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Sample records for stage rectal cancer

  1. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  2. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  4. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  5. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  6. Clinical and endorectal ultrasound staging of circumferential rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Farmer, K.C.; Chapple, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Circumferential rectal cancers present at a more advanced stage than those located in a single quadrant. Although accurate staging is an important aspect of the preoperative management of the patient with a rectal cancer, the clinical and radiological staging of this subgroup of rectal cancer patients has been poorly studied. All patients with a rectal cancer were assessed clinically (by digital rectal examination and rigid sigmoidoscopy) before the radiological assessment by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS). Data collected included tumour height (distance from anal verge in centimetre) and tumour type (circumferential or non-circumferential). Radiological tumour staging was with the TNM system. Fifty-nine subjects (33 men, 26 women; median age 65 years (range 38-86 years)) were identified with a circumferential rectal cancer. Mean height of the cancer was 8 - 0.4 cm (standard error of the mean; range 2-13 cm). Forty-two cancers were palpable, and 17 cancers were impalpable. All cancers assessed clinically as circumferential were confirmed as circumferential on ERUS scanning. Tumour stage as assessed by ERUS was either T3 (n = 57) or T4 (n = 2). Nodal status was NO (n = 29) and N1 (n = 30). All rectal cancers assessed as circumferential on clinical examination have an ERUS stage of T3 or greater.

  7. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  8. Intrarectal ultrasound accuracy in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallone, G.; Della Vecchia, A.; Di Capua, V.; Rengo, C.; Spirito, M.; Romano, G.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were evaluated of endorectal ultrasound in assessing the local extension of rectal carcinomas. The study population consisted of 50 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer. A CT scan was also performed on 45 patients, and the results were then compared to post-operative histologic findings. Endorectal US allowed the correct staging of 39/45 tumors (86.6%), with 1 false positive (overstaging T1 as T2), and 5 false negatives (understaging 3xT3 as T2; 2xT4 as T3). CT allowed the correct staging of 37/45 tumors (82.2%), with 5 false positives (overstaging T1 as T2) and 3 false negatives (understaging T3 as T2). Our results prove endorectal US to be a reliable method for the local staging of rectal cancers, limited to mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the rectal wall (T1 and T2 tumors). CT does not allow proper evaluation of T1 and T2 tumors, but provides with a better assessment of tumors (T3 and T4). Both C and endorectal US should, therefore, be used as complementary diagnostic techniques for an accurate evaluation of the local extension of lower rectal cancers

  9. Multimodal imaging evaluation in staging of rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common cancer and a major cause of mortality in Western countries. Accurate staging is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategies and planning appropriate surgical procedures to control rectal cancer. Endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) is suitable for assessing the extent of tumor invasion, particularly in early-stage or superficial rectal cancer cases. In advanced cases with distant metastases, computed tomography (CT) is the primary approach used to evaluate the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to assess preoperative staging and the circumferential resection margin involvement, which assists in evaluating a patient’s risk of recurrence and their optimal therapeutic strategy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT may be useful in detecting occult synchronous tumors or metastases at the time of initial presentation. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains a challenge with all modalities because it is difficult to reliably differentiate between the tumor mass and other radiation-induced changes in the images. EUS does not appear to have a useful role in post-therapeutic response assessments. Although CT is most commonly used to evaluate treatment responses, its utility for identifying and following-up metastatic lesions is limited. Preoperative high-resolution MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging, and/or PET-CT could provide valuable prognostic information for rectal cancer patients with locally advanced disease receiving preoperative CRT. Based on these results, we conclude that a combination of multimodal imaging methods should be used to precisely assess the restaging of rectal cancer following CRT. PMID:24764662

  10. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  11. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A. [Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. [Rectal cancer - local staging and imaging under neoadjuvant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, M

    2012-06-01

    Rectal cancer restaging after neoadjuvant therapy is based on two principles: an anatomic definition of the tumor allowing surgical planning and prognostic stage grouping. Emerging data suggest that reassessment using a combination of different imaging modalities may help to provide valuable prognostic information before definitive surgery. Perfusion computed tomography (CT) may provide special information regarding tumor vascularity. Evaluation of therapy response, especially of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) is necessary for surgical planning. For local staging high-resolution and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be of high diagnostic accuracy. The M status should be assessed using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) while lymph node evaluation requires either magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning.

  13. Transrectal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of rectal cancer. Effect of experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren R; Sørensen, Torben; Jakobsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of experience on preoperative staging of rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2002 to May 2006, 134 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven rectal cancer were examined with a 1....... In addition to this supervision, the person responsible for staging should be trained through a defined training programme....

  14. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients...... and overestimation resulted in 9 of 74. The figures for digital examination were 5 of 18 and 20 of 76, respectively. Penetration of the rectal wall was correctly identified in 56 of 61 patients by digital examination and in 59 of 61 by TRUS. Specimens without penetration of the rectal wall were identified in 26...

  16. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  17. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact...... on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. LIMITATIONS: Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal...... cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered....

  18. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  19. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-01-01

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation's radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  20. Stage III & IV colon and rectal cancers share a similar genetic profile: a review of the Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlick, Ute; Lu, Kim C; Douthit, Miriam A; Diggs, Brian S; Schuff, Kathryn G; Herzig, Daniel O; Tsikitis, Vassiliki L

    2013-05-01

    Determining the molecular profile of colon and rectal cancers offers the possibility of personalized cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether known genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis differ between colon and rectal cancers and whether they are associated with survival. The Oregon Colorectal Cancer Registry is a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved tissue repository with associated demographic and clinical information. The registry was queried for any patient with molecular analysis paired with clinical data. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, microsatellite instability status, and mutational analysis for p53, AKT, BRAF, KRAS, MET, NRAS, and PIK3CA were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square tests. Continuous variables between groups were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival studies. Comparisons of survival were made using log-rank tests. The registry included 370 patients: 69% with colon cancer and 31% with rectal cancer. Eighty percent of colon cancers and 68% of rectal cancers were stages III and IV. Mutational analysis found no significant differences in detected mutations between colon and rectal cancers, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers (10% vs 0%, P colon versus rectal cancers when stratified by the presence of KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations. Stage III and IV colon and rectal cancers share similar molecular profiles, except that there were significantly more BRAF mutations in colon cancers compared with rectal cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinically-staged T3N0 rectal cancer: is preoperative chemoradiotherapy the optimal treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Raffaele; Cuicchi, Dajana; Pinto, Carmine; Di Fabio, Francesca; Iacopino, Bruno; Neri, Stefano; Tardio, Maria Lucia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Lecce, Ferdinando; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Pini, Sara; Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Taffurelli, Mario; Minni, Francesco; Martoni, Andrea; Cola, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has been widely adopted as the standard of care for stage II-III rectal cancers. However, patients with T3N0 lesions had been shown to have a better prognosis than other categories of locally advanced tumor. Thus, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is likely to be overtreatment in this subgroup of patients. Nevertheless, the low accuracy rate of preoperative staging techniques for detection of node-negative tumors does not allow to check this hypothesis. We analyzed a group of patients with cT3N0 low rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the purpose of evaluating the incidence of metastatic nodes in the resected specimens. Between January 2002 and February 2008, 100 patients with low rectal cancer underwent clinical staging by means of endorectal ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. All patients received preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy and surgical resection with curative aim. Of 100 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, 32 were clinically staged as T3N0M0. Pathological analysis showed the presence of lymph node metastases in nine patients (28%) (node-positive group). In the remaining 23 cases, clinical N stage was confirmed at pathology (node-negative group). Node-positive and node-negative groups differ only in the number of ypT3 tumors (P cancer represents an undertreatment risk in at least 28% of cases, making necessary the use of postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy should be the therapy of choice on the grounds of the principle that overtreatment is less hazardous than undertreatment for cT3N0 rectal cancers.

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  4. Staging and survival of rectal cancer in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Miguel Henriques; Matos, Eduarda; Castro Poças, Fernando; Rocha, Rosa; Pinto, Jorge; Lopes, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    In the county of Vila Nova de Gaia (northern Portugal) in the period of 2004-2006, there were an average of 35 new cases of colorectal cancer per 100,000 population, which constitutes one of the highest rates in the world. The latest research has shown that there are many differences between colon and rectal cancers, thereby justifying an independent approach. The study pertained to the period 1995-2004, by using the census of 1991 and 2001 for calculating specific rates. The 399 diagnosed cases of rectal cancer were drawn from a specialized and active cancer registry, oncological registry of Gaia. Overall survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the curves were compared using a Log Rank test. The effect of topography and histological type on survival was obtained by controlling the stage disease, using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. There was a slight predominance of males, with a ratio between sexes of 1 : 3. The 50% overall survival rate after 5 years increased over time. The localization of the tumour and the histological type, after adjusting by stage, were not significant factors in the prognosis. Our study shows an increase in the number of cases over time, particularly in elderly women. The cumulative risk of having rectal cancer remains unchanged from 1981 to 2004. Unlike other studies, an increase in early lesions was not observed.

  5. Diagnostic value of multidetector row CT in rectal cancer staging: comparison of multiplanar and axial images with histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.; Verma, R.; Rajesh, A.; Richards, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is widely used for rectal cancer staging, many centres in the UK perform computed tomography (CT) for staging rectal cancer at present. Furthermore in a small proportion of cases contraindications to MR imaging may lead to staging using CT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of current generation multidetector row CT (MDCT) in local staging of rectal cancer. In particular the accuracy of multiplanar (MPR) versus axial images in the staging of rectal cancer was assessed. Material and methods: Sixty-nine consecutive patients were identified who had undergone staging of rectal cancer on CT. The imaging data were reviewed as axial images and then as MPR images (coronal and sagittal) perpendicular and parallel to the tumour axis. CT staging on axial and MPR images was then compared to histopathological staging. Results: MPR images detected more T4 and T3 stage tumours than axial images alone. The overall accuracy of T-staging on MPR images was 87.1% versus 73.0% for axial images alone. The overall accuracy of N staging on MPR versus axial images was 84.8% versus 70.7%. There was a statistically significant difference in the staging of T3 tumours between MPR and axial images (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Multidetector row CT has high accuracy for local staging of rectal cancer. Addition of MPR images to standard axial images provides higher accuracy rates for T and N staging of rectal cancer than axial images alone

  6. Social inequalities in stage at diagnosis of rectal but not in colonic cancer: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B L; Osler, M; Harling, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    among colon cancer patients. The social gradient found in rectal cancer patients was significantly different from the lack of association found among colon cancer patients. There are socioeconomic inequalities in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis of a rectal, but not a colonic, cancer....... A reduction in the risk of being diagnosed with distant metastasis was seen in elderly rectal cancer patients with high income, living in owner-occupied housing and living with a partner. Among younger rectal cancer patients, a reduced risk was seen in those having long education. No social gradient was found....... The different risk profile of these two cancers may reflect differences in symptomatology....

  7. Direct lymphography and lower mesentericography - possibilities and limits in determining the localization, stage and operability of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viyachki, I.; Todorova, L.

    1976-01-01

    The indications for direct lymphography and lower mesentericography in determining the localization, stage and operability of rectal cancer are discussed in detail. Direct lymphography was attempted in 23 and lower selective mesentericography in 12 patients with rectal cancer. Essential is only the positive result, although it indicates an advanced malignant process. Lower mesentericography, especially the selective one, furnishes valuable information on the localization and stage of rectal cancer, and hence on its operability. Major importance is attached to the combined use of the two methods. They may thus complement one another in the diagnosis of the early stages of rectal cancer and may be helpful in the search of early recurrences after radical treatment. (author)

  8. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  9. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  10. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-05-28

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images, as compared to the

  11. Analysis of stage and clinical/prognostic factors for colon and rectal cancer from SEER registries: AJCC and collaborative stage data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Charlton, Mary E; Ruiz, Bernardo A; Karlitz, Jordan; Altekruse, Sean F; Ries, Lynn A G; Jessup, J Milburn

    2014-12-01

    The Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System enables multiple cancer registration programs to document anatomic and molecular pathology features that contribute to the Tumor (T), Node (N), Metastasis (M) - TNM - system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). This article highlights changes in CS for colon and rectal carcinomas as TNM moved from the AJCC 6th to the 7th editions. Data from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries were analyzed for the years 2004-2010, which included 191,361colon and 73,341 rectal carcinomas. Overall, the incidence of colon and rectal cancers declined, with the greatest decrease in stage 0. The AJCC's 7th edition introduction of changes in the subcategorization of T4, N1, and N2 caused shifting within stage groups in 25,577 colon and 10,150 rectal cancers diagnosed in 2010. Several site-specific factors (SSFs) introduced in the 7th edition had interesting findings: 1) approximately 10% of colon and rectal cancers had tumor deposits - about 30%-40% occurred without lymph node metastases, which resulted in 2.5% of colon and 3.3% of rectal cases becoming N1c (stage III A/B) in the AJCC 7th edition; 2) 10% of colon and 12% of rectal cases had circumferential radial margins Cancer Society.

  12. Improving staging accuracy in colon and rectal cancer by sentinel lymph node mapping: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zaag, E. S.; Buskens, C. J.; Kooij, N.; Akol, H.; Peters, H. M.; Bouma, W. H.; Bemelman, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare the predictive value of sentinel lymph node (SN) mapping between patients with colon and rectal cancer. Patients and methods: An ex vivo SN procedure was performed in 100 patients with colon and 32 patients with rectal cancer. If the sentinel node was negative, immunohistochemical

  13. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival and the decision to administer chemotherapy and/or metastasectomy after elective surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer. This was a nationwide, retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the National Patient Registry. Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered.

  14. Clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of the staging of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Orita, Kunzo

    1987-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative clinical staging of rectal cancer was prospectively studied in 28 patients with macroscopically proven cancer. The CT studies were based on the previously established CT diagnostic criteria for wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastases (N factor), and liver metastases (H factor). When macroscopic findings were used as the standard, the accuracy of CT was 61 % for S factor, 32 % for N factor, and 86 % for H factor. Using histological findings as the standard, the accuracy was 48 % for S factor and 16 % for N factor. Overall, CT had a high accuracy for H factor in all sites of cancer (75 % in the rectosigmoid, 86 % in the area above the peritoneal reflection, and 90 % in the area below the peritoneal reflection). For the other S and N factors, CT seemed to be of limited value in the preoperative diagnosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Cell-free DNA levels and correlation to stage and outcome following treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Wettergren, Yvonne; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Taflin, Helena; Gustavson, Bengt; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm

    2017-11-01

    Accurate staging of rectal cancer remains essential for optimal patient selection for combined modality treatment, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. We aimed at examining the correlation of cell free DNA with the pathologic stage and subsequent risk of recurrence for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. We examined 75 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Blood samples for translational use were drawn prior to rectal surgery. The level of cell free DNA was quantified by digital droplet PCR and expressed as copy number of beta 2 microglobulin. We found a median level of cell free DNA in the AJCC stages I-III of 3100, 8300, and 10,700 copies/mL respectively. For patients with 12 sampled lymph nodes or above, the median level of cell free DNA were 2400 copies/mL and 4400 copies/mL (p = 0.04) for node negative and node positive disease respectively. The median follow-up was 39 months and 11 recurrences were detected (15%). The median level for patients with recurrent disease was 13,000 copies/mL compared to 5200 copies/mL for non-recurrent patients (p = 0.08). We have demonstrated a correlation between the level of total cell free DNA and the pathologic stage and nodal involvement. Furthermore, we have found a trend towards a correlation with the risk of recurrence following resection of localized rectal cancer.

  16. MRI or CT for pretreatment staging and radiotherapy planning for radiochemotherapy in distal rectal cancer. Radiologists point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vloka, M.; Kirkova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In the recent years, the therapeutic approach to rectal cancer changed dramatically. Implementation of a common mesorectal excision and preoperative radiotherapy has become a standard procedure. Noninvasive imaging methods have become basic and leading methods in the process of pre-therapy staging and rectal cancer radiotherapy planning. What you will learn : Following the recommendations of the 2013 ESGAR EURECCA 2012 we will present: a comparative data about the place and role of MRI and CT in the algorithm for low rectal carcinoma staging ; a standard MRI protocol for low rectum carcinoma staging as well as the questions concerning the image interpretation that the radiologist needs to answer. Discussion : Based on the European rules and consensus in the standard protocols implementation of in conducting MRI in rectal cancer, we have the opportunity for preoperative staging of the tumor and hence for proper treatment. The high spatial and tissue resolution of MRI allows carcinoma’s visualization at the depth infiltration of the wall of rectum, distance from mesorectal fascia, involvement of anorectal sphincter, pelvic floor and adjacent bodies, involvement of the venous plexus and the metastatic pararectal lymph nodes presence. Additional performed lung, abdomen and pelvis CT (MDCT) has limited chance for tumor staging, but it serves for distant metastases detection. Conclusion: MRI is the main method for T and N staging and re-staging of low carcinoma of the rectum. MDCT is used for determination of the N stages of the disease

  17. International preoperative rectal cancer management: staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and impact of multidisciplinary teams.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Augestad, Knut M

    2010-11-01

    Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates.

  18. Diffusion MRI for rectal cancer staging: ADC measurements before and after ultrasonographic gel lumen distension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmucci, S., E-mail: spalmucci@sirm.org; Piccoli, M.; Piana, S.; Foti, P.V.; Siverino, R.O.A.; Mauro, L.A.; Milone, P.; Ettorre, G.C.

    2017-01-15

    Objectives: To compare Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measurements in rectal neoplastic lesions before and after lumen distension obtained with sonography transmission gel. Methods: From January 2014 to July 2016, 25 patients (average age 63.7, range 41–85, 18 males) were studied for pre-treatment rectal cancer staging using a 1.5 T MRI. Diffusion MRI was obtained using echo-planar imaging with b = 800 value; all patients were studied acquiring diffusion sequences with and without rectal lumen distension obtained using sonography transmission gel. In both diffusion sequences, two blinded readers calculated border ADC values and small ADC values, drawing regions of interest respectively along tumour borders and far from tumour borders. Mean ADC values among readers − for each type of ADC measurement − were compared using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test. Correlation was assessed using Pearson analysis. Results: Border ADC mean value for diffusion MR sequences without endorectal contrast was 1.122 mm{sup 2}/sec, with 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.02–1.22; using gel lumen distension, higher border ADC mean value of 1.269 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 1.16–1.38) was obtained. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test revealed statistical difference (p < 0.01); a strong Pearson correlation was reported, with r value of 0.69. Small-ADC mean value was 1.038 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 0.91–1.16) for diffusion sequences acquired without endorectal distension and 1.127 mm{sup 2}/s (95% CI = 0.98–1.27) for diffusion sequences obtained after endorectal gel lumen distension. Wilcoxon analysis did not show statistical difference (p = 0.13). A very strong positive correlation was observed, with r value of 0.81. Conclusions: ADC measurements are slightly higher using endorectal sonographic transmission gel; ROI should be traced far from tumour borders, to minimize gel filled-pixel along the interface between lumen and lesion. Further studies are needed to

  19. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the loco-regional staging of patients with rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Pietro; de Bellis, Mario; D’Angelo, Valentina; Delrio, Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; Di Girolamo, Elena; Rossi, Giovanni Battista; Rega, Daniela; Tracey, Maura Claire; Tempesta, Alfonso Mario

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of rectal cancer (RC) is strictly related to both T and N stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. RC staging is crucial for choosing the best multimodal therapy: patients with high risk locally advanced RC (LARC) undergo surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (NAT); those with low risk LARC are operated on after a preoperative short-course radiation therapy; finally, surgery alone is recommended only for early RC. Several imaging methods are used for staging patients with RC: computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS is highly accurate for the loco-regional staging of RC, since it is capable to evaluate precisely the mural infiltration of the tumor (T), especially in early RC. On the other hand, EUS is less accurate in restaging RC after NAT and before surgery. Finally, EUS is indicated for follow-up of patients operated on for RC, where there is a need for the surveillance of the anastomosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact of EUS on the management of patients with RC, evaluating its role in both preoperative staging and follow-up of patients after surgery. PMID:26140096

  20. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  2. Performance of gadofosveset-enhanced MRI for staging rectal cancer nodes: can the initial promising results be reproduced?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique; Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cappendijk, Vincent C. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, ' s Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Oliveira, Pedro [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Porto (Portugal); Lammering, Guido [Maastro Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    A previous study showed promising results for gadofosveset-trisodium as a lymph node magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively confirm the diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer in a second patient cohort. Seventy-one rectal cancer patients were prospectively included, of whom 13 (group I) underwent a primary staging gadofosveset MRI (1.5-T) followed by surgery (± preoperative 5 x 5 Gy) and 58 (group II) underwent both primary staging and restaging gadofosveset MRI after a long course of chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Nodal status was scored as (y)cN0 or (y)cN+ by two independent readers (R1, R2) with different experience levels. Results were correlated with histology on a node-by-node basis. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were 94 %, 79 % and 0.89 for the more experienced R1 and 50 %, 83 % and 0.74 for the non-experienced R2. R2's performance improved considerably after a learning curve, to an AUC of 0.83. Misinterpretations mainly occurred in nodes located in the superior mesorectum, nodes located in between vessels and nodes containing micrometastases. This prospective study confirms the good diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer. (orig.)

  3. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara; Ferri, Mario; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra; Ziparo, Vincenzo; David, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting

  4. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ferri, Mario [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Pilozzi, Emanuela [Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ziparo, Vincenzo [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); David, Vincenzo [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting.

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  6. Complete pathological response (ypT0N0M0) after preoperative chemotherapy alone for stage IV rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiken, Surennaidoo P; Toso, Christian; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Thomopoulos, Theodoros; Roth, Arnaud; Mentha, Gilles; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2014-01-17

    Complete pathological response occurs in 10-20% of patients with rectal cancer who are treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy prior to pelvic surgery. The possibility that complete pathological response of rectal cancer can also occur with neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (without radiation) is an intriguing hypothesis. A 66-year old man presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum with nine liver metastases (T3N1M1). He was included in a reverse treatment, aiming at first downsizing the liver metastases by chemotherapy, and subsequently performing the liver surgery prior to the rectum resection. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted in a combination of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, irinotecan, leucovorin and bevacizumab (OCFL-B). After a right portal embolization, an extended right liver lobectomy was performed. On the final histopathological analysis, all lesions were fibrotic, devoid of any viable cancer cells. One month after liver surgery, the rectoscopic examination showed a near-total response of the primary rectal adenocarcinoma, which convinced the colorectal surgeon to perform the low anterior resection without preoperative radiation therapy. Macroscopically, a fibrous scar was observed at the level of the previously documented tumour, and the histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal any malignant cells in the rectal wall as well as in the mesorectum. All 15 resected lymph nodes were free of tumour, and the final tumour stage was ypT0N0M0. Clinical outcome was excellent, and the patient is currently alive 5 years after the first surgery without evidence of recurrence. The presented patient with stage IV rectal cancer and liver metastases was in a unique situation linked to its inclusion in a reversed treatment and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone. The observed achievement of a complete pathological response after chemotherapy should promote the design of prospective randomized studies to evaluate the benefits of chemotherapy

  7. Influence of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy on the Surgical Strategy According to the Clinical T Stage of Patients With Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic responses and changes to surgical strategies following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in rectal cancer patients according to their clinical T stage (cT). The use of PCRT has recently been extended to less advanced disease. The authors enrolled 650 patients with cT2 to 4 mid and low rectal cancer who received both PCRT and surgical resection. The rate of total regression and the proportion of local excision were compared according to the cT category. The 3-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was compared using the log-rank test according to patient cT category, pathologic stage, and type of surgical treatment. Patients with cT2 were older (P = 0.001), predominately female (P = 0.028), and had low-lying rectal cancer (P = 0.008). Pathologic total regression was achieved most frequently in cT2 patients (54% of cT2 versus 17.6% of cT3 versus 8.2% of cT4; P rectal cancer, optimal surgical treatment may be achieved with the tailored use of PCRT. PMID:26717384

  8. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient’s quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist’s role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients’ life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  10. [Retrospective analysis of 856 cases with stage 0 to III rectal cancer underwent curative surgery combined modality therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengju; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Li, Ming; Peng, Yifan; Zhan, Tiancheng; Du, Changzheng; Wang, Lin; Chen, Nan; Gu, Jin

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the survival and prognostic factors of stage 0 to III rectal cancer in 10 years. Clinical data and follow-up of 856 rectal cancer patients with stage 0-III underwent curative surgery from January 2000 to December 2010 were retrospective analyzed. There were 470 male and 386 female patients, with a mean age of (58 ± 12) years. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival and disease free survival. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival between groups. Cox regression was used to analyze the independent prognostic factors of rectal cancer. The patients in each stage were stage 0 with 18 cases, stage I with 209 cases, stage II with 235 cases, and stage III with 394 cases. All patients received curative surgery. There were 296 patients evaluated as cT3, cT4 and any T with N+ received preoperative radiotherapy. 5.4% patients got pathological complete response (16/296), and the recurrence rate was 4.7% (14/296). After a median time of 41.7 months (range 4.1 to 144.0 months) follow-up, the 5-year overall survival rate in stage 0 to I of was 91.0%, stage II 86.2%, and stage III 60.0%, with a significant difference (P=0.000). The cumulative local recurrence rate was 4.8% (41/856), of which 70.7% (29/41) occurred within 3 years postoperatively, 97.6% (40/41) in 5 years. The cumulative distant metastasis rate was 16.4% (140/856), of which 82.9% (129/140) occurred within 3 years postoperatively, 96.4% (135/140) in 5 years. The incidence of abnormal imaging findings was significantly higher in pulmonary than liver and other sites metastases (75.0% vs. 21.7%, χ² =25.691, P=0.000). The incidence of CEA elevation was significantly higher in liver than lung and other sites metastases (56.8% vs. 37.8%, χ² =25.691, P=0.000). Multivariable analysis showed that age (P=0.015, HR=1.385, 95% CI: 1.066 to 1.801), surgical approach (P=0.029, HR=1.337, 95% CI: 1.030 to 1.733), differentiation (P=0.000, HR=1.535, 95% CI: 1.222 to 1.928), TNM stage (P

  11. Determinants of morbidity and survival after elective non-curative resection of stage IV colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Axel; Füessl, Kathrin E; Seeliger, Hendrik; Eichhorn, Martin E; Müller, Mario H; Rentsch, Markus; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Angele, Martin K; Kreis, Martin E; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2009-09-01

    The benefit of elective primary tumor resection for non-curable stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) remains largely undefined. We wanted to identify risk factors for postoperative complications and short survival. Using a prospective database, we analyzed potential risk factors in 233 patients, who were electively operated for non-curable stage IV CRC between 1996 and 2002. Patients with recurrent tumors, resectable metastases, emergency operations, and non-resective surgery were excluded. Risk factors for increased postoperative morbidity and limited postoperative survival were identified by multivariate analyses. Patients with colon cancer (CC = 156) and rectal cancer (RC = 77) were comparable with regard to age, sex, comorbidity, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, hepatic spread, tumor grade, resection margins, 30-day mortality (CC 5.1%, RC 3.9%) and postoperative chemotherapy. pT4 tumors, carcinomatosis, and non-anatomical resections were more common in colon cancer patients, whereas enterostomies (CC 1.3%, RC 67.5%, p 50%, and comorbidity >1 organ. Prognostic factors for limited postoperative survival were hepatic tumor load >50%, pT4 tumors, lymphatic spread, R1-2 resection, and lack of chemotherapy. Palliative resection is associated with a particularly unfavorable outcome in rectal cancer patients presenting with a locally advanced tumor (pT4, expected R2 resection) or an extensive comorbidity, and in all CRC patients who show a hepatic tumor load >50%. For such patients, surgery might be contraindicated unless the tumor is immediately life-threatening.

  12. IGRT in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Edy; Mertens, Ine; Haustermans, Karin; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Pasini, Danilo; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    To date, no great interest has been shown in the clinical implementation of recent Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities in rectal cancer since only a few studies have been published on this issue. This may be explained by the fact that with current treatment modalities locoregional recurrences are already very low (around 10%). However, there is still room for improvement in treatment of high risk patients (cT3 CRM+, cT4, N+). In these patients better results may be obtained improving radiation technique from 2D to 3D, which showed to be more reliable in terms of target coverage. Also, when higher doses are delivered, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) may be used to spare small bowel. But before employing 3D irradiation or IMRT, a proper definition of our clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) is needed. The CTV should encompass the tumour site, the mesorectum and the lateral nodes, recognized as the most likely sites of local recurrence, with different incidence according to tumour stage. Recent studies discussed the correct delineation of these target volumes in respect of tumour site and stage. From the preliminary results of a study conducted in Rome University 2D planning seemed insufficient to cover the different target volumes especially in T4 patients compared to 3D planning. Also an appropriate PTV margin is necessary in order to manage set-up errors and organ motion. Particularly in these patients, the knowledge of mesorectal movement is required to avoid target missing. Large mesorectal displacements were observed in a study carried out in Leuven University in collaboration with Rome University. A systematic review of the literature together with the data from these first experiences led to the awareness that IGRT could help us to follow the target volume and organs at risk during the treatment, allowing adjustments to improve accuracy in dose delivery, especially when dose escalation studies are planned in

  13. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  14. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  15. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Michiaki; Kameoka, Shingo; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Izumi, Kiminari; Miyazaki, Kaname; Hamano, Kyoichi; Kouno, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To clarify the usefulness and limitations of CT and MRI in preoperative assessment of the wall invasion of rectal cancer, we compared the results of CT and MRI with the histopathological findings, classifying tumors by the region and site in 34 patients with rectal cancer. Subjects were patients preoperatively examined by MRI and CT. Overall, the percent of cases with the extent of invasion accurately assessed by MRI was 88.2%, and that by CT was 64.7%. In all instances of wrong assessment, the extent of invasion was overestimated. The accurate assessment rate was significantly higher for MRI than for CT. After classification by the region, the accurate assessment rate at Rs was low as 50% for both MRI and CT because slices were not perpendicular to the tumor. The accurate assessment rate was 100% for MRI and 82% for CT at Ra, and respectively 94% and 59% at Rb. The majority of tumors at Ra or Rb centering on the lateral wall of the rectum were accurately assessed either by MRI or CT. With tumors at Ra or Rb (particularly Rb) centering on the anterior or posterior wall, CT frequently failed to identify the extent of invasion accurately, so that MRI seemed more suitable for these tumors. (author)

  16. Statistical modeling of CTV motion and deformation for IMRT of early-stage rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Luiza; Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J P Maarten; Budiarto, Eka; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; van Asselen, Bram; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas

    2014-11-01

    To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model-generated PTV significantly improved sparing of organs at risk compared to uniform

  17. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosing of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perczynski, W.; Walecki, J.; Schier, J.F.; Salamon, Z.

    1994-01-01

    MR has not yet come into widespread use for the staging of rectal cancer. However use of MR imaging in diagnosis of rectal cancer gains clinical acceptance. Use contrast media enables exact staging of rectal cancer. MR multiplaner and noninvasive imaging with excellent spatial and contrast resolution has rising popularity in diagnosis of rectal cancer, especially in cases where it is impossible to insert endorectal US-probe because of stenosis. (author)

  18. Adherence to capecitabine in preoperative treatment of stage II and III rectal cancer: do we need to worry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, R; Espinas, J A; Layos, L; Martinez Villacampa, M; Capdevila, J; Tobeña, M; Pisa, A; Pericay, C; Lezcano, C; Fort, E; Cardona, I; Berga, N; Solà, J; Borras, J M

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative oral capecitabine plus radiotherapy has been progressively adopted in oncology units to provide more convenient care to patients with rectal cancer, but little is known about adherence to this therapy. Prospective, multicentre observational study in six hospitals in metropolitan Barcelona (Spain), in patients with stage II and III rectal cancer. Assessment of adherence was based on the medical report in the clinical history, a patient questionnaire and a pill count in the pharmacy service upon finalization of treatment. Patients were considered adherent if they had taken 80%-110% of the prescribed treatment. We evaluated clinical variables, adverse effects, anxiety and depression (using the hospital anxiety depression scale [HADS]), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-30). We analysed adherence-associated variables using a logistic regression model and concordance between adherence measures by means of the modified Kappa index. We included 119 participants. Adherence measures showed little concordance between the assessment methods used: adherence was 100% according to the clinical history, 83.2% according to self-report and 67.9% according to the pill count. In the multivariable analysis, the most relevant variable associated with non-adherence was anxiety prior to treatment (adjusted odds ratio [ORa] 6.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-32.7). We did not observe any relevant association between adherence and clinical variables and baseline quality of life parameters. Adherence to short-term oral neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer may be a clinical problem, and it should be acknowledged and systematically evaluated by clinicians during treatment. The limited concordance between different measures of adherence highlights the challenges in monitoring it and the need to use different approaches to assess its impact in clinical practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All

  19. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...... but not all considered the level of evidence. CONCLUSION: The intention of the study was to provide an overview of international guidelines for rectal cancer based on the underlying evidence, but despite hard evidence it was very difficult to reach general conclusions. Despite much knowledge...

  2. Rectal cancer: Local staging and assessment of lymph node involvement with endoluminal US, CT, and MR imaging - A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bipat, Shandra; Glas, Afina S.; Slors, Frederik J. M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To perform a meta-analysis to compare endoluminal ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in rectal cancer staging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Relevant articles published between 1985 and 2002 were included if more than 20 patients were studied,

  3. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  4. Whole-body MR imaging versus sequential multimodal diagnostic algorithm for staging patients with rectal cancer. Cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppertz, A.; Charite Universitaetsklinikum Berlin; Schmidt, M.; Schoeffski, O.; Wagner, M.; Asbach, P.; Maurer, M.H.; Puettcher, O.; Strassburg, J.; Stoeckmann, F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the direct costs of two diagnostic algorithms for pretherapeutic TNM staging of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: In a study including 33 patients (mean age: 62.5 years), the direct fixed and variable costs of a sequential multimodal algorithm (rectoscopy, endoscopic and abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, thoracic/abdominal CT in the case of positive findings in abdominal ultrasound or chest X-ray) were compared to those of a novel algorithm of rectoscopy followed by MRI using a whole-body scanner. MRI included T 2w sequences of the rectum, 3D T 1w sequences of the liver and chest after bolus injection of gadoxetic acid, and delayed phases of the liver. The personnel work times, material items, and work processes were tracked to the nearest minute by interviewing those responsible for the process (surgeon, gastroenterologist, two radiologists). The costs of labor and materials were determined from personnel reimbursement data and hospital accounting records. Fixed costs were determined from vendor pricing. Results: The mean MRI time was 55 min. CT was performed in 19 / 33 patients (57 %) causing an additional day of hospitalization (costs 374 Euro). The costs for equipment and material were higher for MRI compared to sequential algorithm (equipment 116 vs. 30 Euro; material 159 vs. 60 Euro per patient). The personnel costs were markedly lower for MRI (436 vs. 732 Euro per patient). Altogether, the absolute cost advantage of MRI was 31.3 % (711 vs. 1035 Euro for sequential algorithm). Conclusion: Substantial savings are achievable with the use of whole-body MRI for the preoperative TNM staging of patients with rectal cancer. (orig.)

  5. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  6. [A case of stage IV rectal cancer with whom EPA oral nutritional supplements could resolve cachectic condition and promote patient compliance with cancer chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Kenji; Nakaya, Maki; Nakagawa, Mio; Miyazaki, Mitsukazu; Miki, Chikao

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a Stage IV rectal cancer patient for whom EPA oral nutritional supplements promoted treatment compliance with cancer chemotherapy by resolving a refractory cachectic condition. A 76-year-old male who developed a local re-growth of residual disease and multiple lung metastases after abdomino-perineal resection for lower rectal cancer was referred to our clinic for chemotherapy. On admission, he suffered from a loss of appetite as well as a 30% loss of usual body weight, caused by a cachectic condition with systemic inflammatory response. On starting chemotherapy, his daily diet was supplemented with EPA containing oral nutritional supplements (EPA ONS). Within 2 weeks after initiating EPA ONS treatment, the systemic inflammatory response resolved, and at the same time, body weight and the serum level of albumin increased, which allowed treatment compliance with aggressive multidrug chemotherapy. The patient gained 10 kg in body weight even after 12 months of aggressive chemotherapy, and has attained a longstanding partial remission from the disease. Although cancer cachexia is generally regarded as an end-stage irreversible pathological condition, EPA ONS may promote patient compliance with cancer chemotherapy by resolving cachectic condition, and thus may improve survival.

