confirmed two novel three-gene signatures in fresh frozen samples that can distinguish tumours from adjacent tissue as well as from blood with a high sensitivity and specificity of up to 1 and an AUC of 1. In addition, methylation of individual CIMP markers was associated with specific clinical parameters such as tumour stage, therapy or patients' age. Methylation of CDKN2A was a negative prognostic factor for overall survival of patients. Conclusions: The newly defined methylation markers will be suitable for early disease detection and monitoring of rectal cancer. PMID:26335606

  3. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Trametinib and TAS-102 in Treating Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-13

    RAS Family Gene Mutation; Stage III Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7

  5. Complete Neoadjuvant Treatment for Rectal Cancer: The Brown University Oncology Group CONTRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard; Sikov, William; Vrees, Matthew; Klipfel, Adam; Shah, Nishit; Schechter, Steven; Oldenburg, Nicklas; Pricolo, Victor; Rosati, Kayla; Dipetrillo, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery, many patients with stage II to III rectal cancer are unable to tolerate full-dose adjuvant chemotherapy. BrUOG R-224 was designed to assess the impact of COmplete Neoadjuvant Treatment for REctal cancer (CONTRE), primary chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery, on treatment delivery, toxicities, and pathologic response at surgery. Patients with clinical stage II to III (T3 to T4 and/or N1 to N2) rectal cancer received 8 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 followed by capecitabine 825 mg/m bid concurrent with 50.4 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Surgery was performed 6 to 10 weeks after chemoradiation. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2013. Median age was 61 years (30 to 79 y); 7 patients (18%) were clinical stage II and 32 (82%) stage III. Thirty-six patients (92%) received all 8 cycles of mFOLFOX6, of whom 35 completed subsequent chemoradiation; thus 89% of patients received CONTRE as planned. No unexpected toxicities were reported. All patients had resolution of bleeding and improvement of obstructive symptoms, with no complications requiring surgical intervention. Pathologic complete response (ypT0N0) was demonstrated in 13 patients (33%; 95% CI, 18.24%-47.76%). CONTRE seems to be a well-tolerated alternative to the current standard treatment sequence. Evaluating its impact on long-term outcomes would require a large randomized trial, but using pathologic response as an endpoint, it could serve as a platform for assessing the addition of novel agents to preoperative treatment in stage II to III rectal cancer.

  6. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  7. Port positioning and docking for single-stage totally robotic dissection for rectal cancer surgery with the Si and Xi Da Vinci Surgical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2017-11-04

    We have previously reported our technique of single-docking totally robotic dissection for rectal cancer surgery using the Da Vinci ® Si Surgical System in 2009. However, we have since optimised our port placement for the Si system and have developed a novel configuration of port placement and docking for the Da Vinci ® Xi Surgical System. We have performed over 700 cases using this technique with the Si system and have used our Xi technique since 2016 for totally robotic dissection for rectal cancer. We have kept the configuration of port placements for both the Xi and Si system as similar as possible, with the priorities to avoid arm collisions as well as to provide a workable port configuration of two left-handed instruments and one right-handed instrument. To date, there have had no major complications or arm collisions related to this technique of docking, port positioning and instrument placement.

  8. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  9. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  10. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    , this might not be the case between guidelines. No formal evaluation of the contrasting guidance has been reported. METHOD: A systematic search for national and international guidelines on rectal cancer was performed. Eleven guidelines were identified for further analysis. RESULTS: There was no consensus...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...

  11. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  12. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Han [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m{sup 2} as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted.

  13. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung; Lee, Yun Han

    2016-01-01

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m 2 ) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m 2 as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted

  14. Digital rectal exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  15. Anal and Rectal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse The ... cancer Foreign objects in the anus and rectum Hemorrhoids Levator syndrome Pilonidal disease Proctitis Rectal prolapse Diagnosis ...

  16. Multigradient Field Active Contour for Multilayer Detection of Ultrasound Rectal Wall Image

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Di

    2001-01-01

    .... One of the aims is to apply this technique for multilayer boundary detection of ultrasound rectal wall image, which is important in colorectal clinical diagnosis for rectal tumor staging The core...

  17. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, T.; Itami, J.; Kotaka, K.; Toriyama, M.

    1996-01-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [de

  18. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Valle, A.; Roldán, G.; Suárez, L.; Rodríguez, R.; Quarneti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Rectal cancer causes about 500 deaths a year in our country. Radio chemotherapy (RTCT) is part of the treatment of rectal tumors especially in stages II and III. The indication for neoadjuvant aims to preserve the sphincter at low tumors and potentially make initially unresectable tumors resectable. Objective: To analyze the indications, treatment, toxicity and development of adenocarcinoma patients receiving treatment rectum preoperative R T ± Q T. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 31 records of patients rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant in Oncology Services Hospital and Central Clinical Hospital of the Armed Forces between 1994 and , 2003. Results: Men / Women: 1.3. Median age 64 years. Eight patients (30%) endorectal ultrasound as preoperative staging were performed. patients matched 20 (65%) stage II, 6 (19%) stage III, 5 (16%) stage IV with potentially resectable liver metastases. The median dose of R T was 50 Gy (35.8-63 Gy) with a median duration was 5 weeks (4-12). One patient (3%) received exclusive R T. Plans Q T used: 5-F U in I / C 52%, 5-F U bolus and 42% leucovorin and 5-F U bolus 3%. Surgery was achieved with sphincter preservation in 7/31 cases (23%). The most common toxicity was diarrhea and radiodermatitis were the cause of discontinuation in 4 patients. Control hematologic weekly was 38% during the RTCT. Responses were achieved Full 5% partial 39%, 17% and stabilization lesion progression 39%. Discussion: The lack of information recorded in the medical records hindered the Analysis of this work. 70% of stage II and III patients were incompletely staged (30% endorectal ultrasound) and controls during treatment were suboptimal. Only 23% of patients achieved sphincter preservation, lower than the figures reported in the literature (65-

  20. Impact of T and N substage on survival and disease relapse in adjuvant rectal cancer: a pooled analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Tepper, Joel E.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Allmer, Cristine; Smalley, Steven R.; Martenson, James A.; Haller, Daniel G.; Mayer, Robert J.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Macdonald, John S.; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rates of survival and disease control by TNM and MAC stage in three randomized North American rectal adjuvant studies. Materials and Methods: Data were merged from 2551 eligible patients on NCCTG 79-47-51 (n=200), NCCTG 86-47-51 (n=656), and INT 114 (n=1695). All patients received postoperative radiation, and 96% were randomized to receive concomitant and maintenance chemotherapy. Five-year follow-up was available in 94% of patients and 7-yr follow-up in 84%. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the distribution of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), and p values were derived using the log-rank test. Time to local and distant relapse was estimated using cumulative incidence methodology. Analyses were adjusted for treatment effect using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: OS and DFS were dependent on both TN stage and NT stage (N substage within T stage and T substage within N stage). Even among N2 patients (4 or more LN+), T stage influenced 5-yr OS (T1-2, 69%; T3, 48%; T4, 38%). Three risk groups of patients were defined: (1) intermediate: T3N0, T1-2N1; (2) moderately high: T4N0, T1-2N2, T3N1; and (3) high: T3N2, T4N1, T4N2. For Group 1, 5-yr OS was 74% and 81%, and 5-yr DFS was 66% and 74%. For Group 2, 5-yr OS ranged from 61% to 69%, and for Group 3, OS ranged from 33% to 48%. Cumulative incidence rates of local relapse and distant metastases revealed similar differences by TN and NT stage, as seen in the survival analyses. Conclusion: Patients with a single high-risk factor of either extension beyond the rectal wall (T3N0) or nodal involvement (T1-2N1) have improved OS, DFS, and disease control when compared to those with both high risk factors. Different treatment strategies may be indicated for intermediate- (T3N0, T1-2N1) vs. moderately high or high-risk patients in view of differential survival and rates of relapse. For future trial design, it may be preferable to perform separate studies, or a planned

  1. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  2. Rectal Cancer Survivors' Participation in Productive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Bulkley, Joanna E; Mcmullen, Carmit K; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa Kf; Herrinton, Lisa J; Krouse, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer and its treatment impair survivors' productivity. To assess determinants of market and nonmarket employment, job search, volunteering, and homemaking among survivors five years or longer after diagnosis. We mailed questionnaires to 1063 survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente (Northern California, Northwest) during 2010 and 2011. Productive activities, functional health status, and bowel management at the time of the survey. Response rate was 60.5% (577/953). Higher comorbidity burdens were associated with lower productivity for men and women rectal cancer survivors. Productive survivors were younger and had lower disease stage and age at diagnosis, higher household income and educational attainment, and fewer comorbidity burdens and workplace adjustments than did nonproductive survivors (p < 0.05 each; 2-sided). Productive rectal cancer survivors were evenly split by sex. Staying productive is associated with better mental health for rectal cancer survivors. Rectal cancer survivors with multiple chronic conditions, higher disease stage, lower productive activities, and older age need better access to medical care and closer monitoring of the quality of their care, including self-care. To capture the full extent of the involvement of survivors in all types of productive activities, research should routinely include measures of employment, searching for employment, homemaking, and volunteering. Counting market and nonmarket productive activities is innovative and recognizes the continuum of contributions survivors make to families and society. Health care systems should routinely monitor rectal cancer survivors' medical care access, comorbidities, health-related quality of life, and productive activities.

  3. In vitro diagnosis of T3-thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the importance of various radioimmunoassays and their reliability in the diagnosis of functional activity of the thyroid parenchyma in patients with nodular goiter. To define the effect of the globulin thyroxine binding ability on the level of general serum triiodothyronine (T 3 ), the index of triiodothyronine and the index of elevated serum triiodothyronine (IEST 3 ) were calculated. A comprehensive procedure of test registration reflecting hypophyseal-thyroid function was used to reveal 3 types of thyrotoxicoses: Tsub(3/4)-thyrotoxicosis, T 3 -thyrotoxicosis and T 4 -thyrotoxicosis. A high informative value of the main tests - the determination of the content of general thyroxine (T 4 ), T 3 and effective thyroxine factor - was established. The IEST 3 is of the utmost diagnostic value, particularly in diagnosing T 3 -thyrotoxicosis

  4. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  5. The use of PET in assessing tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Daisy; Joon, Daryl Lim; Chao, Michael; Wada, Morikatsu; Joon, Michael Lim; See, Andrew; Feigen, Malcolm; Jenkins, Patricia; Mercuri, Angelina; McNamara, Joanne; Poon, Aurora; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of 18F-FDG-PET (PET) response to pathological response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were identified between 2001 and 2005. The median age was 57 years (range 37-72) with 14 males and 6 females. All patients were staged with endorectal ultrasound and/or MRI, CT, and PET. The clinical staging was T3N0M0 (16), T3N1M0 (2), and T3N0M1 (2). Restaging PET was performed after CRT, and prior to definitive surgery. The response on PET and pathology was assessed and correlated. Patient outcome according to PET response was also assessed. Results: Following CRT, a complete PET response occurred in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10, and no response in 3 patients. At surgery, complete pathological response was recorded in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10 and no response in 3. There was a good correlation of PET and pathological responses in complete responders (5/7 cases) and non-responders (3/3 cases). After a median follow-up of 62 months (range 7-73), twelve patients were alive with no evidence of disease. All patients achieving complete metabolic response were alive with no evidence of disease, while as those who had no metabolic response, all died as a result of metastatic disease. Conclusions: PET is a promising complementary assessment tool for assessing tumor response after CRT if there is a complete or no response. PET response may also predict for outcome.

  6. Total mesorectal excision for the treatment of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedan, Ali; Salah, Tareq

    2015-12-01

    In the surgical treatment of rectal cancer, a clear circumferential resection margin and distal resection margin should be obtained. The aim of this study was to determine the morbidity, mortality, survival outcome, and local failure after total mesorectal excision (TME) in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer. This retrospective study was conducted on 101 patients treated for rectal cancer using low anterior resection (LAR), abdominoperinial resection (APR), or Hartmaan's technique. In all operative procedures, total mesorectal excisions (TMEs) were done. The patients were treated from November 2000 to April 2011 in the South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI) of Assuit University (Egypt). Neo-adjuvant therapy was given to those patients with serosalin filtration, lymph node involvement, and sexual and urinary function impairment. Data were analyzed using IBM-SPSS version 21, and survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. One hundred one patients were evaluable (61 males, 40 females). Regarding the operative procedure used, it was: (APR), LAR, Hartmaan's technique in 15.8%, 71.3%, and 12.9% of patients, respectively. Operation-related mortality during the 30 days after surgery was 3%. The operations resulted in morbidity in 25% of the patients, anastomotic site leak in 5.9% of the patients, urinary dysfynction in 9.9% of the patients, and erectile dysfunction in 15.8% of the male patients. Regarding safety margin, the median distances were distal/radial margin, 23/12 mm, distal limit 7 cm. Median lymph nodes harvest 19 nodes. Primary tumor locations were anteriorly 23.8%, laterally 13.9%, posteriorly 38.6%, and circumferential 23.8%. Protective stoma 16.8%. Primary Tumor TNM classification (T1, T2, T3, and T4; 3, 28.7, 55.4, and 12.9%, respectively). Nodes Metastases (N0, N1, and N2; 57.4, 31.7, and 10.9%, respectively). TNM staging (I, II, III, and IV; 15.8, 29.7, 46.5, and 7.9%, respectively). Chemotherapy was administered to 67.3% of the

  7. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  8. External validation of models predicting the individual risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis from colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelman, J; Akre, O; Gustafsson, U O; Bottai, M; Martling, A

    2016-04-01

    To externally validate previously published predictive models of the risk of developing metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) after resection of nonmetastatic colon or rectal cancer and to update the predictive model for colon cancer by adding new prognostic predictors. Data from all patients with Stage I-III colorectal cancer identified from a population-based database in Stockholm between 2008 and 2010 were used. We assessed the concordance between the predicted and observed probabilities of PC and utilized proportional-hazard regression to update the predictive model for colon cancer. When applied to the new validation dataset (n = 2011), the colon and rectal cancer risk-score models predicted metachronous PC with a concordance index of 79% and 67%, respectively. After adding the subclasses of pT3 and pT4 stage and mucinous tumour to the colon cancer model, the concordance index increased to 82%. In validation of external and recent cohorts, the predictive accuracy was strong in colon cancer and moderate in rectal cancer patients. The model can be used to identify high-risk patients for planned second-look laparoscopy/laparotomy for possible subsequent cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  10. Rectal prolapse in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Klaaborg, K E

    1986-01-01

    In infancy there are two types of rectal prolapse. One type is less pronounced and intermittent. This type occurred in 9 out of 17 children referred for rectal prolapse and ceased after a few weeks' conservative treatment. The other type is a more pronounced prolapse occurring at nearly each...

  11. T3 receptors in human pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria A; Pauni, Micaela; Heredia Sereno, Gastón M; Szijan, Irene; Basso, Armando; Burdman, José A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the synthesis of T3 receptors in human tumors of the anterior pituitary gland, its relationship with the hormone synthesized and/or secreted by the tumor and the post-surgical evolution of the patient. Patients were evaluated clinically and by magnetic nuclear resonance to classify the adenoma according to their size. Hormonal concentrations in sera were determined by radioimmunoassay. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary hormones was performed in the tumors. Tumors were obtained at surgery and immediately frozen in ice, transported to the laboratory and stored at -70 degrees C. Reverse transcription was performed with purified RNA from the tumors. Out of 33 pituitary tumors, 29 had RNA for T3 receptors synthesis (88%). They were present in different histological specimens, the tumors were grades 1-4 according to their size, and there was no relationship between the size of the tumor and the presence of T3 receptor RNAs. The post-surgical evolution of the patient was mostly dependent on the size and not on the presence of T3 receptors. The presence of thyroid hormone receptors in pituitary tumors is in line with two important characteristics of these tumors: they are histologically benign and well differentiated.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy as a Boost to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Distal Rectal Cancer: A Phase-II Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Zohourinia, Shadi; Ansari, Mansour; Ghahramani, Leila; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Pourahmad, Saeedeh; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Sayed Hasan; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Despite advances in rectal cancer treatment over the last decade, local control and risk of late side effects due to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) remain as concerns. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and the safety of low-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (LDRBT) as a boost to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for use in treating locally advanced distal rectal adenocarcinomas. This phase-II clinical trial included 34 patients (as the study arm) with newly diagnosed, locally advanced (clinical T3-T4 and/or N1/N2, M0) lower rectal cancer. For comparative analysis, 102 matched patients (as the historical control arm) with rectal cancer were also selected. All the patients were treated with LDRBT (15 Gy in 3 fractions) and concurrent chemoradiation (45-50.4 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 plus oral capecitabine 825 mg/m(2) twice daily during LDRBT and EBRT. The study results revealed a significant differences between the study arm and the control arm in terms in the pathologic tumor size (2.1 cm vs. 3.6 cm, P = 0.001), the pathologic tumor stage (35% T3-4 vs. 65% T3-4, P = 0.003), and the pathologic complete response (29.4% vs. 11.7%, P < 0.028). Moreover, a significantly higher dose of EBRT (P = 0.041) was found in the control arm, and a longer time to surgery was observed in the study arm (P < 0.001). The higher rate of treatment-related toxicities, such as mild proctitis and anemia, in the study arm was tolerable and easily manageable. A boost of LDRBT can optimize the pathologic complete response, with acceptable toxicities, in patients with distal rectal cancer.

  13. Clinical significance of macroscopic completeness of mesorectal resection in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, J S; Martins, S C; Oliveira, J; Cunha, M F; Castro-Sousa, F

    2011-04-01

    Local recurrence after resection of rectal cancer is usually regarded as being due to a 'failure' of surgery. The completeness of resection of the mesorectum has been proposed as an indicator of the 'quality' of the resection. We determined the prognostic value of macroscopic evaluation of rectal cancer resection specimens and the circumferential resection margin (CRM) after curative surgery. From 1999 to 2006, the macroscopic quality of the mesorectum and the CRM were prospectively assessed in 127 patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with curative intent (R0+R1). Chemoradiotherapy was administered for 61 tumours staged as locally advanced tumours (T3, T4 and N+). Univariate analysis of time to local recurrence and cancer-free survival were tested (Kaplan-Meier) and multivariate analysis calculated with a Cox regression model. The mesorectum was incomplete in 34 (26.8%) patients. At a median follow up of 34 months (range, 9-96 months), in the group with an adequate mesorectal excision, the cumulative risk of local recurrence at 5 years was 10%. This was 25% if the mesorectum was incomplete (P CRM and the mesorectal score as independent factors for local recurrence, and T and N status and the mesorectal score as independent factors for disease-free survival. The outcome of surgical treatment of rectal cancer is related to the completeness of mesorectal excision. It is a more discriminative prognostic factor than the classic tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) system. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdomin...

  15. Benchmarking circumferential resection margin (R1) resection rate for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, W; Collins, G; Warren, B; Cunningham, C; Mortensen, N; Lindsey, I

    2010-09-01

    Circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement (R1) is used to audit rectal cancer surgical quality. However, when downsizing chemoradiation (dCRT) is used, CRM audits both dCRT and surgery, its use reflecting a high casemix of locally advanced tumours. We aimed to evaluate predictors of R1 and benchmark R1 rates in the dCRT era, and to assess the influence of failure of steps in the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process to CRM involvement. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected rectal cancer data was undertaken. Patients were classified according to CRM status. Uni- and multivariate analysis was undertaken of risk factors for R1 resection. The contribution of the steps of the MDT process to CRM involvement was assessed. Two hundred and ten rectal cancers were evaluated (68% T3 or T4 on preoperative staging). R1 (microscopic) and R2 (macroscopic) resections occurred in 20 (10%) and 6 patients (3%), respectively. Of several factors associated with R1 resections on univariate analysis, only total mesorectal excision (TME) specimen defects and threatened/involved CRM on preoperative imaging remained as independent predictors of R1 resections on multivariate analysis. Causes of R1 failure by MDT step classification found that less than half were associated with and only 15% solely attributable to a suboptimal TME specimen. Total mesorectal excision specimen defects and staging-predicted threatened or involved CRM are independent strong predictors of R1 resections. In most R1 resections, the TME specimen was intact. It is important to remember the contribution of both the local staging casemix and dCRT failure when using R1 rates to assess purely surgical competence.

  16. What is the significance of the circumferential margin in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakarnsanga, Atthaphorn; Gonen, Mithat; Shia, Jinru; Goodman, Karyn A; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Guillem, José G; Paty, Philip B; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Weiser, Martin R

    2013-04-01

    The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is highly prognostic for local recurrence in rectal cancer surgery without neoadjuvant treatment. However, its significance in the setting of long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) is not well defined. Review of a single institution's prospectively maintained database from 1998 to 2007 identified 563 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3/T4 and/or N1) receiving nCRT, followed after 6 weeks by total mesorectal excision (TME). Kaplan-Meier, Cox regression, and competing risk analysis were performed. The authors noted that 75 % of all patients had stage III disease as determined by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With median follow-up of 39 months after resection, local and distant relapse were noted in 12 (2.1 %) and 98 (17.4 %) patients, respectively. On competing risk analysis, the optimal cutoff point of CRM was 1 mm for local recurrence and 2 mm for distant metastasis. Factors independently associated with local recurrence included CRM ≤1 mm, and high-grade tumor (p = 0.012 and 0.007, respectively). CRM ≤2 mm, as well as pathological, nodal, and overall tumor stage are also significant independent risk factors for distant metastasis (p = 0.025, 0.010, and dataset of locally advanced rectal cancer treated with nCRT followed by TME, CRM ≤1 mm is an independent risk factor for local recurrence and is considered a positive margin. CRM ≤2 mm was associated with distant recurrence, independent of pathological tumor and nodal stage.

  17. Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer combined with an endorectal boost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Mortensen, John P; Bisgaard, Claus

    2006-01-01

    (TRG) system. TRG1 was recorded in 27% of the patients, and a further 27% were classified as TRG2. TRG3 was found in 40%, and 6% had TRG4. The toxicity was low. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that high-dose radiation with concurrent chemotherapy and endorectal brachytherapy is feasible with a high...

  18. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Lee, Yen-Lin; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  19. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  20. Continuous Effect of Radial Resection Margin on Recurrence and Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Who Receive Preoperative Chemoradiation and Curative Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, SooYoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Joo Hwan; Nam, Taek Keun; Jeong, Songmi; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Bae, Jung Min; Lee, Jong Hoon

    2017-07-01

    To elucidate the proper length and prognostic value of resection margins in rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by curative total mesorectal excision (TME). A total of 1476 rectal cancer patients staging cT3-4N0-2M0 were analyzed. All patients received radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Total mesorectal excision was performed 4 to 8 weeks after radiation therapy. The recurrence-free survival (RFS) at 5 years showed a significant difference between 3 groups: patients with circumferential resection margin (CRM) ≤1 mm, CRM 1.1 to 5 mm, and CRM >5 mm (46.2% vs 68.6% vs 77.5%, P5 mm. Distal resection margin (≤5 vs >5 mm) did not show any significant difference in cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (P=.310) and distant metastasis (P=.926). Rectal cancer patients with CRM ≤1 mm are a high-risk group, with the lowest RFS. Patients with CRM 1.1 to 5 mm may be at intermediate risk, with moderately increased distant recurrence. Distal resection margin was not significantly associated with RFS in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT and total mesorectal excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Matilde; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Chablaney

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs has increased by almost ten-fold over the past 30 years. There has been a heightened awareness of the malignant potential of rectal NETs. Fortunately, many rectal NETs are discovered at earlier stages due to colon cancer screening programs. Endoscopic ultrasound is useful in assessing both residual tumor burden after retrospective diagnosis and tumor characteristics to help guide subsequent management. Current guidelines suggest endoscopic resection of rectal NETs ≤10 mm as a safe therapeutic option given their low risk of metastasis. Although a number of endoscopic interventions exist, the best technique for resection has not been identified. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD has high complete and en-bloc resection rates, but also an increased risk of complications including perforation. In addition, ESD is only performed at tertiary centers by experienced advanced endoscopists. Endoscopic mucosal resection has been shown to have variable complete resection rates, but modifications to the technique such as the addition of band ligation have improved outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to further compare the available endoscopic interventions, and to elucidate the most appropriate course of management of rectal NETs.

  4. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  5. Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Raymond H.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Das, Prajnan; Hong, Theodore S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal

  6. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Anne Haahr Mellergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack

    2016-01-01

    study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH......) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated...

