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Sample records for stage magnetic rayleigh-taylor

  1. The Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Astrophysical Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Papadopoulos, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    This is our first study of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the inner edge of an astrophysical disc around a central back hole. We derive the equations governing small-amplitude oscillations in general relativistic ideal magnetodydrodynamics and obtain a criterion for the onset of the instability. We suggest that static disc configurations where magnetic field is held by the disc material are unstable around a Schwarzschild black hole. On the other hand, we find that such configurations are stabilized by the space-time rotation around a Kerr black hole. We obtain a crude estimate of the maximum amount of poloidal magnetic flux that can be accumulated around the centre, and suggest that it is proportional to the black hole spin. Finally, we discuss the astrophysical implications of our result for the theoretical and observational estimations of the black hole jet power.

  2. Effect of magnetic field on Rayleigh-Taylor instability of two superposed fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P K; Tiwari, Anita; Chhajlani, R K

    2012-01-01

    The effect of two dimensional magnetic field on the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability in an incompressible plasma is investigated to include simultaneously the effects of suspended particles and the porosity of the medium. The relevant linearized perturbation equations have been solved. The explicit expression of the linear growth rate is obtained in the presence of fixed boundary conditions. A stability criterion for the medium is derived and discussed the Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in different configurations. It is found that the basic Rayleigh-Taylor instability condition is modified by the presence of magnetic field, suspended particles and porosity of the medium. In case of an unstable R-T configuration, the magnetic field has a stabilizing effect on the system. It is also found that the growth rate of an unstable R-T mode decreases with increasing relaxation frequency thereby showing a stabilizing influence on the R-T configuration.

  3. Effect of magnetic field on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of rotating and stratified plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, PK; Tiwari, Anita; Argal, Shraddha

    2017-01-01

    In the present study the effect of magnetic field and rotation have been carried out on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of conducting and rotating plasma, which is assumed to be incompressible and confined between two rigid planes z = 0 and z = h. The dispersion relation of the problem is obtained by solving the basic MHD equations of the problem with the help normal mode technique and appropriate boundary conditions. The dispersion relation of the medium is analysed and the effect of magnetic field and angular velocity (rotation effect) have been examined on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability. It is found that the magnetic field and angular velocity (rotation effect) have stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability. (paper)

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  5. Theoretical and numerical studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A

    2001-06-01

    The instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type are considered in the thesis. The topic of the thesis was inspired by recent advances in the physics of plasma compression, especially with the aid of systems like Z-pinch. Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays an important role in the evolution of magnetized plasmas in these experiments, as well as in stellar plasmas and classic fluids. For the phenomena concerning the nuclear fusion the RTI is very often the factor limiting the possibility of compression. In the current work we try to examine in detail the characteristic features of the instabilities of this type in order to eliminate their detrimental influence. In this thesis we are studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words, two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external &apos

  6. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites rayleigh-taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, A. Ivanov

    2001-06-15

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of

  7. Theoretical and numerical studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.A.

    2001-06-01

    The instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type are considered in the thesis. The topic of the thesis was inspired by recent advances in the physics of plasma compression, especially with the aid of systems like Z-pinch. Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays an important role in the evolution of magnetized plasmas in these experiments, as well as in stellar plasmas and classic fluids. For the phenomena concerning the nuclear fusion the RTI is very often the factor limiting the possibility of compression. In the current work we try to examine in detail the characteristic features of the instabilities of this type in order to eliminate their detrimental influence. In this thesis we are studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words, two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability

  8. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, A. Ivanov

    2001-06-01

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of the surface plasma-magnetic

  9. Effect of magnetic field on Rayleigh-Taylor instability of quantum and stratified plasma in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Tiwari, Anita; Argal, Shraddha; Chhajlani, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to an investigation of Quantum effects and magnetic field effects on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed incompressible fluids in bounded porous medium. The Quantum magneto hydrodynamic equations are solved by using normal mode method and a dispersion relation is obtained. The dispersion relation is derived for the case where plasma is bounded by two rigid planes z = 0 and z = h. The Rayleigh Taylor instability growth rate and stability condition of the medium is discussed in the presence of quantum effect, magnetic field, porosity and permeability. It is found that the magnetic field and medium porosity have stabilizing influence while permeability has destabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability. (author)

  10. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a rotating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shuchao; Xie, Weiping; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze theoretically the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a rotating magnetic field. Slab configurations of finite thickness are treated both with and without using the Wenzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. Regardless of the slab thickness, the directional rotation of the driving magnetic field contributes to suppressing these instabilities. The two factors of the finite thickness and directional rotation of the magnetic field cooperate to enhance suppression, with the finite thickness playing a role only when the orientation of the magnetic field is time varying. The suppression becomes stronger as the driving magnetic field rotates faster, and all modes are suppressed, in contrast to the case of a non-rotating magnetic field, for which the vertical mode cannot be suppressed. This implies that the dynamically alternate configuration of a Theta-pinch and a Z-pinch may be applicable to the concept of Theta-Z liner inertial fusion.

  11. Development of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Manoranjan; Mandal, Labakanta; Banerjee, Rahul; Roy, Sourav; Gupta, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T), Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability can occur in a wide range of physical phenomenon from astrophysical context to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Using Layzer's potential flow model, we derive the analytical expressions of growth rate of bubble and spike for ideal magnetized fluid in R-T and R-M cases. In the presence of transverse magnetic field, the R-M and R-T instabilities are suppressed or enhanced depending on the direction of magnetic pressure and hydrodynamic pressure. Again the interface of two fluid may oscillate if both the fluids are conducting. However, it is observed that the magnetic field has no effect in linear case.

  12. Stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to the spontaneous magnetic field in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Masatada; Takita, Masami.

    1981-08-01

    Spontaneous magnetic fields due to the temperature gradient nabla T 0 produced by a focussed laser beam on one point of a pellet are taken into account in deriving the dispersion relation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Growth rate γ decreases with time. Density fluctuation with wavelength shorter than 1.5(R/L sub(T)) x (n sub(s)/n 0 )sup(1/2) μm is remarkably stabilized, where R, L sub(T), n sub(s) and n 0 are the radius of a pellet, L sub(T)sup(-1) = + nabla T 0 /T 0 + , number densities of solid and the pellet. Validity condition of the theory is γt 0 >> 1 or in another form R >> L, where t 0 is the time of thermal expansion of a pellet and L -1 = + nabla n 0 /n 0 + . (author)

  13. Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in un-magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P K; Tiwari, A; Argal, S; Chhajlani, R K

    2014-01-01

    The linear Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible Newtonian fluids is discussed with the effect of surface tension which can play important roles in space plasma. As in both the superposed Newtonian fluids, the system is stable for potentially stable case and unstable for potentially unstable case in the present problem also. The equations of the problem are solved by normal mode method and a dispersion relation is obtained for such a system. The behaviour of growth rate is examined in the presence of surface tension and it is found that the surface tension has stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids. Numerical analysis is performed to show the effect of sound velocity and surface tension on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability. It is found that both parameters have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability.