  7. Neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Valle, A.; Roldán, G.; Suárez, L.; Rodríguez, R.; Quarneti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Rectal cancer causes about 500 deaths a year in our country. Radio chemotherapy (RTCT) is part of the treatment of rectal tumors especially in stages II and III. The indication for neoadjuvant aims to preserve the sphincter at low tumors and potentially make initially unresectable tumors resectable. Objective: To analyze the indications, treatment, toxicity and development of adenocarcinoma patients receiving treatment rectum preoperative R T ± Q T. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 31 records of patients rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant in Oncology Services Hospital and Central Clinical Hospital of the Armed Forces between 1994 and , 2003. Results: Men / Women: 1.3. Median age 64 years. Eight patients (30%) endorectal ultrasound as preoperative staging were performed. patients matched 20 (65%) stage II, 6 (19%) stage III, 5 (16%) stage IV with potentially resectable liver metastases. The median dose of R T was 50 Gy (35.8-63 Gy) with a median duration was 5 weeks (4-12). One patient (3%) received exclusive R T. Plans Q T used: 5-F U in I / C 52%, 5-F U bolus and 42% leucovorin and 5-F U bolus 3%. Surgery was achieved with sphincter preservation in 7/31 cases (23%). The most common toxicity was diarrhea and radiodermatitis were the cause of discontinuation in 4 patients. Control hematologic weekly was 38% during the RTCT. Responses were achieved Full 5% partial 39%, 17% and stabilization lesion progression 39%. Discussion: The lack of information recorded in the medical records hindered the Analysis of this work. 70% of stage II and III patients were incompletely staged (30% endorectal ultrasound) and controls during treatment were suboptimal. Only 23% of patients achieved sphincter preservation, lower than the figures reported in the literature (65-

  8. Feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion in predicting early distant metastasis in patients with stage T3 rectal cancer based on rectal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University Health system, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute of Gastroenterology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Jae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion (MVI) in predicting early distant metastasis developed within 1 year of diagnosis of T3 rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Sixty-five patients with T3 rectal cancer (early metastasis, n = 28; non-metastasis, n = 37) were enrolled in this study. Early distant metastases developed in 28 patients (liver, n = 15; lung, n = 9; both, n = 4). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for early distant metastasis. In univariate analysis, tumour location, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), MRI-detected MVI, and mesorectal fat infiltration (MFI) (odds ratio [OR], 4.533, 9.583, 5.539, 27.046, and 5.539, respectively) were associated with early distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MVI (OR, 29.949; P < 0.002) and LVI (OR, 6.684; P = 0.033) were independent factors for early distant metastasis. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MVI (94.59 %, and 89.47 %, respectively) were significantly higher than those of LVI (64.86 %, and 61.76 %), but sensitivity and negative predictive value were not significantly different between MVI (60.71 %, and 76.09 %) and LVI (75.00 %, and 77.42 %). While sensitivity of MRI-detected MVI was equal to that of CEA in predicting early distant metastasis from T3 rectal cancer, specificity and PPV may be improved by assessing MVI. (orig.)

  9. Trametinib and TAS-102 in Treating Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-13

    RAS Family Gene Mutation; Stage III Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colon Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer AJCC v7

  10. The Log Odds of Positive Lymph Nodes Stratifies and Predicts Survival of High-Risk Individuals Among Stage III Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina W; Wilkinson, Katheryn H; Sheka, Adam C; Leverson, Glen E; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2016-04-01

    The log odds of positive lymph nodes (LODDS) is an empiric transform formula that incorporates positive and negative lymph node data into a single ratio for prognostic utility. We sought to determine the value of the log odds ratio as a prognostic indicator compared with established lymph node indices in advanced-stage rectal cancer patients who have undergone curative resection. Retrospective analysis of rectal cancer operations from 1995 to 2013 identified all stage III cancer patients who underwent curative resection. Patients were stratified into three groups according to calculated lymph node ratios (LNRs) and log odds ratios (LODDS). The relationship between LNR, LODDS, and 5-year overall survival (OS) were assessed. OS for all patients was 81.4%. Both LNR and LODDS stratifications identified differences in 5-year OS. LODDS stratification was significantly associated with OS (p = .04). Additional significant clinicopathologic demographic variables included sex (p = .02), venous invasion (p = .02), tumor location (p log odds ratio is a suitable predictor of 5-year overall survival in stage III rectal cancer. LODDS may be applied to stratify high-risk patients in the management of adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, clinicians have relied solely on the total number of positive lymph nodes affected when determining patient prognosis in rectal cancer. However, the current staging strategy does not account for "high-risk," biologically aggressive tumors that fall into the same risk categories as less clinically aggressive tumors. The log odds of positive lymph nodes is a logistic transform formula that uses pathologic lymph node data to stratify survival differences among patients within a single stage of disease. This formula allows clinicians to identify whether patients with clinically aggressive tumors fall into higher-risk groups, providing additional insight into how to better counsel patients and manage postoperative therapies. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI.

  12. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI

  13. Irradiation of low rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven't yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We'll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  14. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  15. Safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil after mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection for stage iii lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Satoru; Souda, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Takahari, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yuji; Takii, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for stage III lower rectal cancer worldwide. However, in Japan, the standard treatment is TME with lateral pelvic lymph node dissection (LPLD) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. We examined the safety and efficacy of adjuvant therapy with oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (modified FOLFOX6) after TME with LPLD. This retrospective study included 33 patients who received modified FOLFOX6 after TME with LPLD for stage III lower rectal cancer. The overall completion rate of 12 cycles of adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was 76%. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in eight patients (24%). Sensory neuropathy was observed in 32 patients (97%) with 4 (12%) having a grade 3 event. The disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 45% at 3 years. Adjuvant modified FOLFOX6 was feasible in patients with stage III lower rectal cancer after TME with LPLD. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  17. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  18. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal...... be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. KEY POINTS: • These guidelines present recommendations for staging and reporting of rectal cancer. • The guidelines were constructed through consensus amongst 14 pelvic imaging experts. • Consensus was reached...

  20. Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, RA; Nieuwenhuijzen, GAP; Martijn, H; Rutten, HJT; Hospers, GAP; Wiggers, T

    2004-01-01

    Historically, locally advanced rectal cancer is known for its dismal prognosis. The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is subject to continuous change due to development of new and better diagnostic tools, radiotherapeutic techniques, chemotherapeutic agents and understanding of the

  1. ORGAN SAVING TREATMENT OF RECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Rasulov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the results of “watch and wait” approach for rectal cancer patients with complete clinical response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy.Materials and methods. Between 2013 and 2016, 130 patients who were diagnosed with stage T2N0–1M0–T3(CRM+–4N0–2M0 middle and low rectal cancer were treated by CRT (single dose 2 Gy to a total dose 50–54 Gy with concominant capecitabine 850 mg/m2 /day of radiotherapy with consolidation chemotherapy (CapOx (capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 14 days and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 intravenous once in 3 weeks.Results. 21 patient showed complete clinical response. During the time of observation (median 14.6 month all patients alive without signs of recurrence and progression.Conclusion. Preliminary results showed that organ saving treatment for rectal cancer patients with a complete clinical response is oncologically safe when followed by strict selection criteria and active follow-up, including endoscopy and magnetic resonance imagin. Future investigation is needed to justify this statement. Probability of complete response is higher for early stages of rectal cancer

  2. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  3. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical Modeling of CTV Motion and Deformation for IMRT of Early-Stage Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, Luiza, E-mail: M.L.Bondar@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J.P. Maarten [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budiarto, Eka [Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; Asselen, Bram van; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. Results: The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. Conclusions: The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model

  5. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Lee, Yen-Lin; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  6. Preoperative staging and treatment options in T1 rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Endreseth, Birger H; Isaksen, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    with high-risk T1 cancers should be offered rectum resection, but old and comorbid patients with high-risk T1 cancers should be treated individually according to objective criteria as age, physical performance as well as patient's preference. All patients treated for cure with local resection or non......Background. Major rectal resection for T1 rectal cancer offers more than 95% cancer specific five-year survival to patients surviving the first 30 days after surgery. A significant further improvement by development of the surgical technique may not be possible. Improvements in the total survival....... Results. Local treatment of T1 cancers combined with close follow-up, early salvage surgery or later radical resection of local recurrences or with chemo-radiation may lead to fewer severe complications and comparable, or even better, long-term survival. Accurate preoperative staging and careful selection...

  7. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  8. Locally aggressive colonic and rectal cancer ,clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, V; Ion, D; şerban, MB; Ciurea, M

    2010-01-01

    This clinical trial studies local invasions from primary colonic and rectal cancers (urinary bladder, abdominal wall, small bowls, uterus, vagina, stomach, bile tract, spleen, duodenum, pancreas, ureters, kidneys), with or without undiscovered metastasis. Primary locally aggressive colonic and rectal cancers include tumors that are staged T4N1–2Mx on diagnosis, and are often associated with a lower prognosis than earlier cancers. [2] Diagnosis is based on thorough clinical evaluation, imagist...

  9. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  10. Polymorphisms in folate-metabolizing enzymes and response to 5-fluorouracil among patients with stage II or III rectal cancer (INT-0144; SWOG 9304).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M; Rankin, Cathryn; Toriola, Adetunji T; Makar, Karen W; Altug-Teber, Özge; Benedetti, Jacqueline K; Holmes, Rebecca S; Smalley, Stephen R; Blanke, Charles D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-11-01

    Recurrence and toxicity occur commonly among patients with rectal cancer who are treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The authors hypothesized that genetic variation in folate-metabolizing genes could play a role in interindividual variability. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the associations between genetic variants in folate-metabolizing genes and clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. The authors investigated 8 functionally significant polymorphisms in 6 genes (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR] [C677T, A1298C], SLC19A1 [G80A], SHMT1 [C1420T], dihydrofolate reductase [DHFR] [Del19bp], TS 1494del,and TSER) involved in folate metabolism in 745 patients with TNM stage II or III rectal cancer enrolled in a phase 3 adjuvant clinical trial of 3 regimens of 5-FU and radiotherapy (INT-0144 and SWOG 9304). There were no statistically significant associations noted between polymorphisms in any of the genes and overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity in the overall analyses. Nevertheless, there was a trend toward worse DFS among patients with the variant allele of MTHFR C677T compared with wild-type, particularly in treatment arm 2, in which patients with the MTHFR C677T TT genotype had worse overall survival (hazards ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.93 [P = .03]) and DFS (hazards ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.03 [P = .02]) compared with those with homozygous wild-type. In addition, there was a trend toward reduced hematological toxicity among patients with variants of SLC19A1 G80A in treatment arm 1 (P for trend, .06) and reduced esophagitis/stomatitis noted among patients with variants of TSER in treatment arm 3 (P for trend, .06). Genetic variability in folate-metabolizing enzymes was found to be associated only to a limited degree with clinical outcomes among patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  11. [Lymphoscintigraphy: evaluating lymphatic spread of rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, C; Huang, X; Shen, W

    1999-12-01

    To investigate lymphatic drainage of rectal and lymphatic spread of rectal cancer. Rectal endoscopic lymphoscintigraphy was performed in 37 volunteers and 16 patients. One millilitre dextran marked with (99m)Tc was injected bilaterally into submucosa of the rectum through rectal endoscopy. 1, 2, 3 hours after the injection, rectal lymphoscintigraphy was registered with a computerized gamma camera (TOSHIBA GCA901A). Lymphoscintigraphy in control subjects showed upward epirectal and pararectal nodes. The average number of the nodes was 12 three hours after the injection. Compared with histological node examination in all patients operated upon for rectal cancer, rectal endoscopic lymphoscintigraphy showed a sensitivity of 97.1%, a specificity of 75.0%, an overall accuracy of 87.5%, a false positivity of 25.0%, and false negativity of 8.3%. The method is better for evaluating lymphatic spread of rectal cancer before operation.

  12. TME quality in rectal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog T

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of total mesorectal excision has revolutionised rectal cancer surgery. TME reduces the rate of local recurrence and tumour associated mortality. However, in clinical trials only 50% of the removed rectal tumours have an optimal TME quality. Patients: During a period of 36 months we performed 103 rectal resections. The majority of patients (76%; 78/103 received an anterior resection. The remaining patients underwent either abdominoperineal resection (16%; 17/103, Hartmann's procedure (6%; 6/103 or colectomy (2%; 2/103. Results In 90% (93/103 TME quality control could be performed. 99% (92/93 of resected tumours had optimal TME quality. In 1% (1/93 the mesorectum was nearly complete. None of the removed tumours had an incomplete mesorectum. In 98% (91/93 the circumferential resection margin was negative. Major surgical complications occurred in 17% (18/103. 5% (4/78 of patients with anterior resection had anastomotic leakage. 17% (17/103 developed wound infections. Mortality after elective surgery was 4% (4/95. Conclusion Optimal TME quality results can be achieved in all stages of rectal cancer with a rate of morbidity and mortality comparable to the results from the literature. Future studies should evaluate outcome and local recurrence in accordance to the degree of TME quality.

  13. [Extraperitoneal rectal cancer: chemo-radiotherapy treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Enrico; Tuzi, Alessandro; Musio, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The determination of the best therapeutic approach in extraperitoneal rectal cancer patients is very complex both in the neoadjuvant/adjuvant and the metastatic setting. We tried to identify and summarize the current methods of diagnosis, staging and treatment from a multidisciplinary approach. Five sections can be indentified: diagnosis and staging; neoadjuvant treatment; adjuvant treatment; liver metastases treatment and local recurrence therapy Data were collected from international guidelines (NCCN) and MEDLINE search. The main aim was the identification of the beast diagnostic and therapeutic approach in extraperitoneal rectal cancer patients in case of local recurrence and metastatic disease. Data from 2010 NCCN guidelines and 48 articles published in major international oncologic reviews were collected and evaluated from 1993 up to 2009. Three articles dealt with staging procedures, 24 dealt with neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy; 18 were about with liver metastases and 3 about local recurrence treatment. The correct disease staging is necessary for pursuing the best therapeutic approach and it should involve different radiological techniques in order to evaluate the clinic TNM. Neoadjuvant treatment (chemo-radiotherapy) should be considered for stage II and stage III extraperitoneal rectal cancer patients, followed by post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients who underwent surgery and have a post-operative stage II or III disease, have to receive four months of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection. Initial treatment options of asymptomatic patient with resectable liver metases include systemic chemotherapy in' order to obtain downstaging of the primary tumor and liver metastase shrinking followed by resection. The treatment of local recurrence is mainly surgical. If not previously administered, radiotherapy represents an alternative therapeutic treatment.

  14. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Linfocintilografia pelvica. Contribuicao ao estadiamento pre-operatorio do cancer retal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-12-31

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation`s radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  15. A prospective randomized trial comparing the sequence of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy following curative resection of stage II, III rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Je Hwan; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yu, Chang Sik [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the side effects, pattern of failure, and survival rate according to the sequence of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, patients with stages II and III rectal cancer who had undergone curative resection were randomized to early radiotherapy group(am II), then we intend to determine the most effective sequence of the radiotherapy and chemotherapy. From January 1996 to March 1999, 313 patients with curatively resected stages II and III rectal cancer have been randomized to 'early' or 'late' radiation therapy group and received combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m{sup 2}, IV bolus daily D1-5, 8 cycles) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 with first cycle of chemotherapy and arm II received radiation therapy from day 57 with third cycle of chemotherapy after completion of first two cycles. Preliminary analysis was performed with 228 patients registered up to Jun 1998. Two out of the 228 patients were excluded because of double primary cancer. Median follow-up period was 23 months. Local recurrence occurred in 11 patients (9.7%) for arm l and 9 patients (8%) for arm II. There was no significant difference between both groups (p=0.64). However, distant metastasis was found in 22 patients (19.5%) for arm l and 35 patients (31.0%) for arm II and which showed statistically significant difference between the two groups (p=0.046). And neither 3-year disease-free survival (70.2% vs 59.2%, p=0.2) nor overall survival (89.4% vs 88.0%, p=0.47) showed significant differences. The incidence of leukopenia during radiation therapy and chemotherapy was 78.3% and 79.9% respectively but leukopenia more than RTOG grade 3 was only 2.1% and 6.0% respectively. The incidence of diarrhea more than 10 times per day was significantly higher in the patients for arm k than for arm II (71.2% vs 41.6%, p=0.02) but this complication was controlled with supportive cares

  16. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. An audit comparing the reporting of staging MRI scans for rectal cancer with the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M R S; Shanmuganandan, A P; Rasheed, S; Tekkis, P; Brown, G; Abulafi, A M

    2017-11-01

    This article focuses on the audit and assessment of clinical practice before and after introduction of MRI reporting guidelines. Standardised proforma based reporting may improve quality of MRI reports. Uptake of the use may be facilitated by endorsement from regional and national cancer organisations. This audit was divided into 2 phases. MRI reports issued between April 2014 and June 2014 were included in the first part of our audit. Phase II included MRI reports issued between April 2015 and June 2015. 14 out of 15 hospitals that report MRI scans in the LCA responded to our audit proposal. The completion rate of key MRI metrics/metrics was better in proforma compared to prose reports both before (98% vs 73%; p < 0.05) and after introduction of the guidelines (98% vs 71%; p < 0.05). There was an approximate doubling of proforma reporting after the introduction of guidelines and workshop interventions (39% vs 65%; p < 0.05). Evaluation of locally advanced cancers (tumours extending to or beyond the circumferential resection margin) for beyond TME surgery was reported in 3% of prose reports vs. 42% in proformas. Incorporation of standardised reporting in official guidelines improved the uptake of proforma based reporting. Proforma based reporting captured more MRI reportable items compared to prose summaries, before and after the implementation of guidelines. MRI reporting of advanced cancers for beyond TME surgery falls short of acceptable standards but is more detailed in proforma based reports. Further work to improve completion especially in beyond TME reporting is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  19. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  20. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  1. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  2. Clinicopathologic Comparison of High-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy versus Conventional Chemoradiotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting for Resectable Stages II and III Low Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess for differences in clinical, radiologic, and pathologic outcomes between patients with stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma treated neoadjuvantly with conventional external beam radiotherapy (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT versus high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (EBT. Methods. Patients undergoing neoadjuvant EBT received 4 consecutive daily 6.5 Gy fractions without chemotherapy, while those undergoing 3DRT or IMRT received 28 daily 1.8 Gy fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Data was collected prospectively for 7 EBT patients and retrospectively for 25 historical 3DRT/IMRT controls. Results. Time to surgery was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P<0.001. There was a trend towards higher rate of pathologic CR for EBT (P=0.06. Rates of margin and lymph node positivity at resection were similar for all groups. Acute toxicity was less for EBT compared to 3DRT and IMRT (P=0.025. Overall and progression-free survival were noninferior for EBT. On MRI, EBT achieved similar complete response rate and reduction in tumor volume as 3DRT and IMRT. Histopathologic comparison showed that EBT resulted in more localized treatment effects and fewer serosal adhesions. Conclusions. EBT offers several practical benefits over conventional radiotherapy techniques and appears to be at least as effective against low rectal cancer as measured by short-term outcomes.

  3. Value of ADC measurements for nodal staging after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer - a per lesion validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bakers, Frans C.H.; Boetes, Carla; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Verwoerd, Jan L. [MR Clinical Science Department, Philips Healthcare Benelux, P.O. Box 90050, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kessels, Alfons G.H. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lammering, Guido [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastro Clinic Maastricht, Radiation Oncology, P.O. Box 1588, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the performance of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in addition to T2-weighted (T2W) MRI for nodal restaging after chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Thirty patients underwent chemoradiation followed by MRI (1.5 T) and surgery. Imaging consisted of T2W-MRI and DWI (b0, 500, 1000). On T2W-MRI, nodes were scored as benign/malignant by two independent readers (R1, R2). Mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured for each node. Diagnostic performance was compared for T2W-MRI, ADC and T2W+ADC, using a per lesion histological validation. ADC was higher for the malignant nodes (1.43 {+-} 0.38 vs 1.19 {+-} 0.27 *10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve/sensitivity/specificity were 0.88/65%/93% (R1) and 0.95/71%/91% (R2) using T2W-MRI; 0.66/53%/82% using ADC (mean of two readers); and 0.91/56%/98% (R1) and 0.96/56%/99% (R2) using T2W+ADC. There was no significant difference between T2W-MRI and T2W+ADC. Interobserver reproducibility was good for T2W-MRI ({kappa}0.73) and ADC (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.77). After chemoradiation, ADC measurements may have potential for nodal characterisation, but DWI on its own is not reliable. Addition of DWI to T2W-MRI does not improve accuracy and T2W-MRI is already sufficiently accurate. (orig.)

  4. Colon and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of colon cancer. The techniques used are the endoscopy with biopsy in the pre and post operative colon surgery, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray studies of hemogram as well as liver and renal function

  5. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky

    2012-01-01

    in Dukes´ C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive...... preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes´ C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma......Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment...

  6. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  7. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  8. Analysis of the prognostic factors for low rectal cancer with the pT1-2NxM0 stage after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-mao; Ma, Chao; Sun, Da-yong; Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the factors influencing local recurrence and survival for low rectal cancer with pT1-2NxM0 stage after an abdominoperineal resection (APR). Data of 429 patients confirmed to have pT1-2NxM0 after APR were reviewed. The recurrence rate in patients with intraoperative perforation, less than 12 lymph nodes (LNs) harvested, T2 staging, and positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) was 25.1, 19.9, 9.5, and 26.1% compared with 6.9, 7.0, 0, and 5.8% in patients with no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. The 5-year survival rate in patients with age of at least 70, perforation, less than 12 LNs harvested, T2, and positive CRM was 71.1, 60.8, 58.8, 69.9, and 46.0%, but 73.4, 73.5, 73.8, 89.4, and 75.0% in patients with age less than 70, no perforation, 12 or more LNs harvested, T1, and negative CRM. Meanwhile, patients with N0, N1, and N2 had a survival rate of 90.7, 69.9, and 63.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that perforation (PCRM status (P=0.002) were associated with local recurrence, whereas age of the patients (P=0.023), N staging (PCRM status (P=0.004) were associated with survival. APR was affected by patients' age, operation performer, perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status. Perforation, number of LNs harvested, T staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors for recurrence; meanwhile, age of the patients, N staging, differentiation, and CRM status were independent factors influencing survival.

  9. Phase I Study of Cetuximab With RO4929097 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Prospective Validation of a Low Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Staging System and Development of a Local Recurrence Risk Stratification Model: The MERCURY II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Nicholas J; How, Peter; Moran, Brendan; Stelzner, Sigmar; West, Nicholas P; Branagan, Graham; Strassburg, Joachim; Quirke, Philip; Tekkis, Paris; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Gudgeon, Mark; Heald, Bill; Brown, Gina

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging classification that preoperatively assessed the relationship between tumor and the low rectal cancer surgical resection plane (mrLRP). Low rectal cancer oncological outcomes remain a global challenge, evidenced by high pathological circumferential resection margin (pCRM) rates and unacceptable variations in permanent colostomies. Between 2008 and 2012, a prospective, observational, multicenter study (MERCURY II) recruited 279 patients with adenocarcinoma 6 cm or less from the anal verge. MRI assessed the following: mrLRP "safe or unsafe," venous invasion (mrEMVI), depth of spread, node status, tumor height, and tumor quadrant. MRI-based treatment recommendations were compared against final management and pCRM outcomes. Overall pCRM involvement was 9.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.9-12.3], significantly lower than previously reported rates of 30%. Patients with no adverse MRI features and a "safe" mrLRP underwent sphincter-preserving surgery without preoperative radiotherapy, resulting in a 1.6% pCRM rate. The pCRM rate increased 5-fold for an "unsafe" compared with "safe" preoperative mrLRP [odds ratio (OR) = 5.5; 95% CI, 2.3-13.3)]. Posttreatment MRI reassessment indicated a "safe" ymrLRP in 33 of 113 (29.2%), none of whom had ypCRM involvement. In contrast, persistent "unsafe" ymrLRP posttherapy resulted in 17.5% ypCRM involvement. Further independent MRI assessed risk factors were EMVI (OR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5-9.6), tumors less than 4.0 cm from the anal verge (OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 1.3-8.8), and anterior tumors (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-6.8). The study validated MRI low rectal plane assessment, reducing pCRM involvement and avoiding overtreatment through selective preoperative therapy and rationalized use of permanent colostomy. It also highlights the importance of posttreatment restaging.

  11. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill...... Europe. Variation ill the distribution of stage at diagnosis. initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum. diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were...

  12. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries...... in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included...

  13. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  14. Differences in survival between colon and rectal cancer from SEER data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about colorectal cancer or colon and rectal cancer. Are they the same disease or different diseases? OBJECTIVES: The aim of this epidemiology study was to compare the features of colon and rectal cancer by using recent national cancer surveillance data. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data included colorectal cancer (1995-2008 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER database. Only adenocarcinoma was included for analysis. PATIENTS: A total of 372,130 patients with a median follow-up of 32 months were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean survival of patients with the same stage of colon and rectal cancer was evaluated. RESULTS: Around 35% of patients had stage information. Among them, colon cancer patients had better survival than those with rectal cancer, by a margin of 4 months in stage IIB. In stage IIIC and stage IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer patients, by about 3 months. Stage IIB colorectal cancer patients had a poorer prognosis than those with stage IIIA and IIIB colorectal cancer. After adjustment of age, sex and race, colon cancer patients had better survival than rectal cancer of stage IIB, but in stage IIIC and IV, rectal cancer patients had better survival than colon cancer. LIMITATIONS: The study is limited by its retrospective nature. CONCLUSION: This was a population-based study. The prognosis of rectal cancer was not worse than that of colon cancer. Local advanced colorectal cancer had a poorer prognosis than local regional lymph node metastasis. Stage IIB might require more aggressive chemotherapy, and no less than that for stage III.

  15. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  16. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  17. Rectal cancer: involved circumferential resection margin - a root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, H; Collantes, E C; Rashid, S H; Wong, L S; Baragwanath, P

    2009-06-01

    An involved circumferential resection margin (CRM) following surgery for rectal cancer is the strongest predictor of local recurrence and may represent a failure of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process. The study analyses the causes of positive CRM in patients undergoing elective surgery for rectal cancer with respect to the decision-making process of the MDT, preoperative rectal cancer staging and surgical technique. From March 2002 to September 2005, data were collected prospectively on all patients undergoing elective rectal cancer surgery with curative intent. The data on all patients identified with positive CRM were analysed. Of 158 patients (male:female = 2.2:1) who underwent potentially curative surgery, 16 (10%) patients had a positive CRM on postoperative histology. Four were due to failure of the pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging scans to predict an involved margin, two with an equivocal CRM on MRI did not have preoperative radiotherapy, one had an inaccurate assessment of the site of primary tumour and in one intra-operative difficulty was encountered. No failure of staging or surgery was identified in the remaining eight of the 16 patients. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) was associated with a 26% positive CRM, compared with 5% for anterior resection. No single consistent cause was found for a positive CRM. The current MDT process and/or surgical technique may be inadequate for low rectal tumours requiring APR.

  18. Evidence and research in rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Krivokapic, Z.; Leer, J.W.H.; Pahlman, L.; Rodel, C.; Schmoll, H.J.; Scott, N.; Velde, C.V.; Verfaillie, C.

    2008-01-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists

  19. Multicenter evaluation of rectal cancer reimaging post neoadjuvant (MERRION) therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanly, Ann M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of reimaging rectal cancer post-CRT (chemoradiotherapy) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis for local staging and computed tomography of thorax, abdomen, and pelvis (CT TAP) to identify distant metastases.

  20. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...

  1. Development of a synoptic MRI report for primary rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi Anna R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important imaging modality for pre-operative staging and surgical planning of rectal cancer, to date there has been little investigation on the completeness and overall quality of MRI reports. This is important because optimal patient care depends on the quality of the MRI report and clear communication of these reports to treating physicians. Previous work has shown that the use of synoptic pathology reports improves the quality of pathology reports and communication between physicians. Methods The aims of this project are to develop a synoptic MRI report for rectal cancer and determine the enablers and barriers toward the implementation of a synoptic MRI report for rectal cancer in the clinical setting. A three-step Delphi process with an expert panel will extract the key criteria for the MRI report to guide pre-operative chemoradiation and surgical planning following a review of the literature, and a synoptic template will be developed. Furthermore, standardized qualitative research methods will be used to conduct interviews with radiologists to determine the enablers and barriers to the implementation and sustainability of the synoptic MRI report in the clinic setting. Conclusion Synoptic MRI reports for rectal cancer are currently not used in North America and may improve the overall quality of MRI report and communication between physicians. This may, in turn, lead to improved patient care and outcomes for rectal cancer patients.

  2. Rectal cancer in pregnancy: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toosi, M.; Moaddabshoar, L.; Malek-Hosseini, S.A.; Sasani, M.R.; Maral Mokhtari, M.; Mohammad Mohammadianpanah, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of colorectal cancer during pregnancy is rare and is associated with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we report such a case of rectal cancer in pregnancy and review the literature. Case report: A 31-year-old multiparous, pregnant woman, in the 20th week of gestation, presented with rectal bleeding progressing to spasmodic abdominal pain and right flank vague pain. A flexible recto sigmoidoscopy showed a large ulcerative mass located in the recto sigmoid junction, 15 cm away from anal verge. Imaging studies and biopsy proved it to be rectal adenocarcinoma with single liver metastasis. The patient’s pregnancy was terminated and neoadjuvant therapy followed by curative surgery was performed. She is currently receiving adjuvant systemic therapy to eradicate potential micro metastatic disease. Conclusion: This case suggests that colorectal cancer can mimic the signs and the symptoms of pregnancy and tends to present at an advanced stage in pregnant women.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung [Dept. of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT.

  4. Local resection of early rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Qvist, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the National Danish screening programme for colorectal cancer will result in the detection of more early rectal cancers (ERC), which may be considered for local excision. For the low risk≤T1 cancer, the oncological outcome at local excision in smaller patient series has shown...

  5. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were...

  6. Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar A; Ryan, David P; Hong, Theodore S

    2016-01-01

    The primary therapy for any potentially curative rectal cancer is surgery. For locally advanced tumors (i.e., T3-4 and/or node positive), the very high rate of local and distant recurrences has necessitated a standard adjuvant regimen of preoperative chemoradiation and postoperative chemotherapy. Several controversies regarding this approach remain, including the technique and fractionation scheme of radiation therapy prior to surgery, the choice of concomitant chemotherapy, and whether all patients require postoperative systemic therapy. Furthermore, in an era of improving staging imaging and surgical techniques, an opportunity for de-escalation of therapy to improve patient morbidity and quality of life may arise. At the same time, advances in radiation and systemic therapy may help facilitate less invasive, sphincter-preserving surgery. This review addresses these questions and others that remain areas of active clinical investigation.

  7. Improved survival for rectal cancer compared to colon cancer: the four cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Pamela; Hall, Claire; Davidson, Callum; Dixon, Liane; Dobbs, Bruce; Robinson, Bridget; Frizelle, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. This study was undertaken to evaluate survival outcomes and changes of disease outcomes of CRC patients over the last decades. A retrospective analysis of CRC patients in Christchurch was performed in four patient cohorts at 5 yearly intervals; 1993-94, 1998-99, 2004-05 and 2009. Data on cancer location, stage, surgical and oncological treatment and survival were collected. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed. There were 1391 patients (355, 317, 419 and 300 per cohort), 1037 colon and 354 rectal cancers, respectively. For colon cancer, right-sided cancers appeared more common in later cohorts (P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in the number of permanent stomas for colon cancer patients (P = 0.001). There was an analogous trend for rectal cancers (P = 0.075). More CRC patients with stage IV disease were treated surgically (P = 0.001) and colon cancer stages I and II tended to have increased survival if operated by a colorectal surgeon (P = 0.06). Oncology referrals have increased remarkably (P = 0.001). Overall 56% of patients were alive at 5 years however rectal cancer patients had significantly better 5-year survival than those with colon cancer (P rectal cancer patients have a better 5-year survival than colon cancer patients. The improved survival with early stage colon cancers operated on by specialist colorectal surgeons needs further exploration. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. [Rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Montenegro, Ernesto; Sierra-Luzuriaga, Gastón; Calle-Loffredo, Daniel; Rodríguez Quinde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The Trousseau syndrome, first described in 1865, is the relationship of venous thromboembolisms and cancer. We present a case with rectal cancer and Trousseau syndrome. Female 40 years old, went to the Coloproctology Service for painless bleeding. A computed tomography report showed a tumor of 5 by 6 cm up 5 cm from the anal margin. Ultra-low anterior resection with colonic reservoir and loop ileostomy surgery was performed. The pathology report showed a semidiferenciate adenocarcinoma of the rectum and we established the stage as T3N0M0. Within 72 hours of her operation, she experienced sudden hypotension and painful abdominal distention. A second surgery was done finding necrosis of the colon from the splenic angle until the colonic reservoir with thrombi in the left colic artery, ischemic signs of bilateral fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, pelvic floor and the small intestine, 40 cm before ileostomy and ileon. Left hemicolectomy and colostomy was done. She was taken to intensive care where continuous administration of heparin was given; she died within 5 days because of multiorgan failure. The mechanism for this syndrome was unknown but there are several hypotheses, suggesting that hematological cancer patients are at an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. Pancreatic cancer is the most common presentation with this syndrome (in 50% of cases). We suggested continuing with the standards of prevention of thromboembolism.

  9. A Single Centre Retrospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic Rectal Resection with TME for Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Cancer-Specific Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Quarati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colon resection has established its role as a minimally invasive approach to colorectal diseases. Better long-term survival rate is suggested to be achievable with this approach in colon cancer patients, whereas some doubts were raised about its safety in rectal cancer. Here we report on our single centre experience of rectal laparoscopic resections for cancer focusing on short- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the last 13 years, 248 patients underwent minimally invasive approach for rectal cancer at our centre. We focused on 99 stage I, II, and III patients with a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Of them 43 had a middle and 56 lower rectal tumor. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection was performed in 71 patients whereas laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection in 28. The overall mortality rate was 1%; the overall morbidity rate was 29%. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 69.7%, The 5-year overall survival rate was 78.8%.

  10. Changing practice of rectal cancer surgery in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.R.; Muneer, A.; Laghari, Z.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presentation and pathology of rectal cancer, and to evaluate the local experience after total meso rectal excision at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methodology: A retrospective study of two hundred cases of carcinoma rectum that had undergone total meso rectal excision at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Pakistan was carried out from January 1998 to December 2007.The cases were admitted through outpatient and emergency departments. The demographic details of each patient and variables such as clinical presentation, tumor location, Dukes staging, TNM staging, operations and complications were recorded on proformas. Each patient was followed up at two months for one year, every four months for three years and annually thereafter. Results: Male to female ratio being almost equal 1.6:1, Age ranged from 14-70 years. Site of tumor at upper one third 25%, middle one third 30% and lower one third 45%. Majority of patients (more than 62%) were in Dukes B Group.There were no postoperative deaths, complications occurred in a total of 59 (29.5%) patients, which were mostly colostomy related (13.0%). The abdominal wound infection 5%, anastomotic dehiscence 1.0%, urinary tract infection 5%, and impotence occurred in 1.5%. In 20% patients local recurrence was detected. Conclusion: Total meso rectal excision is a safe and feasible technique for rectal cancer surgery with acceptable perioperative morbidity and adequate local disease control. (author)

  11. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  12. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo...... demands larger prospective longitudinally studies in order to get more reliable information of the patients HRQoL after treatment with COMP-RCS. In study II an examination of the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the colorectal specific questionnaire, EORTC QLQ-CR38 was undertaken. Included...

  13. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayiguli Hare; Palida Apizi; Iskandar Abulimiti; Zhang Jinrong; Tian Hanhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  14. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  15. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European...

  17. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét, E-mail: margret.sturludottir@karolinska.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Martling, Anna, E-mail: anna.martling@ki.se [Center of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Carlsson, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.carlsson@ki.se [Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart, E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer.

  18. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét; Martling, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer

  19. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  20. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  1. Pelvic exenteration for clinical T4 rectal cancer : Oncologic outcome in 93 patients at a single institution over a 30-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Akasu, Takayuki; Fujita, Shin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Kusters, Miranda; Moriya, Yoshihiro

    Background. Patients with stage T4 rectal cancer are known to have poor survival and often require pelvic exenteration We describe the oncologic outcome of PE for patients with clinical T4 rectal cancer over 30-Year period. Methods. Data for 93 patients with primary rectal cancer who underwent PE

  2. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  3. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although most patients with stage II-III rectal cancer at queried National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers between 2005 and 2011 received 3-dimensional CRT, significant and increasing numbers received IMRT. IMRT utilization is highly variable among institutions and not uniform among sociodemographic groups but may be more consistently embraced in specific clinical settings. Given this trend, comparative-effectiveness research is needed to evaluate the benefits of IMRT for rectal cancer.

  4. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  5. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  6. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  7. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  8. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  9. Predictive Biomarkers of Radiation Sensitivity in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tut, Thein Ga

    repair (MMR) proteins, the insufficiency of which is characteristic of CRCs with microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI may enable unlimited replicative potential of malignant cell that leads to radiation injury resistance. Therefore, these proteins were characterized in both CRC cell lines (MMR proteins) and different (core and invasive front) rectal cancer tissues (Plk1, gammaH2AX and MMR proteins) exposed to radiation. Histopathological grading of tumour regression was performed following radiotherapy in rectal cancer as a marker of radiotherapy response and a surrogate indicator of patient prognosis. Though MMR protein expressions correlated with improved in vitro cell survival following radiation, these findings could only be partially replicated in patient tissue samples. This may not be entirely unexpected, given intratumoural heterogeneity in genetic profiles and oxygenation between individual cancer cells, their interaction with stromal environment and a multitude of other factors that cannot be adequately replicated in cell line experiments. In our rectal cancer patient cohort, histopathological regression following radiotherapy did appear to correlate with better clinical outcome, but certainly no replacement for the routine pTNM staging with which it was compared. Overexpression of Plk1 in the primary rectal cancer also correlates with poor tumour regression and reduced overall survival. High level of gammaH2AX correlates with higher tumour stage, perineural invasion and vascular invasion. However, interpretation of the results is limited by the small number of positivity amongst the cohort, with respect to gammaH2AX and MMR proteins. The combined analysis of all the proteins examined in this thesis revealed no interactions, possibly suggesting these biomarkers act individually within the DDR pathway, rather than in a demonstrably interdependent manner. Though our results are mixed, finding biomarkers predictive of radiation response is nonetheless critical

  10. The importance of a multidisciplinary team in rectal cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochis, Ovidiu Vasile; Fekete, Zsolt; Vlad, Catalin; Fetica, Bogdan; Leucuta, Daniel Corneliu; Busuioc, Constantin Ioan; Irimie, Alexandru

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the interval between surgery and adjuvant treatments regarding the overall survival and recurrence-free survival in patients from a developing country. For stages II and III rectal cancer, international guidelines recommend neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regardless of the tumor location. In the developing countries there is a shortage of radiotherapy centers, specialists, which lead to long waiting lists for radiotherapy. These problems might lead to protocol deviations. We conducted a retrospective study on 161 patients with rectal cancer treated with surgery, postoperative CRT and with or without chemotherapy for a total of 6 months, at The Oncology Institute Cluj-Napoca between 2006-2010. All patients had 5 years of follow-up. A total of 161 patients were enrolled in this study. The majority of patients were locally advanced stages (89.44%). The well known prognostic factors, such as TNM stage, performance status, CEA serum level, perineural, vascular and lymphatic invasion, and node capsular effraction had a statistically significant influence on overall survival. In 21.12% of patients the first adjuvant treatment was started in the first 4 weeks after surgery. Only 13.04% of patients started the concomitant CRT within the limit of 6 weeks after surgery. Concerning the time between surgery and CRT, we did not observe a statistically significantly difference in OS if the radiotherapy started after the first 6 weeks (p=0.701). The OS rate for locally advanced rectal cancer patients was 69.44%. In rectal cancer, the importance of the first therapeutic act is crucial. Following international guidelines provides a survival advantage and a better quality of life. In case of adjuvant treatment, it is recommended to start this treatment as soon as the local infrastructure allows it.