  7. Rectal duplication cyst presenting as rectal prolapse in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Zaiem

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rectal duplication is a rare variety of gastrointestinal duplication. It accounts 4% of the total gastrointestinal duplications.In this paper, we are reporting a case of an 8 months old male who presented with rectal prolapse. Digital rectal examination revealed a soft mass bulging through the posterior wall of rectum. Computed tomography (CT scan showed a cystic mass compressing the posterior wall of the rectum. The mass was excised using a Muscle Complex Saving Posterior Sagittal approach (MCS-PSA. The pathology report confirmed the diagnosis of the rectal duplication cyst. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. Keywords: Intestinal duplication, Cystic rectal duplication, Rectal prolapse

  8. Usefulness of magnetic resonance volumetric evaluation in predicting response to preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung-yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We performed magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for evaluating response to therapy in T3 and T4 rectal cancer. To investigate the utility of MR volumetry for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we compared results from MR volumetry before chemoradiation with those after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A total 112 patients with T3 or T4 rectal cancer who successfully underwent MR volumetry and completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection for cure were identified. MR volumetries were performed before and after chemoradiation. We compared pre- and postchemoradiation tumor volume and % volume reduction rates of patients whose tumors were down-staged with those of patients that were not down-staged. The same analyses were also performed between those patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease in the operative specimen. We assessed the difference of % volume reduction rate according to Dworak's rectal cancer regression grades. Results: Fifty-seven patients (50.9%) demonstrated a tumor down-staging after chemoradiation therapy. Both pre- and posttreatment MR tumor volumes were significantly less in patients whose tumors were down-staged than in patients that were not down-staged (p = 0.04, 0.031), and % volume reduction rates were significantly higher in patients whose tumors were down-staged (p = 0.024). Sixteen patients (14.3%) showed pathologically complete tumor regression. The differences of MR tumor volumes before and after chemoradiation and % volume reduction rates were not significantly different between patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease (p = 0.688, 0.451, and 0.480). The differences of % volume reduction rates according to Dworak's grades were statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The MR volumetric examinations before and after chemoradiation demonstrated the

  9. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  10. Five fractions of radiation therapy followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Robert J; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Active form Notch4 promotes the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Peng-Yeh [Institute of Molecular Biology and Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Chong-Bin [Institute of Molecular Biology and Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi 600, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tseng, Min-Jen, E-mail: biomjt@ccu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology and Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Notch4IC modulates the ERK pathway and cell cycle to promote 3T3-L1 proliferation. ► Notch4IC facilitates 3T3-L1 differentiation by up-regulating proadipogenic genes. ► Notch4IC promotes proliferation during the early stage of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. ► Notch4IC enhances differentiation during subsequent stages of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is composed of adipocytes, which differentiate from precursor cells in a process called adipogenesis. Many signal molecules are involved in the transcriptional control of adipogenesis, including the Notch pathway. Previous adipogenic studies of Notch have focused on Notch1 and HES1; however, the role of other Notch receptors in adipogenesis remains unclear. Q-RT-PCR analyses showed that the augmentation of Notch4 expression during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was comparable to that of Notch1. To elucidate the role of Notch4 in adipogenesis, the human active form Notch4 (N4IC) was transiently transfected into 3T3-L1 cells. The expression of HES1, Hey1, C/EBPδ and PPARγ was up-regulated, and the expression of Pref-1, an adipogenic inhibitor, was down-regulated. To further characterize the effect of N4IC in adipogenesis, stable cells expressing human N4IC were established. The expression of N4IC promoted proliferation and enhanced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells compared with those of control cells. These data suggest that N4IC promoted proliferation through modulating the ERK pathway and the cell cycle during the early stage of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis and facilitated differentiation through up-regulating adipogenic genes such as C/EBPα, PPARγ, aP2, LPL and HSL during the middle and late stages of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis.

  12. Management of Third Stage of Labour with Per Rectal Administration of 400 MCG of Tablet Misoprostol Before Delivery of Placenta - Protocol for 3rd Stage of Labour - A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Tugnait

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The third stage of labour poses potentially life threatening risks and several severe complications to a mother who has just delivered. The patients in rural and peripheral setups are more vulnerable given their poor nutritional status, rare health care facilities, non availability of trained birth attendants and distance to a tertiary care centre. In larger centres also ,avoidance of post partum haemorrhage adds to maternal well being and saves on hospital resources in terms of man and material. The mean blood loss of 163.41 ml during third stage of labour is an encouraging result especially when no significant side effects were noted.

  13. Production of sheep anti triiodothyronine T3 antisera for development of T3 RIA kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsadig, M. G.; Abdalla, O. M.; Eltayed, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    This study was a trial to produce antisera against triiodothyronine T 3 . Small amounts of antibodies were detected due to a poor response of sheep to immunization. Consequently the amount of T 3 tracer bound by antibodies was found to be less than 10% with weak discrimination between zero and high standard doses in all bleeds which dose not satisfy radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique requirements. In this study, two local male Sudanese sheep (ovis aries) were immunized with T 3 -immuno gen intramuscularly and subcutaneously in different sites along their backs. Sheep (I) was immunized with 25μg of antigen per kg body weight in first and boosting injections, while the dose was only 10μg per kg body weight for sheep (II). T 3 -immunogen was emulsified in FCA for the first injection and in FIA for the boosting injections. The sera obtained from both sheep after each injection were subjected to evaluation for the levels of circulating anti T 3 antibodies through both qualitative and quantitative tests. The tests were performed for both purified and non-purified forms of antibodies with different separation techniques. Theses me methods include, precipitation by second antibody assisted by polyethylene glycol (PEG), polystyrene beads, and liquid phase separation techniques.(Author)

  14. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  16. Contact X-ray Therapy for Rectal Cancer: Experience in Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ortholan, Cecile; Benezery, Karene; Ginot, Aurelie; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Benchimol, Daniel; Francois, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of using contact X-ray (CXR), which has been used in the Centre-Lacassagne since 2002 for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 44 patients were treated between 2002 and 2006 using four distinct clinical approaches. Patients with Stage T1N0 tumors were treated with transanal local excision (TLE) and adjuvant CXR (45 Gy in three fractions) (n = 7). The 11 inoperable (or who had refused surgery) patients with Stage T2-T3 disease were treated with CXR plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Those with Stage T3N0-N2 tumors were treated with preoperative CXR plus EBRT (with or without concurrent chemotherapy) followed by surgery (n = 21). Finally, the patients with Stage T2 disease were treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE (n = 5). Results: The median follow-up was 25 months. In the 7 patients who underwent TLE first, no local failure was observed, and their anorectal function was good. Of the 11 inoperable patients who underwent CXR plus EBRT alone, 10 achieved local control. In the third group (preoperative CXR plus EBRT), anterior resection was performed in 16 of 21 patients. Complete sterilization of the operative specimen was seen in 4 cases (19%). No local recurrence occurred. Finally, of the 5 patients treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE, a complete or near complete clinical response was observed in all. TLE with a R0 resection margin was performed in all cases. The rectum was preserved with good function in all 5 patients. Conclusion: These early results have confirmed that CXR combined with surgery (or alone with EBRT) can play a major role in the conservative and curative treatment of rectal cancer

  17. Combined curative radiation therapy alone in (T1) T2-3 rectal adenocarcinoma: a pilot study of 29 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Roy, P.; Coquard, R.; Barbet, N.; Romestaing, P.; Ayzac, L.; Ardiet, J.M.; Thalabard, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of a pilot study including 29 consecutive patients with high surgical risk or refusal of colostomy treated with radiation therapy alone with curative intent. Patients: Between 1986 and 1992, 29 patients were treated for infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Median age was 72 years. Transrectal ultrasound staging was used in 24 patients (T1, 2; T2, 14; T3, 13; N0, 23; N1, 6). In 20 patients the lower border of the tumor was at 5 cm or less from the anal verge and in 19 patients the diameter exceeded 3 cm. CEA was elevated in seven cases. Treatment: Contact X-ray (50 kV) was given first (70 Gy/3 fractions). External beam radiation therapy used a three-field technique in the prone position. Accelerated schedule (39 Gy/13 fractions/17 days) with a concomitant boost 'field within the field' (4 Gy/4 fractions). Six weeks later an iridium-192 implant was performed in 21 (20 Gy/22 h). Results: Median follow-up time was 46 months. Overall and specific survival at 5 years was 68% (SE = 0.09) and 76% (SE = 0.08). Local control was obtained in (21(29)) patients (72%). There was one grade 2 rectal bleeding and five grade 2 rectal necroses. The overall tolerance was good in these frail patients. Discussion: For T2. T3 or T1 > 3 cm diameter rectal adenocarcinoma, where contact X-ray alone is not recommended, a combined treatment with radiation therapy alone is able to give good local control with acceptable toxicity. This treatment should be restricted to inoperable patients

  18. Finding dose-volume constraints to reduce late rectal toxicity following 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Carlo; Mazzetta, Chiara; Cattani, Federica; Tosi, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Simona; Fodor, Andrei; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The rectum is known to display a dose-volume effect following high-dose 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The aim of the study is to search for significant dose-volume combinations with the specific treatment technique and patient set-up currently used in our institution. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of 135 patients with stage T1b-T3b prostate cancer treated consecutively with 3D-CRT between 1996 and 2000 to a total dose of 76 Gy. The median follow-up was 28 months (range 12-62). All late rectal complications were scored using RTOG criteria. Time to late toxicity was assessed using the Kaplan-Meyer method. The association between variables at baseline and ≥2 rectal toxicity was tested using χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. Results: Late rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was observed in 24 of the 135 patients (17.8%). A 'grey area' of increased risk has been identified. Average DVHs of the bleeding and non-bleeding patients were generated. The area under the percent volume DVH for the rectum of the bleeding patients was significantly higher than that of patients without late rectal toxicity. On multivariate analysis the correlation between the high risk DVHs and late rectal bleeding was confirmed. Conclusions: The present analysis confirms the role of the rectal DVH as a tool to discriminate patients undergoing high-dose 3D-CRT into a low and a high risk of developing late rectal bleeding. Based on our own results and taking into account the data published in the literature, we have been able to establish new dose-volume constraints for treatment planning: if possible, the percentage of rectal volume exposed to 40, 50, 60, 72 and 76 Gy should be limited to 60, 50, 25, 15 and 5%, respectively

  19. Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Li Tianyu; Sigurdson, Elin; Cohen, Steven J.; Small, William; Spies, Stewart; Yu, Jian Q.; Wahl, Andrew; Stryker, Steven; Meropol, Neal J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

  20. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  2. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p < 0.0001). The presence of lymph node metastases also resulted in a decrease in DFS with a 5 year rate of 67% for patients with N0 disease

  3. Production of sheep anti triiodothyronine (T3) antisera for development of T3 RIA kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karar, M. G. E.

    2006-11-01

    This study is a trial to produce antisera against triiodothyronine (T 3 ) which resulted in a poor response of sheep to immunization, since small amount of antibodies were detected, hence the amount of T 3 tracer bound by the antibodies in terms of percentage was found to be less than 10% with weak discrimination between zero and high standard doses in all bleeds which dose not satisfy radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique requirements. In this study, two local males Sudanese sheep (ovis aries) were immunized with T 3 -immuno gen intramuscularly and subcutaneously in different sites along their backs. Sheep (I) was immunized with 25μg of antigen per kg body weight in first and boosting injections, while the dose was only 10μg per kg body weight for sheep(II). T 3 -immuno gen was emulsified in FCA for the first injection and in FIA for the boosting injections. The sera obtained from both sheep after each injection were subjected to evaluation for the levels of circulating anti-T 3 antibodies through both qualitative and quantitative tests (titration test). The tests were performed for both purified and non-purified from with different separation methods, these methods included, precipitation by second antibody assisted by polyethylene glycol (PEG), polystyrene beads, and liquid phase separation technique. Tests for the quality and success of polystyrene beads coating process for the titration were done using pre characterized antibodies, namely anti progesterone antibodies and anti thyroxine antibodies. These tests revels that, the coating process including the activation of polystyrene beads, was of good quality, and the results obtained was due to weak response to T 3 -immuno gen. The results obtained from qualitative tests of the two sheep sera did not show clear precipitate, in spite of the positive result obtained in a neat sera, which was an indication for weak antibody formation. The result of the titration tests for all bleeds (third, forth, fifth, sixth, and

  4. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  5. Rectal fistulas after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Audrey; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Seeberger, Jergen M.S.; Armstrong, Julius R.T.T.; Mueller, Amy; Cavanagh, William M.S.; Lin, Daniel; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rectal and prostatic radiation doses for a prospective series of 503 patients, 44 of whom developed persistent rectal bleeding, and 2 of whom developed rectal-prostatic fistulas. Methods and Materials: The 503 patients were randomized and treated by implantation with 125 I vs. 103 Pd alone (n = 290) or to 103 Pd with 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy supplemental external beam radiotherapy (n = 213) and treated at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Medical Center (n = 227), Schiffler Cancer Center (n 242) or University of Washington (n = 34). Patients were treated between September 1998 and October 2001 and had a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The patient groups were treated concurrently. Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using standard American Urological Association and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Patients who reported Grade 1 or greater Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding. Those who reported persistent bleeding, lasting for >1 month were included as having Grade 2 toxicity. Three of the patients with rectal bleeding required a colostomy, two of whom developed a fistula. No patient was lost to follow-up. The rectal doses were defined as the rectal volume in cubic centimeters that received >50%, 100%, 200%, or 300% of the prescription dose. The rectum was considered as a solid structure defined by the outer wall, without attempting to differentiate the inner wall or contents. Results: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 44 of the 502 patients, 32 of whom (73%) underwent confirmatory endoscopy. In univariate analysis, multiple parameters were associated with late rectal bleeding, including all rectal brachytherapy indexes. In multivariate analysis, however, only the rectal volume that received >100% of the dose was significantly predictive of bleeding. Rectal fistulas occurred

  6. Conservative treatment of premature rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The largest radical resections in rectal cancer with significant morbidity and mortality (Urinary dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, permanent colostomy, etc.), on certain occasions and with high selectivity, they can be avoided with the implementation of local resections. Our intention is to assess the results of conservative treatment of rectal cancer early. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.89 and 31.12.09 14 consecutive patients were treated carriers rectal adenocarcinoma who had never received prior cancer treatment and a second simultaneous showed no neoplasia. The age of the patients presented a range between 44 and 72 years with a mean of 60.4 years; sex similarly partitioned and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All patients were operated through a anal resection of which 4 were performed a submucosal tumor excision (T1) and 10 excision was entire rectal wall and tumor invaded the muscularis propria (T2). For this one type of surgery patients were selected the following criteria: tumor ≤6 cm. the anal verge, size ≤3 cm., GH I-II, vegetative, mobile, and T1-2, N0 by EER. After intervention, the pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed that 4 patients GH III, lymphovascular invasion and / or peri neural, or close surgical margins (+) (≤3 mm.) And T3, so underwent Miles operation (March 1 T1 and T2). Subsequently the rest of the patients (10) underwent concomitant radio chemotherapy. Radiation therapy was similar all using megavoltage photons (CO-60, 18mV) to the entire pelvic volume in a normofraccionamiento to complete 50.40 Gy (1.8 Gy / 28) using multiple fields (box technique). Chemotherapy was prepared 5FU + LV in the first patient (4), in following (4) was used 5FU continuous infusion (1st and 5th week) and the remaining (2) Capecitabine. Follow up was complete. Results: In our sample we extract local failure was 4 (29%), distant failure 3 (20%) and two local and distant failures (14%) so it follows that

  7. Capacity for cooperative binding of thyroid hormone (T3) receptor dimers defines wild type T3 response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, G A; Williams, G R; Harney, J W; Forman, B M; Samuels, H H; Moore, D D; Larsen, P R

    1992-04-01

    Thyroid hormone response elements (T3REs) have been identified in a variety of promoters including those directing expression of rat GH (rGH), alpha-myosin heavy chain (rMHC), and malic enzyme (rME). A detailed biochemical and genetic analysis of the rGH element has shown that it consists of three hexamers related to the consensus [(A/G)GGT(C/A)A]. We have extended this analysis to the rMHC and rME elements. Binding of highly purified thyroid hormone receptor (T3R) to T3REs was determined using the gel shift assay, and thyroid hormone (T3) induction was measured in transient tranfections. We show that the wild type version of each of the three elements binds T3R dimers cooperatively. Mutational analysis of the rMHC and rME elements identified domains important for binding T3R dimers and allowed a direct determination of the relationship between T3R binding and function. In each element two hexamers are required for dimer binding, and mutations that interfere with dimer formation significantly reduce T3 induction. Similar to the rGH element, the rMHC T3RE contains three hexameric domains arranged as a direct repeat followed by an inverted copy, although the third domain is weaker than in rGH. All three are required for full function and T3R binding. The rME T3RE is a two-hexamer direct repeat T3RE, which also binds T3R monomer and dimer. Across a series of mutant elements, there was a strong correlation between dimer binding in vitro and function in vivo for rMHC (r = 0.99, P less than 0.01) and rME (r = 0.67, P less than 0.05) T3REs. Our results demonstrate a similar pattern of T3R dimer binding to a diverse array of hexameric sequences and arrangements in three wild type T3REs. Addition of nuclear protein enhanced T3R binding but did not alter the specificity of binding to wild type or mutant elements. Binding of purified T3R to T3REs was highly correlated with function, both with and without the addition of nuclear protein. T3R dimer formation is the common

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayiguli Hare; Palida Apizi; Iskandar Abulimiti; Zhang Jinrong; Tian Hanhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  10. Rectal cancer: involved circumferential resection margin - a root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, H; Collantes, E C; Rashid, S H; Wong, L S; Baragwanath, P

    2009-06-01

    An involved circumferential resection margin (CRM) following surgery for rectal cancer is the strongest predictor of local recurrence and may represent a failure of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process. The study analyses the causes of positive CRM in patients undergoing elective surgery for rectal cancer with respect to the decision-making process of the MDT, preoperative rectal cancer staging and surgical technique. From March 2002 to September 2005, data were collected prospectively on all patients undergoing elective rectal cancer surgery with curative intent. The data on all patients identified with positive CRM were analysed. Of 158 patients (male:female = 2.2:1) who underwent potentially curative surgery, 16 (10%) patients had a positive CRM on postoperative histology. Four were due to failure of the pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging scans to predict an involved margin, two with an equivocal CRM on MRI did not have preoperative radiotherapy, one had an inaccurate assessment of the site of primary tumour and in one intra-operative difficulty was encountered. No failure of staging or surgery was identified in the remaining eight of the 16 patients. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) was associated with a 26% positive CRM, compared with 5% for anterior resection. No single consistent cause was found for a positive CRM. The current MDT process and/or surgical technique may be inadequate for low rectal tumours requiring APR.

  11. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? OBJECTIVES: The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. PATIENTS: A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. RESULTS: Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. LIMITATIONS: The study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSION: This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  12. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Murotani, Masahiro; Iihara, Keisuke

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was applied for advanced rectal cancer. Eligible criteria were as follows: no previous treatment, more than hemicircular occupation, T 3 or more, invasion to adjacent organs or lymph node metastasis on CT scan, tumor fixation by digital examination. Eleven patients were enrolled with this regimen consisting of 5-FU; 500 mg/day x 5/w x 4, CDDP; 10 mg/day x 5/w x 4 and radiation; 2 Gy x 5/w x 4. As a toxicity, grade 2 leukopenia in 2 cases, grade 2 GI symptoms in one case and radiation dermatitis was observed in 8 cases. As a local response, there were PR in 10 cases and NC in 1 case. Surgical resection was performed on 8 patients. Histological responses in the resected specimens were grade 2, 5 cases; grade 1b, 1 case; and grade 1a, 2 cases. Operative radicalities were grade A, 3 cases; grade B, 3 cases; and grade C, 2 cases. Preoperative chemoradiation is one of the effective options in multimodal treatment for advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  13. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Romestaing, P.; Montbarbon, X.

    1989-01-01

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  14. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting for distal rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Pløen, John; Harling, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    -dose radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy followed by observation (watchful waiting) was successful for non-surgical management of low rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with primary, resectable, T2 or T3, N0-N1 adenocarcinoma in the lower 6 cm of the rectum were given chemoradiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions...

  15. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  16. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J., E-mail: rmyerson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gao, Feng [Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hall, Lannis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kodner, Ira [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lockhart, A. Craig [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mutch, Matthew [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Safar, Bashar [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  17. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  18. Rectal carcinoids: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Frank D

    2014-07-01

    Rectal carcinoids are increasing in incidence worldwide. Frequently thought of as a relatively benign condition, there are limited data regarding optimal treatment strategies for both localized and more advanced disease. The aim of this study was to summarize published experiences with rectal carcinoids and to present the most current data.

  19. Irradiation of low rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven't yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We'll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  20. Changing practice of rectal cancer surgery in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.R.; Muneer, A.; Laghari, Z.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presentation and pathology of rectal cancer, and to evaluate the local experience after total meso rectal excision at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methodology: A retrospective study of two hundred cases of carcinoma rectum that had undergone total meso rectal excision at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Pakistan was carried out from January 1998 to December 2007.The cases were admitted through outpatient and emergency departments. The demographic details of each patient and variables such as clinical presentation, tumor location, Dukes staging, TNM staging, operations and complications were recorded on proformas. Each patient was followed up at two months for one year, every four months for three years and annually thereafter. Results: Male to female ratio being almost equal 1.6:1, Age ranged from 14-70 years. Site of tumor at upper one third 25%, middle one third 30% and lower one third 45%. Majority of patients (more than 62%) were in Dukes B Group.There were no postoperative deaths, complications occurred in a total of 59 (29.5%) patients, which were mostly colostomy related (13.0%). The abdominal wound infection 5%, anastomotic dehiscence 1.0%, urinary tract infection 5%, and impotence occurred in 1.5%. In 20% patients local recurrence was detected. Conclusion: Total meso rectal excision is a safe and feasible technique for rectal cancer surgery with acceptable perioperative morbidity and adequate local disease control. (author)

  1. Development and characterization of radioimmunoassay methods for the measurement of iodothyronines (T4, T3 and rT3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, E.M.K.; Vieira, J.G.H.; Barros Maciel, R.M. de; Fonseca, R.M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The experience acquired in the development of radioimmunoassay for T 4 , T 3 and rT 3 in unextrated serum is described. Antisera were produced in rabbits using iodothyronines conjugated to bovine serum albumin: the antisera selected provided the development of sensitive and specific radioassay methods. Stable high activity T 3 , T 4 and rT 3 tracers were prepared by iodination of 3,5 T 2 , T 3 and 3,3' T 2 by the chloramine-T method, and purified by column chromatography on Sephadex G25. Binding of those iodothyronines to endogenous serum proteins was blocked by including 8-aniline-1-naphtalene sulphonic acid (ANSA) in the T 4 and T 3 assays and thymerosal in the rT 3 assay. Normal values were defined in 46 healthy euthyroid adults of both sexes: T 4 = 7,1 +- 1,3μg/dl; T 3 = 139 +- 35ng/dl and rT 3 = 18,0 +- 7,9ng/dl. (Author) [pt

  2. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: A phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6–8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m 2 /day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, (NCT01431599)). Results: All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response

  3. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: a phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6-8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m(2)/day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, NCT01431599). All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Role and efforts of T3C in corrosion economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Appleman, B.R.; Pamer, R.I.; Thompson, J.L.

    1979-11-01

    The basic purpose of T3C activity is to show how to acquire specific corrosion cost information so that overall costs for doing business can be reduced. The scope of T3C is to accumulate data, appraise methods, develop recommended practices, promote knowledge and communicate relative to the economic evaluation of corrosion and counter corrosion techniques

  5. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich [Department of Radio-Oncology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Piringer, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.piringer@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Wels-Grieskirchen Medical Hospital, Wels (Austria); Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Saely, Christoph Hubert [Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radio-Oncology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Öfner, Dietmar [Department of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  6. Management of Liver Metastasis from Colo-Rectal Carcinoma with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide, colo-rectal carcinoma is the second most common cancer with liver metastases as its major cause of mortality.This malignant condition is now seen more frequently in our environment typically at a late stage with distant metastasis especially to the liver. This study aims at highlighting the current use ...

  7. Multicenter evaluation of rectal cancer reimaging post neoadjuvant (MERRION) therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanly, Ann M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of reimaging rectal cancer post-CRT (chemoradiotherapy) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis for local staging and computed tomography of thorax, abdomen, and pelvis (CT TAP) to identify distant metastases.