  14. Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor-Induced Magnetic Fields in the Linear and Non-linear Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are generated in plasmas by the Biermann-battery, or thermoelectric, source driven by non-collinear temperature and density gradients. The ablation front in laser-irradiated targets is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth that produces gradients capable of generating magnetic fields. Measurements of these RT-induced magnetic fields in planar foils have been made using a combination of x-ray and monoenergetic-proton radiography techniques. At a perturbation wavelength of 120 μm, proton radiographs indicate an increase of the magnetic-field strength from ˜1 to ˜10 Tesla during the linear growth phase. A characteristic change in field structure was observed later in time for irradiated foils of different initial surface perturbations. Proton radiographs show a regular cellular configuration initiated at the same time during the drive, independent of the initial foil conditions. This non-linear behavior has been experimentally investigated and the source of these characteristic features will be discussed.

  15. The non-linear growth of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlyle, Jack; Hillier, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    This work examines the effect of the embedded magnetic field strength on the non-linear development of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) (with a field-aligned interface) in an ideal gas close to the incompressible limit in three dimensions. Numerical experiments are conducted in a domain sufficiently large so as to allow the predicted critical modes to develop in a physically realistic manner. The ratio between gravity, which drives the instability in this case (as well as in several of the corresponding observations), and magnetic field strength is taken up to a ratio which accurately reflects that of observed astrophysical plasma, in order to allow comparison between the results of the simulations and the observational data which served as inspiration for this work. This study finds reduced non-linear growth of the rising bubbles of the RTI for stronger magnetic fields, and that this is directly due to the change in magnetic field strength, rather than the indirect effect of altering characteristic length scales with respect to domain size. By examining the growth of the falling spikes, the growth rate appears to be enhanced for the strongest magnetic field strengths, suggesting that rather than affecting the development of the system as a whole, increased magnetic field strengths in fact introduce an asymmetry to the system. Further investigation of this effect also revealed that the greater this asymmetry, the less efficiently the gravitational energy is released. By better understanding the under-studied regime of such a major phenomenon in astrophysics, deeper explanations for observations may be sought, and this work illustrates that the strength of magnetic fields in astrophysical plasmas influences observed RTI in subtle and complex ways.

  16. Nonlinear saturated states of the magnetic-curvature-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman; Benkadda, S.; Beyer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional electromagnetic fluid simulations of the magnetic-curvature-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability are presented. Issues related to the existence of nonlinear saturated states and the nature of the temporal evolution to such states from random initial conditions are addressed. It is found that nonlinear saturated states arising from generation of zonal shear flows continue to exist in certain parametric domains but their spectrum and spatial characteristics have important differences from earlier two-dimensional results reported in Phys. Plasmas 4, 1018 (1997) and Phys. Plasmas 8, 5104 (2001). In particular, the three-dimensional nonlinear states possess a significant power level in short scales and the spatial structures of the potential and density fluctuations appear not to develop any functional correlations. Electromagnetic effects are found to inhibit the formation of zonal flows and thereby to considerably restrict the parametric domain of nonlinear stabilization. The role of finite k parallel and the contribution of the unstable drift wave branch are also discussed and delineated through a number of simulation studies carried out in special simplified limits

  17. Effects of magnetic field, sheared flow and ablative velocity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Zhang, W.L.; Wu, Z.W.

    2005-01-01

    It is found that magnetic field has a stabilization effect whereas the sheared flow has a destabilization effect on the RT instability in the presence of sharp interface. RT instability only occurs in the long wave region and can be completely suppressed if the stabilizing effect of magnetic field dominates. The RT instability increases with wave number and flow shear, and acts much like a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when destabilizing effect of sheared flow dominates. It is shown that both of ablation velocity and magnetic filed have stabilization effect on RT instability in the presence of continued interface. The stabilization effect of magnetic field takes place for whole waveband and becomes more significant for the short wavelength. The RT instability can be completely suppressed by the cooperated effect of magnetic field and ablation velocity so that the ICF target shell may be unnecessary to be accelerated to very high speed. The growth rate decreases as the density scale length increases. The stabilization effect of magnetic field is more significant for the short density scale length. (author)

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLÜTER PROMINENCE MODEL. I. FORMATION OF UPFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari; Berger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The launch of the Hinode satellite led to the discovery of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, that propagate from large (∼10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of quiescent prominences. The plumes move through a height of approximately 10 Mm while developing highly turbulent profiles. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability was hypothesized to be the mechanism that drives these flows. In this study, using three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations, we investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Schlüter prominence model for the interchange mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The model simulates the rise of a buoyant tube inside the quiescent prominence model, where the interchange of magnetic field lines becomes possible at the boundary between the buoyant tube and the prominence. Hillier et al. presented the initial results of this study, where upflows of constant velocity (maximum found 6 km s –1 ) and a maximum plume width ≈1.5 Mm which propagate through a height of approximately 6 Mm were found. Nonlinear interaction between plumes was found to be important for determining the plume dynamics. In this paper, using the results of ideal MHD simulations, we determine how the initial parameters for the model and buoyant tube affect the evolution of instability. We find that the 3D mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows, creating upflows aligned with the magnetic field of constant velocity (maximum found 7.3 km s –1 ). The width of the upflows is dependent on the initial conditions, with a range of 0.5-4 Mm which propagate through heights of 3-6 Mm. These results are in general agreement with the observations of the rising plumes.