  11. Follow-up after rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovdenak Jakobsen, Ida; Juul, Therese; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main treatment for non-metastatic rectal cancer (RC) is surgical resection. Late adverse effects that are highly prevalent and negatively impact patients' symptom burden and quality of life are: bowel-, urological and sexual dysfunctions; psychological distress; fear of recurrence....... As a consequence, the randomized controlled trial Follow-up after Rectal Cancer (FURCA) has been launched, testing the effect of a new patient-led, follow-up program. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the FURCA study and to report results from the development of the patient-led, follow......, or a control group following the current follow-up program with routine medicals. The primary outcomes are symptom burden and quality of life, measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Other outcome and demographic data are collected as patient...

  12. Correlation of chromosomal instability, telomere length and telomere maintenance in microsatellite stable rectal cancer: a molecular subclass of rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Boardman

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC tumor DNA is characterized by chromosomal damage termed chromosomal instability (CIN and excessively shortened telomeres. Up to 80% of CRC is microsatellite stable (MSS and is historically considered to be chromosomally unstable (CIN+. However, tumor phenotyping depicts some MSS CRC with little or no genetic changes, thus being chromosomally stable (CIN-. MSS CIN- tumors have not been assessed for telomere attrition.MSS rectal cancers from patients ≤50 years old with Stage II (B2 or higher or Stage III disease were assessed for CIN, telomere length and telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase activation [TA]; alternative lengthening of telomeres [ALT]. Relative telomere length was measured by qPCR in somatic epithelial and cancer DNA. TA was measured with the TRAPeze assay, and tumors were evaluated for the presence of C-circles indicative of ALT. p53 mutation status was assessed in all available samples. DNA copy number changes were evaluated with Spectral Genomics aCGH.Tumors were classified as chromosomally stable (CIN- and chromosomally instable (CIN+ by degree of DNA copy number changes. CIN- tumors (35%; n=6 had fewer copy number changes (<17% of their clones with DNA copy number changes than CIN+ tumors (65%; n=13 which had high levels of copy number changes in 20% to 49% of clones. Telomere lengths were longer in CIN- compared to CIN+ tumors (p=0.0066 and in those in which telomerase was not activated (p=0.004. Tumors exhibiting activation of telomerase had shorter tumor telomeres (p=0.0040; and tended to be CIN+ (p=0.0949.MSS rectal cancer appears to represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that may be categorized both on the basis of CIN status and telomere maintenance mechanism. MSS CIN- rectal cancers appear to have longer telomeres than those of MSS CIN+ rectal cancers and to utilize ALT rather than activation of telomerase.

  13. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-03-01

    Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 306 patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer were enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of CRM involvement. The overall rate of CRM involvement was found to be 16.0%. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), stage higher than T3, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation and non-sphincter preserving proctectomy (NSPP) were risk factors for CRM involvement. Male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), advanced T stage, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation, and NSPP are significant risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Given that postoperative chemoradiotherapy is recommended for patients with a positive CRM, further oncologic studies are warranted to ascertain which patients with these risk factors would require adjuvant therapy.

  14. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  15. Pertuzumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  16. Treatment tactics in patient with rectal cancer complicating ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful treatment of a young patient with a 15-year anamnesis of ulcerative colitis, who has been diagnosed with rectal cancer, is presented in this case report. A non-standard surgical intervention has been performed following all principles of oncologic surgery. A subtotal colectomy has been performed with ultra-low anterior resection of rectum. Ascendoanal anastomosis has been performed forming the neo-rectum. There were no complications in postoperative period. Considering disease stage (T3N1M0 adjuvant XELOX was administered for 6 months along with 2 cycles of prophylactic treatment with 5-aminosalycilic acid. During 2-years follow-up there are no signs of rectal cancer and ulcerative colitis progression. After pelvic electrostimulation defecation frequency decreased to 3–4 times per day, a patient has complete social rehabilitation.

  17. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detailed information about the cancer stage. TNM Staging System The most common system for staging cancer in the form of solid tumor is the TNM system. Most providers and cancer centers use it to stage ...

  18. Risk of metachronous colon cancer following surgery for rectal cancer in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Parry, Susan; Parry, Bryan; Kalady, Matthew F; Macrae, Finlay A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Young, Graeme P; Lipton, Lara; Winship, Ingrid; Boussioutas, Alex; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Arnold, Julie; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Despite regular surveillance colonoscopy, the metachronous colorectal cancer risk for mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers after segmental resection for colon cancer is high and total or subtotal colectomy is the preferred option. However, if the index cancer is in the rectum, management decisions are complicated by considerations of impaired bowel function. We aimed to estimate the risk of metachronous colon cancer for MMR gene mutation carriers who underwent a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. This retrospective cohort study comprised 79 carriers of germline mutation in a MMR gene (18 MLH1, 55 MSH2, 4 MSH6, and 2 PMS2) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had had a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. Cumulative risks of metachronous colon cancer were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. During median 9 years (range 1-32 years) of observation since the first diagnosis of rectal cancer, 21 carriers (27 %) were diagnosed with metachronous colon cancer (incidence 24.25, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 15.81-37.19 per 1,000 person-years). Cumulative risk of metachronous colon cancer was 19 % (95 % CI 9-31 %) at 10 years, 47 (95 % CI 31-68 %) at 20 years, and 69 % (95 % CI 45-89 %) at 30 years after surgical resection. The frequency of surveillance colonoscopy was 1 colonoscopy per 1.16 years (95 % CI 1.01-1.31 years). The AJCC stages of the metachronous cancers, where available, were 72 % stage I, 22 % stage II, and 6 % stage III. Given the high metachronous colon cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers diagnosed with an index rectal cancer, proctocolectomy may need to be considered.

  19. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric bene...... research should be subgroups of patients who might receive relatively greater benefit from innovative treatment techniques, such as patients receiving chemoradiotherapy with definitive intent and patients treated with dose escalation....

  20. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe.

  1. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer.

  2. Chemotherapeutic Treatment of Priapism in Metastatic Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kitai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man was admitted with penile tenderness and dysuria due to priapism. Enhanced computed tomography revealed metastatic tumors in the liver, lung, sacrum and lymph nodes. Advanced rectal cancer, detected by colonoscopy as a primary tumor, was treated with chemotherapy (FOLFOX4. Although the rectal cancer showed no change, five months of chemotherapy improveid the priapism, suggesting that chemotherapy can improve rare symptoms of rectal cancer.

  3. Adjuvant post-operative radiotherapy vs radiotherapy plus 5-FU and levamisole in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer. A phase III randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafiero, F.; Gipponi, M.; Di Somma, C. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Geneo (Italy). Istituto di Oncologia Clinica] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Loco-regional and distant relapses contribute to impair the outcome of rectal cancer patients. As to the former, either pre-or post-operative radiation therapy (RT) significantly reduce loco-regional recurrence; post-operative chemotherapy (CT), alone or in different combinations with RT, is effective in improving both disease-free survival and survival. However, many drawbacks still exist regarding the method of RT delivery as well as the toxicity of combination adjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this trial is to assess the effectiveness and toxicity of adjuvant post-operative RT vs combined RT and CT (5-FU plus levamisole) in patients with TNM stage II-III resectable rectal cancer (pT3-4, pN0, M0; pT1-4, pN1-3, M0). The primary endpoint is overall survival; secondary endpoints are disease-free survival rate of loco-regional recurrence, and treatment-related toxicity/morbidity. (author).

  4. A Phase I, Pharmacological, and Biological Study of OSI-774 in Combination With FOLFOX 4 (5-FU, Leucovorin, and Oxaliplatin) and Bevacizumab (Avastin) in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pas, Martijn Hgm; Haglind, Eva; Cuesta, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery as an alternative to open surgery in patients with rectal cancer has not yet been shown to be oncologically safe. The aim in the COlorectal cancer Laparoscopic or Open Resection (COLOR II) trial was to compare laparoscopic and open surgery in patients with rectal cancer....

  6. Function-preserving surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    When total mesorectal excision (TME) is accurately performed, dysfunction, theoretically, does not occur. However, there are differences among individuals in the running patterns and the volumes of nerve fibers, and if obesity or a narrow pelvis is present, nerve identification is difficult. Currently, the rate of urinary dysfunction after rectal surgery ranges from 33% to 70%. Many factors other than nerve preservation play a role in minor incontinence. Male sexual function shows impotence rates ranging from 20% to 46%, while 20%-60% of potent patients are unable to ejaculate. In women, information on sexual function is not easily obtained, and there are more unknown aspects than in men. As urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction due to adjuvant radiotherapy have been reported to occur at a high frequency, the creation of a protocol that enables analysis of long-term functional outcome will be essential for future clinical trials. In the treatment of rectal cancer, surgeon-related factors are extremely important, not only in achieving local control but also in preserving function. This article reviews findings from recent studies investigating urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery and discusses questions to be studied in the future. (author)

  7. DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Rectal Cancer: Benchmarking Its Impact on Prognosis, Neoadjuvant Response Prediction, and Clinical Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosa, Nicole; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J; Veerapong, Jula; Borras, Ester; Krishnan, Sunil; Bednarski, Brian; Messick, Craig A; Skibber, John M; Feig, Barry W; Lynch, Patrick M; Vilar, Eduardo; You, Y Nancy

    2016-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) hallmarks consensus molecular subtype 1 of colorectal cancer. It is being routinely tested, but little is known about dMMR rectal cancers. The efficacy of novel treatment strategies cannot be established without benchmarking the outcomes of dMMR rectal cancer with current therapy. We aimed to delineate the impact of dMMR on prognosis, the predicted response to fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant therapy, and implications of germline alterations in the MMR genes in rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 2012, 62 patients with dMMR rectal cancers underwent multimodality therapy. Oncologic treatment and outcomes as well as clinical genetics work-up were examined. Overall and rectal cancer-specific survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years. MMR deficiency was most commonly due to alterations in MSH2 (53%) or MSH6 (23%). After a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the 5-year rectal cancer-specific survival was 100% for stage I and II, 85.1% for stage III, and 60.0% for stage IV disease. Fluoropyrimidine-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation was associated with a complete pathologic response rate of 27.6%. The extent of surgical resection was influenced by synchronous colonic disease at presentation, tumor height, clinical stage, and pelvic radiation. An informed decision for a limited resection focusing on proctectomy did not compromise overall survival. Five of the 11 (45.5%) deaths during follow-up were due to extracolorectal malignancies. dMMR rectal cancer had excellent prognosis and pathologic response with current multimodality therapy including an individualized surgical treatment plan. Identification of a dMMR rectal cancer should trigger germline testing, followed by lifelong surveillance for both colorectal and extracolorectal malignancies. We herein provide genotype-specific outcome benchmarks for comparison with novel interventions. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Rectal complications associated with transperineal interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: As transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) grows in acceptance as an option in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer, its associated toxicities are being defined. This clinical report documents rectal toxicity from a large cohort of men treated by a single practitioner for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Eight hundred twenty-five men were treated from September 1992 to September 1998 with TIPPB. One hundred-forty were treated in conjunction with external beam irradiation (EBRT) and 685 with TIPPB alone. All patients were implanted under real-time ultrasound guidance. No dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for this study. All patients were followed at 5 weeks after the procedure, then every 3-6 months thereafter. Rectal morbidity was graded by a modified RTOG toxicity scale. Therapy to control symptoms was recommended on an individual basis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort is 48 months. A total of 77 patients (9.4%) reported Grade 1 toxicity at some time following an implant whereas 54 patients (6.6%) reported Grade 2 toxicity. The peak post-TIPPB time for experiencing rectal toxicity was 8 months at which time Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 9.5% of the patients. This improved over the subsequent months and resolved in all patients by 3((1)/(2)) years. Four patients (0.5%) reported Grade 3 rectal toxicity with rectal ulceration identified on colonoscopy at 1 year from implant. Two of the four patients had colonic manipulation in the radiated portion of the colon which subsequently caused it to bleed. None of the patients required blood product transfusion. In 3 of the 4 patients the Grade 3 rectal toxicity has resolved spontaneously and 1 patient continues to heal at the time of this report. No patient required hospitalization or surgical intervention. Conclusion: TIPPB is a tolerable and acceptable treatment option when used alone in early-stage, organ

  9. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  10. How Is Rectal Cancer Managed: a Survey Exploring Current Practice Patterns in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, A; Firtell, J; Caycedo-Marulanda, A

    2018-02-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancers are most often treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. However, there are differing opinions surrounding management of rectal cancer, including a lack of consensus on the optimal time interval between chemoradiation and surgery, and the management of patients with complete clinical response following neoadjuvant therapy. This study seeks to summarize management trends for rectal cancer among a sample of Canadian surgeons. A 14-question survey was distributed to surgeons across Canada managing rectal cancer. Surgeons were identified from the membership lists of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons and the Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Web-based questionnaires were distributed by email. A total of 115 surgeons were emailed the survey with a response rate of 38.4%. Approximately 50% of surgeon responders had been in practice for more than 10 years, with the majority practicing in academic centers. Half were considered high-volume rectal cancer surgeons with more than 20 cases per year. All surgeons used magnetic resonance imaging for staging of rectal cancer, but only 50% presented all rectal cancer cases at multidisciplinary cancer conferences. The majority of surgeons applied minimally invasive techniques for surgical resection, including the utilization of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMs) and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS); however, only a small fraction performed high-volume transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME). Regarding the management of complete clinical response (cCR) following neoadjuvant chemoradiation, less than 5% chose the watch and wait management strategy for all patients and 40% did not use it at all. The majority of surgeons reported waiting between eight and 10 weeks between chemoradiation and surgery, and 40% made that decision regardless of patient or tumor factors. The majority of surveyed surgeons use MRI for pelvic staging and

  11. Increased Lymph Node Yield Is Associated with Improved Survival in Rectal Cancer Irrespective of Neoadjuvant Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Jess, Per; Roikjaer, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that the lymph node yield achieved during rectal cancer resection is associated with survival. It is debated whether a high lymph node yield improves survival, per se, or whether it does so by diminishing the International Union Against Cancer stage drifting effect....... OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic implications of the lymph node yield in curative resected rectal cancer. DESIGN: This study was based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. SETTINGS: This was a national cohort study. PATIENTS: All 6793...... are associations rather than causal relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Increased lymph node yield was associated with better overall survival in rectal cancer, irrespective of neoadjuvant treatment. Stage migration was observed....

  12. Rectal cancer in Luxembourg : a national population-based data report, 1988–1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiden, René; Sand, Julien; Weber, Joseph; Turk, Philippe; Wagener, Yolande; Capesius, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Morphologic criteria which might help to support the need for a preventive strategy for early detection of rectal cancer were analysed. Population-based data on rectal adenomas with high-grade dysplastic changes (n = 199) and invasive adenocarcinomas (n = 912) registered by the national Morphologic Tumour Registry (MTR) and diagnosed in a central department of pathology in Luxembourg between 1988 and 1998 were considered. The analysis concerned time trends in frequency, crude incidence, tumour-stage, the rectal 'high-grade' adenoma/invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio and the survival rates. Histopathological tumour-stage parameters (UICC/AJCC, 1997) in a consecutive series of 641 resected rectal cancers and their relationship with the observed patient survival are investigated. The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas are diagnosed at a late stage (i.e. Stage II and III) into contrast with the highly significant increase (355 %) in frequency of rectal high-grade adenomas (Stage 0). During the two-time periods 1988–1992 and 1994–1998 Stage I and Stage IV-cases decreased by 11 % and 47 % respectively. Tumour-stage correlates with prognosis. The rectal high-grade adenoma / invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio improved significantly over the last five years. Over the study period, there has been a highly significant rise in the incidence of resected rectal adenomas with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. The ratio of early tumours to invasive cancers has risen while the numbers of colonoscopies and rectoscopies remained unchanged respectively decreased. As the number of advanced tumour-stages remained stable, mass-screening procedures focusing on the fifty to sixty age group should be reinforced

  13. Rectal cancer in Luxembourg : a national population-based data report, 1988–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk Philippe

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphologic criteria which might help to support the need for a preventive strategy for early detection of rectal cancer were analysed. Population-based data on rectal adenomas with high-grade dysplastic changes (n = 199 and invasive adenocarcinomas (n = 912 registered by the national Morphologic Tumour Registry (MTR and diagnosed in a central department of pathology in Luxembourg between 1988 and 1998 were considered. Methods The analysis concerned time trends in frequency, crude incidence, tumour-stage, the rectal "high-grade" adenoma/invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio and the survival rates. Histopathological tumour-stage parameters (UICC/AJCC, 1997 in a consecutive series of 641 resected rectal cancers and their relationship with the observed patient survival are investigated. Results The majority of invasive adenocarcinomas are diagnosed at a late stage (i.e. Stage II and III into contrast with the highly significant increase (355 % in frequency of rectal high-grade adenomas (Stage 0. During the two-time periods 1988–1992 and 1994–1998 Stage I and Stage IV-cases decreased by 11 % and 47 % respectively. Tumour-stage correlates with prognosis. The rectal high-grade adenoma / invasive adenocarcinoma-ratio improved significantly over the last five years. Conclusion Over the study period, there has been a highly significant rise in the incidence of resected rectal adenomas with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. The ratio of early tumours to invasive cancers has risen while the numbers of colonoscopies and rectoscopies remained unchanged respectively decreased. As the number of advanced tumour-stages remained stable, mass-screening procedures focusing on the fifty to sixty age group should be reinforced.

  14. Fournier gangrene: Rare complication of rectal cancer | Ossibi | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. It's discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  15. Progress in the surgery of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Schiessel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of rectal cancer has been improved a great deal within the last 20 years. Major progress has been made in the preoperative evaluation by introducing MRI- imaging as a basis for the further management. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has been shown to be effective in downstaging of advanced tumours. The surgical technique has been improved in many respects.- Total mesorectal excision has reduced local recurrences, sphincter saving techniques such as low anterior resection and intersphincteric resection reduced the need for a permanent stoma to 10%-20%. Recently the introduction of minimal invasive techniques and the application of robotic systems have reduced the surgical trauma.

  16. Differential expression of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in human colorectal cancer: A comparison with colon and rectal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, SHUAI; CHEN, YIJUN; ZHU, ZHANMENG; DING, YUNLONG; REN, SHUANGYI; ZUO, YUNFEI

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second among women. Accumulating evidence regarding carbohydrate antigen (CA) demonstrated that tumor-associated antigens are clinically useful for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of human gastrointestinal cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. There has been an extensive investigation for sensitive and specific markers of this disease. Currently, the gastrointestinal cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most widely applied tumor marker in cancer diagnosis. Despite a similar etiology and cancer incidence rates, there are anatomical and clinical differences between colon and rectal cancer, as well as differences regarding tumor progression and adjuvant treatments. To investigate whether CA19-9 is differentially expressed between colon and rectal cancer, we conducted a differential analysis of serum CA19-9 levels among 227 cases of colorectal cancer, analyzing gender, age, Dukes’ stage and distant metastasis for human colon and rectal cancer as a single entity, separately and as matched pairs. We demonstrated that the serum CA19-9 levels in colorectal cancer were upregulated in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By contrast, the serum CA19-9 levels in colon cancer displayed a differential and upregulated behavior in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By analyzing as matched pairs, the upregulated serum CA19-9 levels in rectal cancer during the early stages without distant metastasis further supported our hypothesis that the expression of CA19-9 displays a site-specific differential behavior. The integrative analysis suggested a significant difference between human colon and rectal cancer, justifying individualized therapy for these two types of cancer. PMID:24649295

  17. [Circumferential resection margin in the modern treatment of rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnát, P; Martínek, L; Ihnát Rudinská, L; Mitták, M; Vávra, P; Zonča, P

    2013-06-01

    In the last decades, the assessment of circumferential resection margin (CRM) has gained enormous importance in the management of patients with rectal carcinoma, not only in predicting the prognosis, but also in precise cancer staging, in multimodal treatment indications and in quality assessment of provided care. The authors present a review article containing CRM definition, describing the technique of CRM assessment, the effect of CRM status on the prognosis and quality of provided therapy. CRM assessment in the context of a multidisciplinary team is especially emphasised. The aspect of CRM has to be considered by the radiologist during cancer staging, the surgeon in the course of the operation, the pathologist during precise macroscopic and histopathological specimen evaluation, and the oncologist when deciding on neoadjuvant/adjuvant therapy administration. CRM nowadays represents a fundamental aspect in modern treatment of patients with rectal carcinoma. The introduction of CRM assessment into clinical practice has lead to more precise staging, better multimodal therapy indications, more precise surgical technique (total mesorectal excision), an increased rate of sphincter-saving resections, lowered local recurrence rates and improved patient survival.

  18. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  19. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafaelsen, S.R., E-mail: soeren.rafael.rafaelsen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Radiology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark); Vagn-Hansen, C., E-mail: chris.aksel.vagn-hansen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Radiology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark); Sørensen, T., E-mail: torben.soerensen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Radiology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark); Lindebjerg, J., E-mail: jan.lindebjerg@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Pathology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark); Pløen, J., E-mail: john.ploeen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark); Jakobsen, A., E-mail: anders.jakobsen@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, DCCG South, Vejle Hospital, 7100 Vejle (Denmark)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured using the Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse to generate information on the mechanical properties of the tissue. The objective quantitative elastography shear wave velocity was compared to the T stage classification and TRG. Results: The baseline mean tumor elasticity was 3.13 m/s. Two and six weeks after the start of chemoradiation the velocities were 2.17 m/s and 2.11 m/s, respectively. The difference between baseline velocity and velocities during the treatment course was statistically significant, (p < 0.0001). Patients with tumor confined to the rectal wall at histopathology (ypT1-2) had a mean elasticity measurement after two weeks of treatment of 1.95 m/s, whereas tumors invading the mesorectal fat (ypT3-4) had a velocity of 2.47 m/s, (p < 0.05). The mean elasticity tended to be lower (1.99 m/s) after two weeks in patients with TRG 1–2 responses in contrast to 2.24 m/s in those with TRG 3–4. Conclusion: Ultrasound elastography after two weeks of chemoradiation seems to hold early predictive information to the pathological T stage.

  20. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  1. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  2. Significance of thermoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ike, Hideyuki; Fukano, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Sigeki [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1997-05-01

    In patients with rectal cancer, results of 27 cases receiving thermoradiotherapy and of 68 cases, radiotherapy before operation were compared with those of 119 cases receiving expanded radical operation. Radiotherapy was done with 10 MV X-ray generated by linear-accelerator at 2.0 Gy x 5/week and 60 Gy in total. Hyperthermotherapy was performed with the capacitive heating method with 8 MHz radiofrequency (Thermotoron RF8) twice/week x 5. Every thermotherapy was done for 40 min at 42degC-43degC within 1 hr after the radiotherapy. Good results were observed in cases whose cancer was disappeared by either preoperative therapy. However, results in survival and recurrence rates were not always improved when compared with those receiving surgery alone. (K.H.)

  3. Rectal cancer and Fournier's gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-08-14

    Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects.

  4. Rectal cancer: Pattern and outcome of management in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determine the incidence of rectal cancer, its pattern of presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of treatment ... Since most cases in this environment are accessible to digital rectal examination. (DRE), the need for this procedure in patients with lower gastrointestinal symptoms cannot be overemphasized. Keywords: ...

  5. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer: risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, C A; Andreasen, A H; Jørgensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to identify risk factors for clinical anastomotic leakage (AL) after anterior resection for rectal cancer in a consecutive national cohort. METHOD: All patients with an initial first diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma were prospectively registered in a national......, smoking and perioperative bleeding. Faecal diversion is advisable after total mesorectal excision of low rectal tumours in order to prevent AL....

  6. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  7. Modified methylene blue injection improves lymph node harvest in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpei; Huang, Pinjie; Zheng, Zongheng; Chen, Tufeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nodal metastases in rectal cancer plays an important role in accurate staging and prognosis, which depends on adequate lymph node harvest. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the feasibility and survival benefit of improving lymph node harvest by a modified method with methylene blue injection in rectal cancer specimens. One hundred and thirty-one patients with rectal cancer were randomly assigned to the control group in which lymph nodes were harvested by palpation and sight, or to the methylene blue group using a modified method of injection into the superior rectal artery with methylene blue. Analysis of clinicopathologic records, including a long-term follow-up, was performed. In the methylene blue group, 678 lymph nodes were harvested by simple palpation and sight. Methylene blue injection added 853 lymph nodes to the total harvest as well as 32 additional metastatic lymph nodes, causing a shift to node-positive stage in four patients. The average number of lymph nodes harvested was 11.7 ± 3.4 in the control group and 23.2 ± 4.7 in the methylene blue group, respectively. The harvest of small lymph nodes (rectal cancer, especially small node and metastatic node retrieval, which provided more accurate staging. However, it was not associated with overall survival. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Resected irradiated rectal cancers: Are twelve lymph nodes really necessary in the era of neoadjuvant therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Morgan L; Adam, Mohamed A; Shenoi, Mithun M; Turner, Megan C; Sun, Zhifei; Mantyh, Christopher R; Migaly, John

    2017-08-26

    Our study aims to identify the minimum number of lymph nodes (LN) associated with improved survival in patients who underwent NRT for stage II-III rectal cancer. Adults with clinical stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma in the National Cancer Data Base were stratified by NRT. Multivariable Cox regression modeling with restricted cubic splines was used to determine the minimum number of LNs associated with improved survival. Of 38,363 patients, 76% received NRT. After adjustment, a LNY≥12 was associated with improved survival among patients receiving NRT (HR 0.79, p cubic splines to determine the minimum number of lymph nodes associated with improved survival. A minimum yield of 12 remains essential for a survival benefit in rectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Yeon; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Beon Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Oh, Yu Whan

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  10. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  11. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  12. Acute toxicity of chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, C.; Fietkau, R.; Keilholz, L.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Kessler, H.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1995, 120 patients with rectal cancer (73 patients with primary tumor, 47 with recurrent disease) received chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Fifty-six patients received preoperative chemoradiation, 64 patients were treated postoperatively. Radiation was given by 4-field box technique with 6 to 10 MV-photons. Daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy, total dose 50.4 Gy (range: 41,4 to 56 Gy) ± 5.4 Gy (range: 3.6 to 19.8 Gy) local boost in selected cases, specified to the ICRU reference point. During the first and fifth week of radiation 5-FU at a dose of 1000 m 2 /d for 120 hours was administered by continuous infusion. Toxicity was recorded following (modified) WHO-criteria. Results: Acute grade 3 toxicity occurred mainly as diarrhea (33%), perineal skin reaction (37%), and leukopenia (10%). Extension of the treatment volume including paraaortic lymph nodes (L3) led to a significant increase of grade 3-diarrhea (68% vs. 25%, p = 0.0003) and grade 3-leukopenia (18% vs. 8%, p 0.03). After abdominoperineal resection less patients suffered from grade 3-diarrhea (8% vs. 47% after sphincter preserving procedures, p = 0.0006), whereas severe perineal erythema occurred more frequently (56% vs. 29%, p 0.02). Women had significantly more toxic side effects (grade 3-diarrhea: 39% vs. 16% in men, p = 0,04; grade 2 to 3-nausea/emesis: 21% vs 8% in men, p 0.018; grade 2 to 3-leukopenia 53% vs. 31% in men, p = 0.02). After preoperative chemoradiation a significant reduction of grade 3-diarrhea (11% vs 29%, p 0.03) and grade 3-erythema (16% vs. 41%, p = 0.04) was noted. (orig./AJ) [de

  13. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  14. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  18. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  19. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  20. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  1. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  2. Laparoscopic resection for low rectal cancer: evaluation of oncological efficacy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Diarmaid C

    2011-09-01

    Laparoscopic resection of low rectal cancer poses significant technical difficulties for the surgeon. There is a lack of published follow-up data in relation to the surgical, oncological and survival outcomes in these patients.

  3. PET/CT diagnostic of colo-rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straciuc, O.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Presenting the advantages of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/ CT) examination, using the radiotracer fluorure 18-deoxyglucose (FDG) in colo-rectal cancer diagnostic. Basics of the method will be also presented. Introduction: FDG PET/CT is recognized as the most efficient diagnostic imaging weapon in colorectal cancer, enable too comprehend all the 3 targets needed for staging of colo-rectal cancers: 1)Detection and evaluation of primary tumor (T) and recurrence; 2) Lymphadenopathy (N); 3)Metastatic disease (M). Assessment of treatment response during and after therapy, follow up and radiotherapy planning are also indications for PET/CT. There are two essential advantages of the method: 1)The whole body examination; 2)The complementary morphological information offered by CT and functional information offered by PET. Material and methods: Study of a total of 394 patients diagnosed with colo-rectal cancer of the total of 4125 investigated by PET/CT in Diagnosztika Pozitron center of Oradea, between 01.06.2008 - 06.06.2012. All cases had documented preoperative or postoperative histopathologic evaluation. We used a Siemens Biograph 16 device and only FDG as radiotracer, injected intravenously at a dose of 0.1-0.15 mCi /kg. Standard protocol of examination was performed at 60 minutes after FDG injection. CT acquisition consists of 'low dose' from vertex to thighs, followed by PET acquisition in 7 to 8 beds. Results: We followed the performance of PET/CT diagnostic in staging and restaging of colorectal cancer compared with other imaging methods. 141 patients had negative examinations. 107 patients were diagnosed with locally recurrent lesions, lymphadenopathy and/ or metastases. Compared with the results of previous imaging new metabolically active lesions were detected in 87 patients by PET/CT and suspected lesions were denied in 48 patients. Significant clinically cases are presented. Conclusions: The data obtained by PET

  4. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group

  5. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat esophageal cancer. A plastic ...

  6. Stages of Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat anal cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  7. Stages of Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat penile cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  8. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  9. Treatment strategy for rectal cancer with synchronous metastasis: 65 consecutive Italian cases from the Bologna Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carmine; Pini, Sara; Di Fabio, Francesca; Cuicchi, Dajana; Iacopino, Bruno; Lecce, Ferdinando; Ercolani, Giorgio; Rojas Llimpe, Fabiola Lorena; De Raffele, Emilio; Stella, Franco; Di Tullio, PierGiorgio; Giaquinta, Stefania; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Cola, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Twenty percent of rectal cancer patients have synchronous distant metastasis at diagnosis. At present, the treatment strategy in this patient setting is not well defined. This study in one institution evaluates the treatment strategy of three different patient groups. Between January 2000 and July 2011, 65 patients with M1 rectal cancer were evaluated. Three different groups were defined: rectal cancer with resectable metastatic disease (group A); rectal cancer with potentially resectable metastatic disease (group B), and rectal cancer with unresectable metastatic disease (group C). Group A included 11 patients (16.9%), group B 28 patients (43.1%) and group C 26 patients (40%). Forty-three (66.2%) patients underwent surgery for primary rectal cancer, and 30 (46.2%) patients for metastasis resection (23 liver, 4 lung and 3 ovary). Median overall survival (OS) by group was: 51 (5-86; group A), 32 (24-40; group B) and 16 (7-26; group C) months. Patients undergoing metastasis resection have higher median OS than unresected patients (44 vs. 15 months; p cancer must consider the possibility of distant metastasis resection. Long-term survival can be achieved using an integrated approach.

  10. ORGAN-SPARING SURGERY FOR RECTAL CANCER: EVOLUTION, CURRENT TRENDS, AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tamrazov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main stages of the development of sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. An historical look at this issue from the standpoint of research of past years in our country and abroad, as well as analysis of current sphincter-preserving surgery and future directions in this area.

  11. Histology and cell kinetics of rectal mucosa of A/HeJ mice administered syngeneic rectal antigen and its effects on radiation induced rectal cancer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yoritaka

    1980-01-01

    1. Four-week-old A/HeJ mice were immunized by rectal antigen and at the age of 6 weeks the pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad of X-ray for two times. They were observed for a maximum period of 84 weeks. The first rectal cancer detected 36 days after irradiation was histologically found to be mucous-secreting-adenocarinoma. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 21 (61.76%) of the 34 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 25 (55.56%) of the 45 mice. 2. On the other hand, among the mice whose pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad for two times, the first cancer was observed 56 days after irradiation. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 4 (18.18%) of the 22 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 12 (33.33%) of the 36 mice. 3. In the group of 51 non-irradiated mice, no rectal cancer was observed. 4. The stainability of HID-AB stain of the histologically normal mucosa near irradiated site was compared between cancer induced cases and normal cases. In 22 (84.62%) mice among 26 with induced cancer and in 9 (45%) among 20 mice without cancer, rectal crypt with AB positive goblet cells could be observed. (author)

  12. Descriptive characteristics of colon and rectal cancer recurrence in a Danish population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ashley C; Riis, Anders H; Erichsen, Rune; Fedirko, Veronika; Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Vyberg, Mogens; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Lash, Timothy L

    2017-08-01

    Recurrence is a common outcome among patients that have undergone an intended curative resection for colorectal cancer. However, data on factors that influence colorectal cancer recurrence are sparse. We report descriptive characteristics of both colon and rectal cancer recurrence in an unselected population. We identified 21,152 patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed between May 2001 and December 2011 and registered with the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group. Recurrences were identified in 3198 colon and 1838 rectal cancer patients during follow-up. We calculated the frequency, proportion, and incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer recurrence within descriptive categories, and the cumulative five- and ten-year incidences of recurrence, treating death as a competing risk. We used a Cox proportional hazard model to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Recurrence risk was highest in the first three years of follow-up. Patients colon: 7.2 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 6.5-7.9; rectum: 8.1 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 7.2-9.0) and patients diagnosed with stage III cancer (colon HR: 5.70; 95% CI: 4.61-7.06; rectal HR: 7.02; 95% CI: 5.58-8.82) had increased risk of recurrence. Patients diagnosed with stage III cancer from 2009 to 2011 had a lower incidence of recurrence than those diagnosed with stage III cancer in the years before. Cumulative incidences of colon and rectal cancer recurrence were similar for both cancer types among each descriptive category. In this population, increases in colorectal cancer recurrence risk were associated with younger age and increasing stage at diagnosis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence did not differ by cancer type. Descriptive characteristics of colon and rectal cancer recurrence may help to inform patient-physician decision-making, and could be used to determine adjuvant therapies or tailor surveillance strategies so that recurrence may be identified early, particularly within the first 3 years of

  13. Contemporary management of locally advanced rectal cancer: Resolving issues, controversies and shifting paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacion, Aeris Jane D; Park, Youn Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2018-02-01

    Advancements in rectal cancer treatment have resulted in improvement only in locoregional control and have failed to address distant relapse, which is the predominant mode of treatment failure in rectal cancer. As the efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) reaches a plateau, the need for alternative strategies in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has grown in relevance. Several novel strategies have been conceptualized to address this issue, including: 1) neoadjuvant induction and consolidation chemotherapy before CRT; 2) neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone to avoid the sequelae of radiation; and 3) nonoperative management for patients who achieved pathological or clinical complete response after CRT. This article explores the issues, recent advances and paradigm shifts in the management of LARC and emphasizes the need for a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on tumor stage, location, gene expression and quality of life.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: results from the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Michael; Stenborg, Anna; Paahlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial (SRCT) demonstrated that a short-term regimen of high-dose fractionated preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) reduced the local recurrence rates and improved overall survival. This has had an impact on the primary treatment of rectal cancer. The current study investigated the cost-effectiveness of the new combined approach. Methods and Materials: After an 8-year follow-up, in-hospital and outpatient costs related to the treatment of rectal cancer and its complications were analyzed for 98 randomly allocated patients who participated in the SRCT from a single Swedish health care region. The costs were then related to the clinical data from the SRCT regarding complications, local and distant recurrences, and survival. Results: The total cost for a nonirradiated patient was US$30,080 compared with US$35,268 for an irradiated patient. The surgery-alone group had increased costs related to local recurrences, and the radiotherapy group had increased costs for irradiation and complications. With a survival benefit of 21 months (retrieved from the SRCT), the cost for a saved year was US$3654. Sensitivity analyses for different rates of local recurrences, the costs related to complications and less marked survival benefit showed that this figure could vary up to US$15,228. Conclusion: The cost for a life-year saved in these data was US$3654. This figure could reach US$15,228 in the most pessimistic setting of the sensitivity tests, a cost still comparable with other well-accepted medical interventions

  15. A case of rectal cancer following irradiation of cancer of the uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Yosuke; Kawakado, Hiroki; Maki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Tsuneyuki; Kimura, Osamu

    1981-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer which seems to have developed in 18 years following the irradiation of cancer of the uterus was reported. And bibliographies of radiation-induced rectal cancer following the irradiation of cancer of the uterus were reviewed. (J.P.N.)