  8. Prospective trial of preoperative concomitant boost radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher N.; Feig, Barry W.; Cleary, Karen; Dubrow, Ronelle; Curley, Steven A.; Ellis, Lee M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Lenzi, Renato; Lynch, Patrick; Wolff, Robert; Brown, Thomas; Pazdur, Richard; Abbruzzese, James; Hoff, Paulo M.; Allen, Pamela; Brown, Barry; Skibber, John

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: To evaluate the response to a concomitant boost given during standard chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Concomitant boost radiotherapy was administered preoperatively to 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in a prospective trial. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy to the pelvis with 18 mV photons at 1.8 Gy/fraction using a 3-field belly board technique with continuous infusion 5FU chemotherapy (300mg/m 2 ) 5 days per week. The boost was given during the last week of therapy with a 6-hour inter-fraction interval to the tumor plus a 2-3 cm margin. The boost dose equaled 7.5 Gy/5 fractions (1.5 Gy/fraction); a total dose of 52.5 Gy/5 weeks was given to the primary tumor. Pretreatment tumor stage, determined by endorectal ultrasound and CT scan, included 29 with T3N0 [64%], 11 T3N1, 1 T3Nx, 2 T4N0, 1 T4N3, and 1 with TxN1 disease. Mean distance from the anal verge was 5 cm (range 0-13 cm). Median age was 55 years (range 33-77 years). The population consisted of 34 males and 11 females. Median time of follow-up is 8 months (range 1-24 months). Results: Sphincter preservation (SP) has been accomplished in 33 of 42 (79%) patients resected to date. Three patients did not undergo resection because of the development of metastatic disease in the interim between the completion of chemoradiation (CTX/XRT) and preoperative evaluation. The surgical procedures included proctectomy and coloanal anastomosis (n = 16), low anterior resection (n = 13), transanal resection (n = 4). Tumor down-staging was pathologically confirmed in 36 of the 42 (86%) resected patients, and 13 (31%) achieved a pathologic CR. Among the 28 tumors (67%) located <6 cm from the anal verge, SP was accomplished in 21 cases (75%). Although perioperative morbidity was higher, toxicity rates during CTX/XRT were comparable to that seen with conventional fractionation. Compared to our contemporary experience with conventional CTX/XRT (45Gy; 1.8 Gy per

  9. Neoadjuvant Treatment With Single-Agent Cetuximab Followed by 5-FU, Cetuximab, and Pelvic Radiotherapy: A Phase II Study in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Federica; Chiara, Silvana; Bengala, Carmelo; Antognoni, Paolo; Dealis, Cristina; Zironi, Sandra; Malavasi, Norma; Scolaro, Tindaro; Depenni, Roberta; Jovic, Gordana; Sonaglio, Claudia; Rossi, Aldo; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery represents the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Cetuximab has proved activity in advanced colorectal cancer, and its incorporation in preoperative treatment may increase tumor downstaging. Methods and Materials: After biopsy and staging, uT3/uT4 N0/+ LARC received single-agent cetuximab in three doses, followed by weekly cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), concomitantly with RT. Sample size was calculated according to Bryant and Day test, a two-stage design with at least 10 pathologic complete remissions observed in 60 patients (pts) able to complete the treatment plan. Results: Forty pts with LARC were entered: male/female = 34/6; median age: 61 (range, 28-77); 12 uT3N0 Ed(30%); 25 uT3N1 (62%); 3 uT4N1 (8%); all Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group = 0. Thirty-five pts completed neoadjuvant treatment; 5 (12%) withdrew therapy after one cetuximab administration: three for hypersensitivity reactions, one for rapid progression, and one for purulent arthritis. They continued 5-FU in continuous infusion in association with RT. Thirty-one pts (77%) presented with acnelike rash; dose reduction/interruption of treatment was necessary in six pts (15%): two for Grade 3 acnelike rash, two for Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity, and two for refusal. Thirty-eight pts were evaluable for pathological response (one patient refused surgery, and one was progressed during neoadjuvant treatment). Pathological staging was: pT0N0 three pts (8%), pT1N0 1 pt (3%); pT2N0 13 pts (34%), and pT3 19 pts (50%) (N0:9, N1:5; N2:5); pT4 2 pts (5%). Conclusions: Preoperative treatment with 5-FU, cetuximab, and pelvic RT is feasible with acceptable toxicities; however, the rate of pathologic responses is disappointingly low

  10. Downstage migration after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Liersch, Torsten; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Sauer, Rolf; Wittekind, Christian; Rödel, Claus

    2015-06-01

    Downstaging after neoadjuvant treatment is increasingly used as a prognostic factor and surrogate endpoint in clinical trials. However, in recent trials of neoadjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, downstaging did not translate into a benefit with regard to either disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival. By analyzing the 10-year outcome data of the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 phase 3 trial, the authors demonstrated that significantly fewer patients had poor prognostic features (eg, ypT3-4, ypN1-2) after preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy. Nevertheless, these patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage II disease were found to be at a higher risk of developing distant metastases and had poorer DFS compared with patients with corresponding TNM tumor (sub)groups in the postoperative treatment arm, whereas patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage III disease demonstrated a nonsignificant trend toward a worse outcome after preoperative treatment. Overall, DFS remained identical in both treatment arms. Thus, "downstage migration" after neoadjuvant treatment resembles the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon and therefore may not be a reliable endpoint for long-term outcomes. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. A multidisciplinary treatment strategy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, F.; Yanagi, Hidenori; Atono, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic effects and adverse events of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer in different radiation doses and fractions. A total of 142 consecutive patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 and/or cN1-2) adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated with preoperative CRT and were operated radically. 121 patients with resectable cT3 or N1-2 rectal adenocarcinoma were assigned to receive pelvic radiation with single fractions of 2.5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 25 Gy (Short CRT). Surgery was undergone within two weeks. 21 patients with clinical unresectable or marginally resectable cT4 rectal cancer were assigned to receive preoperative pelvic radiation therapy 45 to 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant therapy (Long CRT). We examined retrospectively the preoperative therapeutic effect and adverse event of Short CRT and Long CRT. Short CRT; Overall R0 resection rate was 98%. Anus preserving rate was 95%. pCR rate was 5%. Median follow-up was 62 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 94%. Overall survival for 5 years was 92%. Long neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT); Overall R0 resection rate was 90%. Anus preserving rate was 86%. pCR rate was 24%. Median follow-up was 60 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 88%. Overall survival rate for 5 years was 88%. Radiation related adverse event such as pelvic infection and skin trouble was significantly higher in the long CRT group. Local control in primarily resectable rectal cancer after short chemoradiation was excellent. Long chemoradiation for unresectable or marginal cT4 rectum cancer was higher response ratio, but induced more radiation related adverse event than short course CRT. (author)

  12. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...

  13. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill...... Europe. Variation ill the distribution of stage at diagnosis. initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum. diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were...

  14. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries...... in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included...

  15. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT) with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Patrice; Burtin, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Morel, Alain; Berger, Virginie; Gamelin, Erick; Leduc, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Vié, Brigitte; Chevelle, Christian; Vendrely, Véronique; Salemkour, Augustin; Carrie, Christian; Calais, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT) is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV) and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/ 2 /day), LV (75 mg/day), and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total) 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%). Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A) and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T). Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p < 0.001). The overall downstaging rate was 42% for primary tumors and 44% for lymph nodes. The pCR rate was 8%. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for staging was poor. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 55 patients (65%). Overall and recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86.1% and 66

  16. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high ...

  17. Rectal duplication with sciatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Kalińska-Lipert, Anita; Nachulewicz, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Rectal duplications represent 5% of all duplications in the alimentary tract, and they are very rarely diagnosed during the neonatal period. The authors present the method of investigation and the results of surgical treatment of a full-term neonate with a sciatic hernia containing a rectal duplication. The procedure started with three-port laparoscopy, but excision of the tubular duplication of the rectum was possible only by a transanal endorectal pull-through approach. The sciatic hernia was closed, and plastic sutures on the buttock finished the procedure. The coincidence of sciatic hernia with rectal duplication is extremely rare, and the method of treatment depends exclusively on the anatomical conditions.

  18. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m 2 /d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  19. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of 2 /d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m 2 weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m 2 /d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m 2 weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4–8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4–6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint—the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  20. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  1. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  2. Treatment of advanced rectal cancer after renal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Liu; Xiao-Bo Liang; Yao-Ping Li; Yi Feng; Dong-Bo Liu; Wen-Da Wang

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a standard procedure for end-stage renal disease today. Due to immunosuppressive drugs and increasing survival time after renal trans-plantation, patients with transplanted kidneys carry an increased risk of developing malignant tumors. In this case report, 3 patients with advanced rectal can-cer after renal transplantation for renal failure were treated with anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection plus total mesorectal excision, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient eventually died of metastasized cancer 31 mo after therapy, although his organ grafts functioned well until his death. The other 2 patients were well during the 8 and 21 mo follow-up periods after rectal resection. We therefore strongly argue that patients with advanced rectal cancer should receive standard oncology treatment, including opera-tion and adjuvant treatment after renal transplantation. Colorectal cancer screening in such patients appears justified.

  3. Late rectal sequelae following definitive radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a dosimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Halpern, Howard; Sweeney, Patrick; Sutton, Harold; Powers, Claire; Rotmensch, Jacob; Waggoner, Steve; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempted to correlate patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors with the risk of late rectal sequelae in patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with cervical carcinoma (67 Stage I, 93 Stage II, and 23 Stage III) treated with definitive RT with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were evaluated. Treatment consisted of external beam pelvic RT (EBRT) followed by intracavitary RT (ICRT) consisting of one or two insertions. Complications were scored and analyzed as a function of 25 patient and treatment factors. Conventional total rectal doses were obtained by adding together the EBRT and ICRT rectal doses. To account for differences in dose rate between the ICRT and EBRT, and variations in EBRT fractionation schemes, biologically equivalent rectal doses (BED) were calculated using a linear quadratic model. In addition, the influence of the varying proportions of EBRT and ICRT rectal doses were evaluated. Results: Twenty-eight patients (15.3%) developed late rectal sequelae (13 Grade 1, 3 Grade 2, and 12 Grade 3). Diabetes (p = 0.03), Point A dose (p = 0.04), and conventional EBRT dose (p = 0.03) were the most significant factors on multivariate analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a low risk (<10%) of late rectal sequelae below conventional and biological rectal doses of 75 Gy and 135 BED, respectively. The percentage of rectal dose delivered by the EBRT significantly influenced the dose-response relationship. A defined threshold percentage above which rectal sequelae were more common was identified over the range of doses evaluated. This threshold was 87% at a total rectal dose of 60 Gy and decreased to 60% at 80 Gy. Conclusion: Diabetes, Point A, and EBRT doses are the most significant factors associated with the risk of late rectal sequelae in patients treated with RT for cervical carcinoma. The percentage of rectal dose delivered by the EBRT significantly

  4. Iatrogenic Rectal Injury During Radical Prostatectomy: Is Colostomy Inevitable End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Topaktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Radical prostatectomy (RP is the gold standard treatment method for localized prostate cancer, because of its high oncological success. Iatrogenic rectal injury (IRI during RP is rarely seen, but it may causes serious complications because of the close anatomic relationship between the prostate and rectum. Aim is to present our series about management of IRI without colostomy. Material and Method: Between June 1999 and June 2013, radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP was performed to 372 patients by a single surgeon. 10 cases (%2,6 were complicated by a rectal injury during RRP. Instant rectal closure was performed in 3 layers without a diverting colostomy, at the time of surgery. Omental vascular flap was placed between rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. Results: The clinical stages of IRI cases were T1c, T2a and T2c in 2, 3 and 5 patients, respectively. Their preoperative Gleason scores were 6, 7 and 8 in 3, 5 and 2 patient, respectively. None of the 10 had undergone previous prostatic or rectal surgery, or received preoperative radiotherapy or hormonal therapy. Discussion: Instant diagnosis and rectal wall closures by three layers are essential for successful repair. Our technique seems as a safe, minimal invasive and highly effective option for the management of IRI.

  5. Intersphincteric Resection for Low Rectal Cancer – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russu Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment for low rectal cancer represents a challenge: to perform a radical resection and to preserve the sphincter’s function. We report a case of intersphincteric resection in a combined multimodality treatment for low rectal cancer, with good oncologic and functional outcome. Case presentation: We report a case of a 73 years old woman admitted in April 2014 in surgery, for low rectal cancer. The diagnostic was established by colonoscopy and malignancy confirmed by biopsy. Complete imaging was done using computed tomography and magnetic resonance to establish the exact stage of the disease. The interdisciplinary individualized treatment began with radiotherapy (total dose of 50 Gy, administered in 25 fractions followed by surgery after eight weeks. We performed intersphincteric rectal resection by a modified Schiessel technique. There were no postoperative complications and the oncologic and functional results were very good at one year follow up. Conclusions: Intersphincteric resection, in this selected case of low rectal cancer, represented an efficient surgical treatment, with good functional results and quality of life for the patient. A multidisciplinary team is an invaluable means of assessing and further managing the appropriate, tailored to the case, treatment in the aim of achieving best results.

  6. Increased reverse T3 concentration in patients with anorexia nerrosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowska, B.; Kaniewski, M.; Zgliczynski, S.

    1980-01-01

    In 20 female patients with anorexia nervosa, aging 16 - 26 years, the thyroid function was estimated by +- determining TSH secretion in response to TRH, and serum thyroxine (T 4 ), 3,5,3'L-triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and 3,3',5'L-triiodothyronine (reverse T 3 ) concentrations. 14 healthy women of the same age were included into the control group. If compared with control group, a marked supression of TRH stimulated TSH secretion and a lowering of serum T 3 concentration was found in patients with anorexia nervosa. On the other hand, serum reverse T 3 concentration was markedly higher in patients with anorexia nervosa than in control ones. Gain of body weight leads to normalization of thyroid hormones level in the serum. Obtained results show for peripheral mechanism of described hormonal disorders. (author)

  7. Phosphatidylcholine induces apoptosis of 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hailan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylcholine (PPC formulation is used for lipolytic injection, even though its mechanism of action is not well understood. Methods The viability of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells was measured after treatment of PPC alone, its vehicle sodium deoxycholate (SD, and a PPC formulation. Western blot analysis was performed to examine PPC-induced signaling pathways. Results PPC, SD, and PPC formulation significantly decreased 3T3-L1 cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. PPC alone was not cytotoxic to CCD-25Sk human fibroblasts at concentrations Conclusions PPC results in apoptosis of 3T3-L1 cells.

  8. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  9. Basic and clinical investigation of T3 immunoassay kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Junji; Nakajima, Akiko; Morita, Rikushi; Endo, Keigo; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    1976-01-01

    T 3 immunoassay kit was investigated basically and clinically. A good result was obtained at the prescribed incubation temperature and for 16 hours of incubation time. Moreover, it was thought to be possible that incubation time could be shortened to 1 - 4 hours at 37 0 C. Specificity of antibody was good. Recovery of added T 3 was 100+-5 (S.D.) % on an average and parallel of dilution curve of high T 3 serum was also good. Variation coefficient of accuracy of this kit was 1.5 - 2.1 % and that of reproducibility was 1.3 - 6.6 %. Mild hemolysis did not affect measurement value. Serum T 3 level in normals, untreated patients with Basedow's disease and patients with primary hypothyroidism was 142+-21 ng/100 ml, 452+-156 ng/100 ml and 67+-17 ng/100 ml, respectively. Serum T 3 level in patients with Hashimoto's disease was distributed to a wide extent, but that of patients with goiter and simple goiter ranged within normal range. On the other side, serum T 3 level of normal pregnant woman was high and that of patients with anorexia nervosa showed low level. From the above mentioned results, it was concluded that this kit was simple in method and good in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and it was also useful for clinical applications. (M. Tsunoda)

  10. Importance of Preoperative Rectal Ultrasound and CT in Rectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellyova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The reason of high mortality of colorectal carcinoma is above all the fact, that majority of diseases are detected in progressive stage. Radical change in this unfavorable mortality rate can be achieved only by targeted search for early stages of the disease. Early diagnostics consists in rectoscopy and colonoscopy. Regarding X-ray methods it is X-ray irigography. Regarding CT examinations it is CT irigography, virtual colonoscopy. Another examination can be USG examination of abdomen and endo sonographic examination of rectum. Materials and methods: In the period from June 2006 to December 2010, in 60 patients out of the total number 106 examined patients, tumorous affection of rectum CT examination of pelvis and abdomen separately or pelvisand abdomen at one session was made in 3186 patients. In 115 patients we discovered malign tumorous illness of colon. Metastatic affection in the form of distant metastases was proven n 63 patients. 403 patients had CT irigography examination. In 77 out of them we diagnosed colon carcinoma. CT colonoscopy did not discover in our group of 30 patients examined the presence of colon carcinoma. Results: In the group of 60 patients who were diagnosed rectal carcinoma, in 29 patients expansive infiltrative affection was evaluated in endorectal sonography, histologically confirmed in 28 patients - 96,5 %, expansive affection in 41 patients with histological verification in 100 %. With CT we diagnosed 52 expansive tumorous processes, histologically confirmed in 47 patients - 90,38 %. In 63 patients expansive infiltrative process was evaluated, histologically confirmed in 52 patients 82,53 %. In total of 115 examinations there was conformance with histological examination in 99 patients - 86,08 %. In CT irigography we diagnosed colon tumour in 77 patients. Expansive growth was evaluated in 40 patients, histologically confirmed in 37 patients - 92,5 %. Expansive infiltrative expansion was evaluated in 37 patients, with

  11. Rectal cancer in Luxembourg : a national population-based data report, 1988–1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiden, René; Sand, Julien; Weber, Joseph; Turk, Philippe; Wagener, Yolande; Capesius, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Morphologic criteria which might help to support the need for a preventive strategy for early detection of rectal cancer were analysed. Population-based data on rectal adenomas with high-grade dysplastic changes (n = 199) and invasive adenocarcinomas (n = 912) registered by the national Morphologic Tumour Registry (MTR) and diagnosed in a central department of pathology in Luxembourg between 1988 and 1998 were considered. The analysis concerned time trends in frequency, crude incidence, tumour-stage, the rectal 'high-grade' adenoma/invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio and the survival rates. Histopathological tumour-stage parameters (UICC/AJCC, 1997) in a consecutive series of 641 resected rectal cancers and their relationship with the observed patient survival are investigated. The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas are diagnosed at a late stage (i.e. Stage II and III) into contrast with the highly significant increase (355 %) in frequency of rectal high-grade adenomas (Stage 0). During the two-time periods 1988–1992 and 1994–1998 Stage I and Stage IV-cases decreased by 11 % and 47 % respectively. Tumour-stage correlates with prognosis. The rectal high-grade adenoma / invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio improved significantly over the last five years. Over the study period, there has been a highly significant rise in the incidence of resected rectal adenomas with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. The ratio of early tumours to invasive cancers has risen while the numbers of colonoscopies and rectoscopies remained unchanged respectively decreased. As the number of advanced tumour-stages remained stable, mass-screening procedures focusing on the fifty to sixty age group should be reinforced

  12. A Single Centre Retrospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic Rectal Resection with TME for Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Cancer-Specific Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Quarati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colon resection has established its role as a minimally invasive approach to colorectal diseases. Better long-term survival rate is suggested to be achievable with this approach in colon cancer patients, whereas some doubts were raised about its safety in rectal cancer. Here we report on our single centre experience of rectal laparoscopic resections for cancer focusing on short- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the last 13 years, 248 patients underwent minimally invasive approach for rectal cancer at our centre. We focused on 99 stage I, II, and III patients with a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Of them 43 had a middle and 56 lower rectal tumor. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection was performed in 71 patients whereas laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection in 28. The overall mortality rate was 1%; the overall morbidity rate was 29%. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 69.7%, The 5-year overall survival rate was 78.8%.

  13. Preoperative evaluation of the depth of anal canal invasion in very low rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging and surgical indications for intersphincteric resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yoshiko; Itabashi, Michio; Kameoka, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the depth of anal canal invasion (DACI), and determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of the conjoined longitudinal muscle (CLM) can be used to identify the surgical indication for intersphincteric resection. Sixty-six patients with T1 (n=2), T2 (n=20), T3 (n=39), and T4 (n=5) lower rectal cancer were included. Depth of anal canal invasion was defined as extension of the tumor to the anal canal. The outline of the CLM on MRI was assessed as clear, unclear, or absent (indicating invasion). A comparison of overall T-stage and DACI of 22 pT1-pT2 tumors revealed that none had a higher T-stage within the anal canal, and 16 of 39 pT3 tumors had only pT0-pT2 invasion within the anal canal. The CLM was clear in 30 cases of T0-T2 DACI, unclear in 5 cases of T0-T2 DACI, and 3 cases of T3-T4 DACI, and showed invasion in 3 cases of T2 DACI and 25 cases of T3-T4 DACI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of using a clear CLM outline for determining T0-T2 DACI was 78.9, 91.9, 100, and 77.8%, respectively. Preoperative evaluation of DACI was compatible with the surgical indications. A clear CLM accurately indicates T0-T2 DACI. (author)

  14. Early rectal stenosis following stapled rectal mucosectomy for hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Anja

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last years, stapled rectal mucosectomy (SRM has become a widely accepted procedure for second and third degree hemorrhoids. One of the delayed complications is a stenosis of the lower rectum. In order to evaluate the specific problem of rectal stenosis following SRM we reviewed our data with special respect to potential predictive factors or stenotic events. Methods A retrospective analysis of 419 consecutive patients, which underwent SRM from December 1998 to August 2003 was performed. Only patients with at least one follow-up check were evaluated, thus the analysis includes 289 patients with a mean follow-up of 281 days (±18 days. For statistic analysis the groups with and without stenosis were evaluated using the Chi-Square Test, using the Kaplan-Meier statistic the actuarial incidence for rectal stenosis was plotted. Results Rectal stenosis was observed in 9 patients (3.1%, eight of these stenoses were detected within the first 100 days after surgery; the median time to stenosis was 95 days. Only one patient had a rectal stenosis after more than one year. 8 of the 9 patients had no obstructive symptoms, however the remaining patients complained of obstructive defecation and underwent surgery for transanal strictureplasty with electrocautery. A statistical analysis revealed that patients with stenosis had significantly more often prior treatment for hemorrhoids (p Conclusion Rectal stenosis is an uncommon event after SRM. Early stenosis will occur within the first three months after surgery. The majority of the stenoses are without clinical relevance. Only one of nine patients had to undergo surgery for a relevant stenosis. The predictive factor for stenosis in the patient-characteristics is previous interventions for hemorrhoids, severe postoperative pain might also predict rectal stenosis.

  15. Mediator subunit MED1 is a T3-dependent and T3-independent coactivator on the thyrotropin β gene promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Keiji; Oda, Kasumi; Mizuta, Shumpei; Ishino, Ruri; Urahama, Norinaga; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •MED1 is a bona fide T3-dependent coactivator on TSHB promoter. •Mice with LxxLL-mutant MED1 have attenuated TSHβ mRNA and thyroid hormone levels. •MED1 activates TSHB promoter T3-dependently in cultured cells. •T3-dependent MED1 action is enhanced when SRC1/SRC2 or HDAC2 is downregulated. •MED1 is also a T3-independent GATA2/Pit1 coactivator on TSHB promoter. -- Abstract: The MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex is a nuclear receptor-specific coactivator. A negative feedback mechanism of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, or thyrotropin) expression in the thyrotroph in the presence of triiodothyronine (T3) is employed by liganded thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) on the TSHβ gene promoter, where conventional histone-modifying coactivators act as corepressors. We now provide evidence that MED1 is a ligand-dependent positive cofactor on this promoter. TSHβ gene transcription was attenuated in MED1 mutant mice in which the nuclear receptor-binding ability of MED1 was specifically disrupted. MED1 stimulated GATA2- and Pit1-mediated TSHβ gene promoter activity in a ligand-independent manner in cultured cells. MED1 also stimulated transcription from the TSHβ gene promoter in a T3-dependent manner. The transcription was further enhanced when the T3-dependent corepressors SRC1, SRC2, and HDAC2 were downregulated. Hence, MED1 is a T3-dependent and -independent coactivator on the TSHβ gene promoter.

  16. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Rödel, Claus; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Boelens, Petra G.; Aristei, Cynthia; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  17. Germline polymorphisms may act as predictors of response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced T3 rectal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Nielsen, Jens N; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by total mesorectal excision eight weeks after treatment. Pathologic response was evaluated according to the tumor regression grade system. RESULTS: Thirty percent (18/60) of patients presented with complete pathologic response. Patients with thymidylate synthase genotype 2/2 had a significantly...

  18. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  20. Association of rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters in treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Prokopios-Davos, Savina; Topulos, George P.; Wishnow, Kenneth; Manola, Judith; Bornstein, Bruce A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although hyperthermia has been used for more than two decades in the treatment of pelvic tumors, little is known about the potential impact of heat on rectal toxicity when combined with other treatment modalities. Because rectal toxicity is a concern with radiation and may be exacerbated by hyperthermia, definition of the association of thermal dose parameters with rectal toxicity is important. In this report, we correlate rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters for patients treated with hyperthermia and radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T2b-T3b disease (1992 American Joint Committee On Cancer criteria) enrolled in a Phase II study of external beam radiation ± androgen-suppressive therapy with two transrectal ultrasound hyperthermia treatments were assessed for rectal toxicity. Prostatic and anterior rectal wall temperatures were monitored for all treatments. Rectal wall temperatures were limited to 40 deg. C in 19 patients, 41 deg. C in 3 patients, and 42 deg. C in 8 patients. Logistic regression was used to estimate the log hazard of developing National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 toxicity based on temperature parameters. The following were calculated: hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals, p values for statistical significance of each parameter, and proportion of variability explained for each parameter. Results: Gastrointestinal toxicity was limited to Grade 2. The rate of acute Grade 2 proctitis was greater for patients with an allowable rectal wall temperature of >40 deg. C. In this group, 7 of 11 patients experienced acute Grade 2 proctitis, as opposed to 3 of 19 patients in the group with rectal wall temperatures limited to 40 deg. C (p=0.004). Preliminary assessment of long-term toxicity revealed no differences in toxicity. Hazard ratios for acute Grade 2 proctitis for allowable rectal wall temperature, average rectal wall Tmax, and average prostate Tmax were 9.33 (p=0.01), 3

  1. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  2. Immunohistochemical findings in rectal duplication mimicking rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, M G; Pucci, A; Macchieraldo, R; Sacco Casamassima, M G; Canavese, F

    2008-08-01

    Alimentary tract duplications represent rare anomalies, with only 5 % occurring in the rectum. The variety in clinical presentation may lead to a delay in diagnosis or to incorrect and multiple surgical procedures. We report the clinical, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a rectal duplication occurring in a 3-month-old male with an unusual clinical presentation. Using routine histology and immunohistochemistry, the rectal duplication showed the diffuse presence of gastric mucosa with a characteristic immunophenotype (i.e., diffuse cytokeratin 7 positivity and scattered chromogranin immunoreactivity). As far as we know, this is the first report showing an immunohistochemical differentiation pattern of gastric lining in a rectal duplication. Our results, showing the presence of gastric mucosa, are suggestive of a possible origin from the embryonic foregut.