  19. Growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and bulk convective instabilities in dynamics of plasma liners and pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.; Velikovich, A.L.; Liberman, M.A.; Felber, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    Perturbation growth is studied for the initial, linear stage of an instability development in the course of a cylindrically-symmetric compression and expansion of plasma liners and Z-pinches with a sharp boundary. The hydrodynamic instabilities are Rayleigh-Taylor and bulk convective ones, the former being the most dengerous. Classification of the instability modes developing in accelerated plasmas, inclusing the local and global Rayleigh-Taylor modes, is given. The spectra of the instability growth rates are calculated for plasma liners and Z-pinches. The properties of the spectra appear to explain the filamentation and stratification of plasmas observed in the experiments with liners and Z-pinches. An axial magnetic field is shown to create a window of stability in the space of the flow parameters, where th Rayleigh-Taylor modes are fully suppressed by the magnetic shear, and the bulk convective ones - to a considerable extent. The axial magnetic field required to stabilize the implosion of a liner is estimated as B z0 =(10-30 kG)I(MA)/R 0 (cm), where I is the average current, R 0 - the initial radius of the liner

  20. Development of Rayleigh-Taylor and bulk convection instabilities in the dynamics of plasma liners and pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.; Velikovich, A.L.; Liberman, M.A.; Felber, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    A solution is derived for the problem of the initial, linear stage of the growth of small perturbations in the course of the cylindrically symmetric compression and expansion of a plasma liner and a Z-pinch with a sharp boundary. In these systems, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities localized near the plasma boundaries are the most dangerous. Bulk convective instabilities develop in addition to these Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The various instability modes, including local and global Rayleigh-Taylor modes, which grown in an accelerated plasma with distributed profiles of hydrodynamic variables, are classified. The spectra of the instability growth rates are calculated for plasma liners and Z-pinches. The shape of these spectra reveals an explanation of the stratification and filamentation of the plasma observed experimentally in pinches and liners. The imposition of a longitudinal magnetic field gives rise to a stability window in the space of the flow parameters. In this window, the Rayleigh-Taylor modes are suppressed completely by magnetic shear, while the bulk convective modes are suppressed to a significant extent

  1. Investigation of magnetic field effects on the mitigation of the magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in fast z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, M.; Deeney, C.; Roderick, N.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the role that magnetic field diffusion and ohmic heating have on the magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) development in fast z-pinch implosions. Previous work has indicated these terms can strongly influence the evolution of RT growth, leading to a reduction in RT amplitude, and an improvement in pinch performance. Indeed, Roderick et al have suggested that magnetic smoothing is an important mechanism in linear RT growth. To examine this in more detail, simulations are presented for a 1.4 mg, 25.0 mm diameter tungsten wire array imploded in the Saturn long pulse mode. The 130 ns implosion time of this calculation should enhance any mitigating effects that may be attributed to nonideal MHD. Calculations were performed using the 2D MHD code Mach2. The wire array was approximated by a right cylindrical slab of 1.0 mm width. Both a random density perturbation and single mode density perturbations were incorporated to initiate the instability. In the former case, a 5% cell-to-cell random perturbation was used. This allowed a range of modes to be initially present. In the single mode case, a 1.25 mm wavelength, on the order of the shell thickness, was defined. To isolate the contributions due to field diffusion, joule heating, and equation of state, simulations were run with and without ohmic heating using both constant and material-dependent spitzer resistivities. This analysis was then extended to look at the effect of such parameters on the nested shell load configuration. Detailed analysis of the simulations will be presented

  2. RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick a diabaticregime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

  3. Quantum effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a horizontal inhomogeneous rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshoudy, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied analytically in inhomogeneous plasma rotating uniformly in an external transverse magnetic field. The influence of the quantum mechanism is considered. For a stratified layer the linear growth rate is obtained. Some special cases that isolate the effect of various parameters on the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed. It is shown that for some cases, the presence of the external transverse magnetic field beside the quantum effect will bring about more stability on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order

  5. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  6. Hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in cylindrical implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.S.; Roderick, N.F.; Wu, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in the (r,Θ) plane has been solved by the variational approach. Results are compared to the analytical solutions of two-region and three-region problems at the infinite radius. They show the magnetic stabilization effect. Growth rates in this plane are decreased by the effects of plasma shell thickness, plasma shell radius, magnetic tension, magnetic diffusion and finite density gradient of the plasma magnetic field interface. The most unstable mode number decreases when the radius of the plasma shell decreases

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Yue Ying; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  9. Centrifugally Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scase, Matthew; Hill, Richard

    2017-11-01

    The instability that develops at the interface between two fluids of differing density due to the rapid rotation of the system may be considered as a limit of high-rotation rate Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Previously the authors have considered the effect of rotation on a gravitationally dominated Rayleigh-Taylor instability and have shown that some growth modes of instability may be suppressed completely by the stabilizing effect of rotation (Phys. Rev. Fluids 2:024801, Sci. Rep. 5:11706). Here we consider the case of very high rotation rates and a negligible gravitational field. The initial condition is of a dense inner cylinder of fluid surrounded by a lighter layer of fluid. As the system is rotated about the generating axis of the cylinder, the dense inner fluid moves away from the axis and the familiar bubbles and spikes of Rayleigh-Taylor instability develop at the interface. The system may be thought of as a ``fluid-fluid centrifuge''. By developing a model based on an Orr-Sommerfeld equation, we consider the effects of viscosity, surface tension and interface diffusion on the growth rate and modes of instability. We show that under particular circumstances some modes may be stabilized. School of Mathematical Sciences.

  10. Predictability of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viecelli, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical experiments modeling the Rayleigh Taylor instability are carried out using a two-dimensional incompressible Eulerian hydrodynamic code VFTS. The method of integrating the Navier-Stokes equations including the viscous terms is similar to that described in Kim and Moin, except that Lagrange particles have been added and provision for body forces is given. The Eulerian method is 2nd order accurate in both space and time, and the Poisson equation for the effective pressure field is solved exactly at each time step using a cyclic reduction method. 3 refs., 3 figs

  11. Nonlinear saturation of the Rayleigh Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Mahajan, S.; Kaw, P.; Sen, A.; Benkadda, S.; Verga, A.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of the nonlinear saturation of the 2 dimensional Rayleigh Taylor instability is re-examined to put various earlier results in a proper perspective. The existence of a variety of final states can be attributed to the differences in the choice of boundary conditions and initial conditions in earlier numerical modeling studies. Our own numerical simulations indicate that the RT instability saturates by the self consistent generation of shear flow even in situations (with periodic boundaries) where, in principle, an infinite amount of gravitational energy can be tapped. Such final states can be achieved for suitable values of the Prandtl number. (author)

  12. Earth's core formation due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    A protoearth accretion stage configuration consisting of an undifferentiated solid core, an intermediate metal-melt layer, and an outer silicate-melt layer, is presently taken as the initial state in an investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced core formation. The Ida et al. (to be published) quantitative results on the instability in a self-gravitating fluid sphere are used. The instability is found to occur through the translational mode on a time-scale of about 10 hr, in the case where the metal-melt layer is greater than about 1 km; this implies that the earth's core formed due to the undifferentiated solid core's translation upon the outer layer's melting. Differentiation would then have occurred in the late accretion stage. 17 references