  16. Definition and delineation of the clinical target volume for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roels, Sarah; Duthoy, Wim; Haustermans, Karin; Penninckx, Freddy; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Optimization of radiation techniques to maximize local tumor control and to minimize small bowel toxicity in locally advanced rectal cancer requires proper definition and delineation guidelines for the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this investigation was to analyze reported data on the predominant locations and frequency of local recurrences and lymph node involvement in rectal cancer, to propose a definition of the CTV for rectal cancer and guidelines for its delineation. Methods and Materials: Seven reports were analyzed to assess the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences in rectal cancer. The distribution of lymphatic spread was analyzed in another 10 reports to record the relative frequency and location of metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer, according to the stage and level of the primary tumor. Results: The mesorectal, posterior, and inferior pelvic subsites are most at risk for local recurrences, whereas lymphatic tumor spread occurs mainly in three directions: upward into the inferior mesenteric nodes; lateral into the internal iliac lymph nodes; and, in a few cases, downward into the external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. The risk for recurrence or lymph node involvement is related to the stage and the level of the primary lesion. Conclusion: Based on a review of articles reporting on the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences and the distribution of lymphatic spread in rectal cancer, we defined guidelines for CTV delineation including the pelvic subsites and lymph node groups at risk for microscopic involvement. We propose to include the primary tumor, the mesorectal subsite, and the posterior pelvic subsite in the CTV in all patients. Moreover, the lateral lymph nodes are at high risk for microscopic involvement and should also be added in the CTV

  17. Phase 2 Neoadjuvant Treatment Intensification Trials in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teo, Mark T W; McParland, Lucy; Appelt, Ane L

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Multiple phase 2 trials of neoadjuvant treatment intensification in locally advanced rectal cancer have reported promising efficacy signals, but these have not translated into improved cancer outcomes in phase 3 trials. Improvements in phase 2 trial design are needed to reduce these false......-positive signals. This systematic review evaluated the design of phase 2 trials of neoadjuvant long-course radiation or chemoradiation therapy treatment intensification in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for published...... among the reported effect sizes (I2 = 55.3%, Prectal cancer trials is urgently required. A significant increase...

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  19. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  20. Circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity after MRI assessment and adjuvant treatment in 189 patients undergoing rectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G S; Eardley, N; McNicol, F; Healey, P; Hughes, M; Rooney, P S

    2014-05-01

    The management of rectal cancer relies on accurate MRI staging. Multi-modal treatments can downstage rectal cancer prior to surgery and may have an effect on MRI accuracy. We aim to correlate the findings of MRI staging of rectal cancer with histological analysis, the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on this and the implications of circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity following neoadjuvant therapy. An analysis of histological data and radiological staging of all cases of rectal cancer in a single centre between 2006 and 2011 were conducted. Two hundred forty-one patients had histologically proved rectal cancer during the study period. One hundred eighty-two patients underwent resection. Median age was 66.6 years, and male to female ratio was 13:5. R1 resection rate was 11.1%. MRI assessments of the circumferential resection margin in patients without neoadjuvant radiotherapy were 93.6 and 88.1% in patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Eighteen patients had predicted positive margins following chemoradiotherapy, of which 38.9% had an involved CRM on histological analysis. MRI assessment of the circumferential resection margin in rectal cancer is associated with high accuracy. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has a detrimental effect on this accuracy, although accuracy remains high. In the presence of persistently predicted positive margins, complete resection remains achievable but may necessitate a more radical approach to resection.

  1. Effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Masaomi; Mizuta, Minoru; Kaji, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    To determine the pathologic effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with advanced rectal carcinoma, we reviewed clinical records of 76 patients who received preoperative pelvic radiation +/- chemotherapy. Since 2 patients refused operation and 2 died before surgery, 72 patients underwent operation with a mean delay of 19.9 days after completion of irradiation. Pathologic tumor regression grade (Grade 0-3) was determined by the amount of viable tumor versus necrosis and fibrosis. Grade 0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 (pCR) were observed in 0%, 25.0%, 38.9%, 27.8% and 2.8% of patients, respectively. The pathologic response (PR) rate was 75.0% when PR was defined as greater than grade 1b (tumor regression more than 1/3). Downstaging was observed in 35.8% of patients, in which 5-year overall survival was significantly better than in patients without downstaging (90.0% vs. 50.1%, p<0.05). No correlation could be observed between PR and downstaging. CRT is a useful tool with a high PR rate in patients with advanced rectal cancer. More accurate and careful clinical staging is important to select adequate candidates for CRT. Multi-institutional clinical trials as well as standardizing the surgical procedure including lymph node (LN) dissection are required to validate the advantages of CRT for Japanese patients. (author)

  2. Estadificación del cáncer de recto mediante ultrasonografía endoscópica: correlación con la estadificación histológica Rectal cancer staging with endoscopic ultrasonography: correlation with pathological staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Vila

    2007-03-01

    , to stage rectal cancer. Material and methods: we prospectively included all patients with rectal cancer staged in our unit from September 2002 until February 2006 in a database. We selected those patients who had a complete EUS examination and were surgically treated without neoadjuvant therapy. Once we had the results of the histopathological staging (pTN, which was considered the gold standard, we compared the results of the previous EUS staging (uTN with those of the pTN. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for each T stage, and for N staging considered as N positive or negative. We also calculated the global accuracy for T stage. We also calculated the agreement of uTN with pTN staging using the kappa index for N stage, and quadratic weighted kappa index for T stage. Results: we staged 120 patients with rectal cancer during the mentioned period. Of these, 36 patients met inclusion criteria and were evaluated, 21 women and 15 men. Mean age was 68,53 ± 10,15 yo (range: 48-90. Global T stage accuracy was 83%. N stage accuracy was 72%. We obtained a S, E, PPV, NPV and A of 91, 100, 100, 96 and 97% for T1; 82, 88, 75, 91 and 86% for T2; 86, 91, 86, 91 and 89% for T3; and 14, 86, 20, 80 and 72% for N stage respectively. Kappa value for T stage was 0,87 indicating a "very good" agreement between uT and pT according to the kappa index criteria. Kappa value for N stage agreement was 0,005; "poor" according to the same criteria. Conclusions: in our experience, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS for T and N staging of rectal cancer is 83% and 72% respectively, similar results as previously published. uT staging for rectal cancer shows a "very good" agreement with pT staging.

  3. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  4. Diagnostic accuracy and prognostic impact of restaging by magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Soon Jin; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prognostic role of restaging rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with preoperative CRT has not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic role of radiological staging by rectal MRI after preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 231 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and radical resection from January 2008 to December 2009 were prospectively enrolled. The diagnostic accuracy and prognostic significance of post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was evaluated. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiological diagnosis of good responders (ypTNM stage 0–I) were 32%, 90%, 65%, and 69%, respectively. The overall accuracy of MRI restating for good responders was 68%. The 5-year disease-free survival rates of patients with radiological and pathological TNM stage 0, stage I, and stage II–III were 100%, 94%, and 76%, respectively (P = 0.037), and 97%, 87%, and 73%, respectively (P = 0.007). On multivariate analysis, post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusion: Radiological staging by MRI after preoperative CRT may be an independent predictor of survival in patients with rectal cancer

  5. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  6. Elevated platelet count as predictor of recurrence in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer.

  7. Staging for vaginal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Maheshwari, Amita; Srivastava, Astha

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer comprising about 3% of all gynecologic cancers. Primary vaginal cancer should be carefully assigned as spread from cervix, vulva, and other metastatic tumors to vagina can occur. Although vaginal cancer traditionally occurs in older postmenopausal women, the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is increasing in younger women. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histopathologic type followed by adenocarcinoma. With decreasing use of diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy, non-diethylstilbestrol-associated cancers are described. The Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) staging of vaginal cancer (2009) follows the same rules as cervical cancer; it is clinically staged and allows the use of routine investigative modalities for staging. Although FIGO encourages the use of advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), to guide therapy, the imaging findings may not be used to change or reassign the stage. TNM staging is the pathologic staging system proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and information available from examination of the resected specimen, including pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, may be used for staging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Postoperative Low Expression of RAD50 in Rectal Cancer Patients Associates with Disease-Free Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to the treatment of rectal cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic and clinicopathological implication of RAD50 (DNA repair protein RAD50 homolog expression in rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 266 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery and received chemo- and radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were involved in the study. Postoperative RAD50 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in surgical samples (n = 266. Results: Using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, we found that low RAD50 expression in postoperative samples was associated with worse disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p < 0.001 in early stage/low-grade tumors. In a comparison of patients with low vs. high RAD50 expression, we found that low levels of postoperative RAD50 expression in rectal cancer tissues were significantly associated with perineural invasion (p = 0.002. Conclusion: Expression of RAD50 in rectal cancer may serve as a prognostic biomarker for long-term survival of patients with perineural invasion-positive tumors and for potential use in early stage and low-grade rectal cancer assessment.

  9. Digital rectal examination for prostate cancer: Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Prostate cancer which tends to take an aggressive course in black populations can be detected by digital rectal examination (DRE). There are concerns however that medical students are not acquiring the necessary DRE skills. We therefore studied their experience and attitude towards DRE for prostate cancer to ...

  10. Rectal cancer: Pattern and outcome of management in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the colon and rectum was considered to be rare in Africa three to four decades ago. This is no longer true though it is not as common as in Western Europe and North America. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of rectal cancer, its pattern of presentation, diagnosis, treatment and ...

  11. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels

    2016-01-01

    followed 1995–2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...

  12. Mechanisms of oncogenesis in colon versus rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, E.; Liefers, G.J.; Los, L.C.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hermans, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Moriya, Y.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Observations support the theory that development of left- and right-sided colorectal cancers may involve different mechanisms. This study investigated different genes involved in oncogenesis of colon and rectal cancers and analysed their prognostic value. The study group comprised 35 colon and 42

  13. Three-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Techniques for Rectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The third most common malignancy in the Netherlands is colorectal cancer. Rectal cancer affects every year around 2000 new patients. The highest incidence is found at an age above 70 years, and in men (sex ratio: 1.48). In Europe, the treatment of preference for

  14. Functional results after treatment for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Jossing Emmertsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With improving survival of rectal cancer, functional outcome has become in- creasingly important. Following sphincter-preserving resection many patients suffer from severe bowel dysfunction with an impact on quality of life (QoL – referred to as low ante- rior resection syndrome (LARS. Study objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of LARS regarding symp- tomatology, occurrence, risk factors, pathophysiology, evaluation instruments and treat- ment options. Results: LARS is characterized by urgency, frequent bowel movements, emptying difficulties and incontinence, and occurs in up to 50-75% of patients on a long-term basis. Known risk factors are low anastomosis, use of radiotherapy, direct nerve injury and straight anasto- mosis. The pathophysiology seems to be multifactorial, with elements of anatomical, sen- sory and motility dysfunction. Use of validated instruments for evaluation of LARS is es- sential. Currently, there is a lack of evidence for treatment of LARS. Yet, transanal irrigation and sacral nerve stimulation are promising. Conclusion: LARS is a common problem following sphincter-preserving resection. All pa- tients should be informed about the risk of LARS before surgery, and routinely be screened for LARS postoperatively. Patients with severe LARS should be offered treatment in order to improve QoL. Future focus should be on the possibilities of non-resectional treatment in order to prevent LARS. Resumo: Introdução: Com o aumento da sobrevida após câncer retal, o resultado funcional se tornou cada vez mais importante. Após ressecção com preservação do esfíncter, muitos pacientes sofrem de disfunção intestinal com um impacto sobre a qualidade de vida (QdV – denomi- nada síndrome da ressecção anterior baixa (LARS. Objetivo do estudo: Fornecer uma visão geral do conhecimento atual da LARS com relação à sintomatologia, à ocorrência, aos fatores de risco, à fisiopatologia, aos

  15. Assessing the effectiveness of a guideline recommendation for pre-operative radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchon-Walsh, Paula; Borras, Josep Maria; Espinas, Josep Alfons; Aliste, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the degree of adherence to the guideline recommendation on pre-operative RT/ChT for stage-II and -III patients in Catalonian public hospitals, and its impact on local recurrence among rectal cancer patients. Methods: Data were derived from a multicentre retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for primary rectal cancer at Catalonian public hospitals in 2005 and 2007. Results: The study covered 1229 patients with TNM stage-II or -III primary rectal cancer. Of these patients, 54.5% underwent pre-operative RT/ChT; 14.9% underwent post-operative RT (± chemotherapy); and 30.6% did not undergo any RT. The crude local recurrence rate at 2 years was 4.1% and the crude distant recurrence rate at 2 years was 6.5%. The results of the univariate analyses showed a local-recurrence hazard ratio of 1.84 for the group of patients that received no RT versus the group that received pre-operative RT/ChT (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This is the first population-based study in Catalonia to support the use of pre-operative RT/ChT in rectal cancer patients because, in line with the results of population-based studies reported from other countries, its application, compared to non-application of RT, was found to lead to a clear reduction in the probability of local recurrence.

  16. The differential impact of microsatellite instability as a marker of prognosis and tumour response between colon cancer and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Pil; Min, Byung So; Kim, Tae Il; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a distinct molecular phenotype of colorectal cancer related to prognosis and tumour response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. We investigated the differential impact of MSI between colon and rectal cancers as a marker of prognosis and chemotherapeutic response. PCR-based MSI assay was performed on 1125 patients. Six hundred and sixty patients (58.7%) had colon cancer and 465 patients (41.3%) had rectal cancer. Among 1125 patients, 106 (9.4%) had high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) tumours. MSI-H colon cancers (13%) had distinct phenotypes including young age at diagnosis, family history of colorectal cancer, early Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) stage, proximal location, poor differentiation, and high level of baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), while MSI-H rectal cancers (4.3%) showed similar clinicopathological characteristics to MSS/MSI-L tumours except for family history of colorectal cancer. MSI-H tumours were strongly correlated with longer disease free survival (DFS) (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.009) than MSS/MSI-L tumours in colon cancer, while these positive correlations were not observed in rectal cancers. The patients with MSS/MSI-L tumours receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy showed good prognosis (P=0.013), but this positive association was not observed in MSI-H (P=0.104). These results support the use of MSI status as a marker of prognosis and response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with colon cancers. Further study is mandatory to evaluate the precise role of MSI in patients with rectal cancers and the effect of 5-FU-based chemotherapy in MSI-H tumours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dual-Energy CT of Rectal Cancer Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, Issam; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Madsen, Gunvor

    2016-01-01

    %; specificity, 88%; and accuracy, 91%), and 4) iodine concentration at 2.58 μg/mL (sensitivity, 86%; specificity, 92%; and accuracy, 89%). LIMITATIONS: The investigation is conducted on isolated surgical specimens from rectal cancer operations. CONCLUSIONS: Dual-energy CT can be performed on rectal specimens...... is represented by a certain effective Z value, which allows for information on its composition. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to standardize a method for dual-energy scanning of rectal specimens to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of benign versus malignant lymph node differentiation. Histopathological evaluation...... of the nodes was our reference. DESIGN: This was a descriptive and prospective study. SETTINGS: Seventeen rectal specimens were examined in 2 series. The first series was conducted with 3 specimens from patients who were not given perioperative contrast; 3 had iodine-based contrast and 3 had gadolinium...

  18. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study ...

  19. Reverse-hybrid robotic mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; You, Y Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J

    2012-02-01

    The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a "reverse" hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period, a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional-hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes, and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients; no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic

  20. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  1. The rectal cancer microRNAome - microRNA expression in rectal cancer and matched normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Camps, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    mucosa. The predicted targets for these miRNAs were enriched for the following pathways: Wnt, TGF-beta, mTOR, insulin, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and ErbB signaling. Thirteen of these 49 miRNAs seem to be rectal cancer-specific, and have not been previously reported for colon cancers: miR-492, mi...

  2. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 ± 3mm (mean ± SD) and 10 ± 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 ± 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 ± 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  3. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes

  4. Prognostic factors of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaobin; Yuan Zhiyong; You Jinqiang; Zhang Bailin; Zhu Li; Zhao Peng; Liu Jianzhong; Wang Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic factors and the clinical outcome of locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection. Methods: From April 2000 to April 2004, 105 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection were re-treated in Tianjin cancer hospital. Thirty-four patients were re-treated with surgery combined with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (group 1), 35 with surgery alone (group 2), and 36 with chemoradiotherapy (group 3). The impact of 17 clinico pathological factors and treatment modalities on the survival was analyzed. Results: The follow-up rate was 95. 2%. The median survival time was 23 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were 63% ,34% and 19%, respectively. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates were 79%, 55% and 32% in group 1 ; 68%, 40% and 14% in group 2; and 64%, 36% and 11% in group 3; respectively (χ 2 =7. 96, P =0. 019). The univariate analysis showed that the degree of differentiation, depth of tumor invasion, number of metastatic lymph nodes, initial TNM stage, recurrent location, time to recurrence, and surgery combined with adjuvant therapy were significant prognostic factors, with the last 4 being the independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Surgery combined with chemoradiotherapy may improve the survival of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. (authors)

  5. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Bin; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-09-15

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for rectal cancer. Strategies maintaining hemoglobin level within normal range could potentially be used to improve local control in rectal cancer patients.

  7. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye Bin; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won

    2012-01-01

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for rectal cancer. Strategies maintaining hemoglobin level within normal range could potentially be used to improve local control in rectal cancer patients.

  8. DIFFICULTIES IN DETERMINING THE STAGE OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Lukianov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a technique of treatment of prostate cancer depends on the age of the patient, accompanying diseases and prevalence of tumoral process. The basic methods at an inspection stage at which the cancer stage is defined are: definition of prostate specific membrane antigen, rectal examination, results of the rectal ultrasound guided biopsy, prostate imaging methods and an estimation of a grade of a tumor. Nowadays one of the main directions of determining the treatment for various stages of tumor is the development of prognostic models based on the analysis of predictors for tumor expansion.

  9. Rectal cancer : developments in multidisciplinary treatment, quality control and European collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, Willem van

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, treatment of rectal cancer has considerably improved in Europe. Although this applies to most solid malignancies, improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer surpass virtually all others. In the early 1990s, outcome after rectal cancer treatment was poor,

  10. The prognostic value of lymph node ratio in a national cohort of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J; Jess, P; Roikjaer, O

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prognostic implications of the lymph node ratio (LNR) in curative resected rectal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been proposed that the LNR has a high prognostic impact in colorectal cancer, but the lymph node ratio has not been evaluated exclusively for rectal...... that the introduction of LNR should be considered for rectal cancer in a revised TNM classification....

  11. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  12. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Anne Haahr Mellergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack

    2016-01-01

    study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH......) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated...

  13. Repeatability of diffusion-weighted imaging in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intven, Martijn; Reerink, Onne; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2014-07-01

    Serial diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of rectal tumors are used for rectal cancer response evaluation after neo-adjuvant treatment. In this study, we determined the repeatability of DW-MRI to distinguish therapy-related response from measurement variations. In 18 patients with rectal cancer on five consecutive days, 1.5 Tesla (T) MR imaging was performed including two identical DW-MRI sequences. The repeatability of the tumor ADC measurements and the intraobserver ADC variation were depicted in a Bland-Altman plot. The repeatability coefficient was calculated as the range of ADC values of two identical DWI measurements for 95% of subjects. It was expressed as percentage of the mean ADC value. Three females and 15 males were included. The mean tumor ADC value was 1.15 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (SD 0.07 × 10(-3) mm(2)). The repeatability coefficient of the ADC value was 9.8% and for the intraobserver repeatability 4.7%. In serial DW-MRI for rectal cancer treatment response evaluation, a repeatability coefficient of 9.8% has to be considered to account for measurement variations in rectal tumor ADC. These variations represent observer judgement and patient and MR spectrometer induced variations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Linear array ultrasonography to stage rectal neoplasias suitable for local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Davide; Tamayo, Darina; Fiori, Giancarla; Trovato, Cristina; De Roberto, Giuseppe; de Leone, Annalisa; Crosta, Cristiano

    2011-08-01

    Because of the many therapeutic options available, a reliable staging is crucial for rectal neoplasia management. Adenomas and cancers limited to the submucosa without lymph node involvement may be treated locally. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in the staging of neoplasias suitable for local treatment. We considered all patients who underwent endorectal ultrasonography between 2001 and 2010. The study population consisted of 92 patients with 92 neoplasias (68 adenocarcinomas and 24 adenomas). A 5 and 7.5MHz linear array echoendoscope was used. The postoperative histopathologic result was compared with the preoperative staging defined by endorectal ultrasonography. Adenomas and cancers limited to the submucosa were considered together (pT0-1). The sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy rate, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of endorectal ultrasonography for pT0-1 were 86%, 95.6%, 91.3%, 94.9% and 88.7%. Those for nodal involvement were 45.4%, 95.5%, 83%, 76.9% and 84%, with 3 false positive results and 12 false negative. For combined pT0-1 and pN0, endorectal ultrasonography showed an 87.5% sensitivity, 95.9% specificity, 92% overall accuracy rate, 94.9% positive predictive value and 90.2% negative predictive value. Endorectal linear array ultrasonography is a reliable tool to detect rectal neoplasias suitable for local treatment. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Regression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Radiochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omejc, Mirko; Potisek, Maja

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background The majority of rectal cancers are discovered in locally advanced forms (UICC stage II, III). Treatment consists of preoperative radiochemotherapy, followed by surgery 6–8 weeks later and finally by postoperative chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to find out if tumor regression affected long-term survival in patients with localy advanced rectal cancer, treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Patients and methods Patients with rectal cancer stage II or III, treated between 2006 and 2010, were included in a retrospective study. Clinical and pathohistologic data were acquired from computer databases and information about survival from Cancer Registry. Survival was estimated according to Kaplan-Meier method. Significance of prognostic factors was evaluated in univariate analysis; comparison was carried out with log-rank test. The multivariate analysis was performed according to the Cox regression model; statistically significant variables from univariate analysis were included. Results Two hundred and two patients met inclusion criteria. Median follow-up was 53.2 months. Stage ypT0N0 (pathologic complete response, pCR) was observed in 14.8% of patients. Pathohistologic stage had statistically significant impact on survival (p = 0.001). 5-year survival in patients with pCR was>90%. Postoperative T and N status were also found to be statistically significant (p = 0.011 for ypT and p < 0.001 for ypN). According to multivariate analysis, tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy was the only independent prognostic factor (p = 0.003). Conclusions Pathologic response of tumor to preoperative radiochemotherapy is an important prognostic factor for prediction of long-term survival of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:29520203

  17. Complete Neoadjuvant Treatment for Rectal Cancer: The Brown University Oncology Group CONTRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard; Sikov, William; Vrees, Matthew; Klipfel, Adam; Shah, Nishit; Schechter, Steven; Oldenburg, Nicklas; Pricolo, Victor; Rosati, Kayla; Dipetrillo, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery, many patients with stage II to III rectal cancer are unable to tolerate full-dose adjuvant chemotherapy. BrUOG R-224 was designed to assess the impact of COmplete Neoadjuvant Treatment for REctal cancer (CONTRE), primary chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery, on treatment delivery, toxicities, and pathologic response at surgery. Patients with clinical stage II to III (T3 to T4 and/or N1 to N2) rectal cancer received 8 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 followed by capecitabine 825 mg/m bid concurrent with 50.4 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Surgery was performed 6 to 10 weeks after chemoradiation. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2013. Median age was 61 years (30 to 79 y); 7 patients (18%) were clinical stage II and 32 (82%) stage III. Thirty-six patients (92%) received all 8 cycles of mFOLFOX6, of whom 35 completed subsequent chemoradiation; thus 89% of patients received CONTRE as planned. No unexpected toxicities were reported. All patients had resolution of bleeding and improvement of obstructive symptoms, with no complications requiring surgical intervention. Pathologic complete response (ypT0N0) was demonstrated in 13 patients (33%; 95% CI, 18.24%-47.76%). CONTRE seems to be a well-tolerated alternative to the current standard treatment sequence. Evaluating its impact on long-term outcomes would require a large randomized trial, but using pathologic response as an endpoint, it could serve as a platform for assessing the addition of novel agents to preoperative treatment in stage II to III rectal cancer.

  18. Disparity in the use of combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in the older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohac, Gerald C; Guaqueta, Delia; Cheng, Debbie M; Aschengrau, Ann; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment strategy for patients with rectal adenocarcinoma having T3 or T4 tumors or positive lymph nodes includes concurrent chemoradiation, surgery and chemotherapy. Population based studies show relatively low rates of usage of standard therapy for rectal cancer in the older adult. Two decades of cases of stage II and stage III rectal cancer from two academic teaching hospitals were reviewed. Comparisons were made of subjects ≤70 or ≥71years with regard to initiation and completion of radiation, chemotherapy and surgery. Subjects ≥71years of age had significantly lower proportions of surgical resection (84 vs. 94%) and of initiation of all three component of standard therapy (49 vs. 66%) compared to those ≤70years of age. Subjects ≥71years had significantly more co-morbidities; however, the difference in initiation of therapy remained after adjusting for stage, treating hospital, co-morbid status, race or sex in multivariable analysis. The odds for initiation of therapy were reduced by ≈22% in older adults in the adjusted analysis. Among all patients who started therapy only 56% completed it without dose reduction or delay. There were trends to increased completion among those receiving neo-adjuvant vs. post-operative chemoradiation and among those with stage III as opposed to stage II cancer. Our study indicates that a major disparity in the use of standard therapy for rectal cancer in the older adult exists in academic hospital settings. It will be important for oncologists to reconsider increasing the usage of curative therapy in these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SHMT1 1420 and MTHFR 677 variants are associated with rectal but not colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komlósi, Viktor; Müller, Judit; Tóth, Béla; Ottó, Szabolcs; Kásler, Miklós; Kralovánszky, Judit; Budai, Barna; Hitre, Erika; Pap, Éva; Adleff, Vilmos; Réti, Andrea; Székely, Éva; Bíró, Anna; Rudnai, Péter; Schoket, Bernadette

    2010-01-01

    Association between rectal or colon cancer risk and serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) C1420T or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphisms was assessed. The serum total homocysteine (HCY), marker of folate metabolism was also investigated. The SHMT1 and MTHFR genotypes were determined by real-time PCR and PCR-RFLP, respectively in 476 patients with rectal, 479 patients with colon cancer and in 461 and 478, respective controls matched for age and sex. Homocysteine levels were determined by HPLC kit. The association between polymorphisms and cancer risk was evaluated by logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and body mass index. The population stratification bias was also estimated. There was no association of genotypes or diplotypes with colon cancer. The rectal cancer risk was significantly lower for SHMT1 TT (OR = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36-0.89) and higher for MTHFR CT genotypes (OR = 1.4, 95%CI 1.06-1.84). A gene-dosage effect was observed for SHMT1 with progressively decreasing risk with increasing number of T allele (p = 0.014). The stratified analysis according to age and sex revealed that the association is mainly present in the younger (< 60 years) or male subgroup. As expected from genotype analysis, the SHMT1 T allele/MTHFR CC diplotype was associated with reduced rectal cancer risk (OR 0.56, 95%CI 0.42-0.77 vs all other diplotypes together). The above results are unlikely to suffer from population stratification bias. In controls HCY was influenced by SHMT1 polymorphism, while in patients it was affected only by Dukes' stage. In patients with Dukes' stage C or D HCY can be considered as a tumor marker only in case of SHMT1 1420CC genotypes. A protective effect of SHMT1 1420T allele or SHMT1 1420 T allele/MTHFR 677 CC diplotype against rectal but not colon cancer risk was demonstrated. The presence of SHMT1 1420 T allele significantly increases the HCY levels in controls but not in patients

  20. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  1. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O'Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-05-02

    Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct radiotherapy costs for long- (assumed at 45-50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over a 5 week period) and short-courses (assumed at 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions over a one week period). Following interviews and on-site visits to radiotherapy departments in two designated cancer centers, a radiotherapy care pathway for a typical rectal cancer patient was developed. Total direct costs were derived by applying fixed and variable unit costs to resource use within each care phase. Costs included labor, capital, consumables and overheads. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Radiotherapy treatment was estimated to cost between €2,080 (5-fraction course) and €3,609 (25-fraction course) for an average patient in 2012. Costs were highest in the treatment planning phase for the short-course (€1,217; 58% of total costs), but highest in the radiation treatment phase for the long-course (€1,974: 60% of total costs). By simultaneously varying treatment time, capacity utilization rates and linear accelerator staff numbers, the base cost fell by 20% for 5-fractions: (€1,660) and 35% for 25-fractions: (€2,354). Traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer is relatively inexpensive. Moreover, significant savings may be achievable through service organization and provision changes. These results suggest that a strong economic argument can be made for expanding the use of radiotherapy in rectal cancer treatment.

  2. Prognostic significance of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) gene expression in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis. The elevated glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression has been reported to be associated with resistance to therapeutic agents and a poor prognosis. We wondered whether GLUT1 expression was associated with the clinical outcome in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and whether glycolysis inhibition could represent a novel anticancer treatment. We obtained total RNA from residual cancer cells using microdissection from a total of 52 rectal cancer specimens from patients who underwent preoperative CRT. We performed transcriptional analyzes, and studied the association of the GLUT1 gene expression levels with the clinical outcomes. In addition, we examined each proliferative response of three selected colorectal cancer cell lines to a glycolysis inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvic acid (3-BrPA), with regard to their expression of the GLUT1 gene. An elevated GLUT1 gene expression was associated with a high postoperative stage, the presence of lymph node metastasis, and distant recurrence. Moreover, elevated GLUT1 gene expression independently predicted both the recurrence-free and overall survival. In the in vitro studies, we observed that 3-BrPA significantly suppressed the proliferation of colon cancer cells with high GLUT1 gene expression, compared with those with low expression. An elevated GLUT1 expression may be a useful predictor of distant recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT. (author)

  3. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the literature about anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer a review is presented of the frequency, potential risk factors and consequences of leakage. The risk factors are evaluated according to the level of scientific evidence of the individual background...

  4. Laparoscopic surgery for lower rectal cancer with neoadjuvant preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Keisaku; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) is an accepted standard treatment for low rectal advanced cancer to improve the local control in western countries. Recently laparoscopy has been recognized as an excellent tool from a view point of its magnification. Therefore, we have performed many laparoscopic surgeries for locally advanced rectal cancer after NACRT, We evaluated our results in this study. We studied 100 patients underwent surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer after NACRT. Rate of sphincter preserving surgery was 74%. Rate of laparoscopic surgery was 95%. Positive distal resection margins were not identified in all patients. Positive circumferencial resection margins were identified in only two patients. The pathological complete response rate was 15%. The rate of postoperative complications was 15%. Complications were as follows: wound infection (9%), pelvic abscess (2%), ileus (2%) and others (2%), however without mortality. Anastomotic leakage was not observed in all cases, even though we routinely created diverting stoma. Laparoscopic surgery for low rectal cancer after NACRT is considered to be a safe and feasible procedure. (author)

  5. Risk Factors for Rectal Stump Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M.W.M.D.; van Oijen, M.G.H.; Vleggaar, F.P.; Siersema, P.D.; Broekman, M.M.T.J.; Oldenburg, B.; van Bodegraven, A.A.; Dijkstra, G.; Hommes, D.; de Jong, D.J.; Stokkers, P.C.F.; van der Woude, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with long-standing colitis carry an increased risk of colorectal cancer and are therefore enrolled in colonoscopic surveillance programs. It is presently not known if endoscopic surveillance of patients with colitis with a closed rectal stump after a subtotal colectomy is

  6. Risk factors for rectal stump cancer in inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M.W.; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Vleggaar, F.P.; Siersema, P.D.; Broekman, M.M.T.J.; Oldenburg, B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with long-standing colitis carry an increased risk of colorectal cancer and are therefore enrolled in colonoscopic surveillance programs. It is presently not known if endoscopic surveillance of patients with colitis with a closed rectal stump after a subtotal colectomy is

  7. Sexual function in females after radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Background. Knowledge about female sexual problems after pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy and radical resection of rectal cancer is limited. The aim of this study was to compare self-rated sexual functioning in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT+ vs. RT?), at least two years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and materials. Female patients diagnosed from 1993 to 2003 were identified from a national database, the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Eligible patients were without recurrence or metastases at the time of the study. The Sexual function and Vaginal Changes Questionnaire (SVQ) was used to measure sexual functioning. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 172 of 332 invited and eligible women (52%). The mean age was 65 years (range 42-79) and the time since surgery for rectal cancer was 4.5 years (range 2.6-12.4). Sexual interest was not significantly impaired in RT+ (n=62) compared to RT? (n=110) women. RT+ women reported more vaginal problems in terms of vaginal dryness (50% vs. 24%), dyspareunia (35% vs. 11%) and reduced vaginal dimension (35% vs. 6%) compared with RT? patients; however, they did not have significantly more worries about their sex life. Conclusion. An increased risk of dyspareunia and vaginal dryness was observed in women following surgery combined with (chemo-)radiotherapy compared with women treated with surgery alone. Further research is required to determine the effect of adjuvant therapy on female sexual function

  8. Preoperative radiotherapy improves outcome in recurrent rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, M; Ferenschild, FTJ; Nuyttens, JJME; Marinelli, AWKS; Wiggers, T; van der Sijp, JRMM; Verhoef, C; Graveland, WJ; Eggermont, AMM; de Wilt, JHW

    PURPOSE: When local recurrent rectal cancer is diagnosed without signs of metastases, a potentially curative resection can be performed. This study was designed to compare the results of preoperative radiotherapy followed by Surgery with surgery only. METHODS: Between 1985 and 2003, 117 patients

  9. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm 3 of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications

  10. Health-Related Quality of Life after surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind; Jess, Per; Laurberg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Aim: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after surgery for primary advanced or recurrent rectal cancer and to outline proposals for future HRQoL studies in this area. Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken. Only...... studies concerning surgery for primary advanced or recurrent rectal cancer and describing methods used for measuring HRQoL were considered. Results Seven studies were identified including two prospective longitudinal, three cross-sectional and two based on qualitative data. Global quality of life...... of time of impaired HRQoL and also if this is different after surgery for locally advanced or recurrent disease than after total mesorectal excision used for earlier tumours.. Conclusion Several aspects of HRQoL are impaired for a variable time after treatment for locally advanced or recurrence of rectal...

  11. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensignor, T; Brouquet, A; Dariane, C; Thirot-Bidault, A; Lazure, T; Julié, C; Nordlinger, B; Penna, C; Benoist, S

    2015-06-01

    Pathological response to chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is not well defined in rectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the objective pathological response to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation in middle or low locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Between 2008 and 2013, 22 patients with middle or low LARC (T3/4 and/or N+ and circumferential resection margin rectal resection after preoperative chemotherapy. The pathological response of rectal tumour was analysed according to the Rödel tumour regression grading (TRG) system. Predictive factors of objective pathological response (TRG 2-4) were analysed. All patients underwent rectal surgery after a median of six cycles of preoperative chemotherapy. Of these, 20 (91%) had sphincter saving surgery and an R0 resection. Twelve (55%) patients had an objective pathological response (TRG 2-4), including one complete response. Poor response (TRG 0-1) to chemotherapy was noted in 10 (45%) patients. In univariate analyses, none of the factors examined was found to be predictive of an objective pathological response to chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 37.2 months, none of the 22 patients experienced local recurrence. Of the 19 patients with Stage IV rectal cancer, 15 (79%) had liver surgery with curative intent. Preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is associated with objective pathological response and adequate local control in selected patients with LARC. Further prospective controlled studies will address the question of whether it can be used as a valuable alternative to radiochemotherapy in LARC. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. WRAP53 is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer- a study of Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Da-Wei; Adell, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Expression of WRAP53 protein has oncogenic properties and it is up regulated in several types of tumors. We examined expression of WRAP53 protein in rectal cancers and analyzed its relationship to the response to preoperative radiotherapy and patient survival. The WRAP53 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 143 rectal cancer patients participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Frequency of WRAP53 protein expression was increased in primary rectal cancer compared to the normal mucosa (p < 0.05). In non-radiotherapy group positive WRAP53 in primary tumors (p = 0.03, RR, 3.73, 95% CI, 1.13-11.89) or metastases (p = 0.01, RR, 4.11, 95% CI, 1.25-13.14), was associated with poor prognosis independently of stages and differentiations. In radiotherapy group, positive WRAP53 in the metastasis correlated with better survival (p = 0.04). An interaction analysis showed that the correlations of WRAP53 with the prognostic significance with and without radiotherapy in the metastasis differed (p = 0.01). In the radiotherapy group, expression of WRAP53 in metastases gave a better outcome (p = 0.02, RR, 0.32, 95% CI, 0.13-0.84), and an interaction analysis showed significance between the two groups (p = 0.01). WRAP53 may be a new biomarker used to predict prognosis and to select suitable patients for preoperative radiotherapy

  14. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  15. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, NG Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer. An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate. The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively. Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  16. Prognostic value of pathological response to chemo radiotherapy of locally advanced low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannura C, Guillermo; Vargas N, Claudio; Barrera E, Alejandro; Melo L, Carlos; Illanes F, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative chemo radiotherapy improves the prognosis of locally advanced low rectal cancer and induces a pathological response in the tumor, which may have prognostic value. Aim: To assess the results of rectal cancer treatment according to the degree of pathological response of the tumor after chemo radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: All patients with a locally advanced rectal cancer located within 11 cm of the rectal margin, subjected to preoperative chemo radiotherapy followed by surgical treatment in a period of 13 years, were included. Pathological response was classified as complete, intermediate and poor. The tumor was staged according to TNM 2002 classification. Survival was analyzed with Kaplan Meier curves and Cox regression. Results: Patients were followed for a mean of 50 months (range 18-156). Exclusive and global local relapse was observed in 3 and 9.6% of patients, respectively. Pathological response was complete in 13 patients (none died), intermediate in 23 (three died) and poor in 68 (22 died). Global five years survival was 74%. There was a concordance of 0.64 between survival and pathological response. The concordance between survival and TNM classification was 0.69. Conclusions: The pathological response of the tumor to chemo radiotherapy has a good concordance with prognosis, although it is not superior to the final pathological status

  17. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Delobel

    Full Text Available To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT, while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction.In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day, by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups.Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3-0.6, p<0.01. The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0-1.1 and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1-10.0, and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8, p<0.01. Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated.Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique.