  3. Late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer (I): multivariate analysis and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Cowen, Didier M.; Levegruen, Sabine; Burman, Chandra M.; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the outcome of a dose escalation protocol for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer to study the dose-response for late rectal toxicity and to identify anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal bleeding in multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Seven hundred forty-three patients with T1c-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 64.8 to 81.0 Gy. The 5-year actuarial rate of late rectal toxicity was assessed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. A retrospective dosimetric analysis was performed for patients treated to 70.2 Gy (52 patients) or 75.6 Gy (119 patients) who either exhibited late rectal bleeding (RTOG Grade 2/3) within 30 months after treatment (i.e., 70.2 Gy--13 patients, 75.6 Gy--36 patients) or were nonbleeding for at least 30 months (i.e., 70.2 Gy--39 patients, 75.6 Gy--83 patients). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to correlate late rectal bleeding with several anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical variables. Results: A dose response for ≥ Grade 2 late rectal toxicity was observed. By multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with ≥ Grade 2 late rectal bleeding for patients prescribed 70.2 Gy: 1) enclosure of the outer rectal contour by the 50% isodose on the isocenter slice (i.e., Iso50) (p max (p max

  4. Rectal ulcer in a patient with VZV sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tokushige, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Hideo; Igeta, Yukifusa; Hashida, Hideji

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 55-year-old woman with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome) who presented with herpes zoster in the left S2 dermatome area, urinary retention, and constipation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the left sacral nerve root swelling with enhancement. Thereafter, she suddenly showed massive hematochezia and hemorrhagic shock because of a rectal ulcer. To elucidate the relation between Elsberg syndrome and rectal ulcer, accumulation of similar cases is necessary. To avoid severe complications, attention must be devoted to the possibility of rectal bleeding in the early stage of Elsberg syndrome.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  6. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Yeon; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Beon Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Oh, Yu Whan

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  7. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  8. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals....... on the implementation of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 1043 patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours, and in 1991 patients with pN+ M0 tumours. RESULTS: Hospital volume, i.e. the number of rectal cancer surgical procedures performed per year, was the major predictor for MDT evaluation. Patients treated...... at hospitals with

  9. Results in the elderly with locally advanced rectal cancer from the ACCOR12/PRODIGE 2 phase III trial: Tolerance and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    François, Eric; Azria, David; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Jarlier, Marta; Martel-Laffay, Isabelle; Hennequin, Christophe; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Vendrely, Véronique; Seitz, Jean-François; Conroy, Thierry; Juzyna, Beata; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer predominantly affects the elderly. Unfortunately, this age category is under-represented in clinical trials because clinicians are loath to include patients with a high risk of comorbidity. Patients and methods: An exploratory analysis of the ACCORD12/PRODIGE 2 phase III trial was carried out to retrospectively compare the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy between the elderly (⩾70 years; n = 142) and younger patients (<70 years; n = 442), this analysis was not preplanned in the study protocol. Patients with histologically confirmed resectable stage T3 or T4 rectal adenocarcinoma were eligible with an age limit of 80 years. Results: Overall, the two age categories did not statistically differ in terms of patient’s clinical and tumor baseline characteristics. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy leads to more severe grade 3/4 toxicities (25.6% vs. 15.8%, p = 0.01) and more permanent stomas (33.3% vs. 22.8%, p = 0.014) in elderly patients who were less often operated on than younger patients (95.8% vs. 99.0%, p = 0.008). The relative number of interventions per surgery type (p = 0.18), treatment efficacy in terms of R0 resection rate (88.6% vs. 90.6%; p = 0.54) and complete pathological response (14.7% vs. 16.9%; p = 0.55) were nearly identical between the two categories. Conclusion: Altogether these results warrant the development of specific optimal therapeutic strategies for the elderly

  10. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, Vaneja; Omejc, Mirko; Ocvirk, Janja; Music, Maja; Bracko, Matej; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Edhemovic, Ibrahim; Brecelj, Erik; Kropivnik, Mateja

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower

  11. Chronophysiological modifications of the triiodothyronine's peripheral metabolism(T3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomas; Degrossi, O.J.; Altschuler, Noe; Garcia del Rio, Hernan

    1984-01-01

    An interesting aspect relative to the thyroid function consists in determining the variations produced by the age. Though this relation has been referred to T 4 related with age, there are no differences about T 3 kinetics. For this purpose, different parameters were studied in 68 euthyroid controls of both sexs, in good nutritional state and normal activity, whose ages oscillate between 6 and 83 years old. A kinetic study method of single i.v. T 3 -I 125 injection was used, employing 0,5 μCi/Kg of body weight with maximum activity of 10 μCi to 10 years old; 15 μCi to 15 years old and 30 μCi above this age. Determinations of T 4 , T 3 and TSH serum by radioimmunoassay were carried out. From these studies, the following conclusions were obtained: T 4 and TSH are within the normal values, while a decrease of T 3 related with age was observed. Parallely to said decrease, a prolongation of plasmatic half time and a decrease of the daily value production, which is expressed statistically by a double exponential function are appreciated. The first one, which is of fast slope, corresponds to subjects below 10 years old and the second one, which is slower, starts from that age to the seventh decade of life. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. Prognostic stratification of patients with T3N1M0 non-small cell lung cancer: which phase should it be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicgun, Ali; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Turna, Akif; Metin, Muzaffer; Sayar, Adnan; Solak, Okan; Urer, Nur; Gurses, Atilla

    2012-06-01

    In the 1997 revision of the TNM staging system for lung cancer, patients with T3N0M0 disease were moved from stage IIIA to stage IIB since these patients have a better prognosis. Despite this modification, the local lymph node metastasis remained the most important prognostic factor in patients with lung cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the prognosis of patients with T3N1 disease as compared with that of patients with stages IIIA and IIB disease. During 7-year period, 313 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (297 men, 16 women) who had resection were enrolled. The patients were staged according the 2007 revision of Lung Cancer Staging by American Joint Committee on Cancer. The Kaplan-Meier statistics was used for survival analysis, and comparisons were made using Cox proportional hazard method. The 5-year survival of patients with stage IIIA disease excluding T3N1 patients was 40%, whereas the survival of the patients with stage IIB disease was 66% at 5 years. The 5-year survival rates of stage III T3N1 patients (single-station N1) was found to be higher than those of patients with stage IIIA disease (excluding pT3N1 patients, P = 0.04), while those were found to be similar with those of patients with stage IIB disease (P = 0.4). Survival of the present cohort of patients with T3N1M0 disease represented the survival of IIB disease rather than IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Further studies are needed to suggest further revisions in the recent staging system regarding T3N1MO disease.

  13. Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buttock swelling from a perineal hernia through a levator ani defect has been reported previously [12]. There have also been similar presentations due to rupture of rectal diverticular duplications [6]. Apart from the embryological causes, rectal perforation has been also reported because of rectal thermometers or probes and ...

  14. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  15. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét; Martling, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer

  16. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét, E-mail: margret.sturludottir@karolinska.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Martling, Anna, E-mail: anna.martling@ki.se [Center of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Carlsson, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.carlsson@ki.se [Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart, E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer.

  17. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  18. Rectal bleeding and its management after irradiation for cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Mi Son; Kang, Seung Hee; Kil, Hoon Jong; Oh, Young Taek; Sohn, Jeong Hye; Ryu, Hee Suk; Lee, Kwang Jae; Jung, Hye Young

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the main treatment modality for uterine cervix cancer. Since the rectum is in the radiation target volume, rectal bleeding is a common late side effect. The study evaluates the risk factors of radiation induced rectal bleeding and discusses its optimal management. A total of 213 patients who completed external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiation (ICR) between September 1994 and December 1999 were included in this study. No patient had undergone concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Ninety patients received radiotherapy according to a modified hyperfractionated schedule. A midline block was placed at a pelvic dose of between 30.6 Gy to 39.6 Gy. The total parametrial dose from the EBRT was 51 to 59 Gy depending on the extent of their disease. The point A dose from the HDR brachytherapy was 28 Gy to 30 Gy (4 Gy x 7, or 5 Gy x 6). The rectal point dose was calculated either by the ICRU 38 guideline, or by anterior rectal wall point seen on radiographs, with barium contrast. Rectal bleeding was scored by the LENT/SOMA criteria. For the management of rectal bleeding, we opted for observation, sucralfate enema or coagulation based on the frequency or amount of bleeding. The median follow-up period was 39 months (12 ∼ 86 months). The incidence of rectal bleeding was 12.7% (27/213); graded as 1 in 9 patients, grade 2 in 16 and grade 3 in 2. The overall moderate and severe rectal complication rate was 8.5%. Most complications (92.6%) developed within 2 years following completion of radiotherapy (median 16 months). No patient progressed to rectal fistula or obstruction during the follow-up period. In the univariate analysis, three factors correlated with a high incidence of bleeding: an icruCRBED greater than 100 Gy (19.7% vs. 4.2%), an EBRT dose to the parametrium over 55 Gy (22.1% vs. 5.1%) and higher stages of III and IV (31.8% vs. 10.5%). In the multivariate analysis, the icruCRBED was the only significant factor (ρ > 0.0432). The total

  19. Rectal complications associated with transperineal interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: As transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) grows in acceptance as an option in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer, its associated toxicities are being defined. This clinical report documents rectal toxicity from a large cohort of men treated by a single practitioner for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Eight hundred twenty-five men were treated from September 1992 to September 1998 with TIPPB. One hundred-forty were treated in conjunction with external beam irradiation (EBRT) and 685 with TIPPB alone. All patients were implanted under real-time ultrasound guidance. No dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for this study. All patients were followed at 5 weeks after the procedure, then every 3-6 months thereafter. Rectal morbidity was graded by a modified RTOG toxicity scale. Therapy to control symptoms was recommended on an individual basis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort is 48 months. A total of 77 patients (9.4%) reported Grade 1 toxicity at some time following an implant whereas 54 patients (6.6%) reported Grade 2 toxicity. The peak post-TIPPB time for experiencing rectal toxicity was 8 months at which time Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 9.5% of the patients. This improved over the subsequent months and resolved in all patients by 3((1)/(2)) years. Four patients (0.5%) reported Grade 3 rectal toxicity with rectal ulceration identified on colonoscopy at 1 year from implant. Two of the four patients had colonic manipulation in the radiated portion of the colon which subsequently caused it to bleed. None of the patients required blood product transfusion. In 3 of the 4 patients the Grade 3 rectal toxicity has resolved spontaneously and 1 patient continues to heal at the time of this report. No patient required hospitalization or surgical intervention. Conclusion: TIPPB is a tolerable and acceptable treatment option when used alone in early-stage, organ

  20. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun-Gi [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  1. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Using Concurrent S-1 and Irinotecan in Rectal Cancer: Impact on Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Keishi; Sato, Takeo; Ema, Akira; Naito, Masanori; Watanabe, Masahiko, E-mail: midoris@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes of patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT) with concurrent S-1 and irinotecan (S-1/irinotecan) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 115 patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (45 Gy) plus concurrent oral S-1/irinotecan. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results: Grade 3 adverse effects occurred in 7 patients (6%), and the completion rate of NCRT was 87%. All 115 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients (24%) had a pathological complete response (ypCR). At 60 months, the local recurrence-free survival was 93%, disease-free survival (DFS) was 79%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. On multivariate analysis with a proportional hazards model, ypN2 was the only independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=.0019) and OS (P=.0064) in the study group as a whole. Multivariate analysis was additionally performed for the subgroup of 106 patients with ypN0/1 disease, who had a DFS rate of 85.3%. Both ypT (P=.0065) and tumor location (P=.003) were independent predictors of DFS. A combination of these factors was very strongly related to high risk of recurrence (P<.0001), which occurred most commonly in the lung. Conclusions: NCRT with concurrent S-1/irinotecan produced high response rates and excellent long-term survival, with acceptable adverse effects in patients with rectal cancer. ypN2 is a strong predictor of dismal outcomes, and a combination of ypT and tumor location can identify high-risk patients among those with ypN0/1 disease.

  2. Effectiveness of rectal misoprostol in cessation of Post Partum Haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreen, S.; Baqai, S.; Iftikhar, S.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of rectal misoprostol in management of Post Partum Haemorrhage in third stage of labour. Study Design: Interventional study. Place and Duration of Study: Gynaecology and obstetrics department at PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi, from Sep 2012 to Mar 2013. Material and Methods: All singleton and multiple pregnancies of gestation 37-42 weeks, who presented in labour room to deliver and had prolonged second stage of labour (n=112) were enrolled in the study. Patients, who were having coagulopathy, abruption, placenta previa, and allergy to prostaglandins were excluded from the study. Third stage was managed actively according to hospital standard routine. Hemoglobin was measured at the time of admission and repeated after delivery in patients having PPH. Blood was estimated by weighing all gauzes and packs. If blood loss more than 500ml one hour after delivery and all traumatic causes and retained placenta were excluded, 600 mu g (3 tablets) of misoprostol were given per rectally, which were inserted up to a digit depth. After one hour total amount of blood loss was calculated. The data were then entered in a proforma and analyzed. Results: Majority (44.6%) of the women were 26-33 years of age, 8.9% had PPH with fall in hemoglobin by 1.5-2 gms/dl. Ninety percent of the patients responded to rectal misoprostol. Conclusion: Active management of third stage of labour has a definite role in the preventive of PPH. Rectal administration of misoprostol should be considered for control of PPH in low resource settings like ours as it was found effective in the study. (author)

  3. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1992-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.)

  4. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J. (Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1992-09-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.).

  5. Rectal neoplasms. Postoperative follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galano Urgelles, Rolando; Rodriguez Fernandez, Zenen; Casaus Prieto, Arbelio

    1997-01-01

    A study of 31 patients operated on for rectal neoplasms between September, 1989 and September, 1995 in SantiAug de Cuba was performed. Patients Webre followed-up during this period for the purpose of the study. There was a frank predominance of males and ages between 45 and 64, of the stage II and the groups BI and BII according to Dukes' classification. Most patients received 5-fluoracil, without tumor relapses. The current survival rate of the series was 76 % at the end of the investigation. It is recommended that all patients operated on for this segment be followed-up after the operation; to continue with cytostatic treatment using 5-fluoracil, and to emphasize the importance of the use of tumor markers during the follow-up, in addition to transrectal ultrasound, as well as to make an early diagnosis through mass screening methods

  6. rectal temp sajsm ver 5

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impo

    temperature, heart rate (HR), and altitude during road and cycle racing. This technology has the potential to ... tion to rectal temperature, the logging time decreases in direct proportion to the time interval between heart ... with metabolic rate and course terrain, the former normally being a function of the latter. In addition ...

  7. Rectal duplication: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, K; Masereel, B; Geyskens, P

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplications are uncommon congenital abnormalities, that may occur anywhere along the alimentary tract. Most frequently they occur at the level of the small bowel tract and are symptomatic before the age of two. In our case we report the history of a 68-years old women with a colon duplication, especially a rectal duplication. This is very exceptional.

  8. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  9. Rectal Prolapse in An Emu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    was presented at the surgery clinic of the. INTRODUCTION. Rectal prolapsed is the protrusion of all layers of the rectum through the anal orifice as an elongated cylindrical mass. (Aronson 2003). It usually occurs in patients secondary to tenesmus from urogenital or anorectal disease. It has been reported in small animals ...

  10. Operation and maintenance of the T-3 cask system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussey, M.W.; Berger, J.D.; Peterson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The T-3 cask system consists of three lead-shielded casks and the associated payload containers, internal fixturing, tiedowns, transportation trailers and handling devices. The three casks were designed to meet the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission cask licensing activities for original design and for licensing revisions have required significant analytical support. Commercial transportation contractors can provide needed services including provisions of suitable equipment, compliances with security requirements, and safe movement of the shipment at a potential savings over DOE-owned transportation systems. Proper periodic inspection/maintenance activities supported by adequate decontamination facilities are a must in keeping the T-3 casks available for service

  11. Characterization of 2024-T3: An aerospace aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Zainul; Taib, Nur Iskandar; Zaharinie, Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The 2024-T3 aerospace aluminum alloy, reported in this investigation, was acquired from a local aerospace industry: Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF). The heat treatable 2024-T3 aluminum alloy has been characterized by use of modern metallographic and material characterization techniques (e.g. EPMA, SEM). The microstructural characterization of the metallographic specimen involved use of an optical microscope linked with a computerized imaging system using MSQ software. The use of EPMA and electron microprobe elemental maps enabled us to detect three types of inclusions: Al-Cu, Al-Cu-Fe-Mn, and Al-Cu-Fe-Si-Mn enriched regions. In particular, the presence of Al 2 CuMg (S-phase) and the CuAl 2 (θ') phases indicated precipitation strengthening in the aluminum alloy

  12. Characterization of 2024-T3: An aerospace aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huda, Zainul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: drzainulhuda@hotmail.com; Taib, Nur Iskandar [Department of Geology, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: ntaib@alumni.indiana.edu; Zaharinie, Tuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: rinie_3483@hotmail.com

    2009-02-15

    The 2024-T3 aerospace aluminum alloy, reported in this investigation, was acquired from a local aerospace industry: Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF). The heat treatable 2024-T3 aluminum alloy has been characterized by use of modern metallographic and material characterization techniques (e.g. EPMA, SEM). The microstructural characterization of the metallographic specimen involved use of an optical microscope linked with a computerized imaging system using MSQ software. The use of EPMA and electron microprobe elemental maps enabled us to detect three types of inclusions: Al-Cu, Al-Cu-Fe-Mn, and Al-Cu-Fe-Si-Mn enriched regions. In particular, the presence of Al{sub 2}CuMg (S-phase) and the CuAl{sub 2} ({theta}') phases indicated precipitation strengthening in the aluminum alloy.

  13. Phenomenology of the Gowdy Universe on $T^3 \\times R$

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Beverly K.; Garfinkle, David

    1997-01-01

    Numerical studies of the plane symmetric, vacuum Gowdy universe on $T^3 \\times R$ yield strong support for the conjectured asymptotically velocity term dominated (AVTD) behavior of its evolution toward the singularity except, perhaps, at isolated spatial points. A generic solution is characterized by spiky features and apparent ``discontinuities'' in the wave amplitudes. It is shown that the nonlinear terms in the wave equations drive the system generically to the ``small velocity'' AVTD regi...

  14. Risk Factors Associated With Circumferential Resection Margin Positivity in Rectal Cancer: A Binational Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Satish K; Kong, Joseph Cherng; Guerra, Glen R; Chittleborough, Timothy J; Naik, Arun; Ramsay, Robert G; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2018-04-01

    Rectal cancer outcomes have improved with the adoption of a multidisciplinary model of care. However, there is a spectrum of quality when viewed from a national perspective, as highlighted by the Consortium for Optimizing the Treatment of Rectal Cancer data on rectal cancer care in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess and identify predictors of circumferential resection margin involvement for rectal cancer across Australasia. A retrospective study from a prospectively maintained binational colorectal cancer database was interrogated. This study is based on a binational colorectal cancer audit database. Clinical information on all consecutive resected rectal cancer cases recorded in the registry from 2007 to 2016 was retrieved, collated, and analyzed. The primary outcome measure was positive circumferential resection margin, measured as a resection margin ≤1 mm. A total of 3367 patients were included, with 261 (7.5%) having a positive circumferential resection margin. After adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, hierarchical logistic regression analysis identified a 6-variable model encompassing the independent predictors, including urgent operation, abdominoperineal resection, open technique, low rectal cancer, T3 to T4, and N1 to N2. The accuracy of the model was 92.3%, with an receiver operating characteristic of 0.783 (p risk associated with circumferential resection margin positivity ranged from risk factors) to 43% (6 risk factors). This study was limited by the lack of recorded long-term outcomes associated with circumferential resection margin positivity. The rate of circumferential resection margin involvement in patients undergoing rectal cancer resection in Australasia is low and is influenced by a number of factors. Risk stratification of outcome is important with the increasing demand for publicly accessible quality data. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A512.

  15. Survival of T4aN0 and T3N+ laryngeal cancer patients: a retrospective institutional study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoueir, Nadim; Matar, Nayla; Farah, Chadi; Francis, Evana; Tabchy, Bassam; Haddad, Amine

    2015-01-01

    We aim to assess the correlation of tumor and nodal staging to survival in pT3N+ and T4aN0 laryngeal cancer with subgroup analysis within stage IVa (pT4N0 and pT3N2). Retrospective cohort study with systematic review of the literature. Hotel Dieu de France University Hospital (tertiary referral center). Laryngeal cancer patients' registries were reviewed from 1998 to 2012 selecting pT3N+ and pT4aN0 patients treated by primary total layngectomy. Overall survivals were compared using Log rank and Kaplan-Meier analysis. A systematic review was performed by 2 reviewers including all the articles reporting the outcome of these categories of patients. Online databases, including PubMed and EMBASE, were used. Reference sections of identified studies were examined for additional articles. Thirteen T3N+ patients and 19 T4aN0 patients treated by primary total laryngectomy were included. Five-year overall survival for T3N+, T3N2 and T4aN0 was respectively 33%, 32.1% and 73.7%. Due to the small sample, the difference was not significant. The systematic review revealed three articles reporting overall survival outcome for the T4N0 group and 6 articles for the T3N+. At 5years, the survival ranged from 62.5% to 73% in T4N0 and from 32.2% to 77% in T3N+. In advanced stage laryngeal cancer, T4aN0 tends toward a better survival than T3N+ especially when compared to T3N2 although they are grouped in the same TNM stage IVa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase I trial of cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, and radiotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Horisberger, Karoline; Woernle, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Kaehler, Georg; Dinter, Dietmar; Grobholz, Rainer; Heeger, Steffen; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and efficacy of chemotherapy with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, cetuximab, and pelvic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with rectal cancer (clinical Stage uT3-T4 or N+) received a standard dosing regimen of cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and 250 mg/m 2 on Days 8, 15, 22, and 29) and escalating doses of irinotecan and capecitabine according to phase I methods: dose level I, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 on Days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and capecitabine 800 mg/m 2 on Days 1-38; dose level II, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 ; and dose level III, irinotecan 50 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 . Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy). Resection was scheduled 4-5 weeks after termination of chemoradiotherapy. Results: On dose level I, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred; however, Grade 3 diarrhea affected 1 of 6 patients on dose level II. Of 5 patients treated at dose level III, 2 exhibited dose-limiting toxicity (diarrhea in 2 and nausea/vomiting in 1). Therefore, dose level II was determined as the recommended dose for future studies. A total of 10 patients were treated on dose level II and received a mean relative dose intensity of 100% of cetuximab, 94% of irinotecan, and 95% of capecitabine. All patients underwent surgery. Five patients had a pathologically complete remission and six had microfoci of residual tumor only. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with cetuximab, capecitabine, and weekly irinotecan is feasible and well tolerated. The preliminary efficacy is very promising. Larger phase II trials are ongoing

  17. The preoperative reaction and decision-making process regarding colostomy surgery among Chinese rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-E; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Zheng, Mei-Chun

    2017-06-01

    Patients with rectal cancer have issues in adjusting to their permanent colostomy after surgery, and support is required to help them resume normal life. However, few studies have explored the experience and factors that affect a patient's decision-making and maladjustment prior to colostomy surgery. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of rectal cancer patients who have to undergo colostomy surgery. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. We studied a purposive sample of 18 patients who had received a diagnosis of primary rectal cancer and were expecting permanent colostomy surgery. The thematic analysis approach was used to analyze the data collected using semi-structured, open-ended questions. The overriding theme that emerged was 'stoma dilemma: a hard decision-making process'. From this main theme, three themes were derived: the resistance stage, the hesitation stage, and the acquiescence stage. It is hard for preoperative rectal patients to choose to undergo stoma surgery or a sphincter-saving operation. From the initial stage of definitive diagnosis to the final consent to stoma surgery, most patients experience the resistance and hesitation stages before reaching the acquiescence stage. Arriving at a decision is a process that nurses can facilitate by eliminating unnecessary misunderstanding surrounding colostomy surgery and by fully respecting patients' right to choose at the various stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hötker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Düber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p ≤ 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM ≤ 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p ≤ 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  19. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  20. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  1. Nuclear fusion rate of the muonic T3 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The ground state binding energy, size and effective nuclear charge of the muonic T 3 molecule are calculated using Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. The system possesses two minimum positions, one at typically muonic and the second at the atomic distances. A symmetric planar vibrational model between two minima is assumed and the approximated potential are calculated. Moreover, nuclear fusion rate calculations of the short-life molecule is carried out due to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions

  2. Determination of triiodothyronine using RIA-Mat T3 kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Masao

    1975-01-01

    A RIA-Mat T 3 kit was used for an in vitro measurement of triiodothyronine in serum. A resin strip was utilized to absorb free triiodothyronine after the serum was incubated with antibody against triiodothyronine. This test was easy to manipulate and the reproducibility test with same sera, dilution test, and recovery test were also satisfactory. The normal range of triiodothyronine determined with this test kit was 119 +- 40 ng/dl using 50 test sera. Ninety sera with various thyroid diseases were also determined. (auth.)