  13. Mode coupling in nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofer, D.; Shvarts, D.; Zinamon, Z.; Orszag, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction of a small number of modes in the two-fluid Rayleigh--Taylor instability at relatively late stages of development, i.e., the nonlinear regime, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code incorporating a front-tracking scheme. It is found that the interaction of modes can greatly affect the amount of mixing and may even reduce the width of the mixing region. This interaction is both relatively long range in wave-number space and also acts in both directions, i.e., short wavelengths affect long wavelengths and vice versa. Three distinct stages of interaction have been identified, including substantial interaction among modes some of which may still be in their classical (single mode) ''linear'' phase

  14. Effects of shock waves on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongtao; Shu Chiwang; Zhou Ye

    2006-01-01

    A numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference shock capturing scheme is carried out in this paper, to study the effect of shock waves on the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Shocks with different Mach numbers are introduced ahead or behind the Rayleigh-Taylor interface, and their effect on the transition to instability is demonstrated and compared. It is observed that shock waves can speed up the transition to instability for the Rayleigh-Taylor interface significantly. Stronger shocks are more effective in this speed-up process

  15. Kinetic simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagert, Irina; Bauer, Wolfgang; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is in the linear regime, we compare its position and shape to the analytic prediction. Despite the broadening of the fluid interface we see a good agreement with the analytic solution. At later times we observe the development of a mushroom like shape caused by secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as seen in hydrodynamic simulations and consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Manipulating Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Using Adjoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    It has been observed that initial interfacial perturbations affect the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. However, it remains to be seen to what extent the perturbations alter the RT growth rate. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) provide a powerful means for studying the effects of initial conditions (IC) on the growth rate. However, a brute-force approach for identifying optimal initial perturbations is not practical via DNS. In addition, identifying sensitivity of the RT growth to the large number of parameters used in defining the IC is computationally expensive. A discrete adjoint is formulated to measure sensitivities of multi-mode RT growth to ICs in a high-order finite difference framework. The sensitivity is used as a search direction for adjusting the initial perturbations to both maximize and suppress the RT growth rate during its non-linear regime. The modes that contribute the greatest sensitivity are identified, and optimized perturbation energy spectrum are reported. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  17. Role of parallel flow curvature on the mitigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmah, D.; Sen, S.; Cairns, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a radially varying parallel equilibrium flow on the stability of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mode is studied analytically in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. It is shown that the parallel flow curvature can completely stabilize the RT mode. The flow curvature also has a robust effect on the radial structure of the mode. Possible implications of these theoretical findings to recent experiments are also discussed

  18. The mitigation effect of sheared axial flow on the rayleigh-taylor instability in Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yang

    2005-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic formulation is derived to investigate the mitigation effects of the sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z-pinch plasma. The dispersion relation of the compressible model is given. The mitigation effects of sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Z-pinch plasma in the compressible and incompressible models are compared respectively, and the effect of compressible on the instability of system with sheared axial flow is discussed. It is found that, compressibility effects can stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz (RT/KH) instability, and this allows the sheared axial flow mitigate the RT instability far more effectively. The authors also find that, at the early stage of the implosion, if the temperature of the plasma is not very high, the compressible model is much more suitable to describing the state of system than the incompressible one. (author)

  19. Coupling of sausage, kink, and magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a cylindrical liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Schmit, P. F.; Peterson, K. J.; Hess, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the coupling of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink modes in an imploding cylindrical liner, using ideal MHD. A uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary value is included in each region: liner, its interior, and its exterior. The dispersion relation is solved exactly, for arbitrary radial acceleration (-g), axial wavenumber (k), azimuthal mode number (m), liner aspect ratio, and equilibrium quantities in each region. For small k, a positive g (inward radial acceleration in the lab frame) tends to stabilize the sausage mode, but destabilize the kink mode. For large k, a positive g destabilizes both the kink and sausage mode. Using the 1D-HYDRA simulation results for an equilibrium model that includes a pre-existing axial magnetic field and a preheated fuel, we identify several stages of MRT-sausage-kink mode evolution. We find that the m = 1 kink-MRT mode has a higher growth rate at the initial stage and stagnation stage of the implosion, and that the m = 0 sausage-MRT mode dominates at the main part of implosion. This analysis also sheds light on a puzzling feature in Harris' classic paper of MRT [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962)]. An attempt is made to interpret the persistence of the observed helical structures [Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] in terms of non-axisymmetric eigenmode

  20. Effect of resistivity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an accelerated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, J.L.; Huerta, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in finite-conductivity accelerated plasma arcs of the type found in electromagnetic rail launchers. For a plasma of length l, acceleration a, and thermal speed v T we consider the case where v T 2 /al much-gt 1, which is valid when the projectile mass is large compared to the plasma mass. The conductivity σ enters via a magnetic Reynolds number R=σμ(al 3 ) 1/2 . The fourth-order mode equation is solved analytically using an asymptotic WKB expansion in 1/R. We find the first-order 1/R correction to the classical Rayleigh-Taylor dispersion relation for large wave number K but with K much-lt R 2 /l. The analytical results show good agreement with previous numerical calculations

  1. Potential Flow Model for Compressible Stratified Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydquist, Grant; Reckinger, Scott; Owkes, Mark; Wieland, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is an instability that occurs when a heavy fluid lies on top of a lighter fluid in a gravitational field, or a gravity-like acceleration. It occurs in many fluid flows of a highly compressive nature. In this study potential flow analysis (PFA) is used to model the early stages of RTI growth for compressible fluids. In the localized region near the bubble tip, the effects of vorticity are negligible, so PFA is applicable, as opposed to later stages where the induced velocity due to vortices generated from the growth of the instability dominate the flow. The incompressible PFA is extended for compressibility effects by applying the growth rate and the associated perturbation spatial decay from compressible linear stability theory. The PFA model predicts theoretical values for a bubble terminal velocity for single-mode compressible RTI, dependent upon the Atwood (A) and Mach (M) numbers, which is a parameter that measures both the strength of the stratification and intrinsic compressibility. The theoretical bubble terminal velocities are compared against numerical simulations. The PFA model correctly predicts the M dependence at high A, but the model must be further extended to include additional physics to capture the behavior at low A. Undergraduate Scholars Program - Montana State University.