  18. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 ± 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 ± 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value

  19. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard G.; Greenstein, Adrian J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with IBD and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with IBD and rectal cancer treated over a 34-year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty-five patients had ulcerative colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients, and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In two of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent postoperative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median 24 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease-free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5-year rate of 86% for patients with Tis-T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in three patients (20%) receiving pelvic irradiation ± chemotherapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade 4 gastrointestinal

  20. [Liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer in terms of differences in their clinical parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, V; Emingr, M; Skála, M; Pálek, R; Troup, O; Novák, P; Vyčítal, O; Skalický, T; Třeška, V

    2016-02-01

    From the clinical point of view, rectal cancer and colon cancer are clearly different nosological units in their progress and treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse and clarify the differences between the behaviour of liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer. The study of these factors is important for determining an accurate prognosis and indication of the most effective surgical therapy and oncologic treatment of colon and rectal cancer as a systemic disease. 223 patients with metastatic disease of colorectal carcinoma operated at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital in Pilsen between January 1, 2006 and January 31, 2012 were included in our study. The group of patients comprised 145 men (65%) and 117 women (35%). 275 operations were performed. Resection was done in 177 patients and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the total of 98 cases. Our sample was divided into 3 categories according to the location of the primary tumor to C (colon), comprising 58 patients, S (c. sigmoideum) in 61 patients, and R (rectum), comprising 101 patients. Significance analysis of the studied factors (age, gender, staging [TNM classification], grading, presence of mucinous carcinoma, type of operation) was performed using ANOVA test. Overall survival (OS), disease-free interval (DFI) or no evidence of disease (NED) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves, which were compared with the log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. As regards the comparison of primary origin of colorectal metastases in liver regardless of their treatment (resection and RFA), our study indicated that rectal liver metastases showed a significantly earlier recurrence than colon liver metastases (shorter NED/DFI). Among other factors, a locally advanced finding, further R2 resection of liver metastases and positivity of lymph node metastases were statistically significant for the prognosis of an early recurrence of the primary colon and sigmoid tumor. Furthermore, we proved that in patients with

  1. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Postoperative adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy for rectal cancer: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandolaro, Luciano; Cazzaniga, Luigi Franco; Bianchi, Ernestina; Cagna, Emanuela; Prina, Morena; Valli, Maria Carla; Barsacchi, Lucia; Frigerio, Milena

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer can be considered a broad-spectrum disease, where the surgeon, radiation oncologist and medical oncologist have a peculiar and specific place in order to work harmoniously as a good orchestra. The reality in common general hospitals is far from that of comprehensive cancer centers, particularly for postoperative approaches. The adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer is not codified worldwide, and it is strongly dependent on preoperative staging procedures, surgeon's acts and pathologist's decisions. Starting from our 10-year experience, we analyzed the various steps of postoperative approaches, defining possible decision errors, the incongruity of some attitudes, and the lack of knowledge of recent achievements of science in this disease. A total of 194 patients with advanced surgically removed rectal cancer (pT3-4 pN0-any pT pN+) treated with postoperative radio(chemo)therapy was reviewed retrospectively. Anterior resection was performed in 126, abdominoperineal resection in 48, and other surgical procedures in 20 patients. Irradiation was conducted with a single daily fraction of 1.8 Gy until 45 Gy, and chemotherapy consisted of the combination of 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (Machover schedule): 47% of patients with positive nodes did not receive chemotherapy. Five-year overall survival was 60.6% and relapse-free survival was 55.5%. The main prognostic factors were pathological T and N stages. The principal route of progression was distant metastases. Acute toxicity was severe in 1 case (drug toxic hepatitis) and very severe in 16 patients, and late severe sequelae appeared in 13 patients. The outcome of rectal cancer patients has not changed during the last decade, and this was confirmed in our study. The improvement of radiotherapy techniques has reduced the adverse acute and late toxicity. The best postsurgical approach for pT3pN0 cancer remains unsolved, as the good chemotherapy combination and the real solution could be the application of a new

  3. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Han [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m{sup 2} as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted.

  4. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung; Lee, Yun Han

    2016-01-01

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m 2 ) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m 2 as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted

  5. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer.

  6. Effects of neoadyuvancy on the resectability of locally advanced rectal cancer in the HSJD period 2008-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado Rodriguez, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer has been remains an important medical and social problem; comprises about 30% of colorectal cancers. It is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and has been the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The diagnosis of this disease is based on a rectal examination and a rigid rectosigmoidoscopy that allows to establish the distance between the anal margin and the lesion, as well as to take biopsy for histopathological analysis. Determining the surgical resectability of locally advanced rectal cancer after receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment at Hospital San Juan de Dios. Records of 86 patients were reviewed, diagnosed with rectal cancer who had received radiotherapy between January 2008 and December 2011. The neoadjuvant treatment has verified the achieve of a high percentage of resectability without correspondence to the findings obtained in the imaging studies. Most of staging was done only with CT. This has demonstrated the importance of obtaining other images with magnetic resonance and USTR as pillars for the design and follow-up of patients with rectal cancer [es

  7. Prognostic implications of the number of retrieved lymph nodes of patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2014-10-01

    The impact of the number of retrieved lymph nodes (LNs) on oncological outcomes in patients with rectal cancer remains unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic implications of the number of retrieved LNs in patients with rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The study cohort consisted of 859 patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 or cN+) mid to low rectal cancer that had been treated with preoperative CRT and radical resection between 2000 and 2009. Multivariate analysis and the Kaplan-Meier method were used to evaluate the influence of the number of retrieved LNs on disease-free survival (DFS). The median number of LNs retrieved from included patients was 13 (interquartile range [IQR] 9-17). Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent prognostic importance of the number of retrieved LNs on DFS (hazard ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval = 0.95-0.99, p = 0.029). The 3-year DFS rate in patients with yp stage II rectal cancer was associated with the total number of retrieved LNs. DFS was associated with the number of LNs retrieved from patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative CRT, especially among patients with ypT3-4 N0 stage tumors. The oncological importance of the number of retrieved LNs should be considered when treating these patients.

  8. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  9. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of residual cancer cells in the bowel wall after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duldulao, Marjun P; Lee, Wendy; Streja, Leanne; Chu, Peiguo; Li, Wenyan; Chen, Zhenbin; Kim, Joseph; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2013-02-01

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. After surgery, tumors are classified according to the depth of tumor invasion, nodal involvement, and tumor regression grade. However, these staging systems do not provide information about the distribution of residual cancer cells within the bowel wall. This study aimed to determine the distribution of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall in rectal cancer specimens. This was a secondary analysis of data from a prospective phase II study. This study was performed in a multi-institutional setting. Included were 153 patients with stage II or stage III rectal cancer. Patients were treated with chemoradiation and surgery. The surgical specimen tumor tissue was analyzed, and the distribution of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall was determined. Statistical analysis was used to examine the correlation of residual cancer cells in each layer of the bowel wall with the clinical/pathologic stage and tumor regression grade. Forty-two of 153 (27%) patients had complete response in the bowel wall (ypT0). Of the remaining 111 patients who had residual cancer cells, 5 (3%) were ypTis, 12 (8%) were ypT1, 41 (27%) were ypT2, 50 (33%) were ypT3, and 3 (2%) were ypT4. Of the 94 patients with ypT2-4 tumors, 12 (13%) had cancer cells in the mucosa, and 53 (56%) had cancer cells in the submucosa; 92 (98%) had cancer cells in the muscularis propria. Pretreatment cT correlated with the distribution of residual cancer cells. Tumor regression grade was not associated with the distribution of residual cancer cells after chemoradiation. : Patients received different chemotherapy regimens. Residual cancer cells in rectal cancer specimens after chemoradiation are preferentially located close to the invasive front. This should be considered when designing strategies to diagnose complete pathologic response and when investigating the

  11. A nationwide audit of the use of radiotherapy for rectal cancer in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, G; Pucciarelli, S; Asteria, C R; Infantino, A; Romano, G; Cola, B; De Nardi, P; Brulatti, M; Lambertini, M; Contessini-Avesani, E; Casula, G; Coco, C; D'Amico, D; Selvaggi, F F; Eccher, C; D'Ambrosio, G; Galeotti, F; Jovine, E; Demma, I; Fianchini, A; Ambrosino, G; Casentino, L M; Fiorino, M

    2010-09-01

    There is good evidence that radiotherapy is beneficial in advanced rectal cancer, but its application in Italy has not been investigated. We conducted a nationwide survey among members of the Italian Society of Colo-Rectal Surgery (SICCR) on the use of radiation therapy for rectal cancer in the year 2005. Demographic, clinical and pathologic data were retrospectively collected with an online database. Italy was geographically divided into 3 regions: north, center and south which included the islands. Hospitals performing 30 or more surgeries per year were considered high volume. Factors related to radiotherapy delivery were identified with multivariate analysis. Of 108 centers, 44 (41%) responded to the audit. We collected data on 682 rectal cancer patients corresponding to 58% of rectal cancers operated by SICCR members in 2005. Radiotherapy was used in 307/682 (45.0%) patients. Preoperative radiotherapy was used in 236/682 (34.6%), postoperative radiotherapy in 71/682 (10.4%) cases and no radiotherapy in 375 (55.0%) cases. Of the 236 patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy, only 24 (10.2%) received short-course radiotherapy, while 212 (89.8%) received long-course radiotherapy. Of the 339 stage II-III patients, 159 (47%) did not receive any radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was more frequently used in younger patients (P < 0.0001), in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P < 0.01) and in the north and center of Italy (P < 0.001). Preoperative radiotherapy was more frequently used in younger patients (P < 0.001), in large volume centers (P < 0.05), in patients undergoing APR (P < 0.005) and in the north-center of Italy (P < 0.05). Our study first identified a treatment disparity among different geographic Italian regions. A more systematic audit is needed to confirm these results and plan adequate interventions.

  12. Stages of Urethral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  13. The principles of cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, James; Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic disease extent or tumour stage of a cancer at diagnosis as a determinant of prognosis is discussed. The importance of cancer stage in individual patient prognosis and determination of treatment is reviewed as well as its value in research and cancer control activities. The conflict between the need for stability of cancer stage definitions over time and the need to evolve with advances in medicine are examined. The e cancer elearning modules on Cancer Stage are introduced.

  14. Efficacy of a preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Ho; Seong, Jin Sil; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Suh, Chang Ok; Roh, Jae Kyung; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Min, Jin Sik; Kim, Nam Kyu [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    We conducted a prospective non-randomized clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer. Between January 1995 and June 1998, 37 consecutive patients with locally unresectable advanced rectal cancer were entered into the study. With 3- or 4- fields technique, a total of 45 Gy radiation was delivered on whole pelvis, followed by 5.4 Gy boost to the primary tumor in some cases. Chemotherapy was done at the first and fifth week of radiation with bolus i.v. 5-Fluorouracil (FU) 370-450 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-5, plus leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-5, Of 37 patients, 6 patients dit not receive all planned treatment course (refusal in 4, disease progression in 1, metastasis to lung in 1). Surgical resection was undergone 4-6 weeks after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Complete resection rate with negative margins was 94% (29/31). Complete response was seen in 7 patients (23%) clinically and 2 patients (6%) pathologically. Down staging of tumor occurred in 21 patients (68%). Treatment related toxicity wa minimal except grade III and IV leukopenia in 2 patients, respectively. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer was effective in inducing down staging and complete resection rate. Treatment related toxicity was minimal. Further follow up is on-going to determine long term survival following this treatment.

  15. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithamparam, S; Ahmad, R; Sabarudin, A; Othman, Z; Ismail, M

    2017-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients. (paper)

  16. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  17. Association of perioperative blood pressure with long-term survival in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Chuan; Luo, Yan-Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Zi-Huan; Huang, Mei-Jin; Kang, Liang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-04-11

    Several studies suggested that hypertension is positively related to cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we investigated the association between perioperative blood pressure (BP) and long-term survival outcomes in patients with rectal cancer. This study included a cohort of 358 patients with stages I-III rectal cancer who underwent a curative resection between June 2007 and June 2011. Both pre- and postoperative BPs were measured, by which patients were grouped (low BP: cancer-specific survival (CSS). Univariate analysis showed that patients with high preoperative systolic BP had lower 3-year DFS (67.2% vs. 82.1%, P = 0.041) and CSS rates (81.9% vs. 94.8%, P = 0.003) than patients with low preoperative systolic BP, and the associations remained significant in the Cox multivariate analysis, with the adjusted hazard ratios equal to 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-3.60, P = 0.028] and 2.85 (95% CI = 1.00-8.25, P = 0.050), respectively. Similarly, in postoperative evaluation, patients with high systolic BP had significantly lower 3-year CSS rates than those with low systolic BP (78.3% vs. 88.9%, P = 0.032) in univariate analysis. Moreover, high pre- and/or postoperative systolic BP presented as risk factors for CSS in the subgroups of patients who did not have a history of hypertension, with and/or without perioperative administration of antihypertensive drugs. High preoperative systolic BP was an independent risk factor for both CSS and DFS rates, and high postoperative systolic BP was significantly associated with a low CSS rate in rectal cancer patients. Additionally, our results suggest that rectal cancer patients may get survival benefit from BP control in perioperative care. However, further studies should be conducted to determine the association between BP and CSS and targets of BP control.

  18. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectal cancer: comparison of stapled versus compression anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauser, Bernhard; Braunschmid, Tamara; Ghaffari, Shahbaz; Riss, Stefan; Stift, Anton; Herbst, Friedrich

    2013-10-01

    Surgical technique and perioperative management in rectal cancer surgery have been substantially improved and standardized during the last decades. However, anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection still is a significant problem. Based on animal experimental data of improved healing of compression anastomosis, we hypothesized that a compression anastomotic device might improve healing rates of the highest-risk anastomoses. All low anterior resections for rectal cancer performed or directly supervised by the senior author between January 2004 and June 2012 were analyzed. Only patients with a stapled or compression anastomosis located within 6 cm from the anal verge were included. Until December 2008, circular staplers were employed, while since January 2009, a novel compression anastomotic device was used for rectal reconstruction exclusively. Out of 197 patients operated for rectal cancer, a total of 96 (34 females, 35.4 %) fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifty-eight (60.4 %) were reconstructed with circular staplers and 38 (39.6 %) using a compression anastomotic device. Significantly, more laparoscopic procedures were recorded in the compression anastomosis group, but distribution of gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score, rate of preoperative radiotherapy, tumor staging, or stoma diversion rate were similar. Anastomotic leakage was observed in seven cases (7/58, 12.1 %) in the stapled and twice (2/38, 5.3 %) in the compression anastomosis group (p = 0.26). In this series, rectal reconstruction following low anterior resection using a novel compression anastomotic device was safe and (at least) equally effective compared to traditional circular staplers concerning leak rate.

  19. Impaired defecatory function after resection of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Combination of symptoms such as frequent bowel movement, minor fecal incontinence, defecatory urgency, and evacuation difficulty are common after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. A number of factors including loss of reservoir function of the rectum and impaired function of the internal anal sphincter are thought to be causative of symptoms. Presentation of impaired anal function before operation, anastomosis close to the anal margin, and anastomotic leakage are known to be associated with poor postoperative function. Colonic J-pouch reconstruction and coloplasty used as methods to increase the neorectal capacity and compensate the loss of reservoir function have been reported to improve postoperative defecatory function. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy and neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy are known to enhance the severity of impaired defecatory function. In patients who have undergone intersphincteric resection for very low rectal cancer, fecal incontinence is common but is improved with the use of colonic J-pouch reconstruction. (author)

  20. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A

    2007-01-01

    Although contact radiotherapy was developed 70 years ago, and is highly effective with cure rates of over 90% for early rectal cancer, there are few centres that offer this treatment today. One reason is the lack of replacement of ageing contact X-ray machines, many of which are now over 30 years...... old. To address this problem, the International Contact Radiotherapy Evaluation (ICONE) group was formed at a meeting in Liverpool in 2005 with the aim of developing a new contact X-ray unit and to establish clinical protocols that would enable the new machine to safely engage in the treatment...... of rectal cancer. As a result of these efforts, a European company is starting production of the new Papillon RT-50 machine, which will be available shortly. In addition, the ICONE group is planning an observational study on contact X-ray and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (CONTEM) for curative treatment...

  1. Spectrum of rectal radiation lesions in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.; Gupta, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The study was carried out in 70 cases of carcinoma cervix uteri, showing varying degree of proctitis following radiotherapy treatment for cervical cancer. Grossly, the rectal mucosa showed oedema, congestion, granular proctitis, ulceration, and microscopically stromal connective tissue as well as epithelial changes. The stromal changes have been emphasised as useful diagnostic criteria of radiation reaction. The familarity of these changes is considered necessary because it is imperative to know categorically that a given lesion is entirely or in part due to radiation or due to extension of adjacent tumour in the cervix. Further, this issue is very important in management of cases of cancer cervix. The criteria of distinguishing the lesions in the rectal tissue have been laid down. (auth.)

  2. Increased use of multidisciplinary treatment modalities adds little to the outcome of rectal cancer treated by optimal total mesorectal excision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2012-10-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard surgical treatment for rectal cancer. The roles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy have become more defined, accompanied by improvements in preoperative staging and histopathological assessment. We analyse our ongoing results in the light of changing patterns of treatment over consecutive time periods.

  3. Quality of life after rectal resection for cancer, with or without permanent colostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pachler, Jørn; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    For almost one hundred years abdominoperineal excision has been the standard treatment of choice for rectal cancer. With advances in the techniques for rectal resection and anastomosis, anterior resection with preservation of the sphincter function has become the preferred treatment for rectal...

  4. Female urogenital dysfunction following total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ashraf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of Total Mesorectal Excision (TME on sexual function in the male is well documented. However, there is little literature in female patients. The aim of this study was to review the pelvic autonomic nervous anatomy in the female and to perform a retrospective audit of urinary and sexual function in women following surgery for rectal cancer where TME had been performed. Urogenital dysfunction was assessed through interview and questionnaire. Method Twenty-three questionnaires, eighteen returned, were sent to women with a mean age 65.5 yrs (range 34–86. All had undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer between 1998–2001. Mean follow-up was 18.8 months (range 3–35. Results Preoperatively 5/18 (28% were sexually active, 3/18 (17% of patients described urinary frequency and nocturia and 7/18 (39% described symptoms of stress incontinence prior to surgery. Postoperatively all sexually active patients remained active although all described some discomfort with penetration. Two of the patients sexually active described reduced libido secondary to the stoma. Postoperative urinary symptoms developed with 59% reporting the development of nocturia, 18% developed stress incontinence and one patient required a permanent catheter. Of those with symptoms, 80% persisted longer than three months from surgery. Symptoms were predominant in those patients with low rectal cancers, particularly those undergoing abdomino-perineal excision and in those who had previously undergone abdominal hysterectomy. Conclusion The treatment of rectal cancer involves surgery to the pelvic floor. Despite nerve preservation this is associated with the development of worsening nocturia and stress incontinence. This is most marked in those patients who had previously undergone a hysterectomy. Further studies are warranted to assess the interaction with previous gynaecological surgery.

  5. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  6. Rectal Tumour Staging with Endorectal Ultrasound: Is There Any Difference between Western and Eastern European Countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Fábián

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rectal tumour management depends highly on locoregional extension. Rectal endoscopic ultrasound (ERUS is a good alternative to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, in Hungary only a small amount of rectal tumours is examined with ERUS. Methods. Our retrospective study (2006–2012 evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of ERUS and compares the results, the first data from Central Europe, with those from Western Europe. The effect of neoadjuvant therapy, rectal probe type, and investigator’s experience were also assessed. Results. 311 of the 647 ERUS assessed locoregional extension. Histological comparison was available in 177 cases: 67 patients underwent surgery alone; 110 received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT; ERUS preceded CRT in 77 and followed it in 33 patients. T-staging was accurate in 72% of primarily operated patients. N-staging was less accurate (62%. CRT impaired staging accuracy (64% and 59% for T- and N-staging. Rigid probes were more accurate (79%. At least 30 examinations are needed to master the technique. Conclusions. The sensitivity of ERUS complies with the literature. ERUS is easy to learn and more accurate in early stages but unnecessary for restaging after CRT. Staging accuracy is similar in Western and Central Europe, although the number of examinations should be increased.

  7. Early outcomes for rectal cancer surgery in the republic of ireland following a national centralization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John P; Coffey, J Calvin; Boyle, Emily; Keane, Frank; McNamara, Deborah A

    2013-10-01

    Following a national audit of rectal cancer management in 2007, a national centralization program in the Republic of Ireland was initiated. In 2010, a prospective evaluation of rectal cancer treatment and early outcomes was conducted. A total of 29 colorectal surgeons in 14 centers prospectively collated data on all patients with rectal cancer who underwent curative surgery in 2010. Data were available on 447 patients who underwent proctectomy with curative intent for rectal cancer in 2010; 23.7 % of patients underwent abdominoperineal excision. The median number of lymph nodes identified was 12. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.1 %. Compared with 2007, there was a reduction in positive circumferential margin rate (15.8 vs 4.5 %, P rectal cancer. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery in hospitals following a national centralization initiative received high-quality surgery. Significant heterogeneity exists in radiotherapy administration, and evidence-based guidelines should be developed and implemented.

  8. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  9. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  10. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Sarah

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3\\/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  11. Reirradiation of locally recurrent rectal cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Undseth, Christine; Rekstad, Bernt Louni; Brændengen, Morten; Dueland, Svein; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many patients with rectal cancer receive radiotherapy as a component of primary multimodality treatment. Although local recurrence is infrequent, reirradiation may be needed to improve resectability and outcomes. This systematic review investigated the effects of reirradiation in terms of feasibility, toxicity, and long-term outcomes. Methods: A Medline, Embase and Cochrane search resulted in 353 titles/abstracts. Ten publications describing seven prospective or retrospective studies were included, presenting results of 375 patients reirradiated for rectal cancer. Results: Median initial radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, median 8–30 months before reirradiation. Reirradiation was mostly administered using hyperfractionated (1.2–1.5 Gy twice-daily) or 1.8 Gy once-daily chemoradiotherapy. Median total dose was 30–40 Gy to the gross tumour volume with 2–4 cm margins. Median survival was 39–60 months in resected patients and 12–16 months in palliative patients. Good symptomatic relief was reported in 82–100%. Acute toxicity with diarrhoea was reported in 9–20%, late toxicity was insufficiently reported. Conclusions: Reirradiation of rectal cancer to limited volumes is feasible. When curative resection is possible, the goal is radical resection and long-term survival, and hyperfractionated chemoradiotherapy should be preferred to limit late toxicity. Reirradiation yielded good symptomatic relief in palliative treatment

  12. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  13. Clinical significance of macroscopic completeness of mesorectal resection in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, J S; Martins, S C; Oliveira, J; Cunha, M F; Castro-Sousa, F

    2011-04-01

    Local recurrence after resection of rectal cancer is usually regarded as being due to a 'failure' of surgery. The completeness of resection of the mesorectum has been proposed as an indicator of the 'quality' of the resection. We determined the prognostic value of macroscopic evaluation of rectal cancer resection specimens and the circumferential resection margin (CRM) after curative surgery. From 1999 to 2006, the macroscopic quality of the mesorectum and the CRM were prospectively assessed in 127 patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with curative intent (R0+R1). Chemoradiotherapy was administered for 61 tumours staged as locally advanced tumours (T3, T4 and N+). Univariate analysis of time to local recurrence and cancer-free survival were tested (Kaplan-Meier) and multivariate analysis calculated with a Cox regression model. The mesorectum was incomplete in 34 (26.8%) patients. At a median follow up of 34 months (range, 9-96 months), in the group with an adequate mesorectal excision, the cumulative risk of local recurrence at 5 years was 10%. This was 25% if the mesorectum was incomplete (P CRM and the mesorectal score as independent factors for local recurrence, and T and N status and the mesorectal score as independent factors for disease-free survival. The outcome of surgical treatment of rectal cancer is related to the completeness of mesorectal excision. It is a more discriminative prognostic factor than the classic tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) system. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Phase II trial evaluating the feasibility of interdigitating folfox with chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, M; Chander, S; McKendrick, J; MacKay, J R; Steel, M; Hicks, R; Heriot, A; Leong, T; Cooray, P; Jefford, M; Zalcberg, J; Bressel, M; McClure, B; Ngan, S Y

    2014-11-11

    Patients (pts) with metastatic rectal cancer and symptomatic primary, require local and systemic control. Chemotherapy used during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is adequate for radiosensitisation, but suboptimal for systemic control. The aim of this phase II study was to assess tolerability, local/systemic benefits, of a novel regimen delivering interdigitating intensive chemotherapy with radical CRT. Eligible pts had untreated synchronous symptomatic primary/metastatic rectal cancer. A total of 12 weeks of treatment with split-course pelvic CRT (total 50.4 Gy with concurrent oxaliplatin and 5-FU infusion) alternating with FOLFOX chemotherapy. All pts staged with CT, MRI and FDG-PET pre and post treatment. Twenty-six pts were treated. Rectal primary MRI stage: T3 81% and T4 15%. Liver metastases in 81%. Twenty-four pts (92%) completed the 12-week regimen. All patients received planned RT dose, and for both agents over 88% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity of >75%. Grade 3 toxicities: neutropenia 23%, diarrhoea 15%, and radiation skin reaction 12%. Grade 4 toxicity: neutropenia 15%. FDG-PET metabolic response rate for rectal primary 96%, and for metastatic disease 60%. Delivery of interdigitating chemotherapy with radical CRT was feasible to treat both primary and metastatic rectal cancer. High completion and response rates were encouraging.

  15. Prognostic nomograms for predicting survival and distant metastases in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Peng

    Full Text Available To develop prognostic nomograms for predicting outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal cancers who do not receive preoperative treatment.A total of 883 patients with stage II-III rectal cancers were retrospectively collected from a single institution. Survival analyses were performed to assess each variable for overall survival (OS, local recurrence (LR and distant metastases (DM. Cox models were performed to develop a predictive model for each endpoint. The performance of model prediction was validated by cross validation and on an independent group of patients.The 5-year LR, DM and OS rates were 22.3%, 32.7% and 63.8%, respectively. Two prognostic nomograms were successfully developed to predict 5-year OS and DM-free survival rates, with c-index of 0.70 (95% CI = [0.66, 0.73] and 0.68 (95% CI = [0.64, 0.72] on the original dataset, and 0.76 (95% CI = [0.67, 0.86] and 0.73 (95% CI = [0.63, 0.83] on the validation dataset, respectively. Factors in our models included age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen value, tumor location, T stage, N stage, metastatic lymph nodes ratio, adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Predicted by our nomogram, substantial variability in terms of 5-year OS and DM-free survival was observed within each TNM stage category.The prognostic nomograms integrated demographic and clinicopathological factors to account for tumor and patient heterogeneity, and thereby provided a more individualized outcome prognostication. Our individualized prediction nomograms could help patients with preoperatively under-staged rectal cancer about their postoperative treatment strategies and follow-up protocols.

  16. [A Case of Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Oxaliplatin)and Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, Daichi; Morohashi, Hajime; Umetsu, Satoko; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Wakasa, Yusuke; Odagiri, Tadashi; Kimura, Toshirou; Suto, Akiko; Saito, Takeshi; Yoshida, Eri; Akasaka, Harue; Jin, Hiroyuki; Miura, Takuya; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC)(S-1 plus oxaliplatin)for rectal cancer. The patient was a 50-year-old man who had type 3 circumferential rectal cancer. An abdominal CT scan revealed locally advanced rectal cancer(cT3N2H0P0M0, cStage III b)with severe stenosis and oral-side intestinal dilatation. The patient was treated with NAC after loop-ileostomy. After 3 courses of chemotherapy, a CT scan revealed significant tumor reduction. Laparoscopic low anterior resection and bilateral lymph node dissection were performed 5 weeks after the last course of chemotherapy. The pathological diagnosis was a pathological complete response(no residual cancer cells). This case suggests that laparoscopic low anterior resection after NAC with S-1 plus oxaliplatin for locally advanced rectal cancer is a potentially effective procedure.

  17. Managing anemia with epoetin alfa in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, V.; Oblak, I.; Kodre, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Anemia is one of the most challenging problems in clinical oncology due to its high prevalence among the patients with malignant diseases. The purposes of our study were: (1) to assess the potential of epoetin alfa therapy to prevent the decline in Hb concentrations that typically accompanies chemotherapy/ radiotherapy (ChT/RT) of the patients with rectal cancer; (2) to test the hypothesis that the use of epoetin alfa significantly reduces the transfusion requirements in the patients with rectal cancer treated with ChT/RT after surgery, and (3) to evaluate the safety profile of the administration of epoetin alfa in the clinical setting. Methods. Sixty patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Group A consisted of 39 patients with Hb concentrations ≤13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, and group B of 17 patients with Hb concentrations ≥13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, but whose Hb concentrations fell below 13 g/dl during the ChT/RT protocol. The starting dose of epoetin alfa in both groups was 10,000 IU subcutaneously (sc) three times a week (tiw). The following major parameters were evaluated: (1) change in Hb concentrations relative to the baseline as measured at 4-week intervals, (2) allogenic blood transfusion requirements in relation to Hb concentrations, and (3) incidence and severity of adverse events and their potential relationship to epoetin alfa administration. Results. The study protocol was completed in 56/60 patients. In group A, a statistically significant increase in Hb concentration (p<0.001) was observed after the first 4 weeks of epoetin alfa treatment compared to the baseline values, with the mean increase of Hb concentration of 1.97 g/dl ± 0.91 g/dl and Hb concentrations remained significantly increased through the whole study (p=0.0017). In group B, a continuous decrease in Hb concentrations was observed during the first weeks of therapy, reaching the level of

  18. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  19. A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer developing after a long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirouzu, Kazuo; Isomoto, Hiroharu; Morodomi, Tatsuhisa; Ogata, Yutaka; Araki, Yasumi; Kakegawa, Teruo

    1994-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer is presented. In November, 1971, a 58-year-old woman had a stage II squamous cell carcinoma in the uterine cervix. She underwent a hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. External pelvic irradiation of 10 MV x-ray was carried out in 15 fractions of 2 Gy daily, with a total dose of 30 Gy, and intracavitary radium insertion with a total dose of 960 mg hours (20 mg x 48 hour). She had been followed-up in our department since 1972, when rectal bleeding occurred. Proctoscopy and periodical biopsies were performed when the patient visited our hospital. There was no evidence of malignant tumor cells nor of recurrent cervical cancer from 1973 to 1989. In August, 1990, a biopsy specimen taken from a rectal ulcer revealed a malignant mucinous adenocarcinoma. The time interval between the radiotherapy and the development of the rectal cancer was 19 years. Microscopically, the main lesion was situated in the granulation tissue covered with the regenerating mucosal epithelium, and histologically was found to be a mucinous adenocarcinoma. Other radiation damage was additionally found including colitis, endarteritis and intestinal wall fibrosis. The evidence strongly suggested the present case to be one of radiation-induced rectal cancer. (author)

  20. Celecoxib plus chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase II TCOG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chien, Chun-Ru; Lin, Tze-Yi; Liu, Tsang-Wu

    2014-05-01

    To report the results of a phase II trial combining celecoxib and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer were treated with radiotherapy of 44 Gy in 22 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oral tegafur-uracil and folinate on days 1-30 and 38-65. Celecoxib (400 mg/day) given from days 1 to 65. Surgery was done on day 70. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in tumor tissues was evaluated microscopically as a prognostic factor. From 2008 to 2011, 53 patients completed CRT+ celecoxib therapy and 47 received radical surgery. Grade 3 diarrhea developed in 5 (9%). Grade 4 anemia was seen in 2 (4%). Pathological complete response (pCR) was seen in 6 (13%). T or N downstaging found in 38 (81%). Sphincter preservation was achieved in 77% of low-positioned tumors. Patients with tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT + celecoxib treatment had inferior pelvic control (P = 0.01), disease-free survival (P = 0.04), and overall survival (P = 0.03) than those with low-level expression. Celecoxib can be safely combined with preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. More intensified adjuvant therapy may be considered for tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT and surgery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  2. A Feasibility Study of Neoadjuvant XELOX Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Lower Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Takashi; Manabe, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shigetaka; Ienaga, Jun; Yamanaka, Naoki; Egami, Takuya; Ishikawa, Mikimasa; Konomi, Hiroyuki; Ikubo, Akashi; Nagayoshi, Kinuko; Nakamura, Masafumi; Tanaka, Masao

    2016-02-01

    This study was planned to evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) without radiation in patients with locally advanced lower rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II/III lower rectal cancer underwent three cycles of XELOX followed by radical surgery. The primary end-point was the R0 resection rate. Thirty-one patients were recruited between February 2012 and August 2014. The completion rate of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 96.5% among the 29 patients who received it; the remaining two refused chemotherapy and underwent immediate surgery. Grade 3-4 adverse events occurred in nine patients (31%). All 29 patients who received chemotherapy underwent radical resection. The R0 resection rate was 96.5% among these 29 patients. Pathological complete responses were achieved in three patients (10.3%) and downstaging occurred in 13 (44.8%). This pilot study found that neoadjuvant XELOX for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is feasible and safe. This neoadjuvant treatment improved resection margin status. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic value of Smac expression in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongjiang; Yu, Jinming; Wang, Renben; Jiang, Shumei; Zhu, Kunli; Mu, Dianbin; Xu, Zhongfa

    2012-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate expression of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) expression before and after treatment in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer and to correlate the clinicopathological characteristics and level of Smac expression with pathologic response and outcome. Expression of biomarker was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 98 patients with clinical Stage II and III rectal cancer treated with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy. All patients received a standardized total mesorectal excision procedure after a long interval of 4-6 weeks. For Smac, patients with a good response to neoadjuvant CRT tended to have higher pre-therapy levels (P = 0.007). The level of Smac expression decreased after neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.016). High expression of Smac before CRT, and high Dworak's tumor regression grade (TRG) were significantly associated with improved 5-year disease-free survival (P Smac and Lymph nodal status were independent prognostic factors. Our study suggests that high expression of Smac before neoadjuvant CRT could predict good outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer patients.

  4. The learning curve of laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer does not increase morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Juan; Gonzalez, Antonio; Abrisqueta, Jesús; Hernandez, Quiteria; Valero, Graciela; Abellán, Israel; Frutos, María Dolores; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of rectal cancer via laparoscopy is controversial due to its technical complexity. Several randomized prospective studies have demonstrated clear advantages for the patient with similar oncological results to those of open surgery, although during the learning of this surgical technique there may be an increase in complications and a worse prognosis. Our aim is to analyze how the learning curve for rectal cancer via laparoscopy influences intra- and postoperative results and oncological markers. A retrospective review was conducted of the first 120 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for rectal neoplasia. The operations were performed by the same surgical team with a wide experience in the treatment of open colorectal cancer and qualified to perform advanced laparoscopic surgery. We analyzed sex, ASA, tumour location, neoadjuvant treatment, surgical technique, operating time, conversion, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, number of lymph nodes, stage and involvement of margins. Significant differences were observed with regard to surgical time (224 min in the first group, 204 min in the second group), with a higher rate of conversion in the first group (22.5%) than in the second (11.3%). No significant differences were noted for rate of conservative sphincter surgery, length of hospital stay, post-surgical complications, number of affected/isolated lymph nodes or affected circumferential and distal margins. It is possible to learn this complex surgical technique without compromising the patient's safety and oncological outcome. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. [Perineal wound complications following preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir Hadi; Mohammad, Wael A J; Jess, Per

    2008-04-07

    Every year, approximately 1200 new cases of rectal cancer are registered in Denmark. Preoperative radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy (chemo-radiation) is a gold standard in the treatment of patients with T3 and T4 tumours. Although it carries a good response rate, preoperative radiation is associated with significant morbidity including wound infection and delayed healing. The aim of this study is to clarify the effects of preoperative radiotherapy on wound healing in patients who underwent abdominoperineal excision and primary wound closure for rectum cancer. In the period from 2001 to 2005, a total of 49 patients with rectum cancer underwent abdominoperineal excision with primary wound closure. Of these patients, 17 had preoperative radiotherapy. There was a significantly higher incidence of major wound complications in radiotherapy-treated patients compared to patients treated with operation alone (71% versus 26%). The median wound healing time was 122 days for patients treated with radiotherapy and 22 days for patients treated with operation alone. There was no difference in hospitalisation time following surgery. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer is an effective treatment modality in locally advanced rectum cancer but it carries a high risk of perineal wound complications. Alternative procedures to primary perineal wound closure should therefore be considered for these patients.