  3. Diagnostic accuracy and prognostic impact of restaging by magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Soon Jin; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prognostic role of restaging rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with preoperative CRT has not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic role of radiological staging by rectal MRI after preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 231 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and radical resection from January 2008 to December 2009 were prospectively enrolled. The diagnostic accuracy and prognostic significance of post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was evaluated. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiological diagnosis of good responders (ypTNM stage 0–I) were 32%, 90%, 65%, and 69%, respectively. The overall accuracy of MRI restating for good responders was 68%. The 5-year disease-free survival rates of patients with radiological and pathological TNM stage 0, stage I, and stage II–III were 100%, 94%, and 76%, respectively (P = 0.037), and 97%, 87%, and 73%, respectively (P = 0.007). On multivariate analysis, post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusion: Radiological staging by MRI after preoperative CRT may be an independent predictor of survival in patients with rectal cancer

  4. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y. [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University School of Medicine, Matsuoka-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  7. Steady-State Serum T3 Concentrations for 48 Hours Following the Oral Administration of a Single Dose of 3,5,3'-Triiodothyronine Sulfate (T3S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ferruccio; Giannetti, Monica; Ricco, Ilaria; Querci, Giorgia; Saponati, Giorgio; Bokor, Daniela; Rivolta, Giovanni; Bussi, Simona; Braverman, Lewis E; Vitti, Paolo; Pinchera, Aldo

    2014-07-01

    Sulfate conjugation of thyroid hormones is an alternate metabolic pathway that facilitates the biliary and urinary excretion of iodothyronines and enhances their deiodination rate, leading to the generation of inactive metabolites. A desulfating pathway reverses this process, and thyromimetic effects have been observed following the parenteral administration of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) sulfate (T3S) in rats. The present study investigated whether T3S is absorbed after oral administration in humans and if it represents a source of T3. Twenty-eight hypothyroid patients (7 men and 21 women; mean age, 44 ± 11 years) who had a thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma were enrolled. Replacement thyroid hormone therapy was withdrawn (42 days for thyroxine, 14 days for T3) prior to 131I remnant ablation. A single oral dose of 20, 40, 80 (4 patients/group), or 160 μg (16 patients/group) of T3S was administered 3 days before the planned administration of 131I. Blood samples for serum T3S and total T3 (TT3) concentrations were obtained at various times up to 48 hours after T3S administration. At all T3S doses, serum T3S concentrations increased, reaching a peak at 2 to 4 hours and progressively returning to basal levels within 8 to 24 hours. The T3S maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the 0- to 48-hour concentration-time curve (AUC0-48h) were directly and significantly related to the administered dose. An increase in serum TT3 concentration was observed (significant after 1 hour), and the concentration increased further at 2 and 4 hours and then remained steady up to 48 hours after T3S administration. There was a significant direct correlation between the TT3 AUC0-48h and the administered dose of T3S. No changes in serum free thyroxine (T4) concentrations during the entire study period were observed, whereas serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels increased slightly at 48 hours, but this was not related to the dose of T3S. No adverse events were reported. (1) T3S is

  8. Aspartame downregulates 3T3-L1 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Park, Jeongeun; Kim, Eunjung

    2014-10-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. Since aspartame is 200 times sweeter than traditional sugar, it can give the same level of sweetness with less substance, which leads to lower-calorie food intake. There are reports that consumption of aspartame-containing products can help obese people lose weight. However, the potential role of aspartame in obesity is not clear. The present study investigated whether aspartame suppresses 3T3-L1 differentiation, by downregulating phosphorylated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (p-PPARγ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), which are critical for adipogenesis. The 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured and differentiated for 6 d in the absence and presence of 10 μg/ml of aspartame. Aspartame reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated adipocytes as evidenced by Oil Red O staining. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the PPARγ, FABP4, and C/EBPα mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the induction of p-PPARγ, PPARγ, SREBP1, and adipsin was markedly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that aspartame may be a potent substance to alter adipocyte differentiation and control obesity.

  9. Quantum effects in the Gowdy T3 cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, B.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Gowdy T 3 Cosmology is an exact solution to the vacuum Einstein equations interpreted to be a single polarization of gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic, spatially inhomogeneous background. The classical behavior is reviewed and related to standard cosmological parameters. Canonical quantization of the dynamical degrees of freedom is reviewed. An adiabatic vacuum state is constructed. Adiabatic regularization if used to obtain non-divergent stress-energy tensor vacuum expectation values. Casimir energy terms due to T 3 imposed discrete modes are evaluated. The vacuum expectation values are analyzed in early and late time limits and evaluated numerically. The regularized expectation value is used as a source for the classical background spacetime in the spirit of semi-classical gravity. An entirely vacuum expectation value source term produces essentially the time reverse of the classical evolution. Classical stress-energy added to the source restores the classical behavior at lates times only. The combined system collapses from infinite to small but non-zero volume and reexpands. The classical singularity is replaced by a symmetric bounce

  10. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Gruber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a benign disease that is often misdiagnosed. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, endoscopic findings and histology. Patients present with constipation, rectal bleeding, mucous discharge, pain and a sensation of incomplete defecation. There are many different manifestations of this disease, with or without rectal prolapse. We report an unusual presentation of SRUS as a circular stenosis in a middle-aged male.

  11. Anterior colorectal duplication presenting as rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Resendiz, Amador; Asz, Jose; Medina-Vega, F Antonio; Ortega-Salgado, J Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Duplications of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are rare. Only 5% of them are rectal and there are very few reports of rectal prolapse (RP) caused by a duplication. An 11 month-old female presented with a RP caused by a blind-ended anterior tubular colorectal duplication. The duplication was successfully opened and connected to the normal rectum without complications. Although infrequent, a rectal duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of RP.

  12. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  13. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modified methylene blue injection improves lymph node harvest in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpei; Huang, Pinjie; Zheng, Zongheng; Chen, Tufeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nodal metastases in rectal cancer plays an important role in accurate staging and prognosis, which depends on adequate lymph node harvest. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the feasibility and survival benefit of improving lymph node harvest by a modified method with methylene blue injection in rectal cancer specimens. One hundred and thirty-one patients with rectal cancer were randomly assigned to the control group in which lymph nodes were harvested by palpation and sight, or to the methylene blue group using a modified method of injection into the superior rectal artery with methylene blue. Analysis of clinicopathologic records, including a long-term follow-up, was performed. In the methylene blue group, 678 lymph nodes were harvested by simple palpation and sight. Methylene blue injection added 853 lymph nodes to the total harvest as well as 32 additional metastatic lymph nodes, causing a shift to node-positive stage in four patients. The average number of lymph nodes harvested was 11.7 ± 3.4 in the control group and 23.2 ± 4.7 in the methylene blue group, respectively. The harvest of small lymph nodes (rectal cancer, especially small node and metastatic node retrieval, which provided more accurate staging. However, it was not associated with overall survival. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  16. A second wave of Salmonella T3SS1 activity prolongs the lifespan of infected epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran E Finn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Type III secretion system 1 (T3SS1 is used by the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to establish infection in the gut. Effector proteins translocated by this system across the plasma membrane facilitate invasion of intestinal epithelial cells. One such effector, the inositol phosphatase SopB, contributes to invasion and mediates activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt. Following internalization, some bacteria escape from the Salmonella-containing vacuole into the cytosol and there is evidence suggesting that T3SS1 is expressed in this subpopulation. Here, we investigated the post-invasion role of T3SS1, using SopB as a model effector. In cultured epithelial cells, SopB-dependent Akt phosphorylation was observed at two distinct stages of infection: during and immediately after invasion, and later during peak cytosolic replication. Single cell analysis revealed that cytosolic Salmonella deliver SopB via T3SS1. Although intracellular replication was unaffected in a SopB deletion mutant, cells infected with ΔsopB demonstrated a lack of Akt phosphorylation, earlier time to death, and increased lysis. When SopB expression was induced specifically in cytosolic Salmonella, these effects were restored to levels observed in WT infected cells, indicating that the second wave of SopB protects this infected population against cell death via Akt activation. Thus, T3SS1 has two, temporally distinct roles during epithelial cell colonization. Additionally, we found that delivery of SopB by cytosolic bacteria was translocon-independent, in contrast to canonical effector translocation across eukaryotic membranes, which requires formation of a translocon pore. This mechanism was also observed for another T3SS1 effector, SipA. These findings reveal the functional and mechanistic adaptability of a T3SS that can be harnessed in different microenvironments.

  17. The development of T3-RIA, T4-RIA and TSH-IRMA for in vitro testing of thyroid function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borza, V.; Neacsu, G.; Chariton, Despina

    1998-01-01

    Thyroxine (T 4 ) and triiodothyronine (T 3 ) are two principal thyroid hormones; the release of this hormones and control of different stages of their synthesis are performed by thyrotropin (TSH), secreted by pituitary gland. Also, T 3 and T 4 exert negative feed-back on the pituitary, inhibiting the release of TSH. The measurement of T 3 , T 4 content in un-extracted serum, correlated with TSH values are useful results for investigating the pituitary-thyroid axis. This paper describes radioimmunological procedures for the measurement of T 3 and T 4 using as separation method of the bound and free radiolabeled antigen, the precipitation of antigen-antibody complex by polyethyleneglycol (PEG). Antisera against T 3 , T 4 were produced by immunizing sheep with conjugates of the hormones and bovine albumin; T 3 and T 4 standards were made in horse serum free of these hormones. Binding of T 3 and T 4 to TBG in serum was inhibited by addition of 8-aniline-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS). The separation of antigen-antibody complex was carried out using 25.5% PEG 6000. In order to develop a simple T 3 solid phase radioimmunoassay, in this paper the immobilization of anti-T 3 antibodies on polystyrene tubes is presented. The best results were obtained with an exposure time of anti-T 3 antibodies (diluted in buffer solution, pH 8.4-8.6) of 40 h at 4 o C. Also, in this study the preparation of 125 I labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab)-anti-TSH is described, which will be used as a component of a TSH-IRMA kit; this kit is to be realized in our department. 125 I - Mab anti-TSH has the following characteristics: specific activity = 20 - 24 μCi/μg and radioactive concentration ≅ 25 μCi/ml; also, the immunological properties of tracer were verified. The major results of this activity is that the total dependence on important kits will be eliminated and also, the costs will be reduced. (authors)

  18. Correlation of chromosomal instability, telomere length and telomere maintenance in microsatellite stable rectal cancer: a molecular subclass of rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Boardman

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+. However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-. MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition.MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]. Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH.Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN- and chromosomally instable (CIN+ by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6 had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13 which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066 and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004. Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040; and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949.MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase.

  19. Project Gel a Randomized Rectal Microbicide Safety and Acceptability Study in Young Men and Transgender Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian McGowan

    Full Text Available The purpose of Project Gel was to determine the safety and acceptability of rectal microbicides in young men who have sex with men (MSM and transgender women (TGW at risk of HIV infection.MSM and TGW aged 18-30 years were enrolled at three sites; Pittsburgh, PA; Boston, MA; and San Juan, PR. Stage 1A was a cross-sectional assessment of sexual health and behavior in MSM and TGW. A subset of participants from Stage 1A were then enrolled in Stage 1B, a 12-week evaluation of the safety and acceptability of a placebo rectal gel. This was followed by the final phase of the study (Stage 2 in which a subset of participants from Stage 1B were enrolled into a Phase 1 rectal safety and acceptability evaluation of tenofovir (TFV 1% gel.248 participants were enrolled into Stage 1A. Participants' average age was 23.3 years. The most common sexually transmitted infection (STIs at baseline were Herpes simplex (HSV-2 (16.1% by serology and rectal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT (10.1% by NAAT. 134 participants were enrolled into Stage 1B. During the 12 week period of follow-up 2 HIV, 5 rectal CT, and 5 rectal Neisseria gonorrhea infections were detected. The majority of adverse events (AEs were infections (N = 56 or gastrointestinal (N = 46 and were mild (69.6% or moderate (28.0%. Of the participants who completed Stage 1B, 24 were enrolled into Stage 2 and randomized (1:1 to receive TFV or placebo gel. All participants completed Stage 2. The majority of AEs were gastrointestinal (N = 10 and of mild (87.2% or moderate (10.3% severity.In this study we were able to enroll a sexually active population of young MSM and TGW who were willing to use rectal microbicides. TFV gel was safe and acceptable and should be further developed as an alternative HIV prevention intervention for this population.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01283360.

  20. Evaluating the effect of rectal distension and rectal movement on prostate gland position using cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Suckling, John; Husband, Janet E.; Leach, Martin O.; Dearnaley, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic interrelationship between rectal distension and rectal movements, and to determine the effect of rectal movement on the position of the prostatic gland using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven or suspected prostate cancer were examined in the axial plane using repeated spoiled gradient-echo sequences every 10 seconds for 7 minutes. Twenty-four patients received bowel relaxants before imaging. Images were analyzed for the degree of rectal distension, for the incidence, magnitude, and number of rectal and prostate movements. Results: Rectal movements were seen in 28 (51%) patients overall, in 10 (42%) of those receiving bowel relaxants and in 18 (58%) not receiving bowel relaxants. The incidence of rectal movements correlated with the degree of rectal distension (p = 0.0005), but the magnitude of rectal movements did not correlate with the degree of rectal distension. Eighty-six rectal movements resulting in 33 anterior-posterior (AP) prostate movements were seen. The magnitude of rectal movements correlated well with degree of prostate movements (p < 0.001). Prostate movements in the AP direction were seen in 16 (29%) patients, and in 9 (16%) patients the movement was greater than 5 mm. The median prostate AP displacement was anterior by 4.2 (-5 to +14 mm). Conclusions: Cine MRI is able to demonstrate near real time rectal and associated prostate movements. Rectal movements are related to rectal distension and result in significant displacements of the prostate gland over a time period similar to that used for daily fractionated radiotherapy treatments. Delivery of radiotherapy needs to take into account these organ movements

  1. Klein tunneling in the α -T3 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, E.; Nicol, E. J.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate Klein tunneling for the α -T3 model, which interpolates between graphene and the dice lattice via parameter α . We study transmission across two types of electrostatic interfaces: sharp potential steps and sharp potential barriers. We find both interfaces to be perfectly transparent for normal incidence for the full range of the parameter α for both interfaces. For other angles of incidence, we find that transmission is enhanced with increasing α . For the dice lattice, we find perfect, all-angle transmission across a potential step for incoming electrons with energy equal to half of the height of the potential step. This is analogous to the "super", all-angle transmission reported for the dice lattice for Klein tunneling across a potential barrier.

  2. Analysis of the tool plunge in friction stir welding - comparison of aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, plastic strain and heat generation during the plunge stage of the friction stir welding (FSW of high-strength aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351 are considered in this work. The plunging of the tool into the material is done at different rotating speeds. A three-dimensional finite element (FE model for thermomechanical simulation is developed. It is based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, and Johnson-Cook material law is used for modelling of material behaviour. From comparison of the numerical results for alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351, it can be seen that the former has more intensive heat generation from the plastic deformation, due to its higher strength. Friction heat generation is only slightly different for the two alloys. Therefore, temperatures in the working plate are higher in the alloy 2024 T3 for the same parameters of the plunge stage. Equivalent plastic strain is higher for 2024 T351 alloy, and the highest values are determined under the tool shoulder and around the tool pin. For the alloy 2024 T3, equivalent plastic strain is the highest in the influence zone of the tool pin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34016 i br. TR 35006

  3. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo......Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... in the study was 164 (86%) patients treated with standard rectal cancer surgery (STAN-RCS). The Danish version showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales concerning body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Reduced psychometric properties were found...

  4. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although most patients with stage II-III rectal cancer at queried National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers between 2005 and 2011 received 3-dimensional CRT, significant and increasing numbers received IMRT. IMRT utilization is highly variable among institutions and not uniform among sociodemographic groups but may be more consistently embraced in specific clinical settings. Given this trend, comparative-effectiveness research is needed to evaluate the benefits of IMRT for rectal cancer.

  5. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Rectal Cancer: Benchmarking Its Impact on Prognosis, Neoadjuvant Response Prediction, and Clinical Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Nicole; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J; Veerapong, Jula; Borras, Ester; Krishnan, Sunil; Bednarski, Brian; Messick, Craig A; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Lynch, Patrick M; Vilar, Eduardo; You, Y Nancy

    2016-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) hallmarks consensus molecular subtype 1 of colorectal cancer. It is being routinely tested, but little is known about dMMR rectal cancers. The efficacy of novel treatment strategies cannot be established without benchmarking the outcomes of dMMR rectal cancer with current therapy. We aimed to delineate the impact of dMMR on prognosis, the predicted response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant therapy, and implications of germline alterations in the MMR genes in rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 2012, 62 patients with dMMR rectal cancers underwent multimodality therapy. Oncologic treatment and outcomes as well as clinical genetics work-up were examined. Overall and rectal cancer-specific survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years. MMR deficiency was most commonly due to alterations in MSH2 (53%) or MSH6 (23%). After a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year rectal cancer-specific survival was 100% for stage I and II, 85.1% for stage III, and 60.0% for stage IV disease. Fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation was associated with a complete pathologic response rate of 27.6%. The extent of surgical resection was influenced by synchronous colonic disease at presentation, tumor height, clinical stage, and pelvic radiation. An informed decision for a limited resection focusing on proctectomy did not compromise overall survival. Five of the 11 (45.5%) deaths during follow-up were due to extracolorectal malignancies. dMMR rectal cancer had excellent prognosis and pathologic response with current multimodality therapy including an individualized surgical treatment plan. Identification of a dMMR rectal cancer should trigger germline testing, followed by lifelong surveillance for both colorectal and extracolorectal malignancies. We herein provide genotype-specific outcome benchmarks for comparison with novel interventions. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  7. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  8. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Stephen; Bergsagel, Carl; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  9. Rectal bleeding in children: endoscopic evaluation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Lissy; van Lingen, Anna V.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Rectal bleeding is an alarming event both for the child and parents. It is hypothesized that colonoscopy instead of sigmoidoscopy and adding esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in case of accompanying complaints, improves the diagnostic accuracy in children with prolonged rectal bleeding. Study

  10. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  11. Masquerading Mycobacterium: Rectal Growth or Tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A 37-year old male presented to us with history of lower abdominal pain for 6 months. His physical examination revealed a rectal mass of approximately 1centimeter. He was investigated for possible rectal growth with sigmoidoscopy and biopsy. The histopathological examination (HPE) showed a non-specific ...

  12. Predictive Biomarkers of Radiation Sensitivity in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tut, Thein Ga

    repair (MMR) proteins, the insufficiency of which is characteristic of CRCs with microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI may enable unlimited replicative potential of malignant cell that leads to radiation injury resistance. Therefore, these proteins were characterized in both CRC cell lines (MMR proteins) and different (core and invasive front) rectal cancer tissues (Plk1, gammaH2AX and MMR proteins) exposed to radiation. Histopathological grading of tumour regression was performed following radiotherapy in rectal cancer as a marker of radiotherapy response and a surrogate indicator of patient prognosis. Though MMR protein expressions correlated with improved in vitro cell survival following radiation, these findings could only be partially replicated in patient tissue samples. This may not be entirely unexpected, given intratumoural heterogeneity in genetic profiles and oxygenation between individual cancer cells, their interaction with stromal environment and a multitude of other factors that cannot be adequately replicated in cell line experiments. In our rectal cancer patient cohort, histopathological regression following radiotherapy did appear to correlate with better clinical outcome, but certainly no replacement for the routine pTNM staging with which it was compared. Overexpression of Plk1 in the primary rectal cancer also correlates with poor tumour regression and reduced overall survival. High level of gammaH2AX correlates with higher tumour stage, perineural invasion and vascular invasion. However, interpretation of the results is limited by the small number of positivity amongst the cohort, with respect to gammaH2AX and MMR proteins. The combined analysis of all the proteins examined in this thesis revealed no interactions, possibly suggesting these biomarkers act individually within the DDR pathway, rather than in a demonstrably interdependent manner. Though our results are mixed, finding biomarkers predictive of radiation response is nonetheless critical

  13. Rectal duplication cyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Peter H; Hagen, Regine; Willi, Barbara; Ruetten, Maja; Venzin, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    Enteric duplication is a rare developmental malformation in people, dogs and cats. The purpose of the present report is to describe the first case of a rectal duplication cyst in a 7-year-old domestic shorthair cat presenting for acute constipation and tenesmus. On rectal palpation a spherical mass compressing the lumen of the rectum could be felt in the dorsal wall of the rectum. A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the presence of a well demarcated cystic lesion in the pelvic canal, dorsal to the rectum. The cyst was surgically removed via a perineal approach. No communication with the rectal lumen could be demonstrated. Histopathological examination was consistent with a rectal duplication cyst. Clinical signs resolved completely after excision of this conjoined non-communicating cystic rectal duplicate. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods. Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results. A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54 had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5% expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level (p=0.006 and attitudes (p=0.001 influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that, despite the fact that participants had suboptimal level of knowledge on rectal cancer, their attitude is favorable to pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients’ understanding of preoperative therapy.

  15. Circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity after MRI assessment and adjuvant treatment in 189 patients undergoing rectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G S; Eardley, N; McNicol, F; Healey, P; Hughes, M; Rooney, P S

    2014-05-01

    The management of rectal cancer relies on accurate MRI staging. Multi-modal treatments can downstage rectal cancer prior to surgery and may have an effect on MRI accuracy. We aim to correlate the findings of MRI staging of rectal cancer with histological analysis, the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on this and the implications of circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity following neoadjuvant therapy. An analysis of histological data and radiological staging of all cases of rectal cancer in a single centre between 2006 and 2011 were conducted. Two hundred forty-one patients had histologically proved rectal cancer during the study period. One hundred eighty-two patients underwent resection. Median age was 66.6 years, and male to female ratio was 13:5. R1 resection rate was 11.1%. MRI assessments of the circumferential resection margin in patients without neoadjuvant radiotherapy were 93.6 and 88.1% in patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Eighteen patients had predicted positive margins following chemoradiotherapy, of which 38.9% had an involved CRM on histological analysis. MRI assessment of the circumferential resection margin in rectal cancer is associated with high accuracy. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has a detrimental effect on this accuracy, although accuracy remains high. In the presence of persistently predicted positive margins, complete resection remains achievable but may necessitate a more radical approach to resection.

  16. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin and radiotherapy: Results of the phase II study in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: usufruct ing the benefits of preoperative adjuvant (biological, functional, surgical, etc.), a phase II essay whose purpose was to evaluate the response and toxicity activated preoperative concomitant radio chemotherapy in the oncological pathology. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.03 and 31.12.09 64 consecutive patients were treated with rectal cancer and histopathology for adenocarcinoma; none of them had been received previous oncological treatment and did not have a second simultaneous neoplasia. The age of the patients had a range between 38 and 69 years with a mean of 57.3 years; 60% belonged to male and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All tumors were at a distance of 12cms ≤ anal margin and were staged as AJCC allowing recruiting 28 patients in stage II (T3, T4) and 36 patients in stage III (N1, N2). Staging was performed with clinical (general and proctologic examination), fibrocolonoscopy, systemic imaging and local (TAC, EER, MRI) and laboratory (CEA) total pelvic X 18 MV photons was irradiated by ICRU-50 in a normo fractionation with daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to a final dose of 45 Gy in 25 sessions using multiple fields (box technique) .The chemotherapy was administered Capecitabine 825mgr / m2 / day in 2 daily doses during the course of radiotherapy and oxaliplatin 50mgr / m2 on days 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 of the same therapy. All patients underwent surgery between 4 and 8 weeks after completing the coincidence. Follow-up it was full and the response was weighted according to the degree of tumor regression (GRT) of Dworak and Toxicity was graded according to RTOG / EORTC. Results: As the TSO the following pathological responses were obtained: GRT 0 (remission Full), 16% GRT 1 and 2 (moderate and low remission), 55% and TSO 3 and 4 (weak or absent remission) 29%. Although there were no deaths therapy, toxicity was severe and frequent with 30% Grade 3 and 4 (skin, gastrointestinal, hematological, neuropathies and

  17. Radioimmunological determination of triiodo-thyronine (T3) and thyroidastimulating hormone (TSH) in routine diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, U.J.; Schmidt, H.A.E.

    1974-01-01

    The radioimmunological determination of triiodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) provides two new methods for functional diagnoses of the thyroid. Changes and disturbances of the control mechanism had been difficult to detect with conventional methods. The measurement of the basal TSH rate has further therapeutic and diagnostic consequences such as, e.g., the determination of growth stages of strumae or preclinical hypothyreosis on the basis of increased basal TSH values. The results of the TRH test enable a more exact clarification. Substitution therapy should take into account the rate of the remaining basal TSH secretion as well as the clinical picture. The determination of the serum T 3 concentration enables the diagnosis of isolated triiodothyronine hyperthyreosis. Continuous control of the thyrostatic therapy by T 3 and TSH determination helps to prevent a condition in which hyperthyreosis persists even though all the normal parameters indicate a euthyroid function. The development of a preclinical hypothyreosis can also be detected early. The increased basal TSH secretion after strumectomy is a further proof of the urgent need for consequent prophylaxis of relapses (orig./AK) [de

  18. Clonal nature of spontaneously immortalized 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittling, S R

    1996-11-25

    Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), when plated at appropriate densities, proliferate vigorously for several passages, and then the growth rate of the culture slows considerably. If the cells are plated at a high enough density and continuously passed, the cultures will eventually overcome this "crisis" period and resume rapid growth. Here, we have addressed the question of what the changes are that cells undergo in overcoming the growth restraints of crisis. Primary MEF cells were infected with a retrovirus which confers G418 resistance and selected in G418. The resultant pre-crisis population comprised cells which each contained a retrovirus integrated at a unique genomic location. These cells were then passed according to the 3T3 protocol until immortal, rapidly growing cells emerged. The integration pattern of the retrovirus in the immortal population was examined. In two independent experiments, the immortal population of cells grown in the presence of G418 comprised two independent clones of cells, with additional clones undetectable at the level of detection of the assays used. The integration pattern was also examined in parallel infected cultures grown in the absence of selection. In one experiment the unselected immortal population contained the same labeled clone that appeared in the sister infected culture, indicating that an immortal precursor was present in the precrisis population. These results are consistent with the idea that a mutation is responsible for the immortal phenotype.