  2. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the spherical pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.B.; Hilko, B.; Panarella, E.

    1994-01-01

    The spherical pinch (SP) concept is an outgrowth of the inertial confinement model (ICF). Unlike the ICF where instabilities, especially the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, have been studied extensively, the instability study of the spherical pinch has just begun. The Raleigh-Taylor instability is investigated for the first time in the SP in the present work. By using the simple condition for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability ∇p · ∇p < O (density and pressure gradients have opposite direction), we have qualitatively identified the regions for development of instabilities in the SP. It is found that the explosion phase (central discharge) is stable and instabilities take place in the imploding phase. However, the growth rate for the instability is not in exponential form, and the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability does not prevent the main shock wave from converging to the center of the sphere

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mixing in SN 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisuzaki, T.; Shigeyama, T.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of the supernova ejecta is compared with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a realistic model of SN 1987A. A linear analysis indicates that the layers around the composition interface between the hydrogen-rich and helium zones, and become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable between the helium and metal zones. In these layers, the pressure increases outward because of deceleration due to the reverse shock which forms when the blast shock hits the massive hydrogen-rich envelope. On the contrary, the density steeply decreases outward because of the preexisting nuclear burning shell. Then, these layers undergo the Raleigh-Taylor instability because of the opposite signs of the pressure and density gradients. The estimated growth rate is larger than the expansion rate of the supernova. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability near the composition interface is likely to induce mixing, which has been strongly suggested from observations of SN 1987A. 25 refs

  4. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, O.; Lardjane, N.; Peybernes, M.; Boulet, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerations in actual Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are often variable. This article focuses on a particular class of variable accelerations where g(t) ∝ t n . A reference database is built from high resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulations. The successful comparison with a simple OD analytical model and the statistical 2SFK (2-Structure, 2-Fluid, 2-Turbulence) turbulence model is provided. Moreover, we show the difference between the mechanism at play in the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing zone and Kolmogorov's in the self similar developed turbulent regime. (authors)

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor convective overturn in stellar collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruenn, S.W.; Buchler, J.R.; Livio, M.

    1979-01-01

    Rayleigh--Taylor convective overturn in collapsing stellar cores is modeled with a one-dimensional parametrization. The results of a numerical hydrodynamic study are very encouraging and indicate that such an overturn could well be a dominant feature in the supernova explosion mechanism

  6. New phenomena in variable-density Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, D; Ristorcelli, J R; Petersen, M R; Gore, R A, E-mail: livescu@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents several issues related to mixing and turbulence structure in buoyancy-driven turbulence at low to moderate Atwood numbers, A, found from direct numerical simulations in two configurations: classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability and an idealized triply periodic Rayleigh-Taylor flow. Simulations at A up to 0.5 are used to examine the turbulence characteristics and contrast them with those obtained close to the Boussinesq approximation. The data sets used represent the largest simulations to date in each configuration. One of the more remarkable issues explored, first reported in (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80), is the marked difference in mixing between different density fluids as opposed to the mixing that occurs between fluids of commensurate densities, corresponding to the Boussinesq approximation. Thus, in the triply periodic configuration and the non-Boussinesq case, an initially symmetric density probability density function becomes skewed, showing that the mixing is asymmetric, with pure heavy fluid mixing more slowly than pure light fluid. A mechanism producing the mixing asymmetry is proposed and the consequences for the classical Rayleigh-Taylor configuration are discussed. In addition, it is shown that anomalous small-scale anisotropy found in the homogeneous configuration (Livescu and Ristorcelli 2008 J. Fluid Mech. 605 145-80) and Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence at A=0.5 (Livescu et al 2008 J. Turbul. 10 1-32) also occurs near the Boussinesq limit. Results pertaining to the moment closure modelling of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence are also presented. Although the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer width reaches self-similar growth relatively fast, the lower-order terms in the self-similar expressions for turbulence moments have long-lasting effects and derived quantities, such as the turbulent Reynolds number, are slow to follow the self-similar predictions. Since eddy diffusivity in the popular gradient transport hypothesis

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor/gravitational instability in dense magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S., E-mail: shahid.ali@ncp.edu.p [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); IPFN, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ahmed, Z. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Wah Campus (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, I. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Islamabad Campus (Pakistan)

    2009-08-10

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated in a nonuniform dense quantum magnetoplasma. For this purpose, a quantum hydrodynamical model is used for the electrons whereas the ions are assumed to be cold and classical. The dispersion relation for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes modified with the quantum corrections associated with the Fermi pressure law and the quantum Bohm potential force. Numerically, it is found that the quantum speed and density gradient significantly modify the growth rate of RT instability. In a dense quantum magnetoplasma case, the linear growth rate of RT instability becomes significantly higher than its classical value and the modes are found to be highly localized. The present investigation should be useful in the studies of dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas as well as in laser-produced plasmas.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of cylindrical jets with radial motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang M. [GE Nuclear, Wilmington, NC (United States); Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an interface between fluids with different densities subjected to accelleration normal to itself has interested researchers for almost a century. The classic analyses of a flat interface by Rayleigh and Taylor have shown that this type of instability depends on the direction of acceleration and the density differences of the two fluids. Plesset later analyzed the stability of a spherically symmetric flows (and a spherical interface) and concluded that the instability also depends on the velocity of the interface as well as the direction and magnitude of radial acceleration. The instability induced by radial motion in cylindrical systems seems to have been neglected by previous researchers. This paper analyzes the Rayleigh-Taylor type of the spherical case, the radial velocity also plays an important role. As an application, the example of a liquid jet surface in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor design is analyzed.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor/gravitational instability in dense magnetoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ahmad, I.

    2009-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated in a nonuniform dense quantum magnetoplasma. For this purpose, a quantum hydrodynamical model is used for the electrons whereas the ions are assumed to be cold and classical. The dispersion relation for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes modified with the quantum corrections associated with the Fermi pressure law and the quantum Bohm potential force. Numerically, it is found that the quantum speed and density gradient significantly modify the growth rate of RT instability. In a dense quantum magnetoplasma case, the linear growth rate of RT instability becomes significantly higher than its classical value and the modes are found to be highly localized. The present investigation should be useful in the studies of dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas as well as in laser-produced plasmas.