  6. MAP kinase genes and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate many cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. We evaluate genetic variation in the c-Jun-N-terminal kinases, p38, and extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 MAPK-signaling pathways and colon and rectal cancer risk using data from population-based case-control studies (colon: n = 1555 cases, 1956 controls; rectal: n = 754 cases, 959 controls). We assess 19 genes (DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP4, DUSP6, DUSP7, MAP2K1, MAP3K1, MAP3K2, MAP3K3, MAP3K7, MAP3K9, MAP3K10, MAP3K11, MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK8, MAPK12, MAPK14 and RAF1). MAP2K1 rs8039880 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38, 0.83; GG versus AA genotype] and MAP3K9 rs11625206 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.14, 1.76; recessive model) were associated with colon cancer (P adj value rectal cancer (P adj cancer risk. Genetic variants had unique associations with KRAS, TP53 and CIMP+ tumors. DUSP2 rs1724120 [hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.54, 0.96; AA versus GG/GA), MAP3K10 rs112956 (HRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.10, 1.76; CT/TT versus CC) and MAP3K11 (HRR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.18, 2.62 TT versus GG/GT) influenced survival after diagnosis with colon cancer; MAP2K1 rs8039880 (HRR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.34, 4.79 GG versus AG/GG) and Raf1 rs11923427 (HRR = 0.59 95% CI = 0.40, 0.86; AA versus TT/TA) were associated with rectal cancer survival. These data suggest that genetic variation in the MAPK-signaling pathway influences colorectal cancer risk and survival after diagnosis. Associations may be modified by lifestyle factors that influence inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23027623

  7. Local recurrence in patients treated for rectal cancer using total mesorectal excision or transection of mesorectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojković Bobana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Rectal cancer is a major health problem throughout the world, despite the great progress in the treatment and control of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mesorectal excision type on local recurrence in patients operated on for rectal cancer within a 3- year period. Methods. The clinical retrospective study was conducted at the Clinic for General Surgery at the Clinical Center in Niš, Serbia, and included 225 patients with rectal cancer. Postoperatively, the patients were observed 36 months. Total mesorectal excision (TME method was used in 129 (57.33% patients, and partial mesorectal excision (PME in 96 (42.66%. There were 145 (64.44% man and 80 (35.55% women, average age 66.8 years. Results. In 58 (25.77% of the patients cancer was localized in the proximal third of the rectum, in 99 (44% in the medium third, in 68 (30.22% it was 8 cm of the anocutaneous line. In 167 (74.22% patients rectal cancer was in T3 stadium. TME was performed in all the patients with cancer in the distal third of the rectum and in 61.61% of the patients with cancer in the medium third of the rectum. PME was performed in all the patients with localized cancer in the proximal third and in 38.38% of the patients with cancer in the medium third of the rectum. Local recurrence occurred in 20 (8.88% patients, 12 (9.30% in the TME group and 8 (8.33% in the PME group, which was not a statistically significant difference. In 75% of the cases, relapse occurred in the patients in T3 stage. Relapse occurred in 55% of the cases in the second year after the surgery. The median survival of all the patients amounted to 35 months. The total mortality of all respondents in a 3-year period amounted to 5.3%. Conclusion. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of local recurrence and survival among patients who underwent TME and those underwent PME. The type of mesorectal excision does not affect the incidence of

  8. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results.

  9. Pulmonary recurrence predominates after combined modality therapy for rectal cancer: an original retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Peirong; Liska, David; Tang, Peter; Shia, Jinru; Saltz, Leonard; Goodman, Karyn; Downey, Robert J; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, José G; Wong, W Douglas; Weiser, Martin R

    2012-07-01

    To characterize patterns of recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with combined modality therapy (CMT): neoadjuvant chemoradiation + total mesorectal excision + adjuvant chemotherapy. A total of 593 consecutive rectal cancer patients (1998 to 2007) with locally advanced (stage II/III) disease (noted on endorectal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging) who received CMT were analyzed for patterns of recurrence. After median 44-month follow-up (interquartile range, 25 to 64 months), 119 patients (20%) recurred: 105 distant, 7 local, 7 local and distant, and 112 distant-only recurrence. Ninety-three (78%) had single-organ recurrence, and 26 (22%) had multiple-organ recurrence. The most common site of distant recurrence was lung (69% of all patients with distant relapse); 20% had liver recurrence. Fourteen patients (2.4%) recurred locally. Pulmonary metastases were most commonly identified by computed tomographic scan versus abnormal positron emission tomographic (PET) scan or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Risk factors associated with pulmonary recurrence were the following: pathologic stage, tumor distance from anal verge, lymphovascular or perineural invasion. Five-year freedom from pulmonary recurrence for patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 risk factors was 99%, 90%, 61%, and 42%, respectively. Thirty of 59 patents with pulmonary recurrence underwent lung metastasectomy; 3-year freedom from recurrence was 37%. Unlike colon cancer, which most frequently recurs in the liver, locally advanced rectal cancer treated with CMT relapses most frequently in the lung. Pulmonary metastasis was associated with advanced pathologic stage, low-lying tumor, lymphovascular invasion, or perineural invasion. Confirmation of pulmonary metastasis usually requires serial imaging because metastases are often small when initially detected, well below the resolution of PET, and not necessarily associated with elevated CEA. Individualized risk-based surveillance strategies are

  10. An isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Sadatomo

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: We should keep the vagina within the field of view of pelvic MRI, which is one of the preoperative diagnostic tools for colorectal cancer. If female patients show gynecological symptoms, gynecological examination should be recommended. Isolated vaginal metastases are an indication for surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy is also recommended.

  11. Computed tomography of the colo-rectal cancer using the olive oil enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Hori, Shinichi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Fujikawa, Koichi; Mori, Masaki; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1983-01-01

    The recent widespread use of the double contrast Ba enema method has allowed considerable progress to be made in the diagnosis of colo-rectal cancer. However, the double contrast Ba enema technique has been found to be inadequate in the detection of the extra-luminal extensions of cancer in its early stage. CT can be utilized as an accurate non-invasive technique for evaluating colon tumors, particularly in the rectum and sigmoid colon which are adjacent to many organs. It is possible to apply CT for evaluating whether the cancer's extra-luminal extensions are at a preoperative stage or not. Due to the many limitations inherent in the Ba enema study. We developed a new olive oil enema technique to make it possible to more accurately differentiate the intra-luminal lesion, the intestinal wall and the extra-luminal extension. (author)

  12. External validation of models predicting the individual risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis from colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelman, J; Akre, O; Gustafsson, U O; Bottai, M; Martling, A

    2016-04-01

    To externally validate previously published predictive models of the risk of developing metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) after resection of nonmetastatic colon or rectal cancer and to update the predictive model for colon cancer by adding new prognostic predictors. Data from all patients with Stage I-III colorectal cancer identified from a population-based database in Stockholm between 2008 and 2010 were used. We assessed the concordance between the predicted and observed probabilities of PC and utilized proportional-hazard regression to update the predictive model for colon cancer. When applied to the new validation dataset (n = 2011), the colon and rectal cancer risk-score models predicted metachronous PC with a concordance index of 79% and 67%, respectively. After adding the subclasses of pT3 and pT4 stage and mucinous tumour to the colon cancer model, the concordance index increased to 82%. In validation of external and recent cohorts, the predictive accuracy was strong in colon cancer and moderate in rectal cancer patients. The model can be used to identify high-risk patients for planned second-look laparoscopy/laparotomy for possible subsequent cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P resection, appears to be a safe and effective, but time-limited, diverting technique to protect an elective low colorectal anastomosis. PMID:25546660

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor producing rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh Mikinori

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF-producing cancer has been reported to occur in various organs, especially the lung. However, G-CSF-producing colorectal cancer (CRC has never been reported in the English literature. Case presentation A 57-year-old man was admitted for the surgical removal of a rectal cancer. Some hepatic tumors in the liver were revealed concurrently, and their appearance suggested multiple liver metastases. Low anterior resection was performed. with the help of histopathological examination and immunohistochemical studies, we diagnosed this case to be an undifferentiated carcinoma of the rectum. After the operation, the white blood cell (WBC count increased gradually to 81,000 cells/μL. Modified-FOLFOX6 therapy was initiated to treat the liver metastases, but there was no effect, and peritoneal dissemination had also occurred. The serum level of G-CSF was elevated to 840 pg/mL (normal range, Conclusion This is the first case of G-CSF-producing rectal cancer, and its prognosis was very poor.

  15. A multi-centred randomised trial of radical surgery versus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after local excision for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstlap, W. A. A.; Tanis, P. J.; Koedam, T. W. A.; Marijnen, C. A. M.; Cunningham, C.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery is accompanied with high morbidity and poor long term functional outcome. Screening programs have shown a shift towards more early staged cancers. Patients with early rectal cancer can potentially benefit significantly from rectal preserving therapy. For the earliest stage cancers, local excision is sufficient when the risk of lymph node disease and subsequent recurrence is below 5 %. However, the majority of early cancers are associated with an intermediate risk of lymph node involvement (5–20 %) suggesting that local excision alone is not sufficient, while completion radical surgery, which is currently standard of care, could be a substantial overtreatment for this group of patients. In this multicentre randomised trial, patients with an intermediate risk T1-2 rectal cancer, that has been locally excised using an endoluminal technique, will be randomized between adjuvant chemo-radiotherapylimited to the mesorectum and standard completion total mesorectal excision (TME). To strictly monitor the risk of locoregional recurrence in the experimental arm and enable early salvage surgery, there will be additional follow up with frequent MRI and endoscopy. The primary outcome of the study is three-year local recurrence rate. Secondary outcomes are morbidity, disease free and overall survival, stoma rate, functional outcomes, health related quality of life and costs. The design is a non inferiority study with a total sample size of 302 patients. The results of the TESAR trial will potentially demonstrate that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is an oncological safe treatment option in patients who are confronted with the difficult clinical dilemma of a radically removed intermediate risk early rectal cancer by polypectomy or transanal surgery that is conventionally treated with subsequent radical surgery. Preserving the rectum using adjuvant radiotherapy is expected to significantly improve morbidity, function and quality of life if compared to completion

  16. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  17. The impact of a dedicated multidisciplinary team on the management of early rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan-Shaw, P G; Wheeler, J M D; Borley, N R

    2015-08-01

    Local excision of early rectal cancer (ERCa) offers comparable survival and reduced operative morbidity compared with radical surgery, yet it risks an adverse oncological outcome if performed in the wrong setting. This retrospective review considers the impact of the introduction of a specialist early rectal cancer multidisciplinary team (ERCa MDT) on the investigation and management of ERCa. A retrospective comparative cohort study was undertaken. Patients with a final diagnosis of pT1 rectal cancer at our unit were identified for two 12-month periods before and after the introduction of the specialist ERCa MDT. Data on investigations and therapeutic interventions were compared. Nineteen patients from 2006 and 24 from 2011 were included. In 2006, 12 patients underwent MRI and four transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) examination, while in 2011, 18 and 20, respectively, received MRI and TRUS. In 2006 four patients underwent incidental ERCa polypectomy, with all having a positive resection margin leading to anterior resection. In 2011 only one case with a positive margin following extended endoscopic mucosal resection was identified. Definitive local excision without subsequent resection occurred in two patients in 2006 and in 16 in 2011. The study demonstrates an improvement in preoperative ERCa staging, a reduction in margin positivity and an increase in the use of local excision following the implementation of a specialist ERCa MDT. The increased detection of rectal neoplasms through screening and surveillance programmes requires further investigation and management. A specialist ERCa MDT will improve management and should be available to all practitioners involved with patients with ERCa. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Benchmarking circumferential resection margin (R1) resection rate for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, W; Collins, G; Warren, B; Cunningham, C; Mortensen, N; Lindsey, I

    2010-09-01

    Circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement (R1) is used to audit rectal cancer surgical quality. However, when downsizing chemoradiation (dCRT) is used, CRM audits both dCRT and surgery, its use reflecting a high casemix of locally advanced tumours. We aimed to evaluate predictors of R1 and benchmark R1 rates in the dCRT era, and to assess the influence of failure of steps in the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process to CRM involvement. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected rectal cancer data was undertaken. Patients were classified according to CRM status. Uni- and multivariate analysis was undertaken of risk factors for R1 resection. The contribution of the steps of the MDT process to CRM involvement was assessed. Two hundred and ten rectal cancers were evaluated (68% T3 or T4 on preoperative staging). R1 (microscopic) and R2 (macroscopic) resections occurred in 20 (10%) and 6 patients (3%), respectively. Of several factors associated with R1 resections on univariate analysis, only total mesorectal excision (TME) specimen defects and threatened/involved CRM on preoperative imaging remained as independent predictors of R1 resections on multivariate analysis. Causes of R1 failure by MDT step classification found that less than half were associated with and only 15% solely attributable to a suboptimal TME specimen. Total mesorectal excision specimen defects and staging-predicted threatened or involved CRM are independent strong predictors of R1 resections. In most R1 resections, the TME specimen was intact. It is important to remember the contribution of both the local staging casemix and dCRT failure when using R1 rates to assess purely surgical competence.

  19. What is the significance of the circumferential margin in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakarnsanga, Atthaphorn; Gonen, Mithat; Shia, Jinru; Goodman, Karyn A; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Guillem, José G; Paty, Philip B; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Weiser, Martin R

    2013-04-01

    The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is highly prognostic for local recurrence in rectal cancer surgery without neoadjuvant treatment. However, its significance in the setting of long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) is not well defined. Review of a single institution's prospectively maintained database from 1998 to 2007 identified 563 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3/T4 and/or N1) receiving nCRT, followed after 6 weeks by total mesorectal excision (TME). Kaplan-Meier, Cox regression, and competing risk analysis were performed. The authors noted that 75 % of all patients had stage III disease as determined by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With median follow-up of 39 months after resection, local and distant relapse were noted in 12 (2.1 %) and 98 (17.4 %) patients, respectively. On competing risk analysis, the optimal cutoff point of CRM was 1 mm for local recurrence and 2 mm for distant metastasis. Factors independently associated with local recurrence included CRM ≤1 mm, and high-grade tumor (p = 0.012 and 0.007, respectively). CRM ≤2 mm, as well as pathological, nodal, and overall tumor stage are also significant independent risk factors for distant metastasis (p = 0.025, 0.010, and dataset of locally advanced rectal cancer treated with nCRT followed by TME, CRM ≤1 mm is an independent risk factor for local recurrence and is considered a positive margin. CRM ≤2 mm was associated with distant recurrence, independent of pathological tumor and nodal stage.

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and impact on outcomes - A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsli, Linn M; Johannesen, Tom B; Myklebust, Tor Å; Møller, Bjørn; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Guren, Marianne Grønlie

    2017-06-01

    Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy ((C)RT) for rectal cancer is, in Norway, restricted to patients with cT4-stage or threatened circumferential resection margin. This nationwide population-based study assessed the use of preoperative (C)RT in Norway and its impact on treatment outcomes. Data from The Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Registry were used to identify all stage I-III rectal cancers treated with major resection (1997-2011: n=9193). Cumulative risk of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and relative survival was estimated for patients in 2007-2011 (n=3179). Multivariate regression-models were used to compare outcomes following preoperative (C)RT and surgery versus surgery alone. The proportion of patients given preoperative (C)RT increased from 5% to 49% during 1997-2011. Preoperative (C)RT was associated with reduced risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio (HR)=0.55; 95% CI=0.29-1.04) and a tendency of improved survival (excess HR=0.75; 95% CI=0.52-1.08) with significant effects in patients aged ≥70years (local recurrence: HR=0.35; 95% CI=0.13-0.91; survival: excess HR=0.58; 95% CI=0.35-0.95). This study indicates that when use of preoperative (C)RT is restricted to selected high-risk rectal cancers, preoperative (C)RT is associated with improved local recurrence, and possibly improved survival, when studied on a population-based level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. What is the role for the circumferential margin in the modern treatment of rectal cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagtegaal, I.D.; Quirke, P.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Treatment of rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last decade. The worldwide introduction of total mesorectal excision in combination with the increasing use of radio(chemo)-therapy has led to an improved prognosis. One of the main prognostic factors in rectal cancer is the

  2. Laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: a single-centre experience of 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Good, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    For colorectal surgeons, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery poses a new challenge. The defence of the questionable oncological safety tempered by the impracticality of the long learning curve is rapidly fading. As a unit specialising in minimally invasive surgery, we have routinely undertaken rectal cancer surgery laparoscopically since 2005.

  3. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purposes: The aim of this study was to observe the quality of life (QOL) in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in different periods after operation. Methods: A 1-,3-,6-month prospective study of QOL in 51 rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy and 50 ones without permanent colostomy was assessed ...

  4. Systematic review of outcomes after intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, S T

    2012-05-01

    For a select group of patients proctectomy with intersphincteric resection (ISR) for low rectal cancer may be a viable alternative to abdominoperineal resection, with good oncological outcomes while preserving sphincter function. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence regarding oncological outcomes, morbidity and mortality, and functional outcomes after ISR for low rectal cancer.

  5. Impact of bowel dysfunction on quality of life after sphincter-preserving resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, Katrine; Laurberg, Solveig; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    Bowel dysfunction after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer is a common complication, with the potential to affect quality of life (QoL) strongly. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of bowel dysfunction and impact on health-related QoL after curative sphincter......-preserving resection for rectal cancer....

  6. Ezrin expression in rectal cancer predicts time to development of local recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörgren, Fredrik; Nilbert, Mef; Rambech, Eva

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Improved outcome after rectal cancer surgery requires identification of novel risk factors of tumour recurrence in order to personalise therapy, that is, enhanced selection of high-risk patients to additional radiochemotherapy or intensified follow-up. In several tumour types, including...... a relevant marker for personalised treatment of rectal cancer with respect to risk of local recurrence after R0 surgery....

  7. Peculiarities of plasma homeostasis in the patients with rectal cancer according to laser correlation spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byilenko, O.A.; Bazhora, Yu.Yi.; Sokolov, V.M.; Andronov, D.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Laser correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate plasma homeostasis in 82 patients with rectal cancer. The spectra of the blood plasma from 21 donors of the transfusion station were used as the control. The blood plasma homeostasis changes reheated with laser correlation spectrometry in the patients with rectal cancer allow to use them for diagnosis of this pathology

  8. Radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor markers in the diagnosis of rectal cancer recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozhiganov, E.L.; Kuznetsova, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The levels of tumor markers were determined in patients with rectal cancer recurrences by radioimmunoassay. An increase in a CEA level was observed most frequently. An increase in the levels of α-fetoprotein, ferritin and β 2 -microglobulin was observed. It was shown that the most specific and effective diagnostic test of rectal cancer recurrences was the determination of a CEA level

  9. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Keywords Quality of life, Rectal cancer, Permanent colostomy, EORTC QOL-30, CR38 questionnaires ... Table 1 The general demographic characteristics of permanent colostomy patients of rectal cancer (n=49) variables n. %. Gender ..... Afterwards, knowledge on the reasonable diet and colonic irrigation.

  10. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Ost, Piet; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Colman, Roos; Sadeghi, Simin; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  11. Transanal vs laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perdawood, Sharaf; Al Khefagie, Ghalib Ali Abod

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LaTME) has improved short-term outcomes of rectal cancer surgery with comparable oncological results to open approach. LaTME can be difficult in the lower most part of the rectum, leading potentially to higher rates of complications, conversion...... of conversion, operating time and hospital stay. RESULTS: In total, 50 patients were included (TaTME = 25, LaTME = 25). The groups were comparative in demographic data and tumour characteristics. Circumferential resection margin was positive in one patient in TaTME group versus four patients in LaTME group (P=0...

  12. [18F]Fluoromisonidazole PET in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Tanuj; Greenhalgh, Tessa A; Wilson, James M; Franklin, Jamie; Wang, Lia Mun; Strauss, Victoria; Cunningham, Chris; Partridge, Mike; Maughan, Tim

    2017-09-20

    There is an increasing interest in developing predictive biomarkers of tissue hypoxia using functional imaging for personalised radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer that are considered for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The study explores [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole ([ 18 F]FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) scans for predicting clinical response in rectal cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant CRT. Patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma were imaged at 0-45 min, 2 and 4 h, at baseline and after 8-10 fractions of CRT (week 2). The first 6 patients did not receive an enema (the non-enema group) and the last 4 patients received an enema before PET-CT scan (the enema group). [ 18 F]FMISO production failed on 2 occasions. Static PET images at 4 h were analysed using tumour-to-muscle (T:M) SUVmax and tumour-to-blood (T:B) SUVmax. The 0-45 min dynamic PET scans were analysed using Casciari model to report hypoxia and perfusion. Akaike information criteria (AIC) were used to compare data fittings for different pharmacokinetic models. Pathological tumour regression grade was scored using American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 7.0. Shapiro-Wilk test was used to evaluate the normality of the data. Five out of eleven (5/11) patients were classed as good responders (AJCC 0/1 or good clinical response) and 6/11 as poor responders (AJCC 2/3 or poor clinical response). The median T:M SUVmax was 2.14 (IQR 0.58) at baseline and 1.30 (IQR 0.19) at week 2, and the corresponding median tumour hypoxia volume was 1.08 (IQR 1.31) cm 3 and 0 (IQR 0.15) cm 3 , respectively. The median T:B SUVmax was 2.46 (IQR 1.50) at baseline and 1.61 (IQR 0.14) at week 2, and the corresponding median tumour hypoxia volume was 5.68 (IQR 5.86) cm 3 and 0.76 (IQR 0.78) cm 3 , respectively. For 0-45 min tumour modelling, the median hypoxia was 0.92 (IQR 0.41) min -1 at baseline and 0.70 (IQR 0.10) min -1 at week 2. The median perfusion was 4.10 (IQR 1.71) ml g -1

  13. Clinicopathological studies on three preoperative combined treatments for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Iizuka, Ryouji; Hagiwara, Akeo; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Toshio

    1995-01-01

    To prevent postoperative local recurrence of rectal cancer, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and 5-fluorouracil suppository (2,000-2,500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of patients receiving combined treatments. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.54 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that in the surgery alone group. No systemic side effects nor severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer were beneficial to survival and local control. (author)

  14. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  15. Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC offers similar outcomes in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases compared to colon cancer patients: a matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkens, Geert A; van Oudheusden, Thijs R; Braam, Hidde J; Wiezer, Marinus J; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Rutten, Harm J; van Ramshorst, Bert; de Hingh, Ignace H

    2016-04-01

    The effect of cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases (PM) is unclear. This case-control study aims to assess the results of cytoreduction and HIPEC in patients with rectal PM compared to colon PM patients. Colorectal PM patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC were included. Two colon cancer patients were case-matched for each rectal cancer patient, based on prognostic factors (T stage, N stage, histology type, and extent of PM). Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between both groups. From 317 patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC, 29 patients (9.1%) had rectal PM. Fifty-eight colon cases were selected as control patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Major morbidity was 27.6% and 34.5% in the rectal and colon group, respectively (P = 0.516). Median disease-free survival was 13.5 months in the rectal group and 13.6 months in the colon group (P = 0.621). Two- and five-year overall survival rates were 54%/32% in rectal cancer patients, and 61%/24% in colon cancer patients (P = 0.987). Cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients with rectal PM is feasible and provides similar outcomes as in colon cancer patients. Rectal PM should not be regarded a contra-indication for cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:548-553. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Interleukin genes and associations with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurant, Kristina L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukins are a group of cytokines that contribute to growth and differentiation, cell migration, and inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by the immune system. In this study we examined genetic variation in genes from various anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory interleukins to determine association with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival. Data from two population-based incident studies of colon cancer (1555 cases and 1956 controls) and rectal cancer (754 cases and 954 controls) were utilized. After controlling for multiple comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from four genes, IL3, IL6R, IL8, IL15, were associated with increased colon cancer risk and CXCR1, and CXCR2 were significantly associated with increased rectal cancer risk. Only SNPs from genes within the IL-8 pathway (IL8, CXCR1, and CXCR2) showed a significant association with both colon and rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs interacted significantly with IL8 and IFNG SNPs and with aspirin/NSAID, cigarette smoking, estrogen use and BMI. For both colon and rectal cancer, increasing numbers of risk alleles were associated with increased hazard of death from cancer; the estimated hazard of death for colon cancer for the highest category of risk alleles was 1.74 (95% CI 1.18–2.56) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.28–2.99) for rectal cancer. These data suggest interleukin genes play a role in risk and overall survival for colon and rectal cancer. PMID:22674296

  17. Rectal cancer survival in a Brazilian Cancer Reference Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdo da Silva Corrêa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malign tumors in men and women all over the world. In spite of prevention advances in the last few years, worldwide incidence remains significant, about one million per year. Objectives: Evaluate rectal cancer survival in patients diagnosed and surgically treated at the Cancer Reference Unit at Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil. Methods: Observational retrospective study composed by 135 patients assisted from 2007 to 2014 at Doctor Luiz Antonio Hospital, Natal, Brazil. Data were collected from the patient records revision and survival rates were calculated and analyzed by non-parametric Kaplan–Meier and Wilcoxon tests, respectively. All patients were submitted to surgical treatment, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Results: Overall survival was 62% in seven years, while disease-free survival in one, three and five years was 91.7%, 75.5% and 72.1%, respectively. Conclusion: Overall survival and disease-free survival remained enhanced until the end of the study, suggesting that the treatment protocols used in the institution have shown to be effective. Resumo: O câncer colorretal é um dos tumores malignos mais comuns em homens e mulheres em todo o mundo. Apesar das melhorias na prevenção nos últimos anos, a incidência global ainda é expressiva, cerca de um milhão por ano. Objetivos: Avaliar a sobrevida do câncer de reto nos pacientes diagnosticados e tratados cirurgicamente na Unidade de Referência do Câncer no Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Métodos: Estudo observacional retrospectivo composto por 135 pacientes, compreendido no período de 2007 a 2014 no Hospital Dr. Luiz Antônio, Natal, Brasil. Os dados foram coletados através da revisão de prontuários e as sobrevidas foram calculadas e comparadas utilizando, respectivamente, os métodos não-paramétricos de Kaplan-Meier e teste de Wilcoxon. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico, quimioterápico e radioter

  18. The result of implementation of multidisciplinary teams in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Sparre, Peter; Glenthøj, Anders

    2013-01-01

    , postoperative mortality, local recurrence, distant recurrence and over-all and disease-free survival. Results:  811 patients were diagnosed with primary rectal cancer in Hvidovre and Bispebjerg Hospitals 1.5.2001-31.8.2006. The frequency of preoperative MRI scans increased in the MDT cohort and perioperative......Aim:  In 2003 colorectal multidisciplinary teams (MDT) were established in all major Danish hospitals treating colorectal cancer. The aim was to improve the prognosis by a multidisciplinary evaluation and decision about surgical and oncological treatment, based on medical history, clinical...... two years after (the MDT cohort).. The national colorectal cancer database, with follow-up recorded by the National Patient Registry in September 2010 was used. The endpoints included the incidence of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) offered according to the national guidelines, R0/R1/R2 resection...

  19. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Tei

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: This is the first report of choroidal metastasis from early rectal cancer. We consider it important to enforce systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy for choroidal metastasis from colorectal cancer.

  2. Dual-energy CT can detect malignant lymph nodes in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Najami, I; Lahaye, M J; Beets-Tan, R G H; Baatrup, G

    2017-05-01

    There is a need for an accurate and operator independent method to assess the lymph node status to provide the most optimal personalized treatment for rectal cancer patients. This study evaluates whether Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) could contribute to the preoperative lymph node assessment, and compared it to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The objective of this prospective observational feasibility study was to determine the clinical value of the DECT for the detection of metastases in the pelvic lymph nodes of rectal cancer patients and compare the findings to MRI and histopathology. The patients were referred to total mesorectal excision (TME) without any neoadjuvant oncological treatment. After surgery the rectum specimen was scanned, and lymph nodes were matched to the pathology report. Fifty-four histology proven rectal cancer patients received a pelvic DECT scan and a standard MRI. The Dual Energy CT quantitative parameters were analyzed: Water and Iodine concentration, Dual-Energy Ratio, Dual Energy Index, and Effective Z value, for the benign and malignant lymph node differentiation. DECT scanning showed statistical difference between malignant and benign lymph nodes in the measurements of iodine concentration, Dual-Energy Ratio, Dual Energy Index, and Effective Z value. Dual energy CT classified 42% of the cases correctly according to N-stage compared to 40% for MRI. This study showed statistical difference in several quantitative parameters between benign and malignant lymph nodes. There were no difference in the accuracy of lymph node staging between DECT and MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostatic irradiation is not associated with any measurable increase in the risk of subsequent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Eapen, Libni; MacRae, Robert; Malone, Shawn; Nicholas, Garth

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a putative increased risk of rectal cancer subsequent to prostatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we compared men who had radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma with those treated surgically and those treated with neither modality. Kaplan-Meier analyses for the time to failure from rectal cancer were performed between age-matched subgroups of the three cohorts. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to ascertain what influences might affect the incidence of subsequent rectal cancer. Results: In all, 33,831 men were irradiated, 167,607 were treated surgically, and 36,335 received neither modality. Rectal cancers developed in 243 (0.7%) of those irradiated (mean age, 70.7 years), 578 (0.3%) of those treated surgically (68.7 years), and 227 (0.8%) of those treated with neither modality (74.2 years). When age effects and the differences between the surgical and untreated cohorts were controlled for, we were unable to demonstrate any significant increased incidence of rectal cancer in men irradiated for prostatic cancer. Conclusions: An increased frequency of rectal cancer after prostatic irradiation, apparent on crude analysis, could be attributed to age confounding and other unmeasured confounders associated with prostate cancer treatment and rectal cancer risk

  4. A case of rectal cancer successfully treated with surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for metachronous lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Yu; Hosoda, Yohei; Tachi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent polypectomy for a rectal polyp (Isp). Pathological findings were invasion of the submucosa (3,500 μm diameter), and she underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer (RS, pT1b, pN0, cM0, Stage I ) without adjuvant chemotherapy. Lung masses were found in her right (8 mm) and left lung (7 mm). The tumors enlarged during the 4 month follow-up period. We decided to perform left partial pneumonectomy. The tumor was diagnosed as a lung metastasis from colon cancer by pathology. Because the right tumor was located towards the center, performing right pneumonectomy would have been quite invasive and we feared occult metastases. We decided to apply SRT (50 Gy) to the right tumor. The tumor shrunk and became a scar after treatment. There were no complications such as radiation pneumonitis. The patient was in good health without any recurrence for 12 months after SRT. Surgical resection is an optimal method to control lung metastasis from colon cancer if the lesion is operable. However, in the case of a tumor centrally located, surgical resection may cause deterioration of lung function. There are also cases with contraindications for surgery due to co-morbidities. In addition, there is no consensus on observation periods to exclude occult metastases. SRT can be an effective treatment for lung metastases from colon cancer when there are bilateral lung metastases and no metastases outside the lungs. (author)

  5. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Zhang; Gao, Peng; Song, Yong-Xi; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2016-04-12

    Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992-2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I-III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN- patients.

  6. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  7. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  8. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  9. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary mission statement on better care for patients with colon and rectal cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Aristei, Cynthia; Boelens, Petra G; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Blomqvist, Lennart; Borras, Josep M; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cutsem, Eric Van; Espin, Eloy; Gore-Booth, Jola; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Iversen, Lene H; Han van Krieken, J; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm J T; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Meldolesi, Elisa; Wiggers, Theo; Cervantes, Andres; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    oncology, radiotherapy, and follow-up where applicable for treatment of colon cancer, rectal cancer and stage IV separately. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. The total number of the voted sentences was 465. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the experts. Of the 465 sentences, 84% achieved large consensus, 6% achieved moderate consensus, and 7% resulted in minimum consensus. Only 3% was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. It is feasible to achieve European Consensus on key diagnostic and treatment issues using the Delphi method. This consensus embodies the expertise of professionals from all disciplines involved in the care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms were developed to implement the current evidence and to define core treatment guidance for multidisciplinary team management of colon and rectal cancer throughout Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age (≤68 vs. ≥69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (≤II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: ≤50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. ≥12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. ≥12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels ≥12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels ≥12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for locally

  11. Rectal squamous cell carcinoma in immunosuppressed populations: is this a distinct entity from anal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    COGHILL, Anna E.; SHIELS, Meredith S.; RYCROFT, Randi K.; COPELAND, Glenn; FINCH, Jack L.; HAKENEWERTH, Anne M.; PAWLISH, Karen S.; ENGELS, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the rectum is rare, but as with anal cancer, risk may be increased among immunosuppressed individuals. We assessed risk of rectal SCC in HIV-infected people. Design Population-based registry Methods We utilized the HIV/AIDS Cancer Match, a linkage of US HIV and cancer registries (1991–2010), to ascertain cases of anal SCC, rectal SCC, rectal non-SCC, and colon non-SCC. We compared risk in HIV-infected persons to the general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and evaluated risk factors using Poisson regression. We reviewed cancer registry case notes to confirm site and histology for a subset of cases. Results HIV-infected persons had an excess risk of rectal SCC compared to the general population (SIR=28.9; 95%CI 23.2–35.6), similar to the increase for anal SCC (SIR=37.3). Excess rectal SCC risk was most pronounced among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM, SIR=61.2). Risk was not elevated for rectal non-SCC (SIR=0.88) or colon non-SCC (SIR=0.63). Individuals diagnosed with AIDS had higher rectal SCC rates than those with HIV-only (incidence rate ratio=1.86; 95%CI 1.04–3.31). Based on available information, one-third of rectal SCCs were determined to be misclassified anal cancer. Conclusions HIV-infected individuals, especially with advanced immunosuppression, appear to have substantially elevated risk for rectal SCC. As for anal SCC, rectal SCC risk was highest in MSM, pointing to involvement of a sexually transmitted infection such as human papillomavirus. Site misclassification was present, and detailed information on tumor location is needed to prove that rectal SCC is a distinct entity. PMID:26372482

  12. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  13. Associations between birth weight and colon and rectal cancer risk in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Natalie R; Jensen, Britt W; Zimmermann, Esther

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birth weight has inconsistent associations with colorectal cancer, possibly due to different anatomic features of the colon versus the rectum. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between birth weight and colon and rectal cancers separately. METHODS: 193,306 children......, born from 1936 to 1972, from the Copenhagen School Health Record Register were followed prospectively in Danish health registers. Colon and rectal cancer cases were defined using the International Classification of Disease version 10 (colon: C18.0-18.9, rectal: 19.9 and 20.9). Only cancers classified....... No significant sex differences were observed; therefore combined results are presented. Birth weight was positively associated with colon cancers with a HR of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) per kilogram of birth weight. For rectal cancer a significant association was not observed for birth weights below 3.5kg. Above 3...

  14. Association Between Geographic Access to Cancer Care and Receipt of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun Chieh, E-mail: anna.lin@cancer.org [American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kirkwood, M. Kelsey [American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, Virginia (United States); Hershman, Dawn L. [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Jemal, Ahmedin [American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, James B. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Goldstein, Michael [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bajorin, Dean [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kosty, Michael [Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States); Arnone, Anna [American Society for Radiation Oncology, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Hanley, Amy [American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, Virginia (United States); Stevens, Stephanie [American Society for Radiation Oncology, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Trimodality therapy (chemoradiation and surgery) is the standard of care for stage II/III rectal cancer but nearly one third of patients do not receive radiation therapy (RT). We examined the relationship between the density of radiation oncologists and the travel distance to receipt of RT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study based on the National Cancer Data Base identified 26,845 patients aged 18 to 80 years with stage II/III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2007 to 2010. Radiation oncologists were identified through the Physician Compare dataset. Generalized estimating equations clustering by hospital service area was used to examine the association between geographic access and receipt of RT, controlling for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Of the 26,845 patients, 70% received RT within 180 days of diagnosis or within 90 days of surgery. Compared with a travel distance of <12.5 miles, patients diagnosed at a reporting facility who traveled ≥50 miles had a decreased likelihood of receipt of RT (50-249 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.75, P<.001; ≥250 miles, adjusted odds ratio 0.46; P=.002), all else being equal. The density level of radiation oncologists was not significantly associated with the receipt of RT. Patients who were female, nonwhite, and aged ≥50 years and had comorbidities were less likely to receive RT (P<.05). Patients who were uninsured but self-paid for their medical services, initially diagnosed elsewhere but treated at a reporting facility, and resided in Midwest had an increased the likelihood of receipt of RT (P<.05). Conclusions: An increased travel burden was associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving RT for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer, all else being equal; however, radiation oncologist density was not. Further research of geographic access and establishing transportation assistance programs or lodging services for patients with an unmet need might help decrease

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy on older and oldest elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, F; Cartei, F; Carau, B; Berretta, S; Spartà, D; Tirelli, U; Santangelo, A; Maugeri, D; Luca, S; Leotta, C; Sorace, R; Berretta, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy in terms of feasibility and activity in the patients aged > or = 75 with advanced rectal cancer. From January 2002 to December 2006, 41 consecutive patients (27 men and 14 women) aged > or = 75 received radiotherapy for local advanced rectal cancer, 9 in a pre-operative and 22 in a post-operative setting. Sixteen patients received concomitant chemotherapy. Variables considered were age, co-morbidities, evaluated according to the adult co-morbidity evaluation index (ACE-27), surgery versus no surgery, and timing of radiotherapy. The median age was 80.5 years (range 75-90). A total of 19.5% of the patients had no co-morbidity, 48.8% mild, 17.1% moderate, and 14.6% had severe co-morbidities. Thirty-nine subjects (95.1%) were submitted to surgery. All patients but one completed the planned radiation schedule. At a median follow-up of 23.1 months, the 2- and 4-year overall survival rates were 71.8% and 61.6%, respectively. There was a better survival for patients with no or mild co-morbidities (p=0.002) and a good performance status (p=0.003). The cancer-free survival at 2 and 4 years was 78.9% and 26.4%, respectively. No difference in acute and late toxicity rates was found between patients with different ACE-27 indexes. We conclude that compliance with radiotherapy is good and rate of toxicity is acceptable in elderly patients. Patients with no or mild co-morbidities have a significantly better survival. Increasing severity of co-morbidity may sufficiently shorten remaining life expectancy to cancel gains with adjuvant radiotherapy. Further prospective trials are needed to confirm these results.