  19. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  20. Effects of previous protein intake on rectal temperature, blood glucose, plasma thyroid hormone and minerals by laying hens during a forced molt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.A.; Moraes, V.M.B.; Cherici, I; Furlan, R.L.; Macari, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of forced molting on blood glucose, rectal temperature, plasma T4, T3 and minerals were studied in hens previously fed rations with different protein contents (14, 17 and 20% crude protein). Blood samples were obtained from brachial veins for blood glucose, T4 and T3 were measured by radioimmunoassay, and plasma minerals were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Blood glucose and rectal temperature were reduced during fasting regardless of previous protein intake. Pre molting T4 plasma level was higher in laying hens fed higher protein ration, but feed deprivation reduced T 4 and T 3 concentrations irrespective of protein intake, except T 4 level for 14% crude protein fed birds that increased during fasting. The data obtained in this experiment suggest that previous protein intake does not interfere with the metabolic changes during forced molt. (author). 19 refs, 1 fig, 4 tabs

  1. Role of MRI in rectal carcinoma after chemo irradiation therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectal cancer is associated with a high risk of metastases and local recurrence; local recurrence rates after surgical treatment being up to 32% (1). Local recurrence is directly related to incomplete tumor resection (2, 3) and also related to the circumferential safety of resection (4, 5). An accurate local staging at the time of ...

  2. ORGAN-SPARING SURGERY FOR RECTAL CANCER: EVOLUTION, CURRENT TRENDS, AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tamrazov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main stages of the development of sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. An historical look at this issue from the standpoint of research of past years in our country and abroad, as well as analysis of current sphincter-preserving surgery and future directions in this area.

  3. Locally advanced rectal cancer: a cooperative surgical approach to a complex surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-01-01

    Single stage en bloc abdominoperineal resection and sacrectomy, with a myocutaneous flap closure is a relatively uncommon procedure. Our case study of a 77 year old man with a locally invasive rectal adenocarcinoma highlights the complex intraoperative management of such a patient.

  4. Improved survival for rectal cancer compared to colon cancer: the four cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Pamela; Hall, Claire; Davidson, Callum; Dixon, Liane; Dobbs, Bruce; Robinson, Bridget; Frizelle, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. This study was undertaken to evaluate survival outcomes and changes of disease outcomes of CRC patients over the last decades. A retrospective analysis of CRC patients in Christchurch was performed in four patient cohorts at 5 yearly intervals; 1993-94, 1998-99, 2004-05 and 2009. Data on cancer location, stage, surgical and oncological treatment and survival were collected. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed. There were 1391 patients (355, 317, 419 and 300 per cohort), 1037 colon and 354 rectal cancers, respectively. For colon cancer, right-sided cancers appeared more common in later cohorts (P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in the number of permanent stomas for colon cancer patients (P = 0.001). There was an analogous trend for rectal cancers (P = 0.075). More CRC patients with stage IV disease were treated surgically (P = 0.001) and colon cancer stages I and II tended to have increased survival if operated by a colorectal surgeon (P = 0.06). Oncology referrals have increased remarkably (P = 0.001). Overall 56% of patients were alive at 5 years however rectal cancer patients had significantly better 5-year survival than those with colon cancer (P rectal cancer patients have a better 5-year survival than colon cancer patients. The improved survival with early stage colon cancers operated on by specialist colorectal surgeons needs further exploration. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. The pre, post brachytherapy and postoperative CEA serum concentration of 53 rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Danh; Nguyen Kim Luu; Phan Van Dan

    2008-01-01

    CEA serum concentration level of 53 rectal cancer patients was measured at moments pre, post brachytherapy (45 Gy), post surgery one week, 6 months and 12 months. Response to radiation with reduce CEA serum concentration was achieved in 20/53 patients (37,7%), mainly at staging Dukes B, C. Postoperative CEA level of patients significantly decreased, especially in resection group. (author)

  6. Interstitial irradiation of rectal carcinoma with rectal template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Tanaka, Ken; Nakanishi, Makoto; Inoue, Takehiro

    1984-01-01

    Using Iridium-192 wires through a rectal template after Syed, interstitial brachytherapy was conducted in a patient with inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum. 67-year-old man with constipation and change in the stool caliber underwent external radiotherapy (4,000cGy/4W) to the whole pelvis including the perineum, followed by interstitial implant using a template, at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Marked tumor regression, marked circumferential fibrosis and a remarkable decline of CEA titers (pre-RT: 35.8ng/ml, post-RT: 6.2ng/ml) were observed until 7 months post-RT. The domestic production of Iridium-192 wires has made possible the intergrated use of brachytherapy in the perineal region in Japan. (author)

  7. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  8. Cold exposure rapidly induces virtual saturation of brown adipose tissue nuclear T3 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Cold exposure induces a rapid increase in uncoupling protein (UCP) concentration in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid, but not hypothyroid, rats. To normalize this response with exogenous 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T 3 ), it is necessary to cause systemic hyperthyroidism. In contrast, the same result can be obtained with just replacement doses of thyroxine (T 4 ) and, in euthyroid rats, the normal response of UCP to cold occurs without hyperthyroid plasma T 3 levels. Consequently, the authors explored the possibility that the cold-induced activation of the type II 5'-deiodinase resulted in high levels of nuclear T 3 receptor occupancy in euthyroid rats. Studies were performed with pulse injections of tracer T 3 or T 4 in rats exposed to 4 degree C for different lengths of time (1 h-3 wk). Within 4 h of cold exposure, they observed a significant increase in the nuclear [ 125 I]T 3 derived from the tracer [ 125 I]T 4 injections (T 3 [T 4 ]) and a significant reduction in the nuclear [ 125 I]T 3 derived from [ 125 I]T 3 injections (T 3 [T 3 ]). The number of BAT nuclear T 3 receptors did not increase for up to 3 wk of observation at 4 degree C. The mass of nuclear-bound T 3 was calculated from the nuclear tracer [ 125 I]T 3 [T 3 ] and [ 125 I]T 3 [T 4 ] at equilibrium and the specific activity of serum T 3 and T 4 , respectively. By 4 h after the initiation of the cold exposure, the receptors were >95% occupied and remained so for the 3 weeks of observation. They conclude that the simultaneous activation of the deiodinase with adrenergic BAT stimulation serves the purpose of nearly saturating the nuclear T 3 receptors. This makes possible the realization of the full thermogenic potential of the tissue without causing systemic hyperthyroidism

  9. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  10. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer: the MERCURY research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G; Daniels, I R

    2005-01-01

    The development of a surgical technique that removes the tumour and all local draining nodes in an intact package, namely total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery, has provided the impetus for a more selective approach to the administration of preoperative therapy. One of the most important factors that governs the success of TME surgery is the relationship of tumour to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). Tumour involves the CRM in up to 20% of patients undergoing TME surgery, and results in both poor survival and local recurrence. It is therefore clear that the importance of the decision regarding the use of pre-operative therapy lies with the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia. In addition, a high-spatial-resolution MRI technique will identify tumours exhibiting other poor prognostic features, namely, extramural spread >5 mm, extramural venous invasion by tumour, nodal involvement, and peritoneal infiltration. The potential benefits of a selective approach using MRI-based selection criteria are evident. That is, over 50% of patients can be treated successfully with primary surgery alone without significant risk of local recurrence or systemic failure. Of the remainder, potentially dramatic improvements may be achieved through the use of intensive and targeted preoperative therapy aimed not only at reducing the size of the primary tumour and rendering potentially irresectable tumour resectable with tumour-free circumferential margins, but also at enabling patients at high risk of systemic failure to benefit from intensive combined modality therapy aimed at eliminating micrometastatic disease.

  11. Rectal malignant melanoma mistaken for thrombotic hemorrhoids - rare tumor with poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacova, E.; Hvizdakova, A.; Vyskocil, M.; Kinova, S.; Sesovsky, V.; Kobzova, D.; Palkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Rectal malignant melanoma originates in the melanocytes of the anorectal area. Represent less than 1 % of all melanomas, and 4 % of all malignant tumors of the rectum and anus. The most common clinical manifestation is bleeding, the clinical examination may be mistaken for benign lesions or hemorrhoids. Given the rarity of the diagnosis are not well-defined therapeutic procedures. Prognosis for patient is poor. The authors present a case of 70-year old patient with rectal melanoma diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, initially with diagnosis a thrombotic hemorrhoid. (author)

  12. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe.

  13. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst.

  14. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  15. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  16. Palliative reirradiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingareddy, Vasudha; Ahmad, Neelofur; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    a significant difference in late complication rate between patients receiving standard fractionation (47%) and those receiving hyperfractionation (18%), p=0.04. Median survival time (MST) from recurrence for the entire group was 12 months. Two and 3 year acturial survival rates were 25% and 14%, respectively. Gender, age, initial stage, and fractionation scheme did not significantly impact survival. However, patients who recurred ≤ 2 years of initial treatment had an MST of 10 months vs. 17 months for patients who recurred later (p=0.0569). Reirradiation doses of ≤30.6 Gy resulted in an MST of 9 months vs. 18 months for higher doses (p=0.0125). Patients with Karnofsky Performance Status ≤70 had an MST of 6 months vs. 18 months in patients with KPS > 70 (p=0.0005). CONCLUSION: This unique institutional approach to recurrent rectal cancers results in excellent palliation of symptoms. Late complications may be reduced by hyperfractionated treatment delivery. Patients recurring > 2 years from initial treatment, and those with KPS > 70 may have prolonged survival when retreated to higher doses

  17. Incidence, treatment and outcome of rectal stenosis following transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J A; Hill, J

    2011-09-01

    As an alternative to more radical abdominal surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) offers a minimally invasive solution for the excision of certain rectal polyps and early-stage rectal tumours. The patient benefits of TEM as compared to radical abdominal surgery are clear; nevertheless, some drawback is possible. The aim of our study was to determine the risk factors, treatment and outcomes of rectal stenosis following TEM. We analysed a series of 354 consecutive patients who underwent TEM for benign or malignant rectal tumours between 1997 and 2009. We recorded the maximum histological diameter of the lesion, and whether the lesion was circumferential. Rectal stenosis was defined as a rectal narrowing not allowing passage of a 12 mm sigmoidoscope. Histological results with a measured specimen diameter were available in 304 of the 354 cases. There were 11 stenoses in total (3.6%), 7 stenoses due to 9 circumferential lesions (78%) and 4 due to lesions with a maximum diameter ≥ 5 cm (3.2%). Two patients presented as emergencies, and the other 9 patients reported symptoms of increased stool frequency at follow-up. Three of the stenoses were associated with recurrent disease. All stenoses were treated by a combination of endoscopic/radiological balloon dilatation or surgically with Hegar's dilators. A median of two procedures were required to treat stenoses until resolution of symptoms. Rectal stenosis following TEM excision is rare. It is predictable in patients with circumferential lesions but is rare in patients with non-circumferential lesions with a maximum diameter ≥ 5 cm. It is effectively treated with surgical or balloon dilatation. Most patients require repeated treatments.

  18. Perineal mass protrusion with rectal mucosa: a rectal duplication that underwent exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Vongphet, Soulithone; Zhang, Zhichong; Mo, Jiacong

    2011-08-01

    We present a rare case of a male neonate with a perineal mass with rectal mucosa, diagnosed as an exstrophic duplication of the rectum. It was accompanied by a cord that was deeply invested in the pelvic diaphragm and was composed of smooth muscle, fibrous tissue, and some rectal glands. The association of exstrophic rectal duplication with a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and normal anus has not been described previously in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  20. Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review of 10 series using electrocoagulation, fulguration, or local excision demonstrates that about 70% of all patients had tumors smaller than 3 cm and the remainder had tumors measuring between 4 cm and 7 cm. Although primary tumor size in rectal cancer has little prognostic value per se, it is obviously important when determining the appropriateness of local therapy. Selecting patients for local therapy based on tumor size alone seems reasonable, since the recurrence and survival rates for the patients are similar to those achieved with radical surgery. Since patients treated with local excision alone have predominantly T1 or T2 tumors, a comparison with the data of others illustrates the prognostic utility of the degree of bowel penetration and shows five-year survival rates of 71% to 76% for patients with limited disease. In this chapter, the author describes an additional group of patients who also did well following postoperative radiotherapy after conservative surgical treatment

  1. Transvaginal ultrasonography of rectal endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egekvist, Anne Gisselmann; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel; Forman, Axel

    Objectives: The aim of this present study was to evaluate the interobserver variation of transvaginal ultrasonographic measurements of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid wall. Methods: Transvaginal ultrasonography was performed independently by two observers. Observer 1 had several years...... of experience in ultrasonography while observer 2 was a medical student with no prior experience in ultrasonography or endometriosis. In 24 patient length, width and depth of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid bowel was measured. The differences between the observers were analysed by Bland and Altman...... for a relatively short period gives comparable scanning results between the two observers. It seems that transvaginal ultrasound could be used as a diagnostic tool for rectal endometriosis in most departments. However, the irregular morphology of the lesions makes the measurements very complex, and a strict...

  2. Early Postoperative Low Expression of RAD50 in Rectal Cancer Patients Associates with Disease-Free Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to the treatment of rectal cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic and clinicopathological implication of RAD50 (DNA repair protein RAD50 homolog expression in rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 266 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery and received chemo- and radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were involved in the study. Postoperative RAD50 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in surgical samples (n = 266. Results: Using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, we found that low RAD50 expression in postoperative samples was associated with worse disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p < 0.001 in early stage/low-grade tumors. In a comparison of patients with low vs. high RAD50 expression, we found that low levels of postoperative RAD50 expression in rectal cancer tissues were significantly associated with perineural invasion (p = 0.002. Conclusion: Expression of RAD50 in rectal cancer may serve as a prognostic biomarker for long-term survival of patients with perineural invasion-positive tumors and for potential use in early stage and low-grade rectal cancer assessment.

  3. Causes and outcomes of emergency presentation of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Haase, Trutz; Johnson, Howard; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Emergency presentation of rectal cancer carries a relatively poor prognosis, but the roles and interactions of causative factors remain unclear. We describe an innovative statistical approach which distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of a number of contextual, patient and tumour factors on emergency presentation and outcome of rectal cancer. All patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Ireland 2004-2008 were included. Registry information, linked to hospital discharge data, provided data on patient demographics, comorbidity and health insurance; population density and deprivation of area of residence; tumour type, site, grade and stage; treatment type and optimality; and emergency presentation and hospital caseload. Data were modelled using a structural equation model with a discrete-time survival outcome, allowing us to estimate direct and mediated effects of the above factors on hazard, and their inter-relationships. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty patients were included in the analysis. Around 12% had emergency presentations, which increased hazard by 80%. Affluence, private patient status and being married reduced hazard indirectly by reducing emergency presentation. Older patients had more emergency presentations, while married patients, private patients or those living in less deprived areas had fewer than expected. Patients presenting as an emergency were less likely to receive optimal treatment or to have this in a high caseload hospital. Apart from stage, emergency admission was the strongest determinant of poor survival. The factors contributing to emergency admission in this study are similar to those associated with diagnostic delay. The socio-economic gradient found suggests that patient education and earlier access to endoscopic investigation for public patients could reduce emergency presentation. © 2016 UICC.

  4. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (≤7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  5. Elevated platelet count as predictor of recurrence in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer.

  6. Rectal cooling test in the differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; Shafik, I; El Sibai, O; Shafik, A A

    2007-03-01

    The differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and that due to outlet obstruction from non-relaxing puborectalis muscle (PRM) is problematic and not easily achieved with one diagnostic test. Therefore, we studied the hypothesis that the rectal cooling test (RCT) can effectively be used to differentiate between those two forms of constipation. The study enrolled 28 patients with constipation and abnormal transit study in whom radio-opaque markers accumulated in the rectum; 15 healthy volunteers acted as controls. Electromyographic activity of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and PRM was initially recorded. Subsequently rectal wall tone was assessed by a barostat system during rectal infusion with normal saline at 30 degrees C and at 4 degrees C with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). There was a significant increase in EMG activity of the EAS and PRM on strain- ing (panismus, in 10 of 28 patients and 0 of 15 controls. Rectal tone in controls did not respond to saline infusion at 30 degrees C, but it increased at 4 degrees C (panismus (panismus while it had no effect in the remaining patients. Lack of increase of rectal tone may be secondary to rectal inertia. According to these preliminary observations, the rectal cooling test may be useful in differentiating between rectal inertia and anismus.

  7. Phase II trial of preoperative radiochemotherapy with concurrent bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Jürgen; Höhler, Thomas; Reese, Thomas; Würschmidt, Florian; Engel, Erik; Rödel, Claus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Richter, Michael; Arnold, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-FU or capecitabine is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preoperative RCT achieves pathological complete response rates (pCR) of 10-15%. We conducted a single arm phase II study to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of addition of bevacizumab and oxaliplatin to preoperative standard RCT with capecitabine. Eligible patients had LARC (cT3-4; N0/1/2, M0/1) and were treated with preoperative RCT prior to planned surgery. Patients received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) and simultaneous chemotherapy with capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 bid (d1-14, d22-35) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m 2 (d1, d8, d22, d29). Bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was added on days 1, 15, and 29. The primary study objective was the pCR rate. 70 patients with LARC (cT3-4; N0/1, M0/1), ECOG < 2, were enrolled at 6 sites from 07/2008 through 02/2010 (median age 61 years [range 39–89], 68% male). At initial diagnosis, 84% of patients had clinical stage T3, 62% of patients had nodal involvement and 83% of patients were M0. Mean tumor distance from anal verge was 5.92 cm (± 3.68). 58 patients received the complete RCT (full dose RT and full dose of all chemotherapy). During preoperative treatment, grade 3 or 4 toxicities were experienced by 6 and 2 patients, respectively: grade 4 diarrhea and nausea in one patient (1.4%), respectively, grade 3 diarrhea in 2 patients (3%), grade 3 obstipation, anal abscess, anaphylactic reaction, leucopenia and neutropenia in one patient (1.4%), respectively. In total, 30 patients (46%) developed postoperative complications of any grade including one gastrointestinal perforation in one patient (2%), wound-healing problems in 7 patients (11%) and bleedings in 2 patients (3%). pCR was observed in 12/69 (17.4%) patients. Pathological downstaging (ypT < cT and ypN ≤ cN) was achieved in 31 of 69 patients (44.9%). All of the 66 operated patients had a R0 resection

  8. Comparison of abdominoperineal resection and low anterior resection in lower and middle rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidvari, Sh.; Ahmadloo, N.; Ansari, M.; Hamedi, S.H.; Razzaghi, S.; Mohammadianpanah, M.; Mosalaei, A.; Pourahmad, S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to investigate local control and survival rates following abdominoperineal resection (APR) compared with low anterior resection (LAR) in lower and middle rectal cancer. Methods: In this retrospective study, 153 patients with newly histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma located at low and middle third that were treated between 2004 and 2010 at a tertiary hospital. The tumors were pathologically staged according to the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Surgery was applied for 138 (90%) of the patients, of which 96 (70%) underwent LAR and 42 were (30%) treated with APR. Total meso rectal excision was performed for all patients. In addition, 125 patients (82%) received concurrent (neoadjuvant, adjuvant or palliative) pelvic chemo radiation, and 134 patients (88%) received neoadjuvant, adjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy. Patients follow-up ranged from 4 to 156 (median 37) months. Results: Of 153 patients, 89 were men and 64 were women with a median age of 57 years. One patient (o.7%) was stage 0, 15 (9.8%) stage I, 63 (41.2%) stage II, 51 (33.3%) stage III and 23 (15%) stage IV. There was a significant difference between LAR and APR in terms of tumor distance from anal verge, disease stage and combined modality therapy used. However, there was no significant difference regarding 5-year local control, disease free and overall survival rates between LAR and APR. Conclusion: LAR can provide comparable local control, disease free and overall survival rates compared with APR in eligible patients with lower and middle rectal cancer

  9. Contemporary management of locally advanced rectal cancer: Resolving issues, controversies and shifting paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacion, Aeris Jane D; Park, Youn Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2018-02-01

    Advancements in rectal cancer treatment have resulted in improvement only in locoregional control and have failed to address distant relapse, which is the predominant mode of treatment failure in rectal cancer. As the efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) reaches a plateau, the need for alternative strategies in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has grown in relevance. Several novel strategies have been conceptualized to address this issue, including: 1) neoadjuvant induction and consolidation chemotherapy before CRT; 2) neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone to avoid the sequelae of radiation; and 3) nonoperative management for patients who achieved pathological or clinical complete response after CRT. This article explores the issues, recent advances and paradigm shifts in the management of LARC and emphasizes the need for a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on tumor stage, location, gene expression and quality of life.

  10. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Mocellin, Simone

    2012-03-14

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Dukes' C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes' C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma; moreover, no formal systematic review and meta-analysis has been so far performed on this subject. We undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975 until March 2011 in order to quantitatively summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with surgically resectable rectal cancer. The outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). CCCG standard search strategy in defined databases with the following supplementary search. 1. Rect* or colorect* - 2. Cancer or carcinom* or adenocarc* or neoplasm* or tumour - 3. Adjuv* - 4. Chemother* - 5. Postoper* Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer who received no adjuvant chemotherapy with those receiving any postoperative chemotherapy regimen. Two authors extracted data and a third author performed an independent search for verification. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) between the risk of event between the treatment arm (adjuvant chemotherapy

  11. Endoscopically observable white nodule caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread of rectal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumura Ayako

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes a case of rectal cancer with endoscopically observable white nodules caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread. A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with frequent diarrhea and hemorrhoids. Computed tomography showed bilateral ovarian masses and three hepatic tumors diagnosed as rectal cancer metastases, and also showed multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was preoperatively diagnosed with stage IV rectal cancer. Colonoscopy demonstrated that primary rectal cancer existed 15 cm from the anal verge and that there were multiple white small nodules on the anal side of the primary tumor extending to the dentate line. Biopsies of the white spots were performed, and they were identified as adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent Hartmann’s procedure because of the locally advanced primary tumor. The white nodules were ultimately diagnosed as being caused by intramural lymphatic spreading because lymphatic permeation was strongly positive at the surrounding area. Small white nodules near a primary rectal cancer should be suspected of being intramural spreading. Endoscopic detection of white nodules may be useful for the diagnosis of distal intramural spread.

  12. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  13. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  14. Perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Correlation with microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Choi, Jun Jeong; Kim, Dae Hong; Myoung, Sung Min

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) correlate with immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in rectal cancer. Preoperative DCE-MRI was performed in 63 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. Transendothelial volume transfer (K trans ) and fractional volume of the extravascular-extracellular space (Ve) were measured by Interactive Data Language software in rectal cancer. After surgery, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression scores were determined using immunohistochemical staining of rectal cancer specimens. Perfusion parameters (K trans , Ve) of DCE-MRI in rectal cancer were found to be correlated with MVD and VEGF expression scores by Spearman's rank coefficient analysis. T stage and N stage (negative or positive) were correlated with perfusion parameters and MVD. Significant correlation was not found between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and MVD (rs = -0.056 and p 0.662 for K trans ; rs = -0.103 and p = 0.416 for Ve), or between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and the VEGF expression score (rs = -0.042, p 0.741 for K trans ; r = 0.086, p = 0.497 for Ve) in rectal cancer. TN stage showed no significant correlation with perfusion parameters or MVD (p > 0.05 for all). DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, K trans and Ve, correlated poorly with MVD and VEGF expression scores in rectal cancer, suggesting that these parameters do not simply denote static histological vascular properties.

  15. The Rectal Cancer Female Sexuality Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyø, Anne; Emmertsen, Katrine J; Laurberg, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction and impaired quality of life is a potential side effect to rectal cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a simple scoring system intended to evaluate sexual function in women treated for rectal cancer. DESIGN......: This is a population-based cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: Female patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 2001 and 2014 were identified by using the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database. Participants filled in the validated Sexual Function Vaginal Changes questionnaire. Women declared to be sexually active...... in the validation group. PATIENTS: Female patients with rectal cancer above the age of 18 who underwent abdominoperineal resection, Hartmann procedure, or total/partial mesorectal excision were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measured was the quality of life that was negatively affected because...

  16. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  18. Management of Civilian Extraperitoneal Rectal Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf J. Shatnawi

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Rectal injuries are serious additive mortality and morbidity factors in multi-injured patients. Regardless of treatment modality, wound infection is associated with shock at presentation and more than 6 hours' delay in treatment.

  19. Treatment of Rectal Hemorrhage by Coil Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, Craig Charles; Nicholson, Anthony A.