  10. Influence of velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Satyanarayana, P.; Huba, J.D.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a transverse velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is found that a sheared velocity flow can substantially reduce the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in short wavelength regime (i.e., kL>1 where L is the scale length of the density inhomogeneity), and causes the growth rate to maximize at kL<1.0. Applications of this result to ionospheric phenomena [equatorial spread F (ESF) and ionospheric plasma clouds] are discussed. In particular, the effect of shear could account for, at times, the 100's of km modulation observed on the bottomside of the ESF ionosphere and the km scale size wavelengths observed in barium cloud prompt striation phenomena

  11. Stochastic model of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.; Cadjan, M.; Fedotov, S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model to describe the random character of the dissipation process in Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing. The parameter alpha, used conventionally to characterize the mixing growth-rate, is not a universal constant and is very sensitive to the statistical properties of the dissipation. The ratio between the rates of momentum loss and momentum gain is the statistic invariant and a robust parameter to diagnose with or without turbulent diffusion accounted for

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adak, Ashish, E-mail: ashish-adak@yahoo.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran-g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a visco-plastic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demianov, A Yu; Doludenko, A N; Son, E E; Inogamov, N A

    2010-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities of a visco-plastic fluid are discussed. The Bingham model is used as an effective rheological model which takes into account plastic effects. For the purposes of numerical simulation a one-mode disturbance of the contact surface between two fluids is considered. The main goal of this work is to construct numerical 2D and 3D models and to obtain the relationship between yield stress and the development of instability.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a visco-plastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianov, A. Yu; Doludenko, A. N.; Inogamov, N. A.; Son, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities of a visco-plastic fluid are discussed. The Bingham model is used as an effective rheological model which takes into account plastic effects. For the purposes of numerical simulation a one-mode disturbance of the contact surface between two fluids is considered. The main goal of this work is to construct numerical 2D and 3D models and to obtain the relationship between yield stress and the development of instability.

  15. Preliminary study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in wire-array Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Feng Kaiming; Li Qiang; Gao Chunming

    2000-01-01

    It is important to research into the MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability developed in Z-pinch implosion. A snowplough model of the single wire Z-pinch is presented. The perturbation amplitude of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the wire-array Z-pinch is analyzed quantitatively. Sheared axial flow is put forward to mitigate and reduce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. And other approaches used to mitigate MHD instability in such a super-fast process are explored

  16. Shear flow stabilization of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Douglas, M.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Ruden, E.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations have indicated that shear flow may help stabilize the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding plasma z-pinches. A simple extension to a model presented in Chandrasekhar has been developed to study the linear stability of incompressible plasma subjected to both a shear flow and acceleration. The model has been used to investigate the stability plasma implosion schemes using externally imposed velocity shear which develops from the plasma flow itself. Specific parameters were chosen to represent plasma implosions driven by the Saturn and PBFA-Z, pulsed power generators at Sandia National Laboratories. Results indicate a high shear is necessary to stabilize the z-pinch implosions studied

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic-solid slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    We develop the linear theory for the asymptotic growth of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated solid slab of density ρ2, shear modulus G , and thickness h , placed over a semi-infinite ideal fluid of density ρ110.1007/s000330050121] to arbitrary values of AT and unveil the singular feature of an instability threshold below which the slab is stable for any perturbation wavelength. As a consequence, an accelerated elastic-solid slab is stable if ρ2g h /G ≤2 (1 -AT) /AT .

  18. Statistical approach of weakly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.; Masse, L.

    2005-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear model is proposed for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of ablation and thermal transport. The nonlinear effects for a single-mode disturbance are computed, included the nonlinear correction to the exponential growth of the fundamental modulation. Mode coupling in the spectrum of a multimode disturbance is thoroughly analyzed by a statistical approach. The exponential growth of the linear regime is shown to be reduced by the nonlinear mode coupling. The saturation amplitude is around 0.1λ for long wavelengths, but higher for short instable wavelengths in the ablative regime

  19. Three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor convection of miscible fluids in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suekane, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Yuji; Wang, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Natural convection of miscible fluids in a porous medium is relevant for fields, such as geoscience and geoengineering, and for the geological storage of CO2. In this study, we use X-ray computer tomography to visualize 3D fingering structures associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability between miscible fluids in a porous medium. In the early stages of the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a fine crinkling pattern gradually appears at the interface. As the wavelength and amplitude increase, descending fingers form on the interface and extend vertically downward; moreover, ascending and highly symmetric fingers form. The adjacent fingers are cylindrical in shape and coalesce to form large fingers. Fingers appearing on the interface tend to become finer with increasing Rayleigh number, which is consistent with linear perturbation theory. If the Péclet number exceeds 10, the transverse dispersion increases the finger diameter and enhances finger coalescence, strongly impacting the decay in finger number density. When mechanical dispersion is negligible, the finger-extension velocity, the mass-transfer rate, and the onset time scale with Rayleigh number. Mechanical dispersion not only reduces the onset time but also enhances mass transport, which indicates that mechanical dispersion influences the long-term dissolution process of CO2 injected into aquifers.

  20. Model for the saturation of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Hussey, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The saturation of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh--Taylor instability is caused by the reduction of driving current in the bubble region between the spikes formed as the instability develops. For short wavelengths linear magnetic field diffusion provides the necessary smoothing of the magnetic field to reduce the driving force. For wavelengths longer than the magnetic field diffusion length, the current is shorted through material which expands into the bubble region. This initially low density accumulates in the bubble and eventually provides a source of sufficiently high conductivity plasma which reduces the magnetic field penetration to the front of the bubble. Simple analytic models have been developed to verify and and quantify these predictions. These models have been compared with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations for imploding plasma shells and give good agreement with these more detailed simulations

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in multi-structured spherical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Lawande, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    An eigenvalue equation for the exponential growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is derived in spherical geometry. The free surface and jump boundary conditions are obtained from the eigenvalue equation. The eigenvalue equation is solved in the cases where the initial fluid density profile has a step function or exponential variation in space and analytical formulae for growth rate of the instability are obtained. The solutions for the step function are generalized for any number N of spherical zones forming an arbitrary fluid density profile. The results of the numerical calculations for N spherical zones are compared with the exact analytical results for exponential fluid density profile with N=10 and a good agreement is observed. The formalism is further used to study the effects of density gradients on Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry. Also analytical formulae are presented for a particular case of N=3 and shell targets. The formalism developed here can be used to study the growth of the instability in present day multi-structured shell targets. (author)

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a time-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of time, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical regimes of self-similar RT mixing-acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with time-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with space-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a space-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of space coordinate, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical sub-regimes of self-similar RT mixing - the acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type mixing and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type mixing with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with space-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of cylindrical jets with radial motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.