  16. Prognostic Aspects of DCE-MRI in Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollub, M.J.; Gultekin, D.H.; Sohn, M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cao, K. [Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Kuk, D.; Gonen, M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, L.H. [Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weiser, M.R.; Temple, L.K.; Nash, G.M.; Guillem, J.G.; Garcia-Aguilar, J.; Paty, P.B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Wang, M. [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Colorectal Surgery, Shanghai (China); Goodman, K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    To explore whether pre-reoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI findings correlate with clinical outcome in patients who undergo surgical treatment for recurrent rectal carcinoma. A retrospective study of DCE-MRI in patients with recurrent rectal cancer was performed after obtaining an IRB waiver. We queried our PACS from 1998 to 2012 for examinations performed for recurrent disease. Two radiologists in consensus outlined tumour regions of interest on perfusion images. We explored the correlation between K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, AUC90 and AUC180 with time to re-recurrence of tumour, overall survival and resection margin status. Univariate Cox PH models were used for survival, while univariate logistic regression was used for margin status. Among 58 patients with pre-treatment DCE-MRI who underwent resection, 36 went directly to surgery and 18 had positive margins. K{sup trans} (0.55, P = 0.012) and K{sub ep} (0.93, P = 0.04) were inversely correlated with positive margins. No significant correlations were noted between K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, AUC90 and AUC180 and overall survival or time to re-recurrence of tumour. K{sup trans} and K{sub ep} were significantly associated with clear resection margins; however overall survival and time to re-recurrence were not predicted. Such information might be helpful for treatment individualisation and deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  17. [Two Cases of Fournier's Gangrene That Occurred during Chemotherapy for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Makoto; Kitazawa, Masato; Ehara, Takehito; Yamamoto, Yuta; Suzuki, Akira; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of Fournier's gangrene occurred during chemotherapy for advanced rectal cancer. Patients were treated using surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. Case 1: A 66-year-old man had advanced rectal cancer with para-aortic and inguinal lymph node metastases. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy(capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab). Due to progression of the rectal mass, we performed radiotherapy(30 Gy)and chemotherapy(irinotecan, S-1, bevacizumab). After 14 days, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with anal pain and fever. Case 2: A 63-year-old man had mucinous rectal carcinoma with sacrum invasion. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy. Sixteen days after regorafenib therapy, as a fifth-line of chemotherapy, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with hip pain, swollen perineum, and fever. There have been no reports of Fournier's gangrene occurring during chemotherapy for rectal cancer. We report 2 cases with a review of literature.

  18. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Harashima, Koichi; Miyazawa, Yasushi; Yamada, Masami; Ito, Kazuto; Kurokawa, Kouhei; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi; Nakano, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V 30 , V 50 , V 80 , and V 90 , respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V 50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V 90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  19. Comparisons of Rigid Proctoscopy, Flexible Colonoscopy, and Digital Rectal Examination for Determining the Localization of Rectal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akira; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Okada, Kazutake; Saito, Gota

    2018-02-01

    Rigid proctoscopy is considered essential for rectal tumor localization, although the current gold standard for detection of colorectal cancers is colonoscopy. The European Society for Medical Oncology Guidelines indicate that rigid and flexible endoscopies afford essentially identical results, although little evidence is yet available to support this. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of colonoscopy in identifying the location of rectal cancer and to compare the results with those of rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective database. The study was conducted at a single tertiary colorectal surgery referral center. A total of 173 patients scheduled for curative surgery for histologically verified rectal adenocarcinoma between December 2009 and February 2015 were entered into the study, after having given informed consent. The main study measure was the mean difference and limits of agreement in assessment of the height of the distal edge of rectal cancer from the anal verge, using the Bland and Altman method. The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and flexible colonoscopy was -0.2 cm (95% CI, -2.0 to 1.6 cm). The mean difference between rigid proctoscopy and digital rectal examination was 0.3 cm (95% CI, 1.9 to 2.4 cm). Intermethod variability larger than the 95% CI between rigid and flexible endoscopes was correlated to the tumor height (OR, 4.27 (95% CI, 1.84-3.10); p = 0.021). This study was conducted in a single center. The limits of agreement (-2.0 and 1.6 cm) in identifying the height of rectal cancers from the anal verge are sufficiently small to support the view that flexible colonoscopy provides similar tumor locations to those measured by rigid proctoscopy, although the discrepancy occasionally exceeded 2 cm for tumors >5 cm above the anal verge. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A405.

  20. Potential of DNA methylation in rectal cancer as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Exner, Ruth; Pulverer, Walter; Diem, Martina; Spaller, Lisa; Woltering, Laura; Schreiber, Martin; Wolf, Brigitte; Sonntagbauer, Markus; Schr?der, Fabian; Stift, Judith; Wrba, Fritz; Bergmann, Michael; Weinh?usel, Andreas; Egger, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aberrant DNA methylation is more prominent in proximal compared with distal colorectal cancers. Although a number of methylation markers were identified for colon cancer, yet few are available for rectal cancer. Methods: DNA methylation differences were assessed by a targeted DNA microarray for 360 marker candidates between 22 fresh frozen rectal tumour samples and 8 controls and validated by microfluidic high-throughput and methylation-sensitive qPCR in fresh frozen and formalin-...

  1. Dietary risk factors for colon and rectal cancers: a comparative case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kenji; Hirose, Kaoru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Takashi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Tajima, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    In Japan, the incidence rate of colon cancer has more rapidly increased than that of rectal cancer. The differential secular trends may be due to different dietary factors in the development of colon and rectal cancers. To compare dietary risk factors between colon and rectal cancers, we undertook a case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. Subjects were 507 patients with newly diagnosed colon (n = 265) and rectal (n = 242) cancers, and 2,535 cancer-free outpatients (controls). Intakes of nutrients and food groups were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. We found a decreasing risk of colon cancer with increasing intakes of calcium and insoluble dietary fiber; the multivariate ORs across quartiles of intake were 1.00, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.67 (trend p = 0.040), and 1.00, 0.69, 0.64, and 0.65 (trend p = 0.027), respectively. For rectal cancer, a higher consumption of carotene and meat was associated with a reduced risk; the corresponding ORs were 1.00, 1.10, 0.71, and 0.70 for carotene (trend p = 0.028), and 1.00, 0.99, 0.68, and 0.72 for meat (trend p = 0.036). Carbohydrate intake was positively correlated with the risk of rectal cancer (ORs over quartiles: 1.00, 1.14, 1.42, and 1.54; trend p = 0.048). This association was stronger in women, while fat consumption was inversely correlated with the risk of female colon and rectal cancers. Dietary risk factors appear to considerably differ between colon and rectal cancers.

  2. Clinical significance of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colo-rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jie; Hu Junyan; Sun Shuming; Cheng Benkun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical usefulness of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Serum SA (with colorimetry), CEA (with CLIA) and CRP (with ILIA) levels were measured in 120 patients with colo-rectal cancer. Results: (1) Serum SA, CEA and CRP levels increased significantly as the disease stage advanced from Duke A through Duke D. (2) As the malignancy of the growth advanced from well-differentiated to anaplastic, the serum SA and CRP levels increased significantly while the reverse was true for serum CEA levels. (3) In 68 post-operative patients followed 1-5 years, the serum levels of SA, CEA and CRP were significantly higher in the patients with recurrence (n=29) than those in patients without recurrence (n=39) (P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum SA CEA and CRP levels were closely related to the disease process in patients with colo-rectal cancer. (authors)

  3. Efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with intermittent oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin in Japanese rectal cancer patients: a single center experience retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Maeda, Fumi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-05-31

    Various types of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been established for rectal cancer; thus, Physicians will need to refine the selection of appropriate preoperative CRT for different patients since there are various treatment regimens. Oral tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) is commonly used to treat rectal cancer in Japan. Oral chemotherapy offers patients many potential advantages. Since 2008, we have been performing preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV in locally advanced rectal cancer patients to prevent postoperative local recurrence. Here, in a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV. We analyzed data from 62 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, including 31 patients who underwent preoperative CRT between 2009 and 2013 (the CRT group) and 31 patients who were treated with surgery alone between 2001 and 2008 (the non-CRT group). Clinicopathologically, both groups included patients with rectal cancer at clinical tumor stages III-IV or clinical node stages 0-III. In the CRT group, curative operations were performed ≥8 weeks after CRT. Patients were concomitantly treated with 2 cycles of oral UFT (300 mg/m 2 /day, days 1-14 and 29-42) plus LV (75 mg/day, days 1-14 and 29-42) and 45 Gy of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days, followed by a 2-week break. The completion rate of CRT was high at 94% (n = 29/31). The downstaging rate of CRT was 61% (n = 19/31). The pathological complete response rate was 6.5% (n = 2/31). Significant differences were observed in the 3-year local recurrence rate between the two groups (P rectal cancer. A further investigation of a diversification of preoperative CRT for Japanese rectal cancer patients is required.

  4. Risk of ano-rectal cancer following irradiation for cancer of the uterus. Epidemiological risk or radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domergue, J.; Dubois, J.B.; Joyeux, H.; Pujol, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is the report of 9 cases of anal and low rectal cancer following pelvic irradiation for cancer of uterus or cervix. This second cancer appears between the 10th and 20th year after radiotherapy, with a mean of 18,2 years. Its treatment can still be conservative for anal cancer but for low rectal tumor, abdominal resection is necessary. A statistical study has concluded that there is an excess risk for this group of patients, only for patients treated by radiotherapy for uterus cervix cancer. Those patients justify, endoscopic follow-up, especially after the 10th year with anterior rectal wall biopsies. With this attitude, these late complications should not offset the benefit of pelvic irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the uterus [fr

  5. Effect of the circumferential resection margin on survival following rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S B; Mills, S J; Bradburn, D M; Ratcliffe, A A; Borowski, D W

    2011-04-01

    The aim was to determine the effect of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) on overall survival following surgical excision of rectal cancer. The effect of CRM on survival was examined by case mix-adjusted analysis of patients undergoing potentially curative excision of a rectal cancer between 1998 and 2002. Of 1896 patients, 1561 (82.3 per cent) had recorded data on the CRM. In 232 patients (14.9 per cent) tumour was found 1 mm or less from the CRM. In 370 patients (23.7 per cent) it was over 1 mm but no more than 5 mm from the CRM, and in 288 (18.4 per cent) it was over 5 mm but no more than 10 mm from the CRM. The remaining 671 patients (43.0 per cent) had a CRM exceeding 10 mm. Overall 5-year survival rates for these groups were 43.2, 51.7, 66.6 and 66.0 per cent respectively. Compared with patients with a CRM exceeding 10 mm, the adjusted risk of death was significantly increased for patients with a CRM of 1 mm or less (hazard ratio (HR) 1.61, P CRM (HR 1.02, P = 0.873). The adverse effect of a CRM greater than 1 mm but no larger than 5 mm was found particularly in mid-rectal cancers. A predicted CRM of 5 mm or less on preoperative staging should be considered for neoadjuvant treatment. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance in restaging of rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongming; Chu, Lili; Zhao, Risheng; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance(MR) in restaging of rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy(CRT). Comprehensive search of literature concerning the diagnosis of MR for rectal cancer after preoperative CRT was performed from databases of PubMed, EMbase, OVID and WOK. Sensitivity and specificity of MR on restaging of rectal cancer after preoperative CRT were investigated by SAS and MetaDiSc software. Thirteen articles including 749 patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. For T3-T4 stage, sensitivity of MR was 82.1%(95%CI:67.9%-90.9%), specificity was 53.5%(95%CI:39.3%-67.3%), and diagnostic odds ratio(DOR) was 5.34(2.73, 6.59). For lymph node involvement, sensitivity of MR was 61.8%(95%CI:50.7%-71.8%), specificity was 72.0%(95%CI:61.3%-80.7%), and DOR was 4.33(95%CI:2.84-6.59). For circumferential resection margin(CRM) by MR, pooled sensitivity was 85.4%(95%CI:60.5%-95.7%), specificity was 80.0%(95%CI:57.4%-92.3%), and DOR was 27.62(95%CI:13.03-58.55). Restaging accuracy of T3-T4 and lymph nodes involvement of rectal cancer after preoperative CRT by MR is not high. MR may be a good method to make reassessment of CRM. To avoid overtreatment for T0-T2, negative lymph node and circumferential resection of rectal cancer, restaging by MR after preoperative CRT is important.

  7. Postoperative morbidity after fast-track laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stottmeier, S; Harling, H; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer Anders

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Analysis was carried out of the nature and chronological order of early complications after fast-track laparoscopic rectal surgery with a view to optimize the short-time outcome of rectal cancer surgery. Method: 102 consecutive patients who underwent elective fast-track laparoscopic rectal...... cancer surgery were analysed prospectively from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Database supplemented by data from the medical records. We studied in detail the nature and chronological order of postoperative morbidity and reason for prolonged stay (>5 days). Results: Twenty-five patients (25 per cent) had...

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene and chemoradiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Ploen, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive impact of polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene on the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This study included two cohorts of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving long-course CRT. The HIF-1α C1772T (rs11549465...... tumour response (P=0.03) in the validation cohort. In conclusion, these results suggest that HIF-1α polymorphisms have no value as predictors of response to neoadjuvant CRT in rectal cancer. The results of the HIF-1α c(*)191T>C in two cohorts differ and emphasise the importance of biomarker validation....

  9. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Okigami, Masato; Kawamoto, Aya; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Kobayashi, Minako; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-01-01

    We performed colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis in 61 patients with rectal cancer located <4 cm from the anal verge. Surgical and oncological results were evaluated in multimodality therapy for advanced rectal cancer. According to Wexner's score, 7% of patients were fully continent, 71% had acceptable function with minor continence problems, and 22% were incontinent. No patients required intermittent self-catheterization during follow-up. After a median follow-up of 49 months, there was only 1 case of local recurrence after surgery. Our surgical approach irrespective of internal sphincter resection produces satisfactory functional and oncological results in multimodality therapy using preoperative chemoradiotherapy for lower rectal cancer. (author)

  10. COMBINATION NEOADJUVANT THERMOCHEMICAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH RECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new combined treatment scheme with short-course chemoradiotherapy and 2 selective radiosensitizers (metronidazole in a polymeric composition and local hyperthermia is investigated in this article.Material and methods. 77 T1–3N0–2M0 rectal cancer patients treatment data was analyzed. All patients received 5 Ч 5 Gy radiotherapy with capecitabine 1300 mg/m2 days 1–5 per os and radiosensitization with local hyperthermia and metronidazole.Results. Investigated treatment scheme has acceptable toxicity and leads to high local control rate (none of the patients experienced local recurrence. 7 (9.1 % patients developed distant metastases. 59 (76.6 % patients had sphincter-sparing surgery. Median followup was 65.6 months. 5-year survival rate was 81.7 %.Conclusion. Developed treatment scheme is safe and leads to high local control rate.

  11. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Groenberg, Henrik; Jaerhult, Johannes; Wallgren, Arne; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for rectal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 3 meta-analyses. Moreover, data from 36 prospective studies, 7 retrospective studies and 17 other articles were used. A total of 131 scientific articles are included, involving 25,351 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized thus: The results after rectal cancer surgery have improved during the past decade. It is likely that local failure rates after 5 years of follow-up at hospitals adopting the TME-concept (TME=total mesorectal excision) have decreased from about 28% to 10-15%. Preoperative radiotherapy at biological effective doses above 30 Gy decreases the relative risk of a local failure by more than half (50-70%). Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk by 30-40% at doses that generally are higher than those used preoperatively. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy is more effective than postoperative. There is moderate evidence that preoperative radiotherapy significantly decreases the local failure rate (from 8% to 2% after 2 years) also with TME. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy improves survival (by about 10%). There is no evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival. There is some indication that survival is prolonged when postoperative radiotherapy is combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Preoperative radiotherapy at adequate doses can be given with low acute toxicity. Higher, and unacceptable acute toxicity has been seen in some preoperative radiotherapy trials using suboptimal techniques. Postoperative radiotherapy can also be

  12. Excess mortality after curative surgery for colorectal cancer changes over time and differs for patients with colon versus rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrebø, Bjørn Steinar; Søreide, Kjetil; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Søreide, Jon Arne; Kørner, Hartwig

    2013-06-01

    Improved management of colorectal cancer patients has resulted in better five-year survival for rectal cancer compared with colon cancer. We compared excess mortality rates in various time intervals after surgery in patients with colon and rectal cancer. We analysed all patients with curative resection of colorectal cancers reported in the Cancer Registry of Norway before (1994-1996) and after (2001-2003) national treatment guidelines were introduced. Excess mortality was analysed in different postoperative time intervals within the five-year follow-up periods for patients treated in 1994-1996 vs. 2001-2003. A total of 11 437 patients that underwent curative resection were included. For patients treated from 1994 to 1996, excess mortality was similar in colon and rectal cancer patients in all time intervals. For those treated from 2001 to 2003, excess mortality was significantly lower in rectal cancer patients than in colon cancer patients perioperatively (in the first 60 days: excess mortality ratio = 0.46, p = 0.007) and during the first two postoperative years (2-12 months: excess mortality ratio = 0.54, p = 0.010; 1-2 years: excess mortality ratio = 0.60, p = 0.009). Excess mortality in rectal cancer patients was significantly greater than in colon cancer patients 4-5 years postoperatively (excess mortality ratio = 2.18, p = 0.003). Excess mortality for colon and rectal cancer changed substantially after the introduction of national treatment guidelines. Short-term excess mortality rates was higher in colon cancer compared to rectal cancer for patients treated in 2001-2003, while excess mortality rates for rectal cancer patients was significantly higher later in the follow-up period. This suggests that future research should focus on these differences of excess mortality in patients curatively treated for cancer of the colon and rectum.

  13. Oral fluorpyrimidines in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for operable rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to compare short and long-term outcomes after neoadjuvant short-course chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine ot tegafur for operable rectal cancer.Materials and methods. Patients with histologycally verified Т3N0M0, Т2–3N1–2M0 rectal cancer, who underwent 5 × 5 Gy neoadjuvant radiotherapy with local 41–45 °C hyperthermia on days 3–5 and metronidazole 10 g/m2 per rectum days 3, 5 were randomized to receive capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 bid per os days 1–14 or tegafur 400 mg/m2 bid per os days 1–21. Toxicity, tumor regression, sphincter preservation rate and long-term outcomes were analyzed.Results. During 2011–2013 26 patients were included in the tegafur group and 30 – in capecitabine group. Overall toxicity was 50 % in the tegafur arm and 36.7 % in the capecitabine arm (p = 0.42, grade III–IV toxicity (diarrhoea was the most common grade 3+ event was observed in 23.1 % and 6.7 % (p = 0.13 patients accordingly. Grade III–IV tumor regression was observed in 34.6 % patients, who received tegafur and 53.3 % (p = 0.12 patients who received capecitabine. Sphincter-sparing surgery was performed in 84.6 % and 100 % (p = 0.04 patients who received tegafur and capecitabine accordingly. Median follow-up was 31.6 and 32.2 months accordingly. 3-year overall survival in capecitabine and tegafur arms was 95.4 and 82.1 % (р = 0.13, 3-year disease-free survival – 91 and 74 % (р = 0.029.Conclusions. Both fluorpyrimidines demonstrated comparable short-term outcomes with a tendency to better results in the capecitabine arm.

  14. [Meta-analysis of extralevator abdominoperineal excision for rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yilin; Chi, Pan

    2017-03-25

    To evaluate the efficacy of extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) of rectal cancer. PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase database were searched for clinical studies comparing the ELAPE and abdominoperineal excision (APE) for rectal cancer between 2007 and 2016. Two reviewers independently screened the articles and extracted the data. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to evaluate the quality of the observational studies and the score more than 5 points was the inclusion criteria. Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions v5.1.0 was used to evaluate the quality of the randomized controlled trials (RCT). Intra-operative perforation rate, circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement, local recurrence rate, perineal wound complications were brought into meta-analysis by Review Manager 5.3 software. A total of 556 articles were retrieved and 12 articles were enrolled finally, including 11 observational studies and 1 RCT study. All the 12 articles were high quality (scores of all observational studies were more than 11 points, RCT study accorded with 6 criteria of the quality evaluation). A total of 3 788 patients were enrolled, including 2 141 cases of ELAPE and 1 647 cases of APE. Meta-analysis revealed that intra-operative perforation rate of ELAPE was lower than APE (RR=0.52, 95%CI:0.34-0.79, P=0.002). There were no significant differences between two groups in CRM involvement (RR=0.72, 95%CI:0.49-1.07, P=0.10), local recurrence rate (OR=0.55, 95%CI:0.24-1.29, P=0.17) and perineal wound complications (RR=0.94, 95%CI:0.58-1.53, P=0.800). Compared with APE, ELAPE reduces the intra-operative perforation rate, and does not increase the perineal wound complications, but it has no advantages in decreasing the CRM involvement and local recurrence rate.

  15. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m 2 /day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m 2 /day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  16. Associations between birth weight and colon and rectal cancer risk in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Natalie R; Jensen, Britt W; Zimmermann, Esther; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    Birth weight has inconsistent associations with colorectal cancer, possibly due to different anatomic features of the colon versus the rectum. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between birth weight and colon and rectal cancers separately. 193,306 children, born from 1936 to 1972, from the Copenhagen School Health Record Register were followed prospectively in Danish health registers. Colon and rectal cancer cases were defined using the International Classification of Disease version 10 (colon: C18.0-18.9, rectal: 19.9 and 20.9). Only cancers classified as adenocarcinomas were included in the analyses. Cox regressions were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by birth cohort and sex. During 3.8 million person-years of follow-up, 1465 colon and 961 rectal adenocarcinomas were identified. No significant sex differences were observed; therefore combined results are presented. Birth weight was positively associated with colon cancers with a HR of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) per kilogram of birth weight. For rectal cancer a significant association was not observed for birth weights below 3.5kg. Above 3.5kg an inverse association was observed (at 4.5kg, HR=0.77 [95% CI, 0.61-0.96]). Further, the associations between birth weight and colon and rectal cancer differed significantly from each other (p=0.006). Birth weight is positively associated with the risk of adult colon cancer, whereas the results for rectal cancer were inverse only above values of 3.5kg. The results underline the importance of investigating colon and rectal cancer as two different entities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. GRP78 Protein Expression as Prognostic Values in Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy and Laparoscopic Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yeon; Jung, Ji-Han; Cho, Hyun-Min; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Jong Hoon; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the relationships between biomarkers related to endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins (glucose-regulated protein of molecular mass 78 [GRP78] and Cripto-1 [teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 protein]), pathologic response, and prognosis in locally advanced rectal cancer. All clinical stage II and III rectal cancer patients received 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks, plus 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m(2)/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m(2)/day) bolus on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 33, and surgery was performed at 7 to 10 weeks after completion of all therapies. Expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry and was assessed in 101 patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). High expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was observed in 86 patients (85.1%) and 49 patients (48.5%), respectively. Low expression of GRP78 protein was associated with a significantly high rate of down staging (80.0% vs. 52.3%, respectively; p=0.046) and a significantly low rate of recurrence (0% vs. 33.7%, respectively; p=0.008) compared with high expression of GRP78 protein. Mean recurrence-free survival according to GRP78 expression could not be estimated because the low expression group did not develop recurrence events but showed a significant correlation with time to recurrence, based on the log rank method (p=0.007). GRP78 also showed correlation with overall survival, based on the log rank method (p=0.045). GRP78 expression is a predictive and prognostic factor for down staging, recurrence, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin neoadjuvant CRT.

  18. Outcomes of patients with abdominoperineal resection (APR) and low anterior resection (LAR) who had very low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seung-Seop; Park, In Ja; Jung, Sung Woo; Oh, Se Heon; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Nayoung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2017-10-01

    We compared the oncological outcomes of sphincter-saving resection (SSR) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in 409 consecutive patients with very low rectal cancer (i.e., tumors within 3 cm from the anal verge); 335 (81.9%) patients underwent APR and 74 (18.1%) underwent SSR. The APR group comprised higher proportions of men (67.5% vs 55.4%, P = .049) and advanced-stage patients (P cancer stages. RFS was associated with ypT and ypN stages in patients who received PCRT, while pN stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement were risk factors for RFS in those who did not receive PCRT. Notably, SSR was not found to be a risk factor for RFS in either subgroup. Patients who were stratified according to cancer stage and PCRT also showed no differences in RFS according to the mode of surgery. Our results demonstrate that, regardless of PCRT administration, SSR is an effective treatment for very low rectal cancer, while CRM is an important prognostic factor for patients who did not receive PCRT.

  19. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cancer. Tracheostomy : Surgery to create an opening ( stoma ) into the windpipe to help you breathe. The ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  20. Rectal Cancer: Treatment, Research and Quality of Life, Facebook Live Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute hosted a Facebook Live to discuss rectal cancer treatment, research, and quality of life. The event featured subject matter experts Carmen Allegra, MD, of the National Cancer Institute and University of Florida Health, Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and moderator

  1. Predictive utility of cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression by colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Prabhu, Kristel C; Vu, Lan; Chan, Simon K; Phang, Terry; Gown, Allen; Jones, Steven J; Wiseman, Sam M

    2014-05-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme expressed in areas of inflammation, is a target of interest for colorectal cancer therapy. Currently, the predictive significance of COX-2 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Tissue microarrays were constructed using 118 colon cancer and 85 rectal cancer specimens; 44 synchronous metastatic colon cancer and 22 rectal cancer lymph nodes were also evaluated. COX-2 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Univariate analysis was used to determine the predictive significance of clinicopathologic variables. Overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival were the main outcomes examined. COX-2 was found to be expressed in 93% of colon cancers and 87% of rectal cancers. Decreased COX-2 expression was related to decreased disease-specific survival (P = .016) and decreased disease-free survival (P = .019) in the rectal cancer cohort but not in the colon cancer cohort. COX-2 expression has predictive utility for management of rectal but not colon cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early results of quality of life for curatively treated rectal cancers in Chinese patients with EORTC QLQ-CR29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Junjie; Shi, Debing; Goodman, Karyn A; Goldstein, David; Xiao, Changchun; Guan, Zuqing; Cai, Sanjun

    2011-01-01

    To assess the quality of life in curatively treated patients with rectal cancer in a prospectively collected cohort. Patients with stage I-III rectal cancer who were treated curatively in a single institution were accrued prospectively. Quality of life was assessed by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire module for all cancer patients (QLQ-C30) and for colorectal cancer patients (QLQ-CR29). Quality of life among different treatment modalities and between stoma and nonstoma patients was evaluated in all patients. A total of 154 patients were assessed. The median time of completion for the questionnaires was 10 months after all the treatments. For patients with different treatment modalities, faecal incontinence and diarrhea were significantly higher in radiation group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively), and no difference in male or female sexual function was found between radiation group and non-radiation group. For stoma and nonstoma patients, the QLQ-CR29 module found the symptoms of Defaecation and Embarrassment with Bowel Movement were more prominent in stoma patients, while no difference was detected in scales QLQ-C30 module. Our study provided additional information in evaluating QoL of Chinese rectal cancer patients with currently widely used QoL questionnaires. As a supplement to the QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR29 is a useful questionnaire in evaluating curatively treated patients with rectal cancer. Bowel dysfunction (diarrhea and faecal incontinence) was still the major problem compromising QoL in patients with either pre- or postoperative chemoradiotherapy

  3. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Per J; Marijnen, Corrie AM; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wiggers, Theo; Glimelius, Bengt; Etten, Boudewijn van; Hospers, Geke AP; Påhlman, Lars; Velde, Cornelis JH van de; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beukema, Jannet C; Kapiteijn, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  4. Pathologic complete response predicts long-term survival following preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Neelofur R.; Nagle, Deborah A.; Topham, Allan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The finding of a pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint for treatment outcome. In most reported series, the pCR rate ranges from 10 to 25%. An underlying assumption is that pCR relates to favorable long-term patient outcome; however, such results are rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of patients having pCR's following preoperative RT and surgery for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1978 and 1993, 49 of 315 patients (16%) were found to have pCR's following 40 to 65 Gy of preoperative RT for rectal cancer (median RT dose 55.8 Gy). Six complete responders also received concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy with RT. Follow-up time ranged from 7 to 224 months (median 52 months). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local control (LC) rates were calculated. Patient outcome was analyzed with respect to pretreatment clinical stage (mobile vs. tethered/fixed on digital exam), tumor level in the rectum as measured from the anorectal ring (0-3 cm vs. >3 cm), type of surgery (local excision, APR, or other), and use of concurrent chemotherapy vs. RT alone. Results: Prior to treatment, clinical stage tumor stage was 43% mobile ((21(49))) and 35% tethered/fixed ((17(49))). Twenty-two percent ((11(49))) did not have palpable tumor at presentation to our institution due to prior local excision of an invasive cancer. Tumor level in the rectum was 74% 0-3 cm, 16% >3 to 6 cm, and 10% > 6 cm. Surgical procedures were 12% APR, 24% LAR, 6% combined abdominal transsacral resection (CATS), 27% coloanal anastamosis, and 31% full thickness local excision. Overall, 2 of 49 patients (4%) developed a local tumor recurrence, and 4 of 49 (8%) developed distant metastases. The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 91% and 86%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial DFS rate was 85%, and the

  5. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Deken, Marion M.; ten Berge, Martijn G.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; van Krieken, J. Han; de Noo, Mirre E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness

  6. Reduced Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Rectal Cancer Surgery: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, L.; Wouters, M.W.; Tanis, P.J.; Deken, M.M.; Berge, M.G. Ten; Tollenaar, R.A.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Noo, M.E. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The circumferential resection margin (CRM) is a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival after rectal cancer surgery. Therefore, availability of this parameter is essential. Although the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial raised awareness

  7. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  8. The usefulness of FDG-PET for diagnosis of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Nomura, Masaya; Takemasa, Ichiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Higuchi, Ichiro; Monden, Morito

    2006-01-01

    The local recurrence is the most frequently encountered recurrent pattern after radical resection of rectal cancer. We show the results of our study evaluating the usefulness of FDGPET (PET) and fusion image of PET and CT for the diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal cancer. Forty-two patients with a suspicious local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer were prospectively recruited and underwent PET and CT. The fusion image yielded a correct diagnosis in 39 (93%) of 42 patients, whereas CT alone and PET alone did so in 33 (79%) and 37 (88%) patients, respectively. The fusion image had better diagnostic accuracy than CT alone (P=.0138) and PET alone (P=.0156), and altered patient management in 11 (26.2%) cases on the basis of additional information. Fusion image had a potential clinical value in the treatment of suspected local recurrence of rectal cancer. (author)

  9. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Facts, obscurity, and fiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taflampas, P.; Christodoulakis, M.; Tsiftsis, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection (LAR) for rectal cancer remains controversial. Risk factors have been discussed in several studies but the findings are often inconclusive. This review evaluates these studies and separates the known risk factors into those that are well documented, those that are obsolete, and those that require further research. We searched the Medline and PubMed databases using the keywords: leakage,' 'low anterior resection,' 'rectal cancer,' 'risk factors,' and their combinations. There were no language or publication year restrictions. References in published papers were also reviewed. Each risk factor was evaluated and discussed separately. The evidence suggests that low anastomoses are more prone to leakage. Other well-documented risk factors are male sex, smoking, and preoperative malnutrition. Routine mobilization of the splenic flexure and the use of a J-pouch seem to reduce the leakage rate. The effect of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy is under scrutiny. The indications for a protective stoma remain debatable. Omentoplasty, bowel preparation, the use of a drain, and tumor stage do not seem to affect the leakage rate. The type of operation (open or laparoscopic) and anastomosis (hand-sewn or stapled) is not crucial. (author)

  10. Anastomotic leakage after sphincter-sparing surgery in a young woman diagnosed with low rectal cancer - case report

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Aslan; Adrian Bordea; Traean Burcoș

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the third most common site for cancer in the world, with a high morbidity and mortality. The new techniques for the treatment of low rectal cancer have been improved recently, allowing sphincter-sparing surgery to be available for more patients, with an optimal oncological and functional outcome. The most fundamental advance in rectal cancer surgery was the concept of total mesorectal resection (TME) introduced by Heald in 1982. Association with neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy...

  11. MRI-detected extramural vascular invasion is an independent prognostic factor for synchronous metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Lim, Joon-seok; Kim, Honsoul; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Myoung, Sungmin [Jungwon University, Department of Medical Information, Goesan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Junjeong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) could predict synchronous distant metastases in rectal cancer. Patients who underwent rectal MRI between July 2011 and December 2012 were screened. This study included 447 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone MRI without previous treatment. Distant metastases were recorded at the initial work-up and over a 6-month follow-up. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the risk of metastasis. The diagnostic performance was calculated using pathologic lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as a gold standard. Among 447 patients, 79 patients (17.7 %) were confirmed to have distant metastases. Three MRI features are significantly associated with a high risk of distant metastasis: positive EMVI (odds ratio 3.02), high T stage (odds ratio 2.10) and positive regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 6.01). EMVI in a large vessel (≥3 mm) had a higher risk for metastasis than EMVI in a small vessel (<3 mm). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI-detected EMVI were 28.2 %, 94.0 % and 80.3 %, respectively. MRI-detected EMVI is an independent risk factor for synchronous metastasis in rectal cancer. EMVI in large vessels is a stronger risk factor for distant metastasis than EMVI in small vessels. (orig.)

  12. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF SQUAMOUS-CELL RECTAL CANCER: А CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term results of conservative squamous-cell rectal cancer treatment (12 cm above anal verge are presented in the article. Squamous-cell rectal cancer is a rare disease with only 73 cases described in the literature. Patient received a novel chemoradiotherapy scheme. Complete response was achieved and no surgery performed. Patient is disease-free and has good quality of life with 4 years followup.

  13. Prognostic role of sensitive-to-apoptosis gene expression in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozden, Sevgi A; Ozyurt, Hazan; Ozgen, Zerrin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the association between prognosis of rectal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and expression of sensitive-to-apoptosis (SAG), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-X(L)) and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak).......To investigate the association between prognosis of rectal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and expression of sensitive-to-apoptosis (SAG), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-X(L)) and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak)....

  14. Intersphincteric Resection and Coloanal Anastomosis in Treatment of Distal Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cipe, Gokhan; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut; Yardimci, Erkan; Memmi, Naim; Aysan, Erhan

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of distal rectal cancer, abdominoperineal resection is traditionally performed. However, the recognition of shorter safe distal resection line, intersphincteric resection technique has given a chance of sphincter-saving surgery for patients with distal rectal cancer during last two decades and still is being performed as an alternative choice of abdominoperineal resection. The first aim of this study is to assess the morbidity, mortality, oncological, and functional outcomes ...

  15. [Conversion Therapy of Initially Unresectable Rectal Cancer with Perforation via FOLFOX4 Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chizu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Nitta, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Omoto, Hideyuki; Kamata, Shigeyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of perforated rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after FOLFOX4 chemotherapy. An 81- year-old woman was transferred to our hospital with a diagnosis of bowel perforation. She underwent emergency transverse colostomy, peritoneal lavage, and the insertion of indwelling drainage tubes, because the perforated rectal cancer was considered unresectable. After recuperation, she received chemotherapy consisting of FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab. Owing to a good response to the treatment after 4 months, rectal resection was achieved curatively. Wound dehiscence occurred as a postoperative complication. The patient chose not to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Currently, she has been alive for more than 1 year 3 months after resection without recurrence.

  16. C-reactive protein as predictor of recurrence in patients with rectal cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2013-11-01

    The clinical significance of the systemic inflammatory response (SIR) in patients with rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), to the best of our knowledge, has not been thus far investigated. The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and C-Reactive protein (CRP) levels for 84 patients with rectal cancer undergoing CRT were available as indicators of SIR status. The impact of SIR status on the prognosis of these patients was assessed. Elevated NLR, CRP, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and pathological TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were identified as significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival (OS), with CRP and ypN(+) being validated as independent predictors of OS. Elevated CRP and CEA levels were significant predictive factors for poor disease-free survival (DFS), and an elevated CRP level was identified as the only independent predictive factor for DFS. In addition, an elevated CRP level predicted for poorer OS and DFS in patients with pathological TNM stage I-II [ypN(-)]. CRP is a promising predictor of recurrence and prognosis in patients with rectal cancer treated by CRT.