    1998-01-01

    Four patients, aged 54-84 years, presenting with life-threatening rectal bleeding from the superior hemorrhoidal artery, underwent percutaneous fibered platinum coil embolization via coaxial catheters. Pre-procedure sigmoidoscopy had failed to identify the source of hemorrhage, because the rectum was filled with fresh blood. Embolization was technically and clinically successful in all four patients. Subsequent sigmoidoscopy confirmed the diagnoses in three patients as a solitary rectal ulcer, iatrogenic traumatic ulceration following manual evacuation, and a rectal Dieulafoy's lesion. The other case was angiographically seen to be due to a rectal angiodysplasia. Embolization is an effective procedure in life-threatening superior hemorrhoidal arterial bleeding when endoscopic treatment fails, and should be preferred to rectosigmoid resection

  20. Rectal dihydroartemisinin versus intravenous quinine in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectal dihydroartemisinin versus intravenous quinine in the treatment of severe malaria: A randomised clinical trial. F Esamai, P Ayuo, W Owino-Ongor, J Rotich, A Ngindu, A Obala, F Ogaro, L Quoqiao, G Xingbo, L Guangqian ...

  1. Defecography of rectal wall prolapse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Muto, M.; De Rosa, A.; Ginolfi, F.; Carbone, M.; Amodio, F.; Rossi, E.; Tuccillo, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pelvic floor and rectal prolapse conditions have greatly benefited by new imaging and instrumental diagnostic approaches, and especially defecography, for both pathophysiological interpretation and differential diagnosis. The authors investigated the efficacy of defecography in the assessment of rectal prolapse, and in particular the role of videproctography in diagnosis such dynamic disorders. The dynamic changes of ampulla are well depicted by videoproctography, which showed anorectum normalization and spontaneous reduction of invagination after intussusception. Defecography exhibited good capabilities in showing rectal wall function abnormalities. Finally, some features of videoproctography such as low radiation dose, non-invasiveness and ease of execution, make the examination acceptable to patients with anorectal disorders and for the follow-up of rectal prolapse [it

  2. Wind sock deformity in rectal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed M V; Ghahramani, Farhad; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Razmi, Tannaz; Zarenezhad, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Rectal atresia is a rare anorectal deformity. It usually presents with neonatal obstruction and it is often a complete membrane or severe stenosis. Windsock deformity has not been reported in rectal atresia especially, having been missed for 2 years. A 2-year-old girl reported only a severe constipation despite having a 1.5-cm anal canal in rectal examination with scanty discharge. She underwent loop colostomy and loopogram, which showed a wind sock deformity of rectum with mega colon. The patient underwent abdominoperineal pull-through with good result and follow-up. This is the first case of the wind sock deformity in rectal atresia being reported after 2 years of age. (author)

  3. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  4. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  5. Definition and delineation of the clinical target volume for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roels, Sarah; Duthoy, Wim; Haustermans, Karin; Penninckx, Freddy; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Optimization of radiation techniques to maximize local tumor control and to minimize small bowel toxicity in locally advanced rectal cancer requires proper definition and delineation guidelines for the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this investigation was to analyze reported data on the predominant locations and frequency of local recurrences and lymph node involvement in rectal cancer, to propose a definition of the CTV for rectal cancer and guidelines for its delineation. Methods and Materials: Seven reports were analyzed to assess the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences in rectal cancer. The distribution of lymphatic spread was analyzed in another 10 reports to record the relative frequency and location of metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer, according to the stage and level of the primary tumor. Results: The mesorectal, posterior, and inferior pelvic subsites are most at risk for local recurrences, whereas lymphatic tumor spread occurs mainly in three directions: upward into the inferior mesenteric nodes; lateral into the internal iliac lymph nodes; and, in a few cases, downward into the external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. The risk for recurrence or lymph node involvement is related to the stage and the level of the primary lesion. Conclusion: Based on a review of articles reporting on the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences and the distribution of lymphatic spread in rectal cancer, we defined guidelines for CTV delineation including the pelvic subsites and lymph node groups at risk for microscopic involvement. We propose to include the primary tumor, the mesorectal subsite, and the posterior pelvic subsite in the CTV in all patients. Moreover, the lateral lymph nodes are at high risk for microscopic involvement and should also be added in the CTV

  6. CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN LEVELS IN THE PERIPHERAL AND MESENTERIC VENOUS BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH RECTAL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminio Cabral de REZENDE JUNIOR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is an important prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, however the rectum presents different routes of venous drainage, stating that the level of CEA in peripheral and mesenteric rectal tumors may be different, depending on the location of the tumor in the rectal segment. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the peripheral and mesenteric venous levels of CEA and the association between these levels and the tumour location in the rectums of patients successfully operated on for rectal carcinoma. Methods Thirty-two patients who were surgically treated for rectal carcinoma were divided into patients with tumours located in the upper rectum (n = 11 or lower rectum (n = 21. The CEA values were assessed by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Serum and mesenteric CEA levels were associated with the tumour anatomopathological characteristics: location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the rectal wall, angiolymphatic invasion, tumour, node, and metastasis staging; and the CEA index (≤1.0 or ≥1.0 ng /mL. Results Analysis of the serum CEA values using clinical and anatomopathological parameters revealed no significant association with tumour location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the intestinal wall, and tumour, node, and metastasis staging. The mesenteric CEA levels were significantly associated with the tumour location (P = 0.01. The CEA values in the mesenteric venous blood and the presence of angiolymphatic invasion (P = 0.047 were significantly different. A significant relationship was found between the CEA index value and the rectal tumour location (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The CEA levels were higher in the mesenteric vein in tumours located in the upper rectum and in the presence of angiolymphatic invasion. CEA drainage from lower rectum adenocarcinomas preferentially occurs

  7. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Fitzgerald

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of

  8. Anterior rectal duplication: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, K; Poenaru, D; Soboleski, D; Hurlbut, D; Kamal, I

    2000-04-01

    The authors present an anterior rectal cyst in a 14-month-old girl. This rare variant of rectal duplications presented with recurrent urinary infections. The diagnosis was challenging in view of the multiple differential diagnoses to be considered. Magnetic resonance imaging appeared to be the most accurate preoperative investigation. The cyst was removed uneventfully by partial excision and mucosal ablation. An awareness of this variant can lead to early diagnosis and curative resection.

  9. A method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong; Song, Paul Y.; Li Shidong; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Haraf, Daniel J.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-surface histograms of the rectum, which state the rectal surface area irradiated to any given dose, were calculated for a group of 27 patients treated with a four-field box technique to a total (tumor minimum) dose ranging from 68 to 70 Gy. Occurrences of rectal toxicities as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were recorded and examined in terms of dose and rectal surface area irradiated. For a specified end point of rectal complication, the complication probability was analyzed as a function of dose irradiated to a fixed rectal area, and as a function of area receiving a fixed dose. Lyman's model of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was used to fit the data. Results: The observed occurrences of rectal complications appear to depend on the rectal surface area irradiated to a given dose level. The patient distribution of each toxicity grade exhibits a maximum as a function of percentage surface area irradiated, and the maximum moves to higher values of percentage surface area as the toxicity grade increases. The dependence of the NTCP for the specified end point on dose and percentage surface area irradiated was fitted to Lyman's NTCP model with a set of parameters. The curvature of the NTCP as a function of the surface area suggests that the rectum is a parallel structured organ. Conclusions: The described method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated yields interesting insight into understanding rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Application of the method to a larger patient data set has the potential to facilitate the construction of a full dose-surface-complication relationship, which would be most useful in guiding clinical practice

  10. Tumor budding is a strong and reproducible prognostic marker in T3N0 colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Lai Mun

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor budding along the advancing front of colorectal adenocarcinoma is an early event in the metastatic process. A reproducible, prognostic budding scoring system based on outcomes in early stage colorectal cancer has not been established. DESIGN: One hundred twenty-eight T3N0M0 colorectal carcinoma patients with known outcome were identified. Tumor budding was defined as isolated tumor cells or clusters of <5 cells at the invasive tumor front. Tumor bud counts were generated in 5 regions at 200x by 2 pathologists (conventional bud count method). The median bud count per case was used to divide cases into low (median=0) and high budding (median > or =1) groups. Forty cases were reevaluated to assess reproducibility using the conventional and a novel rapid bud count method. RESULTS: Fifty-seven (45%) carcinomas had high and 71 (55%) had low budding scores. High budding was associated with an infiltrative growth pattern (P<0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P=0.005). Five-year cancer-specific survival was significantly poorer in high compared with low budding groups: 63% versus 91%, respectively, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis demonstrated tumor budding to be independently prognostic (hazard ratio=4.76, P<0.001). Interobserver agreement was at least equivalent comparing the conventional to the rapid bud count methods: 87.5% agreement (kappa=0.75) versus 92.5% agreement (kappa=0.85), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor budding is a strong, reproducible, and independent prognostic marker of outcome that is easily assessed on hematoxylin and eosin slides. This may be useful for identifying the subset of T3N0M0 patients at high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  11. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  12. External cystic rectal duplication: an unusual presentation of rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I; Karaman, A; Arda, N; Cakmak, O

    2007-11-01

    Duplications of gastrointestinal tract are rare anomalies, and rectal duplications account for five percent of the alimentary tract duplications. We present an unusual case of rectal duplication, which was located externally in a newborn female, and discuss the types of distal hindgut duplications.

  13. Patterns of Failure After Radical Cystectomy for pT3-4 Bladder Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Abhinav V. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Pariser, Joseph J.; Pearce, Shane M. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Weichselbaum, Ralph R. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Norm D.; Steinberg, Gary D. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: In patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, local-regional failure (LF) has been reported to occur in up to 20% of patients following radical cystectomy. The goals of this study were to describe patterns of LF, as well as assess factors associated with LF in a cohort of patients with pT3-4 bladder cancer. This information may have implications towards the use of adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologic T3-4 N0-1 bladder cancer were examined from an institutional radical cystectomy database. Preoperative demographics and pathologic characteristics were examined. Outcomes included overall survival and LF. Local-regional failures were defined using follow-up imaging reports and scans, and the locations of LF were characterized. Variables were tested by univariate and multivariate analysis for association with LF and overall survival. Results: A total of 334 patients had pT3-4 and N0-1 disease after radical cystectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection. Of these, 46% received perioperative chemotherapy. The median age was 71 years old, and median follow-up was 11 months. On univariate analysis, margin status, pT stage, and pN stage, were all associated with LF (P<.05), however, on multivariate analysis, only pT and pN stages were significantly associated with LF (P<.05). Three strata of risk were defined, including low-risk patients with pT3N0 disease, intermediate-risk patients with pT3N1 or pT4N0 disease, and high-risk patients with pT4N1 disease, who had a 2-year incidence of LF of 12%, 33%, and 72%, respectively. The most common sites of pelvic relapse included the external and internal iliac lymph nodes (LNs) and obturator LN regions. Notably, 34% of patients with LF had local-regional only disease at the time of recurrence. Conclusions: Patients with pT4 or N1 disease have a 2-year risk of LF that exceeds 30%. These patients may be the most likely to benefit from local adjuvant therapies.

  14. Neoadjuvant conformal chemoradiation with induction chemotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma. A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Zsolt; Muntean, Alina-Simona; Hica, Ştefan; Rancea, Alin; Resiga, Liliana; Csutak, Csaba; Todor, Nicolae; Nagy, Viorica Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the rate and the prognostic factors for down-staging and complete response for rectal adenocarcinoma after induction chemotherapy and neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery, and to analyze the rate of sphincter-saving surgery. We included from March 2011 to October 2013 a number of 88 patients hospitalized with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma in the Prof. Dr. Ion Chiricuta Institute of Oncology, Cluj. The treatment schedule included 2-4 cycles of Oxaliplatin plus a fluoropyrimidine followed by concomitant chemoradiation with a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions combined with a fluoropyrimidine monotherapy. The rate of T down-staging was 49.4% (40/81 evaluable patients). Independent prognostic factors for T down-staging were: age >57 years (p5 cm (p35 days (p5 cm (p=0.03). Sixty-eight patients (79.1%) underwent radical surgery and among them 35 patients (51.5 %) had a sphincter saving procedure. Induction chemotherapy with neoadjuvant chemoradiation produced important down-staging in rectal adenocarcinoma. Independent prognostic factors for T down-staging were: age, cN0, distance from anal verge, initial CEA, the number of Oxaliplatin cycles and duration of radiotherapy; for complete response: cT2, initial tumor size and distance from the anal verge.

  15. Intracavitary radiation for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basrur, V.R. (Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Hamilton (Canada). Hamilton Clinic); Knight, P.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients with low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma have been treated with intra-cavitary radiation (Papillon's technique). Twenty-three were treated for cure and 12 for palliation. The indications for curative intracavity radiation were mobile polypoid tumors, less than 3 cm in diameter, with Broder's Grades 1 and 2 differentiation lying less than 11 cm from the anal verge. Doses between 2000 and 4000 cGy were delivered to a total of 7000 to 20000 cGy with complete resolution of the tumors. Eighty-seven per cent in the curative group are alive and well up to 42 months after treatment with a minimum follow-up of six months. Of the 23 patients treated for cure, three patients had recurrences within 18 months of therapy. Two of the three patients are alive following surgery. The third patient died in the postoperative period. The results of intracavitary radiation are comparable to ablative surgery and avoid a permanent colostomy. Age, frailty, or other medical conditions do not preclude this treatment. Anesthesia and hospitalization are not required. This method can also be used for palliation of recurrent tumors and in patients who are unsuitable for surgery.

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxing; Lin, Ruifang; Li, Huifang; Su, Meng; Zhang, Wenyi; Deng, Xia; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Background . The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods . Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results . A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54) had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5%) expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level ( p = 0.006) and attitudes ( p = 0.001) influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients' understanding of preoperative therapy.

  17. Abdominal and perineal approaches in the surgical treatment of rectal prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Gül

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rectal prolapse is a disease, which is an important cause of social and functional problems and has a continuing debate about the ideal surgical treatment of itself. In this study, we aimed to investigate the abdominal and perineal approaches with early and late postoperative result in the patients undergoing surgery for rectal prolapse.Materials and methods: Between 2006-2011, the records of 21 patients undergoing surgery with the diagnosis of rectal prolapse were reviewed, retrospectively. The demographic and physical examination findings, surgical procedures, early and late postoperative complications, recurrence and mortality rates were recorded.Results: The median age was 43 years and female/male ratio was 1.63/1. The most common presenting complaint was gas control failure and often wetting with mucus. Stage 1 and stage 3 rectal prolapses was detected in 19% and 81% of the patients, respectively. The most common surgical procedure was Notaras (54%. Early postoperative complications were seen in 14.3% of the patients. There were no postoperative recurrence, mortality and complication requiring re-exploration. Advanced age and shorter duration of hospital stay were determined and often performed under regional anesthesia in the patients undergoing perineal approach. No statistical differences were observed in terms of early postoperative complications and recurrence.Conclusion: Results of abdominal and perineal approaches were similar, when they were applied with taking into account the risk factors for surgical treatment, findings of the patients and the surgeon’s experience.

  18. Assessing the effectiveness of a guideline recommendation for pre-operative radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchon-Walsh, Paula; Borras, Josep Maria; Espinas, Josep Alfons; Aliste, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the degree of adherence to the guideline recommendation on pre-operative RT/ChT for stage-II and -III patients in Catalonian public hospitals, and its impact on local recurrence among rectal cancer patients. Methods: Data were derived from a multicentre retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for primary rectal cancer at Catalonian public hospitals in 2005 and 2007. Results: The study covered 1229 patients with TNM stage-II or -III primary rectal cancer. Of these patients, 54.5% underwent pre-operative RT/ChT; 14.9% underwent post-operative RT (± chemotherapy); and 30.6% did not undergo any RT. The crude local recurrence rate at 2 years was 4.1% and the crude distant recurrence rate at 2 years was 6.5%. The results of the univariate analyses showed a local-recurrence hazard ratio of 1.84 for the group of patients that received no RT versus the group that received pre-operative RT/ChT (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This is the first population-based study in Catalonia to support the use of pre-operative RT/ChT in rectal cancer patients because, in line with the results of population-based studies reported from other countries, its application, compared to non-application of RT, was found to lead to a clear reduction in the probability of local recurrence.

  19. Piggy-back Hepatic Transplant Technique and Veno-venous Bypass Without Cardiac Arrest: A Multidisciplinary Approach in Borderline T3b/T3c Renal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechifor-Boila IA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for renal cell carcinomas with tumor thrombus extending in the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC can be particularly challenging, especially in the retrohepatic and intraatrial situations (T3b and T3c. Classically, these tumors require the intraoperative use of cardio-pulmonary by-pass (CPB and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA, that can result in specific complications (stroke, platelet dysfunction, with increased postoperative morbidity rates.

  20. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  1. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • LPA 5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA 5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA 5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA 1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA 5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA 5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA 1 –LPA 6 ) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA 1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA 5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA 1 and LPA 5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA 5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA 1

  4. MicroRNA expression profile associated with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Marek; Sana, Jiri; Fabian, Pavel; Kocakova, Ilona; Gombosova, Jana; Nekvindova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Vyzula, Rostislav; Slaby, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancer accounts for approximately one third of all colorectal cancers (CRC), which belong among leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/4 and/or cN+) includes neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil) followed by radical surgical resection. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of tumors do not respond enough to the neoadjuvant treatment and these patients are at risk of relapse. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs playing significant roles in the pathogenesis of many cancers including rectal cancer. MiRNAs could present the new predictive biomarkers for rectal cancer patients. We selected 20 patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer and whose tumors were classified as most sensitive or resistant to the treatment. These two groups were compared using large-scale miRNA expression profiling. Expression levels of 8 miRNAs significantly differed between two groups. MiR-215, miR-190b and miR-29b-2* have been overexpressed in non-responders, and let-7e, miR-196b, miR-450a, miR-450b-5p and miR-99a* have shown higher expression levels in responders. Using these miRNAs 9 of 10 responders and 9 of 10 non-responders (p < 0.05) have been correctly classified. Our pilot study suggests that miRNAs are part of the mechanisms that are involved in response of rectal cancer to the chemoradiotherapy and that miRNAs may be promising predictive biomarkers for such patients. In most miRNAs we identified (miR-215, miR-99a*, miR-196b, miR-450b-5p and let-7e), the connection between their expression and radioresistance or chemoresistance to inhibitors of thymidylate synthetase was already established

  5. Preparation of high specific activity labelled triiodothyronine (T3) for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.; Nagvekar, U.H.; Desai, C.N.; Mani, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    A method standardized for the preparation of high specific activity labelled triiodothyronine (T 3 ) is discussed. Iodine-125 labelled T 3 with a specific activity of 3 mCi μg was prepared by iodinating 3,5-diiodothyronine (T 2 ) and purifying it over Sephadex G-25 gel. Radochemical purity and stability evaluations were done by paper chromatography. Specific activity of the labelled T 3 prepared was estimated by the self-displacement method. The use of this high specific activity labelled T 3 in radioimmunoassay increased the sensitivity considerably. The advantage of this procedure is that the specific activity of labelled T 3 formed is independent of reaction yield and labelled T 3 yield. (author)

  6. Initial experience with 3T 3D-TOF MRA in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Shizue; Matsubara, Ichiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Miki, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the value of 3T 3D-time of flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms compared with 1.5T 3D-TOF MRA. Twenty-one patients with 22 aneurysms underwent MRA at 1.5T and 3T. Images were interpreted by two radiologists. Each of nine aneurysms that had been considered ''definite'' at 1.5T 3D-TOF MRA were considered ''definite'' at 3T 3D-TOF MRA. Seven aneurysms that had been considered ''suspicious'' at 1.5T MRA were considered ''definite'' at 3T. And four aneurysms that had been considered ''suspicious'' at 1.5T were considered ''negative'' at 3T. We concluded that 3T 3D-TOF MRA is superior to 1.5T 3D-TOF MRA in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms. (author)

  7. Knowledge and acceptability of the rectal treatment route in Laos and its application for pre-referral emergency malaria treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rectal artesunate has been shown to reduce death and disability from severe malaria caused by delays in reaching facilities capable of providing appropriate treatment. Acceptability of this mode of drug delivery in Laos is not known. In 2009 the acceptability of rectal treatments was evaluated among the general Lao population and Lao doctors in a national survey. Methods A cross sectional survey was performed of 985 households selected through a multi-stage random sampling process from 85 villages in 12/18 provinces and of 315 health staff randomly selected at each administrative level. Results Out of 985 families, 9% had used the rectal route to treat children (the main indication was seizures or constipation. The population considered it less effective than other routes. Other concerns raised included pain (28%, discomfort for children (40% and the possibility of other side effects (20%. Of 300 health staff surveyed (nurses 44%, doctors 66%, only 51% had already used the rectal route with a suppository, mostly to treat fever (76%. Health staff working in provincial hospitals had more experience of using the rectal route than those in urban areas. The majority (92% were keen to use the rectal route to treat malaria although oral and intramuscular routes were preferred and considered to be more efficacious. Discussion and conclusion Use of rectal treatments is uncommon in Laos and generally not considered to be very effective. This view is shared by the population and health care workers. More information and training are needed to convince the population and health staff of the efficacy and advantages of the rectal route for malaria treatment.

  8. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 ± 3mm (mean ± SD) and 10 ± 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 ± 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 ± 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  9. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  10. Pengaruh Rapat Arus Anodizing terhadap Nilai Kekerasan pada Plat Aluminium Paduan Aa Seri 2024-t3

    OpenAIRE

    Fajar Nugroho

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum alloy AA 2024-T3 is widely applied in the aircraft industry because it has good mechanical properties such as; light weight, good conductivity and the corrosion resistance. However Aluminium 2024-T3 susceptible to wearing. One method to improve the wear resistance o f AA 2024-T3 is the anodizing process. The aims of this research to study the effect of current density and anodizing time against the hardness of aluminum alloy AA 2024-T3. The process of anodizing was carried out using ...

  11. High Performance Programming Using Explicit Shared Memory Model on the Cray T3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Cray T3D is the first-phase system in Cray Research Inc.'s (CRI) three-phase massively parallel processing program. In this report we describe the architecture of the T3D, as well as the CRAFT (Cray Research Adaptive Fortran) programming model, and contrast it with PVM, which is also supported on the T3D We present some performance data based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to illustrate both architectural and software features of the T3D.

  12. Effects of Maillard reaction on allergenicity of buckwheat allergen Fag t 3 during thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen-Huang; Li, Chen; Li, Yu-Ying; Wang, Zhuan-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Fag t 3 is a major allergenic protein in tartary buckwheat. The Maillard reaction commonly occurs in food processing, but few studies have been conducted on the influence of thermal processing on the allergenic potential of buckwheat allergen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of autologous plant polysaccharides on the immunoreactivity of buckwheat Fag t 3 (11S globulin) following the Maillard reaction. Fag t 3 and crude polysaccharides were prepared from tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) flour. After heating, the polysaccharides were covalently linked to Fag t 3 via a Maillard reaction, and the IgE/IgG-binding properties of Fag t 3 decreased dramatically, with significant changes also being observed in the electrophoretic mobility, secondary structure and solubility of the glycated Fag t 3. The great influence of glycation on IgE/IgG binding to Fag t 3 was correlated with a significant change in the structure and epitopes of the allergenic protein. These data indicated that conjugation of polysaccharides to Fag t 3 markedly reduced the allergen's immunoreactivity. Glycation that occurs via the Maillard reaction during the processing of buckwheat food may be an efficient method to reduce Fag t 3 allergenicity. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Masaomi; Mizuta, Minoru; Kaji, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    To determine the pathologic effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with advanced rectal carcinoma, we reviewed clinical records of 76 patients who received preoperative pelvic radiation +/- chemotherapy. Since 2 patients refused operation and 2 died before surgery, 72 patients underwent operation with a mean delay of 19.9 days after completion of irradiation. Pathologic tumor regression grade (Grade 0-3) was determined by the amount of viable tumor versus necrosis and fibrosis. Grade 0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 (pCR) were observed in 0%, 25.0%, 38.9%, 27.8% and 2.8% of patients, respectively. The pathologic response (PR) rate was 75.0% when PR was defined as greater than grade 1b (tumor regression more than 1/3). Downstaging was observed in 35.8% of patients, in which 5-year overall survival was significantly better than in patients without downstaging (90.0% vs. 50.1%, p<0.05). No correlation could be observed between PR and downstaging. CRT is a useful tool with a high PR rate in patients with advanced rectal cancer. More accurate and careful clinical staging is important to select adequate candidates for CRT. Multi-institutional clinical trials as well as standardizing the surgical procedure including lymph node (LN) dissection are required to validate the advantages of CRT for Japanese patients. (author)

  14. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer.