    1997-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an interface between fluids with different densities subjected to acceleration normal to itself has interested researchers for almost a century. The classic analyses of a flat interface by Rayleigh and Taylor have shown that this type of instability depends on the direction of acceleration and the density differences of the two fluids. Plesset later analyzed the stability of a spherically symmetric flows (and a spherical interface) and concluded that the instability also depends on the velocity of the interface as well as the direction and magnitude of radial acceleration. The instability induced by radial motion in cylindrical systems seems to have been neglected by previous researchers. This paper analyzes the Rayleigh-Taylor type of instability for a cylindrical surface with radial motions. The results of the analysis show that, like the spherical case, the radial velocity also plays an important role. As an application, the example of a liquid jet surface in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor design is analyzed. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear interaction of Rayleigh--Taylor and shear instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Results on the nonlinear behavior of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability and consequent development of shear flow by the shear instability [Phys. Fluids B 4, 488 (1992)] are presented. It is found that the shear flow is generated at sufficient amplitude to reduce greatly the convective transport. For high viscosity, the time-asymptotic state consists of an equilibrium with shear flow and vortex flow (with islands, or ''cat's eyes''), or a relaxation oscillation involving an interplay between the shear instability and the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in the presence of shear. For low viscosity, the dominant feature is a high-frequency nonlinear standing wave consisting of convective vortices localized near the top and bottom boundaries. The localization of these vortices is due to the smaller shear near the boundary regions. The convective transport is largest around these convective vortices near the boundary and there is a region of good confinement near the center. The possible relevance of this behavior to the H mode and edge-localized modes (ELM's) in the tokamak edge region is discussed

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of two superposed conducting Walters B' elastico-viscous fluids in hydromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.C.; Kumar, Pardeep

    1998-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of two superposed electrically conducting Walters elastico-viscous fluids (Model B') of uniform densities when the whole system is immersed in a uniform horizontal magnetic field has been studied. The stability analysis has been carried out, for mathematical simplicity, for two highly viscoelastic fluids of equal kinematic viscosities and equal kinematic viscoelasticities. For the stable configuration as in hydrodynamic case, the system is found to be stable or unstable for the wave-number range k (2v') -12 depending on kinematic viscoelasticity v'. For the unstable configuration, the magnetic field has got stabilizing effect and completely stabilizes certain wave-number range which was always unstable in the absence of magnetic field. The behaviour of growth rates with respect kinematic viscosity and kinematic viscoelasticity parameters are examined analytically. (author)

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor analysis in a laser-induced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, R A; Gonzales, C A; Riascos, H

    2012-01-01

    We report the conditions (plasma parameters) under which the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) develops in an Al plasma produced by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser with a fluence range of 1 to 4 J/cm 2 , wavelength of 1064nm and 10Hz repetition rate. The used data correspond to different pressure values of the ambient N atmosphere. From previous works, we took the RTI growth rate form. From the perturbation theory the instability amplitude is proportional to e -ηt . Using the drag model, we calculated the plume dynamics equations integrating the instability term and plotted the instability growth profile with the delay time values to get critical numbers for it, in order to show under which conditions the RTI appears.

  8. Simulation of Rayleigh--Taylor flows using vortex blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    An inviscid boundary-integral method is modified in order to study the single-scale Rayleigh--Taylor instability for arbitrary Atwood number. The primary modification uses vortex blobs to smooth the Green's function and suppress a finite time singularity in the curvature. Additional modifications to earlier codes such as using second-order central differences along the interface to accommodate spikes in the vorticity and spreading the nodes evenly along the interface to suppress clustering of nodes are designed to maintain resolution and accuracy. To achieve second-order accuracy in time when the nodes are spread, an extra predictor step is needed that shifts the nodes before the variables are advanced. The method successfully follows the development of a single mode to states with asymptotic velocities for the bubble and spike that depend on the Atwood number and are independent of the blob size. Incipient droplet formation is observed. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc

  9. Size invariance of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Øistein; Flekkøy, Eirik G; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2010-04-01

    The size scaling behavior of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability [J. L. Vinningland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 048001 (2007)] is investigated experimentally, numerically, and theoretically. An upper layer of grains displaces a lower gap of air by organizing into dense fingers of falling grains separated by rising bubbles of air. The dependence of these structures on the system and grain sizes is investigated. A spatial measurement of the finger structures is obtained by the Fourier power spectrum of the wave number k. As the size of the grains increases the wave number decreases accordingly which leaves the dimensionless product of wave number and grain diameter, dk, invariant. A theoretical interpretation of the invariance, based on the scaling properties of the model equations, suggests a gradual breakdown of the invariance for grains smaller than approximately 70 microm or greater than approximately 570 microm in diameter.

  10. Numerical simulation of anisotropic preheating ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lifeng; Ye Wenhua; Li Yingjun

    2010-01-01

    The linear growth rate of the anisotropic preheating ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) is studied by numerical simulations. The preheating model κ(T)=κ SH [1+f(T)] is applied, where f(T) is the preheating function interpreting the preheating tongue effect in the cold plasma ahead of the ablative front. An arbitrary coefficient D is introduced in the energy equation to study the influence of transverse thermal conductivity on the growth of the ARTI. We find that enhancing diffusion in a plane transverse to the mean longitudinal flow can strongly reduce the growth of the instability. Numerical simulations exhibit a significant stabilization of the ablation front by improving the transverse thermal conduction. Our results are in general agreement with the theory analysis and numerical simulations by Masse. (authors)

  11. Observation of Rayleigh - Taylor growth to short wavelengths on Nike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawley, C.J.; Bodner, S.E.; Dahlburg, J.P.; Obenschain, S.P.; Schmitt, A.J.; Sethian, J.D.; Sullivan, C.A.; Gardner, J.H.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Chan, Y.; Lehecka, T.

    1999-01-01

    The uniform and smooth focal profile of the Nike KrF laser [S. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to ablatively accelerate 40 μm thick polystyrene planar targets with pulse shaping to minimize shock heating of the compressed material. The foils had imposed small-amplitude sinusoidal wave perturbations of 60, 30, 20, and 12.5 μm wavelength. The shortest wavelength is near the ablative stabilization cutoff for Rayleigh - Taylor growth. Modification of the saturated wave structure due to random laser imprint was observed. Excellent agreement was found between the two-dimensional simulations and experimental data for most cases where the laser imprint was not dominant. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. Front propagation in Rayleigh-Taylor systems with reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scagliarini, A; Biferale, L; Sbragaglia, M; Mantovani, F; Pivanti, M; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R; Pozzati, F; Toschi, F

    2011-01-01

    A special feature of Rayleigh-Taylor systems with chemical reactions is the competition between turbulent mixing and the 'burning processes', which leads to a highly non-trivial dynamics. We studied the problem performing high resolution numerical simulations of a 2d system, using a thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. We spanned the various regimes emerging at changing the relative chemical/turbulent time scales, from slow to fast reaction; in the former case we found numerical evidence of an enhancement of the front propagation speed (with respect to the laminar case), providing a phenomenological argument to explain the observed behaviour. When the reaction is very fast, instead, the formation of sharp fronts separating patches of pure phases, leads to an increase of intermittency in the small scale statistics of the temperature field.