  17. [Injection of methylene blue into inferior mesenteric artery improves lymph node harvest in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpei; Huang, Pinjie; Huang, Jianglong; Chen, Tufeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2015-06-09

    To confirm the feasibility of improving lymph node harvest by injecting methylene blue into inferior mesenteric artery in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy. Forty two ex vivo specimens were collected from rectal cancer patients with neoadjuvant therapy and radical operation at our hospital. Traditional method with palpation and injection of methylene blue into inferior mesenteric artery were employed. The data of lymph node harvest were analyzed by paired t and chi-square tests. The average number of detected lymph node in traditional method and methylene blue groups were 6.1 ± 4.3 and 15.2 ± 6.4 respectively (Pmethylene blue groups respectively (Pmethylene blue added 13 extra metastatic lymph nodes and caused a shift to node-positive stage (P=0.89). Neoadjuvant therapy decrease lymph node retrieval in rectal cancer. Injecting methylene blue into inferior mesenteric artery improves lymph node harvest especially for small nodes and helps to acquire more metastatic nodes for accurate pathological staging.

  18. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  19. Use of primary radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J. J.; Aarts, M. J.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W. J.; Poortmans, P. M. P.; Lybeert, M. L. M.; Koning, C. C. E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J. W. W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of four comprehensive cancer

  20. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  1. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterus. See the PDQ summary on Uterine Sarcoma Treatment for more information about uterine sarcoma . Obesity and having metabolic syndrome may increase the risk of endometrial cancer. Anything ...

  2. Effect of long interval between hyperthermochemoradiation therapy and surgery for rectal cancer on apoptosis, proliferation and tumor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshihide; Fujii, Takaaki; Ide, Munenori; Takada, Takahiro; Sutoh, Toshinaga; Morita, Hiroki; Yajima, Reina; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Oyama, Tetsunari; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is commonly used to improve the local control and resectability of locally advanced rectal cancer, with surgery performed after an interval of a number of weeks. We have been conducting a clinical trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia (hyperthermo-chemoradiation therapy; HCRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. In the current study we assessed the effect of a longer (>10 weeks) interval after neoadjuvant HCRT on pathological response, oncological outcome and especially on apoptosis, proliferation and p53 expression in patients with rectal cancer. Forty-eight patients with proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent HCRT followed by surgery were identified for inclusion in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval between HCRT and surgery, ≤ 10 weeks (short-interval group) and >10 weeks (long-interval group). Patients in the long-interval group had a significantly higher rate of pathological complete response (pCR) (43.5% vs. 16.0%) than patients of the short-interval group. Patients of the long-interval group had a significantly higher rate of down-staging of T-stage (78.3% vs. 36.0%) and relatively higher rate of that of N-stage (52.2% vs. 36.0%) than patients of the short-interval group. Furthermore, apoptosis in the long-interval group was relatively higher compared to that of the short-interval group, without a significant difference in the Ki-67 proliferative index and expression of p53 in the primary tumor. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a longer interval after HCRT (>10 weeks) seemed to result in a better chance of a pCR, a result confirmed by the trends in tumor response markers, including apoptosis, proliferation and p53 expression. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Percutaneous cryoablation of prostate cancer guided by rectal ultrasound: a retrospectively analysis of 42 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Wenge; Guo Zhi; Wang Haitao; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo; Yu Haipeng; Li Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of rectal ultrasound-guided agon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation in treatment of patients with median and or late-stage prostate cancer patients. Methods: Retrospectively analysis of 42 cases of with stage C and D prostate cancer patients treated by rectal ultrasound-guided argon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation during the follow-up of 1-12 months. The prostate specific antigen (PSA), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), PSA objective response, transrectal ultrasound of the prostate (TRUS), TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate, the maximum urinary flow rate(MFR), MRI examination at before, and 3,6,12 months after cryoablation were recorded and evaluated. The results were statistically evaluated by using variance analysis. Results: The PSA value at before and 3,6, 12 months after cryoablation were (4.48±1.35), (3.54±1.67), (3.18±1.76), (2.87±1.89) μg/L, respectively; TRUS-measured prostate volumes at before and 3, 6,12 months after cryoablation were (59.7± 8.2), (46.9±8.3), (26.2±3.9), (25.9±3.7) mm 3 , respectively; MFR before and 3, 6,12 months after cryoablation were (10.4±0.8), (14.3±1.2), (18.3±1.3), (18.9±1.3) ml/s, respectively; Compared with before cryoablation, the differences between before and after cryoablation was statistically significant (F= 53.93,747.92,3843.03, respectively, P<0.01). The bPFS rates in 3 months,6 months and 12 months were 95.2% (40/42), 95.2% (40/42), and 90.5% (38/42), respectively. According to the PSA response, the total effective rate (CR 16 cases, PR 15 cases) at 12 months was 73.8%, and SD was 16.7% (7/42), PD was 9.5% (4/42). Complications included temporary incontinence 2.4% (1/42), Penile tingling/numbness 2.4% (1/42), pelvic pain 4.9% (2/41) and Scrotum Edema 2.4% (1/42). There was no case with severe complications such as severe infection or urethrorectal fistula, etc. Conclusions: Rectal ultrasound-guided agon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation showed

  4. Predominance of CIN versus MSI in the development of rectal cancer at young age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernebro, Eva; Halvarsson, Britta; Baldetorp, Bo; Nilbert, Mef

    2002-01-01

    Development of proximal and distal colorectal cancers involve partly different mechanisms associated with the microsatellite instability (MSI) and the chromosomal instability (CIN) pathways. Colorectal cancers in patients under 50 years of age represent about 5% of the total number of tumors and have been associated with an increased frequency of MSI tumors. However, MSI and CIN may play different roles in the development of colon cancer and rectal cancer, and we have specifically investigated their contribution to the development of rectal cancer at young age. Thirty rectal cancers diagnosed before the age of 50 were characterized for DNA-ploidy, MSI, mutations of KRAS and CTNNB1 and immunohistochemical expression of p53, β-catenin and of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1 and MSH2. DNA aneuploidy was detected in 21/30 tumors, KRAS mutations in 6 tumors, no mutations of CTNNB1 were detected but immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin showed nuclear staining in 6 tumors, and immunohistochemical expression of p53 was detected in 18 tumors. MSI was detected in 3/30 tumors, all of which showed and immunohistochemical loss of staining for the MMR protein MSH2, which strongly indicates a phenotype associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). MSI occurs only in a small fraction of the tumors from young patients with rectal cancer, but when present it strongly indicates an underlying HNPCC-causing mutation, and other mechanisms than HNPCC thus cause rectal cancer in the majority of young patients

  5. Pathologic complete response in patients with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola M, Daniela; Espinola M, Daniela; Bellolio R, Felipe; Gellona V, Jose; Bustos C, Mariza; Zuniga D, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) of the middle and lower third of the rectum is neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (XRQT) follow by oncologic resection. After this treatment in 15-25% of the cases, the pathologist reports complete pathological response (pCR). Aim: To describe demographic, clinical and survival data of patients with pCR undergoing chemoradiotherapy and radical resection for RC. Material and Methods: Historic cohort study. In a prospectively maintained database between 2000 and 2010, we identified patients with RC, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy according to protocol, followed by radical resection. The preoperative staging was obtained by clinical examination, endoscopy, rectal ultrasound, CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis and pelvic MRI. Demographic data, tumor location, time between the end of XRTQ and surgery, postoperative staging (according AJCC) and survival, were collected. Results: 119 patients received preoperative XRTQ, 65% male, with a mean age of 58 years. The most frequent tumor site was the lower third (63%). Surgery was performed 8 weeks after the end of XRTQ. Of 119 patients with XRTQ, 15.1% had a pCR. Overall survival was 75%, and cancer-specific survival was 80.4% at 5 years in patients without pCR. For patients with pCR, the 5 year survival estimates for overall and cancer specific survival was 100%. We did not identify factors associated with pCR. Conclusions: In this study, pCR was comparable to other larger series reported elsewhere. No factors associated with pCR were identified

  6. Comparative molecular analyses of left-sided colon, right-sided colon, and rectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed E; Weinberg, Benjamin A; Xiu, Joanne; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Hwang, Jimmy J; Gatalica, Zoran; Philip, Philip A; Shields, Anthony F; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Marshall, John L

    2017-10-17

    Tumor sidedness has emerged as an important prognostic and predictive factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with advanced right-sided colon cancers have a worse prognosis than those with left-sided colon or rectal cancers, and these patient subgroups respond differently to biological therapies. Historically, management of patients with metastatic colon and rectal cancers has been similar, and colon and rectal cancer patients have been grouped together in large clinical trials. Clearly, the differences in molecular biology among right-sided colon, left-sided colon, and rectal cancers should be further studied in order to account for disparities in clinical outcomes. We profiled 10,570 colorectal tumors (of which 2,413 were identified as arising from the left colon, right colon, or rectum) using next-generation sequencing, immunohistochemistry, chromogenic in-situ hybridization, and fragment analysis (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ). Right-sided colon cancers had higher rates of microsatellite instability, more frequent aberrant activation of the EGFR pathway including higher BRAF and PIK3CA mutation rates, and increased mutational burden compared to left-sided colon and rectal cancers. Rectal cancers had higher rates of TOPO1 expression and Her2/neu amplification compared to both left- and right-sided colon cancers. Molecular variations among right-sided colon, left-sided colon, and rectal tumors may contribute to differences in clinical behavior. The site of tumor origin (left colon, right colon, or rectum) should certainly be considered when selecting treatment regimens and stratifying patients for future clinical trials.

  7. Limited accuracy of DCE-MRI in identification of pathological complete responders after chemoradiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Tong, Tong [Fudan University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Weiser, Martin [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Divison of Colorectal Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Zakian, Kristen L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-04-15

    To examine whether post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) DCE-MRI can identify rectal cancer patients with pathologic complete response (pCR). From a rectal cancer surgery database 2007-2014, 61 consecutive patients that met the following inclusion criteria were selected for analysis: (1) stage II/III primary rectal adenocarcinoma; (2) received CRT; (3) underwent surgery (4); underwent rectal DCE-MRI on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Two experienced radiologists, in consensus, drew regions of interest (ROI) on the sagittal DCE-MRI image in the tumour bed. These were exported from ImageJ to in-house Matlab code for modelling using the Tofts model. K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and v{sub e} values were compared to pathological response. Of the 61 initial patients, 37 had data considered adequate for fitting to obtain perfusion parameters. Among the 13 men and 24 women, median age 53 years, there were 8 pCR (22 %). K{sup trans} could not distinguish patients with pCR. For patients with 90 % or greater response, mean K{sup trans} and K{sub ep} values were statistically significant (p = 0.032 and 0.027, respectively). Using a cutoff value of K{sup trans} = 0.25 min{sup -1}, the AUC was 0.71. K{sup trans} could be used to identify patients with 90 % or more response to chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer with an AUC of 0.7. (orig.)

  8. Could a wait and see policy be justified in T3/4 rectal cancers after chemo-radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Robert; Harrison, Mark; Glynne-Jones, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard when MRI staging demonstrates threatened surgical margins in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Interest in non-surgical management of LARC as an alternative to a resection has been provoked by published excellent long-term outcomes of patients who achieve clinical complete responses (cCR) after CRT. The present retrospective study aimed to determine whether similar rates of local disease control are seen in a UK cancer centre in patients with T3-4 tumours, who obtained a cCR after preoperative CRT, but did not undergo surgery. Method. The outcome and treatment details of 266 patients who underwent CRT for clinically staged T3-4 rectal adenocarcinomas between 1993 and 2005 were reviewed. Results. Fifty-eight patients did not proceed to surgery, 10 of whom were identified as having a cCR. Six of these 10 patients subsequently developed intrapelvic recurrent disease with a median time to local progression of 20 months. Local relapse preceded the development of metastatic disease or occurred simultaneously. No patients underwent salvage resection. Conclusion. CRT alone in cT3/T4 rectal cancers has a high rate of local relapse even after cCR. Delaying or avoiding surgery might be appropriate for cT1 or cT2 tumours, or elderly and frail patients with co-morbidity, but these results do not support the current uncritical move to extrapolate this approach to all surgically fit patients with rectal cancer

  9. Downstage migration after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Liersch, Torsten; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Sauer, Rolf; Wittekind, Christian; Rödel, Claus

    2015-06-01

    Downstaging after neoadjuvant treatment is increasingly used as a prognostic factor and surrogate endpoint in clinical trials. However, in recent trials of neoadjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, downstaging did not translate into a benefit with regard to either disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival. By analyzing the 10-year outcome data of the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 phase 3 trial, the authors demonstrated that significantly fewer patients had poor prognostic features (eg, ypT3-4, ypN1-2) after preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy. Nevertheless, these patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage II disease were found to be at a higher risk of developing distant metastases and had poorer DFS compared with patients with corresponding TNM tumor (sub)groups in the postoperative treatment arm, whereas patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage III disease demonstrated a nonsignificant trend toward a worse outcome after preoperative treatment. Overall, DFS remained identical in both treatment arms. Thus, "downstage migration" after neoadjuvant treatment resembles the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon and therefore may not be a reliable endpoint for long-term outcomes. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Review on adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer - why do treatment guidelines differ so much?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Laurids Ø; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pfeiffer, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is controversial for rectal adenocarcinoma. Both international and national guidelines display a great span varying from recommending no adjuvant chemotherapy at all, over single drug 5-fluororuacil (5-FU), to combinations of 5-FU/oxalipl...... of adjuvant chemotherapy and if adjuvant colon cancer studies are considered transferrable to rectal cancer patients regardless of the molecular differences......./oxaliplatin. METHODS: A review of the literature was made identifying 24 randomized controlled trials on adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer based on about 10 000 patients. The trials were subdivided into a number of clinically relevant subgroups. RESULTS: As regards patients treated with preoperative (chemo......BACKGROUND: The use of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is controversial for rectal adenocarcinoma. Both international and national guidelines display a great span varying from recommending no adjuvant chemotherapy at all, over single drug 5-fluororuacil (5-FU), to combinations of 5-FU...

  11. VEGF concentrations in tumour arteries and veins from patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Kim; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    2002-01-01

    in numbers during the same passage. These findings indicate that the tumour itself is not the only source of elevated VEGF concentrations in peripheral blood from patients with rectal cancer. A consistent finding was that a large number of neutrophils disappeared from the blood during passage through......This pilot study investigated the hypothesis that the tumour itself is the source of the elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations which are often observed in peripheral blood from patients with rectal cancer. Twenty-four consecutive patients with primary rectal cancer were...... significantly (p = 0.03) lower in venous blood than in arterial blood. Unexpectedly, a 16% reduction (p number of neutrophils was observed during transit of the arterial blood through the rectal tumours, while none of the other types of leukocytes or platelets was significantly reduced...

  12. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer Linfocintilografia pélvica: contribuição ao estadiamento pré-operatório do câncer retal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Hyppolito da Silva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preservation of the anal sphincter in surgery for cancer of the distal rectum in an attempt to avoid colostomy has been a main concern of colorectal surgeons. Various proposed procedures contradict oncological principles, especially with respect to pelvic lymphadenectomy. Therefore, prior knowledge of pelvic lymph node involvement is an important factor in choosing the operative technique, i.e., radical or conservative resection. Introduction of ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance have made preoperative study of the area possible. Nevertheless, these resources offer information of an anatomical nature only. Lymphoscintigraphy enables the morphological and functional evaluation of the pelvic area and contributes toward complementing the data obtained with the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective study is twofold: to standardize the lymphoscintigraphy technique and to use it to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctologic diseases. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: Sixty patients with various coloproctologic diseases were studied prospectively. Ages ranged from 21 to 96 years (average, 51 and median, 55 years. Twenty-six patients were male and 34 were female. Thirty patients had carcinoma of the distal rectum as diagnosed by proctologic and anatomic-pathologic examinations, 20 patients had hemorrhoids, 5 had chagasic megacolon, 2 had diverticular disease, 2 had neoplasm of the right colon, and 1 had ulcerative colitis as diagnosed by proctologic exam and/or enema. The lymphoscintigraphy method consisted of injecting 0.25 mL of a dextran solution marked with radioactive technetium-99m into the right and left sides of the perianal region and obtaining images with a gamma camera. The results were analyzed statistically with a confidence level of 95% (P PROPÓSITO: A preservação do aparelho esfincteriano na cirurgia do câncer do reto distal tem sido objeto de preocupa

  13. COMPARISON OF SIDE EFFECTS OF MISOPROSTOL BY ORAL AND RECTAL ROUTES IN ACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THIRD STAGE OF LABOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Bulusu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Every year, there are 14 million cases of PPH. It accounts for about 25% of maternal deaths worldwide. This can be reduced by active management of third stage of labour. Administration of misoprostol after delivery of neonate has been shown to be effective in reducing amount of blood loss during delivery. The aim of the study is to compare the side effects of misoprostol in terms of distribution, frequency and severity by oral and rectal route for active management of third stage of labour. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective randomised study conducted on 100 women in labour in Department of OBG in MVJMC and RH. They were divided into 2 groups of 50 parturient mothers each group receiving misoprostol (600 µg by oral route (Group 1 and rectal route (Group 2. Outcome of these women were noted in terms of blood loss, duration of 3 rd stage of labour and side effects like shivering, fever, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. RESULTS There was not much difference in amount of blood loss and duration of third stage among the two groups. However, side effects were more in the group receiving misoprostol orally (32% as compared to that receiving by rectal route (14%. CONCLUSION In the present study, both oral and rectal routes are effective in active management of third stage of labour. However, rectal route has lesser side effects.

  14. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy mapped by lymphoscintigraphy for rectal adenocarcinoma staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, C.A.; Araujo, I.; Lopes, A.

    2010-01-01

    The good prognosis of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy has raised the question of whether total mesorectal excision is suitable for adequate staging of rectal adenocarcinoma patients. The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of dye and probe detection of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes and to define the upstaging impact of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy in rectal adenocarcinoma patients. Ninety-seven rectal adenocarcinoma patients were submitted to total mesorectal excision and retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Lymphoscintigraphy using technetium-99 m-phytate and patent blue was performed to detect blue and/or radioactive retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes which were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically with a step-sectioning technique. Mesorectal mean node count was 11.5 and retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic node was 11.7. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy identified metastases in 17.5%, upstaging 8.2%. Variables related to metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes were the following: Stage III in total mesorectal excision specimens (P<0.04), pT3/pT4 tumors (P=0.047), high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (P=0.014) and large tumors (P=0.03). Marker migration to retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes occurred in 37.1%, upstaging 11.1%. The markers' accuracy in the detection of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes was 100%. Retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy detected an important rate of metastatic retroperitoneal and/or lateral pelvic nodes (RLPN), resulting in upstaging. When markers migrated, they were able to detect RLPN metastases. The use of markers should be improved in the identification of RLPN metastases for selective indication of retroperitoneal and lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. (author)

  15. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof; Edler, David; Syk, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence

  16. Potential tumor spread of lateral pelvic lymphatic flow in low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Kimihiko; Koike, Junichi; Shiokawa, Hiroyuki; Ushigome, Mitsunori; Matsuda, Satoshi; Kagami, Satoru; Koda, Takamaru; Kurihara, Akiharu; Shimada, Hideaki; Kaneko, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    In Japan lateral pelvic lymph node dissection has been actively performed with total mesorectal excision for low rectal cancer. However, its definitive efficacy remains unclear. This study is to evaluate clinical significance of lateral pelvic lymphatic drainage in low rectal cancer patients by 99mTc-Sn colloid radioactive tracers. Intraoperatively detecting rectal lymphatic drainage using 99mTc-Sn colloid radioactive tracer in 39 low rectal cancer patients, we performed lateral pelvic lymph node dissection in lateral pelvic lymphatic flow-positive patients. Lateral pelvic lymphatic flow was detected in 11 patients (28%). In four (36%) of 11 patients, tumor cells were histologically identified in lateral pelvic lymph nodes. A median size of metastatic lateral pelvic lymph nodes was 7.5 (range, 2-150) mm, and all but one overlooked patient could not be detected by routine preoperative imaging scans retrospectively. The five-year disease-free survival rate of lateral pelvic lymphatic flow-positive patients was significantly poorer (45% vs. 75%, p = 0.0044). Tumor cells potentially extended beyond the fascia propria recti in low rectal cancer with lateral pelvic lymphatic flow. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy and adjuvant therapy are considered to be reasonable to improve a poor prognosis of low rectal cancer patients with lateral pelvic lymphatic flow.

  17. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sign of disease. Sestamibi scan : A type of radionuclide scan used to find an overactive parathyroid gland. ... speech problems caused by this nerve damage. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses ...

  18. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be at risk. Risk factors for gastric cancer include the following: Having any of the following medical conditions : Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection of the stomach. Chronic gastritis ( inflammation of the stomach). Pernicious anemia . Intestinal metaplasia ( ...

  19. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  20. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  1. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide . Taking Aristolochia fangchi , a Chinese herb . Drinking water from a well that has high ... patients may be given chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ...

  2. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  3. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Liang; Chen, Wen-Hao; Luo, Shuang-Ling; Luo, Yan-Xin; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Huang, Mei-Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Currently, the majority cases of the novel down-to-up transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) were performed in a hybrid approach with conventional laparoscopic assistance because of less operative difficulty. However, although cases are limited, the successes of TaTME in a pure approach (without laparoscopic assistance) indicate that the costly and less mini-invasive hybrid TaTME could be potentially avoided. In the present single institutional, prospective study, we attempted to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of this approach in rectal cancer by evaluating the short-term results of our first 20 TaTME cases. For the majority of cases, we adopted a strategy that laparoscopic assistance was not introduced unless it was required during the planned pure TaTME procedure. A total of 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) were analyzed in this study, including 11 cases (55 %) of pure TaTME and 9 cases (45 %) of hybrid TaTME. Overall, the median operative time was 200 min (range 70-420), along with a median estimated blood loss of 50 ml (range 20-800). Morbidity rate was 20 % (one urethral injury, two urinary retentions, one anastomotic hemorrhage and one mild anastomotic leak). The median number of harvested lymph nodes was 12 (range 1-20). All specimens were intact in mesorectum without positive distal and circumferential resection margins. Among the 15 patients who were preoperatively scheduled to undertake pure TaTME, four patients (26.7 %) required converting to laparoscopic assistance. Moreover, among these 15 patients, the results of the comparative analysis between female and male subgroups favor the former, suggesting easier operation in them. This preliminary study demonstrates that TaTME in rectal cancer is safe and feasible. The strategy of not introducing laparoscopic assistance unless it is required while performing the planned pTaTME should be cautiously explored. Further studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted.

  4. Aims of combined modality therapy in rectal cancer (M0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, J P; Benezery, K; Doyen, J; Francois, E

    2014-01-01

    OPTIMIZING THE COST/BENEFIT RATIO OF TREATMENT: Evidence Based The aim of a cancer treatment is always to achieve the maximum of cure rate with a minimum of toxicity and best quality of life at an acceptable cost for the society. It is always a multifactorial challenge depending on the patient, the tumor, the doctor, and the society cultural and financial backgrounds. The goal is to find the best cost/benefit ratio between all possible strategies in agreement with a well-informed patient. In rectal cancer (M0) surgery is the cornerstone of treatment. Combined modality therapies aim at optimizing the cost/benefit ratio of possible strategies and only randomized trials can bring strong evidence regarding their results and recommendations. LESSONS FROM RANDOMIZED TRIALS: quite modest During the past decades many phase III trials have shown that: (1) neoadjuvant treatment even with "TME" surgery was better than adjuvant, (2) chemoradiotherapy (CRT) was better than RT alone, (3) long course CRT was probably more efficient (in terms of ypCR) than short course (25/5), and (4) capecitabine was as efficient as 5 FU but oxaliplatin was not adding benefit. Overall, the gains of nCRT remain modest and it is mainly a reduction in local relapse not exceeding 5 %, but no benefit in survival and neither in sphincter saving surgery has been proven. The way forwards organ preservation in case of CCR. Local control: can probably be improved for T4 tumors by RT dose escalation. Survival: can be increased by innovative medical treatment either before or after surgery. may be reduced by a less aggressive treatment in elderly. Conservative treatment: A new field of clinical research is to achieve "organ preservation" (and not only sphincter saving). To modify the surgical approach and preserve the whole rectum, neoadjuvant treatment must achieve safely a clinical complete response. As rectal adenocarcinoma is a relatively radioresistant tumor endocavitary irradiation (contact X-Ray) is a

  5. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  6. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Li; Qiu, Miao-Zhen; Zhou, Yi-Xin; He, Ming-Ming; Luo, Hui-Yan; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Li, Yu-Hong; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-11-15

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 - 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 - 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

  7. Cancer of the uterine cervix: dosimetric guidelines for prevention of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications as a result of radiotherapeutic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourquier, H.; Dubois, J.B.; Delard, R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is the report of a dosimetric study of 41 rectal and rectosigmoid complications after radiotherapeutic treatment (1974-1978) of 287 cervical uterine tumors. Treatment consisted of external irradiation (25 MeV linear accelerator) and intracavitary irradiation (Fletcher-Suit applicator) at different doses depending on tumor stage. Dosimetric measurements were expressed as the maximum rectal dose and mean rectal dose on the anterior surface of the rectum, as proposed by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie. Rectal doses were also studied as a function of intracavitary irradiation and intracavitary + external irradiation (maximum rectal and mean cummulative doses for each). The results show a significant difference in the state of the patients with and without complications, based on the dose reaching the rectum. The maximum and the mean cumulative rectal doses serve as one of the primary indicators for predicting complications. These values should therefore be determined before placement of intracavitary sources or, at the latest, before the second intracavitary applications. We have shown that there is no fixed threshold dose, but that it varies from one region to another, depending on level of external irradiation. Our results argue in favor of adapting individual patient therapy based on simple precautions, which are adjustable to all treatment modalities. This method could lead to complete elimination of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications arising from radiotherapeutic treatment of cervical uterine cancer

  8. A randomized trial of laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonjer, H Jaap; Deijen, Charlotte L; Abis, Gabor A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer is widely used. However, robust evidence to conclude that laparoscopic surgery and open surgery have similar outcomes in rectal cancer is lacking. A trial was designed to compare 3-year rates of cancer recurrence in the pelvic or perineal ar...

  9. Association of sedentary behaviour with colon and rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Y J; Gan, Y; Sun, H L; Deng, J; Cao, S Y; Xu, X; Lu, Z X

    2014-02-04

    Sedentary behaviour is ubiquitous in modern society. Emerging studies have focused on the health consequences of sedentary behaviour, including colorectal cancer, but whether sedentary behaviour is associated with the risks of colon and rectal cancer remains unclear. No systematic reviews have applied quantitative techniques to independently compute summary risk estimates. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate this issue. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2013 to identify cohort and case-control studies that evaluated the association between sedentary behaviour and colon or rectal cancer. A random-effect model was used to pool the results of included studies. Publication bias was assessed by using Begg's funnel plot. Twenty-three studies with 63 reports were included in our meta-analysis. These groups included 4,324,462 participants (27,231 colon cancer cases and 13,813 rectal cancer cases). Sedentary behaviour was significantly associated with colon cancer (relative risk (RR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-1.39) but did not have a statistically significant association with rectal cancer (RR 1.05, 95% CI, 0.98-1.13). Subgroup analyses suggested that the odds ratio (OR) of colon cancer was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.22-1.68) in the case-control studies, and the RR was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.18-1.36) in the cohort studies, the OR of rectal cancer was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.85-1.33) in the case-control studies, and the RR was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12) in the cohort studies. Sedentary behaviour is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. Subgroup analyses suggest a positive association between sedentary behaviour and risk of rectal cancer in cohort studies. Reducing sedentary behaviour is potentially important for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  10. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  11. Resection of pulmonary metastases from colon and rectal cancer: factors to predict survival differ regarding to the origin of the primary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimarakis, G; Spelsberg, F; Angele, M; Preissler, G; Fertmann, J; Crispin, A; Reu, S; Kalaitzis, N; Stemmler, M; Giessen, C; Heinemann, V; Stintzing, S; Hatz, R; Winter, H

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine differences in prognostic factors for survival of patients with pulmonary metastases resected in curative intent from colon or rectum cancer. Between 1980 and 2006, prognostic factors after resection of pulmonary metastases in 171 patients with primary rectum or colon tumor were evaluated. Survival of patients after surgical metastasectomy was compared with that of patients receiving standard chemotherapy by matched-pair analysis. Median survival after pulmonary resection was 35.2 months (confidence interval 27.3-43.2). One-, 3-, and 5-year survival for patients following R0 resection was 88.8, 52.1, and 32.9 % respectively. Complete metastasectomy (R0), UICC stage of the primary tumor, pleural infiltration, and hilar or mediastinal lymph node metastases are independent prognostic factors for survival. Matched-pair analysis confirmed that pulmonary metastasectomy significantly improved survival. Although no difference in survival for patients with pulmonary metastases from lower rectal compared to upper rectal or colon cancer was observed, factors to predict survival are different for patients with lower and middle rectal cancer (R0, mediastinal and/or hilar lymph nodes, gender, UICC stage) compared with patients with upper rectal or colon cancer (R0, number of metastases). Our results indicate that distinct prognostic factors exist for patients with pulmonary metastases from lower rectal compared with upper rectal or colon cancer. This supports the notion that colorectal cancer should not be considered as a single-tumor entity. Metastasectomy, especially after complete resection resulted in a dramatic improvement of survival compared with patients treated with chemotherapy alone.

  12. Results of postoperative radiation therapy of rectal cancers: with the emphasis of the overall treatment time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Myung Hag; Lee, Kyu Chan

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the treatment of locally advanced but resectable rectal cancers and to analyze prognostic factors, especially with the emphasis on the treatment time factor. There were 71 patients with rectal cancer who had been treated by curative surgical procedure and postoperative radiotherapy from August 1989 to December 1993. The minimum follow up period was 24 months and the median follow-up was 35 months. Radiation therapy had been given by 6 MV linear accelerator by parallel opposing or four-box portals. Whole pelvis was treated up to 5040 cGy in most cases. Systemic chemotherapy had been given in 94% of the patients, mostly with 5-FU/ACNU regimen. Assessment for the overall and disease-free survival rates were done by life-table method and prognostic factors by Log-Rank tests. Five-year overall survival, disease-free survival were 58.8% and 57%, respectively. Two-year local control rate was 76.6%. Stage according to Modified Astler-Coller (MAC) system, over 4 positive lymph nodes, over 6 weeks interval between definitive surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy and over 7 days of interruption during radiotherapy period were statistically significant, or borderline significant prognostic factors. The treatment results of patients with rectal cancers are comparable to those of other large institutes. The treatment results for the patients with bowel wall penetration and/or positive regional lymph nodes were still discouraging for their high local recurrence rate for the patients with MAC 'C' stage diseases and high distant metastases rate even for the patients with node-negative diseases. Maybe more effective regimen of chemotherapy would be needed with proper route and schedule. To maximize postoperative adjuvant treatment, radiotherapy should be started at least within 6 weeks after surgery and preferably as soon as wound healing is completed. Interruption of treatment during radiotherapy course affects disease-free survival badly, especially if

  13. Preoperative concurrent radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: report of early results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Yong Chan; Chun, Ho Kyung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2003-06-01

    To report the early results of preopeartive concurrent radio-chemotherapy(CRCT) for treating rectal cancer. From June 1999 to April 2002, 4D rectal cancer patients who either had lesions with a questionable resectability or were candidates for sphincter-sacrificing surgery received preoperative CRCT. Thirty-seven patients completed the planned CRCT course. 45 Gy by 1.8 Gy daily fraction over 5 weeks was delivered to the whole pelvis in the prone position. The chemotherapy regimens were oral UFT plus oral leucovorin (LV) in 12 patients, intravenous bolus 5-FU pius LV in 10 patients, and intravenous 5-FU alone in 15 patients (bolus infusion in 10, continuous infusion in 5). Surgery was planned in 4-6 weeks of the completion of the preoperative CRCT course, and surgery was attempted in 35 patients. The compliance to the current preoperative CRCT protocol was excellent, where 92.5% (37/40) completed the planned treatment. Among 35 patients, in whom surgery was attempted after excluding two patients with new metastatic lesions in the liver and the lung, sphincter-preservation was achieved in 22 patients (62.9%), while resection was abandoned during laparotomy in two patients (5.7%). Gross complete resection was performed in 30 patients, gross incomplete resection was performed in one patient, and no detailed information on the extent of surgery was available in two patients. Based on the surgical and pathological findings, the down-staging rate was 45.5% (15/33), and the complete resection rate with the negative resection margin 78.8% (26/33). During the CRCT course, grade 3-4 neutropenia developed in four patients (10.8%1. Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 12.1% (4/33), and distant metastases after the preoperative CRCT start developed in 21.6% (8/37). The overall 3-years survival rate was 87%. Preoperative CRCT in locally advanced rectal cancer is well tolerated and can lead to high resection rate, down-staging rate, sphincter preservation rate

  14. High-performance size-based microdevice for the detection of circulating tumor cells from peripheral blood in rectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Sun

    Full Text Available Since individualized therapy becomes more and more important in the treatment of rectal cancer, an accurate and effective approach should be established in the clinical settings to help physicians to make their decisions. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, originated from either primary or metastatic cancer, could provide important information for diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. However, the implication and development of CTCs are limited due to the extreme rarity of these tumor cells. In this study we fabricated a simple and high-performance microfluidic device, which exploited numerous filtered microchannels in it to enrich the large-sized target tumor cells from whole blood. A very high CTC capture efficiency (average recovery rate: 94% was obtained in this device at the optimum flow rate of 0.5 mL/h and channel height of 5 µm. Additionally, we used this device for detecting CTCs in 60 patients with rectal cancer. The CTC counts of rectal cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the CTC counts detected by this device were significantly higher than those by EpCAM bead-based method for rectal cancer patients with various stage. Especially, for localized rectal cancer patients, the positive rates of samples with more than 3 CTCs per 5 mL blood by use of microdevice vs. EpCAM-based ones were 100% vs. 47%, respectively. Thus, this device provides a new and effective tool for accurate identification and measurement of CTCs in patients with rectal cancer, and has broad potential in clinical practice.

  15. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  16. Endosonographic features of rectal cancer: A single-center experience in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Frootan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Aim: The study aim was to describe an endosonographic feature of rectal cancer in Iranian patients. Settings and Design: A retrospective study in Mehrad Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case series, all patients with confirmed diagnosis of rectal cancer during 2012-2014 were included and their hospital records were reviewed. Results: Hospital records of 76 patients with rectal cancer including 44 male (57.9% and 32 females (42.1% were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 57.81 ± 14.26 years. The distal rectum was the most common location of the tumor (42 patients, 55.3% and complete luminal obstruction was observed in 11 patients (14.5%. Sphincters were free of disease in 70% of patients (53, while lymph nodes were involved in more than 70% of patients at diagnosis. Internal anal sphincter (IAS alone was the most common sphincter involved (16 patients, 21% followed by involvement of all three sphincters together (IAS and external anal sphincter and longitudinal muscle (5, 6.6%. Conclusion: The mean age at diagnosis of rectal cancer in our country is less than that of Western countries. Lower rectum is the most common location of rectal cancer in our patients and lymph node metastasis is present in more than 70% of patients at the time of diagnosis.

  17. Use of Primary Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: A Population-based Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, Sabine; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W.J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Lybeert, M.L.M.; Koning, C.C.E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Materials and methods: Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of

  18. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Lymph node dissection : ... pelvic lymph nodes may be removed. If the cancer is in the lower vagina, lymph nodes in ... colon , rectum , bladder , cervix, vagina, and ovaries . Nearby lymph ...

  19. Pre-surgery radiotherapy of rectal cancer; Radioterapia pre-operatoria no cancer de reto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Paulo, Francisco [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2005-04-15

    High indexes of loco-regional recurrence in patients with rectal cancer have stimulated the search of complementary therapy. Since the sixties, neo adjuvant radiotherapy has gained space in order to reduce local recurrence and to increase the survival of these patients. Recently some publications have pointed out the importance of associating chemotherapy and total excision of mesorectum to the radiotherapy in the same way. The results of large prospective researches are expected to determine the exact role of this association. (author)

  20. Diagnosis of prostate cancer: comparison of serum prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, K H; Chang, P L; Wang, T M; Hsieh, M L

    1997-03-01

    While prostate specific antigen (PSA) is useful as a tumor marker for monitoring patients with prostate cancer after definitive therapy, limitations have been noted when it is used for early detection of prostate cancer. We reviewed the charts of 121 patients who had undergone prostate needle biopsies, documented digital rectal examination (DRE) and serum PSA determination before biopsy from January 1993 to October 1994. Indications for biopsy included abnormal DRE. PSA level greater than 4.0 ng/ml or abnormal lesions on transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). Seventeen patients (14%) had stage A carcinoma with normal DRE and PSA levels from 0.1 to 34.9 ng/ml (mean 9.0 ng/ml). Four patients (3%) had stage B carcinoma with an average PSA level of 32.3 ng/ml and less than one lobe indurated on DRE. Six patients (5%) had stage C carcinoma and had an average PSA level of 48.5 ng/ml and less than one lobe indurated on DRE. Ninety-four (78%) patients had stage D carcinoma with an average PSA level of 120 ng/ml and more than one lobe indurated on DRE. While hypoechoic sectors were more than twice as likely as isoechoic sectors of the prostate to contain malignancy on biopsy, nearly 20% of cancers were found in isoechoic sectors. Serum PSA is the most accurate of the three diagnostic tests evaluated. The addition of DRE or TRUS improves the detection rate of prostate cancer over PSA alone.

  1. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Rödel, Claus; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Boelens, Petra G.; Aristei, Cynthia; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  2. Genetic variation in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are part of the TGF-β-signaling pathway; genetic variation in these genes may be involved in colorectal cancer. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic variation in BMP1 (11 tagSNPs)