  15. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Before, During, and After Radiotherapy for High-Risk Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Markussen, Alice; Jensen, Benny V; Fromm, Anne L; Vistisen, Kirsten K; Parner, Vibeke K; Linnemann, Dorte; Hansen, Rasmus H; Johannesen, Helle H; Schou, Jakob V

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer. Patients with rectum cancer T4 or T3 involving the mesorectal fascia was included in a prospective phase 2 trial. Liver or lung metastases were accepted if the surgeons found them resectable. The patients received 6 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before chemoradiotherapy (CRT), continued capecitabine and oxaliplatin during radiotherapy, and received 4 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin after CRT. The patients received radiotherapy as intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was planned 8 weeks after CRT. The patients were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before start of treatment, after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, and again just before the operation. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-CR29 scoring system was used to evaluate adverse events. Fifty-two patients were enrolled between 2009 and 2012. The treatment was well tolerated, with only one death during treatment. Eighty percent of assessable patients experienced response to chemotherapy alone as evaluated by MRI, which increased to 94% after complete oncologic treatment. Forty-nine patients had a total mesorectal excision performed, all with a R0 resection and with a pathologic complete response of 20% for patients with T3 tumor and 7% for patients with T4 tumor. Five patients had metastases at study entry, while 47 patients had locally advanced rectal cancer without metastases. Of these 47 patients, overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% and 62%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 60 months. This aggressive approach with capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer is safe and feasible; it also has an impressive response rate as measured by MRI and a promising 5-year overall survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. The predictive and prognostic potential of plasma telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) RNA in rectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzo, Enrica; Del Bianco, Paola; Bertorelle, Roberta; Boso, Caterina; Perin, Alessandro; Spiro, Giovanna; Bergamo, Francesca; Belluco, Claudio; Buonadonna, Angela; Palazzari, Elisa; Leonardi, Sara; De Paoli, Antonino; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; De Rossi, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Background: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery is the standard care for locally advanced rectal cancer, but tumour response to CRT and disease outcome are variable. The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of plasma telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) levels in predicting tumour response and clinical outcome. Methods: 176 rectal cancer patients were included. Plasma samples were collected at baseline (before CRT=T0), 2 weeks after CRT was initiated (T1), post-CRT and before surgery (T2), and 4–8 months after surgery (T3) time points. Plasma TERT mRNA levels and total cell-free RNA were determined using real-time PCR. Results: Plasma levels of TERT were significantly lower at T2 (P<0.0001) in responders than in non-responders. Post-CRT TERT levels and the differences between pre- and post-CRT TERT levels independently predicted tumour response, and the prediction model had an area under curve of 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–0.87). Multiple analysis demonstrated that patients with detectable TERT levels at T2 and T3 time points had a risk of disease progression 2.13 (95% CI 1.10–4.11)-fold and 4.55 (95% CI 1.48–13.95)-fold higher, respectively, than those with undetectable plasma TERT levels. Conclusions: Plasma TERT levels are independent markers of tumour response and are prognostic of disease progression in rectal cancer patients who undergo neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:29449673

  17. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pisani Ceretti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below.

  18. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  19. High dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: risk factors for late rectal complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun; Aruga, Moriyo; Kotaka, Kikuo; Fujimoto, Hajime; Minoura, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the incidence of late rectal complications in patients treated with high dose rate brachytherapy for FIGO stage IIB, IIIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and to evaluate the treatment factors associated with an increased probability of treatment complications. Materials and Methods: Records of 100 patients with FIGO IIB or IIIB cervical carcinoma treated with definitive irradiation using high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICR) between 1977 and 1994 were retrospectively reviewed. For each HDR-ICR session, 6 Gy isodose volume was reconstructed three dimensionally and the following three parameters were determined to represent this isodose volume, length (L); maximum longitudinal distance of 6 Gy isodose area in an oblique frontal plane containing the intrauterine applicator, width (W); maximum width of 6 Gy isodose area in the same plane, height (H); maximum dimension of 6 Gy isodose area perpendicular to the intrauterine applicator determined in the oblique sagittal plane. Point P/Q (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the proximal retention point of the intrauterine source) and point R/S (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the midpoint of the ovoid sources) were also defined retrospectively and HDR-ICR dose at these points were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the treatment factors predictive of late rectal complications. Results: The 5-year cumulative cause-specific disease-free survival rate was 50% for all, 74% for Stage IIB, and 38% for Stage IIIB, with a significant difference between two FIGO Stages (p=0.0004). Of patients treated for both stages, 30% and 36% had experienced moderate to severe (Grade 2-4) complications at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Average H value (p=0.013) and cumulative point S dose by HDR-ICR (p=0.020) were significantly correlated with the incidence of late rectal complications (Student's t-test), whereas these factors did not significantly affect the probability of pelvic control. No

  20. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, NG Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer. An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate. The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively. Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  1. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  2. Anorectal function orientated surgery for rectal prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Yoshihiko; Tsujizuka, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Until quite recently, rectal prolapse was regarded as being a simple condition to treat. Surgical control of the prolapse was largely regarded as a successful outcome. However, recent detailed clinical assessment indicate that many patients have a rectal prolapse which is successfully controlled by surgical operation, yet suffer severe symptoms of disordered defecation, which either persists, or develops as a result of operative treatment. Difficulty with rectal evacuation, persistent incontinence and continuing mucus discharge are recognized as important, despite successful repair of the prolapse itself. There are two major theory of the pathology; circumferential intussusception and sliding hernia. However, many other multifarious factors are concomitant with the condition. These factors often need to be balanced against one another. Usually, a single surgical procedure will not be able to solve the problems. Therefore, the choice of treatment tailored for the individual patient. (author)

  3. [Severe vaginal discharge following rectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, L C; Bremers, A J A; Heesakkers, J P F A; Kluivers, K B

    2018-01-01

    Almost 50% of women who have had rectal surgery subsequently develop vaginal discharge. Due to the recurrent and unexpected nature of this heavy discharge, they often experience it as very distressing. Many of these women undergo extensive diagnostic tests that are mainly focused on identifying fistula formation. If no fistula is found, in most cases no other cause for severe vaginal discharge can be demonstrated. In our practice, we saw three patients (49-, 54- and 74-years-old, respectively) with similar severe vaginal discharge after rectal surgery and in whom no explanation for the vaginal discharge could be found. For this reason we conducted a literature search into this condition. Anatomical changes appear to be responsible for heavy vaginal discharge following rectal surgery. Changes in pelvic floor muscles and compression of the distal part of the vagina may lead to pooling of fluid in the proximal part of the vagina, resulting in severe discharge. Symptomatic treatment may reduce the symptoms.

  4. Microstructural effects on the initiation of zinc phosphate coatings on 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susac, D.; Sun, X.; Li, R.Y.; Wong, K.C.; Wong, P.C.; Mitchell, K.A.R.; Champaneria, R.

    2004-01-01

    The initiation of coatings deposited on to 2024-T3 aluminum alloy from supersaturated zinc phosphating solutions has been studied using scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The alloy microstructure, especially associated with the second-phase particles, strongly affects the formation stages of the coating process, where etching of the substrate has a significant role. At the start, zinc phosphate (ZPO) crystals form on the Al-Cu-Mg second-phase particles, rather than on the matrix or on the Al-Cu-Fe-Mn particles, with the initial nucleation appearing at interfaces between Al-Cu-Mg particles and the matrix. In contrast, the formation of the ZPO coating is delayed on the cathodic Al-Cu-Fe-Mn particles, compared to those of the Al-Cu-Mg composition. When the coating process is completed, the whole sample surface is covered with ZPO although its thickness varies at the different micro-regions

  5. Effects of Methylmercury exposure in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Vertigan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mercury-containing compounds are environmental pollutants that have become increasingly consequential in the Arctic regions of North America due to processes of climate change increasing their release and availability at northern latitudes. Currently, the form of mercury known to be most detrimental to human health is methylmercury, CH3Hg+, which is found in the environment and accumulates in the tissues of piscivores, including those consumed by Alaska Natives through subsistence gathering. Much is known about the neurotoxicity of methylmercury after exposure to high concentrations, but little is known about toxicity to other tissues and cell types, particularly for long-term exposure and the lower concentrations that would occur through fish consumption. Effects of methylmercury exposure on 3T3-L1 adipocytes in culture were assessed using assays for cytotoxicity and an ELISA assay for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, a signaling molecule shown to be important for maintaining metabolic status in adipose tissue. Results showed that exposure to methylmercury leads to significant toxicity in adipocytes at exposures of 100 ng/mL during later stages of differentiation, but lower methylmercury concentrations produced little to no toxicity. Results also showed that VEGF secretion is elevated in adipocytes exposed to methylmercury after the process of differentiating into mature, fat-storing cells. These results provide a basis for further exploration into metabolic consequences of methylmercury exposure on specific cell types and cell models.

  6. Fisetin induces Sirt1 expression while inhibiting early adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Chon; Kim, Yoo Hoon; Son, Sung Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi; Pyo, Suhkneung; Um, Sung Hee

    2015-11-27

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a naturally found flavonol in many fruits and vegetables and is known to have anti-aging, anti-cancer and anti-viral effects. However, the effects of fisetin on early adipocyte differentiation and the epigenetic regulator controlling adipogenic transcription factors remain unclear. Here, we show that fisetin inhibits lipid accumulation and suppresses the expression of PPARγ in 3T3-L1 cells. Fisetin suppressed early stages of preadipocyte differentiation, and induced expression of Sirt1. Depletion of Sirt1 abolished the inhibitory effects of fisetin on intracellular lipid accumulation and on PPARγ expression. Mechanistically, fisetin facilitated Sirt1-mediated deacetylation of PPARγ and FoxO1, and enhanced the association of Sirt1 with the PPARγ promoter, leading to suppression of PPARγ transcriptional activity, thereby repressing adipogenesis. Lowering Sirt1 levels reversed the effects of fisetin on deacetylation of PPARγ and increased PPARγ transactivation. Collectively, our results suggest the effects of fisetin in increasing Sirt1 expression and in epigenetic control of early adipogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Satisfaction with life after rectal prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Daria; Pusty, Michal; Dziki, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of satisfaction with life, as a result of comparing own life situation with the individualised personal standards, is an important element for measuring satisfaction with life of the patients suffering from somatic disorders. Literature provides numerous data on satisfaction with life of different groups of patients suffering from somatic disorders. Little space is devoted to the study of the level of satisfaction of patients with rectal prolapse, which is particularly evident in relation to the Polish patient population. The aim of the study was planned to determine the level of satisfaction with life and its determinants among patients with full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery as well as to assess the improvement of continence after this surgery. The study group consisted of 20 patients operated on for full-thickness rectal prolapse in the Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University in Lódź. SWLS (Satisfaction with Life Scale) Diener et al. in the Polish adaptation by Juczyński was used to assess global life satisfaction. Assessment of the incontinence severity and the postoperative improvement was made with Jorge and Wexner scale. The average level of global life satisfaction among patients with rectal prolapse surgery is 21.05 (SD = 4.68) and it corresponds to the level of satisfaction of the total population. In the study group, there were no statistically significant differences in the level of global satisfaction with life depending on age, disease recurrence and continence improvement after surgery. The continence after rectal prolapse surgery improved significantly (plife satisfaction of patients operated on for rectal prolapse.

  8. Intestinal Obstruction Due to Rectal Endometriosis: A Surgical Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructed rectal endometriosis is an uncommon presentation. The clinical and intraoperative presentation may present as malignant obstruction. The difficulty in making the diagnosis may delay the definitive management of the patient. We report a unique case of rectal endometriosis mimicking malignant rectal mass causing intestinal obstruction and discuss the management of the case.

  9. Clinical Fact of Rectal Duplication with gastric heterotopy | Atmani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enteric duplication could occur through the entire alimentary tract. A case of rectal duplication cyst with heterotopic gastric mucosa in a chid is described. MRI scan is shown useful in the diagnosis of the duplication. The treatment is the complete local resection of the rectal duplication. Keywords: duplication, rectal, MRI, ...

  10. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  11. Effects of previous protein intake on rectal temperature, blood glucose, plasma thyroid hormone and minerals by laying hens during a forced molt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, G A; Moraes, V M.B.; Cherici, I; Furlan, R L; Macari, M [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias

    1991-12-01

    The effects of forced molting on blood glucose, rectal temperature, plasma T4, T3 and minerals were studied in hens previously fed rations with different protein contents (14, 17 and 20% crude protein). Blood samples were obtained from brachial veins for blood glucose, T4 and T3 were measured by radioimmunoassay, and plasma minerals were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Blood glucose and rectal temperature were reduced during fasting regardless of previous protein intake. Pre molting T4 plasma level was higher in laying hens fed higher protein ration, but feed deprivation reduced T{sub 4} and T{sub 3} concentrations irrespective of protein intake, except T{sub 4} level for 14% crude protein fed birds that increased during fasting. The data obtained in this experiment suggest that previous protein intake does not interfere with the metabolic changes during forced molt. (author). 19 refs, 1 fig, 4 tabs.

  12. Osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 Cells Prefer Glycolysis for ATP Production but Adipocyte-like 3T3-L1 Cells Prefer Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntur, Anyonya R; Gerencser, Akos A; Le, Phuong T; DeMambro, Victoria E; Bornstein, Sheila A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Maridas, David E; Clemmons, David E; Brand, Martin D; Rosen, Clifford J

    2018-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are early progenitors that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. We hypothesized that osteoblasts and adipocytes utilize distinct bioenergetic pathways during MSC differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we compared the bioenergetic profiles of preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and calvarial osteoblasts with preadipocyte 3T3L1 cells, before and after differentiation. Differentiated MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts met adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand mainly by glycolysis with minimal reserve glycolytic capacity, whereas nondifferentiated cells generated ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. A marked Crabtree effect (acute suppression of respiration by addition of glucose, observed in both MC3T3-E1 and calvarial osteoblasts) and smaller mitochondrial membrane potential in the differentiated osteoblasts, particularly those incubated at high glucose concentrations, indicated a suppression of oxidative phosphorylation compared with nondifferentiated osteoblasts. In contrast, both nondifferentiated and differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes met ATP demand primarily by oxidative phosphorylation despite a large unused reserve glycolytic capacity. In sum, we show that nondifferentiated precursor cells prefer to use oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP; when they differentiate to osteoblasts, they gain a strong preference for glycolytic ATP generation, but when they differentiate to adipocytes, they retain the strong preference for oxidative phosphorylation. Unique metabolic programming in mesenchymal progenitor cells may influence cell fate and ultimately determine the degree of bone formation and/or the development of marrow adiposity. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. Peritoneocele and enterocele. Formation and transformation during rectal evacuation as studied by means of defaeco-peritoneography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremmer, S.; Uden, R.; Mellgren, A.; Holmstroem, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study, by means of defaeco-peritoneography, the formation and transformation of the peritoneocele, with and without an enterocele, during rectal evacuation. Material and Methods: Forty-six patients with a peritoneocele at defaecoperitoneography were selected for the study, and examined at three different stages:(1) at the start with a contrast-filled rectum; (2) at maximum straining; and (3) at rest after rectal evacuation. Results: Fourteen patients had a peritoneocele at the start. These peritoneoceles were largest at maximum straining and were all still present at rest after rectal evacuation. In 32 patients defaeco-peritoneography was regarded as normal at the start. At maximum straining these patients developed a peritoneocele and 20 of these were still present after rectal evacuation. No enterocele was seen at the start. At maximum straining 21 patients developed an enterocele and 15 of these were still present after rectal evacuation. Liquid in varying amounts was found in the peritoneoceles. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that peritoneoceles were present at different stages of the defaeco-peritoneographic investigations. (orig./MG)

  14. Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC offers similar outcomes in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases compared to colon cancer patients: a matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkens, Geert A; van Oudheusden, Thijs R; Braam, Hidde J; Wiezer, Marinus J; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Rutten, Harm J; van Ramshorst, Bert; de Hingh, Ignace H

    2016-04-01

    The effect of cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases (PM) is unclear. This case-control study aims to assess the results of cytoreduction and HIPEC in patients with rectal PM compared to colon PM patients. Colorectal PM patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC were included. Two colon cancer patients were case-matched for each rectal cancer patient, based on prognostic factors (T stage, N stage, histology type, and extent of PM). Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between both groups. From 317 patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC, 29 patients (9.1%) had rectal PM. Fifty-eight colon cases were selected as control patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Major morbidity was 27.6% and 34.5% in the rectal and colon group, respectively (P = 0.516). Median disease-free survival was 13.5 months in the rectal group and 13.6 months in the colon group (P = 0.621). Two- and five-year overall survival rates were 54%/32% in rectal cancer patients, and 61%/24% in colon cancer patients (P = 0.987). Cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients with rectal PM is feasible and provides similar outcomes as in colon cancer patients. Rectal PM should not be regarded a contra-indication for cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:548-553. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sphincter Preservation After Short-term Preoperative Radiotherapy for Low Rectal Cancer - Presentation of Own Data and a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Oldzki, Janusz; Sopyo, Rafa; Skoczylas, Jerzy; Chwaliski, Maciej [The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Inst. of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    This report is based on a series of 108 patients with clinically staged T2 (9), T3 (94) and T4 (5) rectal cancer treated with preoperative irradiation with 25 Gy, 5 Gy per fraction given for one week. In 77% of patients, the tumour was located within 7 cm of the anal verge and in 15% the anal canal was involved. Surgery was usually undertaken during the week after irradiation. For low tumours, total mesorectal excision was performed, and for middle and upper cancers, the whole circumference of the mesorectum was excised at least 2 cm below the lower pole of a tumour. Tumour was resected in 103 patients, and sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 73% of them. In the subgroup where the tumour was located higher than 4 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 95%. The follow-up period ranged from 10 to 49 months, with a median of 25 months. Local recurrences were observed in 4% of patients. Anorectal dysfunction caused impairment of social life in 40% of patients and 18% admitted that their quality of life was seriously affected - however, none of them stated that they would have preferred a colostomy. These preliminary data suggest that following high dose per fraction short-term preoperative radiotherapy a high rate of sphincter-preserving surgery can be reached, with acceptable anorectal function and an acceptable rate of local failure and late complications. The results of our own data and literature review indicate the need for a randomized clinical trial comparing high dose per fraction preoperative radiotherapy with immediate surgery with conventional preoperative radiochemotherapy with delayed surgery.

  16. Radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis. Prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of oral sulfasalazine plus rectal steroids versus rectal sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochhar, R.; Patel, F.; Dhar, A.; Sharma, S.C.; Ayyagari, S.; Aggarwal, R.; Goenka, M.K.; Gupta, B.D.; Mehta, S.K. (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India))

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study, 37 consecutive patients with radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis were randomized to receive a four-week course of either 3.0 g oral sulfasalazine plus 20 mg twice daily rectal prednisolone enemas (group I, N = 18) or 2.0 g twice daily rectal sucralfate enemas plus oral placebo (group II, N = 19). The two groups were comparable with respect to demographic features, duration of symptoms, and clinical and endoscopic staging of the disease. Fifteen patients in group I and 17 in group II completed the trial. At four weeks, both groups showed significant clinical improvement (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II) and endoscopic healing (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II). When the two groups were compared, sucralfate enemas showed a significantly better response as assessed clinically (P less than 0.05), although endoscopically the response was not statistically different (P greater than 0.05). We conclude that both treatment regimens are effective in the management of radiation proctitis. Sucralfate enemas give a better clinical response, are tolerated better, and because of the lower cost should be the preferred mode of short-term treatment.

  17. Radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis. Prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of oral sulfasalazine plus rectal steroids versus rectal sucralfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochhar, R.; Patel, F.; Dhar, A.; Sharma, S.C.; Ayyagari, S.; Aggarwal, R.; Goenka, M.K.; Gupta, B.D.; Mehta, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study, 37 consecutive patients with radiation-induced proctosigmoiditis were randomized to receive a four-week course of either 3.0 g oral sulfasalazine plus 20 mg twice daily rectal prednisolone enemas (group I, N = 18) or 2.0 g twice daily rectal sucralfate enemas plus oral placebo (group II, N = 19). The two groups were comparable with respect to demographic features, duration of symptoms, and clinical and endoscopic staging of the disease. Fifteen patients in group I and 17 in group II completed the trial. At four weeks, both groups showed significant clinical improvement (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II) and endoscopic healing (P less than 0.01 for group I and P less than 0.001 for group II). When the two groups were compared, sucralfate enemas showed a significantly better response as assessed clinically (P less than 0.05), although endoscopically the response was not statistically different (P greater than 0.05). We conclude that both treatment regimens are effective in the management of radiation proctitis. Sucralfate enemas give a better clinical response, are tolerated better, and because of the lower cost should be the preferred mode of short-term treatment

  18. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were...

  19. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  20. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  1. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  2. Kinetic studies of triiodothyronine (T3) in subjects with autonomous thyroid nodule using specific antiserum for the determination of labelled T3 in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, R.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Giannessi, D.; Pilo, A.; Toni, M.G.; Carpi, A.

    1976-01-01

    The triiodothyronine (T 3 ) kinetics have been evaluated using a 125 I-T 3 and single injection technique; five patients with autonomously functioning thyroid nodule clinically euthyroid, one hypothyroid patient and three control subjects have been studied. Serum-labelled T 3 concentration has been measured by a new method based on extraction of the hormone on small Sephadex G-25 columns, followed by elution with specific antiserum. The analysis of experimental data has been performed using noncompartmental treatment (integral approach). Single compartment analysis of the same data has been also done and results presented for comparison. Average value of metabolic clearance rate was 26.0 1/day in control subjects while larger values (range 28.9 - 53.4 1/day) were found in patients with autonomous nodule and total inhibition of extranodular parenchyma

  3. T3i: A Tool for Generating and Querying Test Suites for Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasetya, I.S.W.B.

    2015-01-01

    T3i is an automated unit-testing tool to test Java classes. To expose interactions T3i generates test-cases in the form of sequences of calls to the methods of the target class. What separates it from other testing tools is that it treats test suites as first class objects and allows users to e.g.

  4. An evaluation of the Cray T3D programming paradigms in atmospheric chemistry/transport models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blom (Joke); C. Keßler (Carsten); J.G. Verwer (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we compare the different programming paradigms available on the Cray T3D for the implementation of a 3D prototype of an Atmospheric Chemistry/Transport Model. We discuss the amount of work needed to convert existing codes to the T3D and the portability of the resulting

  5. Comparison of abdominoperineal resection and low anterior resection in lower and middle rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Hamedi, Sayed Hasan; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Razzaghi, Samira; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Ansari, Mansour; Pourahmad, Saeideh

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate local control and survival rates following abdominoperineal resection (APR) compared with low anterior resection (LAR) in lower and middle rectal cancer. In this retrospective study, 153 patients with newly histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma located at low and middle third that were treated between 2004 and 2010 at a tertiary hospital. The tumors were pathologically staged according to the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Surgery was applied for 138 (90%) of the patients, of which 96 (70%) underwent LAR and 42 were (30%) treated with APR. Total mesorectal excision was performed for all patients. In addition, 125 patients (82%) received concurrent (neoadjuvant, adjuvant or palliative) pelvic chemoradiation, and 134 patients (88%) received neoadjuvant, adjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy. Patients' follow-up ranged from 4 to 156 (median 37) months. Of 153 patients, 89 were men and 64 were women with a median age of 57 years. One patient (0.7%) was stage 0, 15 (9.8%) stage I, 63 (41.2%) stage II, 51 (33.3%) stage III and 23 (15%) stage IV. There was a significant difference between LAR and APR in terms of tumor distance from anal verge, disease stage and combined modality therapy used. However, there was no significant difference regarding 5-year local control, disease free and overall survival rates between LAR and APR. LAR can provide comparable local control, disease free and overall survival rates compared with APR in eligible patients with lower and middle rectal cancer. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Hemangioma colorretal Colon rectal hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pinheiro Barreto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma colorretal (HCR é uma lesão vascular benigna rara, com manifestação clínica geralmente entre 5 e 25 anos de idade. Faz parte do diagnóstico diferencial das causas de hemorragia digestiva baixa, sendo confundido, na maioria das vezes, com entidades mais comuns, como hemorróidas e doenças inflamatórias intestinais. O retardo do diagnóstico ocorre freqüentemente devido ao desconhecimento da doença, com taxas de mortalidade alcançando 40 a 50% na presença de sangramento importante. O caso relatado é de uma paciente de 17 anos de idade, admitida no Serviço de Colo-proctologia do Hospital Universitário - HUUFMA, em setembro de 2005, com anemia e sangramento retal, desde a infância, de forma intermitente e não dolorosa. Apresentado sua história clínica e propedêutica diagnóstica, realizada por meio de exames laboratoriais, endoscopia digestiva alta, colonoscopia e arteriografia de mesentéricas e ilíacas internas. O tratamento cirúrgico realizado foi retossigmoidectomia convencional com anastomose colorretal baixa, com boa evolução pós-operatória, tendo o exame histopatológico da peça cirúrgica ressecada, confirmado o diagnostico.The colon and rectum hemangioma is a rare benign vascular lesion, with clinical features usually between 5 and 25 years of age. It is included in the differential diagnose of the lower digestive bleeding causes, and has been frequently misdiagnosed with other more common entities, like hemorrhoids and bowel inflammatory disease. The late diagnose occurs usually because of the rarity of the disease, with mortality rates reaching 40 to 50% in presence of severe bleeding. We report a case of a 17 years old girl who was admitted at the Coloproctology Service of the Academic Hospital - HUUFMA, in September 2005, with anemia and intermittent rectal bleeding since childhood. Laboratorial findings included laboratorial exams, GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and arteriography of mesenteric and

  7. Increased use of multidisciplinary treatment modalities adds little to the outcome of rectal cancer treated by optimal total mesorectal excision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2012-10-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard surgical treatment for rectal cancer. The roles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy have become more defined, accompanied by improvements in preoperative staging and histopathological assessment. We analyse our ongoing results in the light of changing patterns of treatment over consecutive time periods.

  8. Long-term L-Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment in stable systolic heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmager, Pernille; Schmidt, Ulla; Mark, Peter

    2015-01-01

    %, range: 37-52 and serum T3 levels 1·4 nmol/l (0·9-1·6). The T3 dose was 20 μg per day (10-40). TSH levels did not change between groups, whereas serum T3 levels increased in the active arm. Cardiac function as measured by LVEF, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and cardiac output did not change...... during T3-treatment and neither did the neurohormonal profile. There were no side-effects in terms of cardiac arrhythmias and no change in resting heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that oral T3 treatment might be beneficial to patients with chronic, stable systolic HF...