  13. Unstable Titan-generated Rayleigh-Taylor Lakes Impact Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Korycansky, D. G.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of surface morphology on Titan, Triton, and other worlds is strongly influenced by the interplay of various fluid dynamical processes. Specifically, overturning instabilities can easily arise due to the special circumstances of landform evolution that probably occurred on these worlds. On Titan, large impacts that formed basins like Menrva crater (and possibly Hotei Regio) would have generated impact-melt ice lakes unstably arranged over less dense ice. Cantaloupe terrains, for example as seen on Triton, may be the result of condensation of volatiles (methane, nitrogen) leading to unstably stratified layers of different compositions and densities. In each of these cases, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities leading to large scale diapirism may be at play. In addition to the dynamics of these instabilities, other physical effects (e.g. heat diffusion, freezing/melting, porosity, temperature dependent viscosity) likely play an important role in the evolution of these features. In this ongoing study, we examine the properties of unstably stratified fluids in which the lower less-dense ice has a temperature dependent viscosity. Surprisingly, we find that there exists an optimal disturbance length scale corresponding to the fastest growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For unstably stratified layers of water (low viscosity heavy liquid lying above an ice whose viscosity increases with depth) the fastest growing mode corresponds to 40-60 km scales with overturn times of approximately 100 days. We present a detailed numerical stability analysis in a corresponding Boussinessq model (in the creeping flow limit) incorporating thermal conduction and latent heat release and we examine the stability properties surveying a variety of parameters. We have also developed a two-dimensional numerical code (a hybrid spectral/compact-differencing scheme) to model the evolution of such systems for which we shall present preliminary numerical results depicting the outcome of

  14. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixing by Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngs, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A key feature of compressible turbulent mixing is the generation of vorticity via the ∇px ∇(1/ρ) term. This source of vorticity is also present in incompressible flows involving the mixing of fluids of different density, for example Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows. This paper gives a summary of an experimental investigation of turbulent mixing at a plane boundary between two fluids, of densities ρ 1 , and ρ 2 . (ρ 1 > ρ 2 ) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The two fluids are near incompressible and mixing occurs when an approximately constant acceleration, g, is applied normal to the interface with direction from fluid 2 to fluid 1. Full details of the experimental programme are given in a set of three reports. Some of the earlier experiments are also described by Read. Previous experimental work and much of the theoretical research has concentrated on studying the growth of the instability from a single wavelength perturbation rather than turbulent mixing. Notable exceptions are published in the Russian literature. A related process, turbulent mixing induced by the passage of shock waves though an interface between fluids of different density is described by Andronov et al. The major purpose of the experiments described here was to study the evolution of the instability from small random perturbations where it is found that large and larger structures appear as time proceeds. A novel technique was used to provide the desired acceleration. The two fluids were enclosed in a rectangular tank, the lighter fluid 2 initially resting on top of the denser fluid 1. One or more rocket motors were then used to drive the tank vertically downwards. The aim of the experimental programme is to provide data for the calibration of a turbulence model used to predict mixing in real situations

  15. Two-dimensional simulation of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an imploding foil plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Hussey, T.W.; Faehl, R.J.; Boyd, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional (r-z) magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the electromagnetic implosion of metallic foil plasmas show, for certain initial configurations, a tendency to develop large-amplitude perturbations characteristic of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These perturbations develop at the plasma magnetic field interface for plasma configurations where the density gradient scale length, the characteristic dimension for the instability, is short. The effects on the plasma dynamics of the implosion will be discussed for several initial foil configurations. In general, the growth rates and linear mode structure are found to be influenced by the plasma shell thickness and density gradient scale length, in agreement with theory. The most destructive modes are found to be those with wavelengths of the order of the plasma shell thickness

  16. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a self-gravitating two-layer fluid sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Yoshitsugu; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in a self-gravitating two-layer fluid sphere: an inner sphere and an outer layer. The density and the viscosity are assumed to be constant in each region. Analytic expressions of the dispersion relations are obtained in inviscid and viscid cases. This examination aims at the investigation of the Earth's core formation. The fluid sphere corresponds to the proto-Earth in the accretion stage. The instability is examined without rotation of the fluid sphere, while the proto-Earth is rotating. However, it is shown that the Coriolis force does not influence the conclusion in the Earth's core formation problem. 5 refs.; 10 figs

  17. Effect of FLR correction on Rayleigh -Taylor instability of quantum and stratified plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Tiwari, Anita; Argal, Shraddha; Chhajlani, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    The Rayleigh Taylor instability of stratified incompressible fluids is studied in presence of FLR Correction and quantum effects in bounded medium. The Quantum magneto hydrodynamic equations of the problem are solved by using normal mode analysis method. A dispersion relation is carried out for the case where plasma is bounded by two rigid planes z = 0 and z = h. The dispersion relation is obtained in dimensionless form to discuss the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability in presence of FLR Correction and quantum effects. The stabilizing or destabilizing behavior of quantum effect and FLR correction on the Rayleigh Taylor instability is analyzed. (author)

  18. Ablation front rayleigh taylor dispersion curve in indirect drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budil, K.S.; Lasinski, B.; Edwards, M.J.; Wan, A.S.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Suter, L.; Stry, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, which occurs when a lower-density fluid accelerates a higher-density layer, is common in nature. At an ablation front a sharp reduction in the growth rate of the instability at short wave-lengths can occur, in marked contrast to the classical case where growth rates are highest at the shortest wavelengths. Theoretical and numerical investigations of the ablative RT instability are numerous and differ considerably on the level of stabilization expected. We present here the results of a series of laser experiments designed to probe the roll-over and cutoff region of the ablation-front RT dispersion curve in indirect drive. Aluminum foils with imposed sinusoidal perturbations ranging in wavelength from 10 to 70 pm were ablatively accelerated with a radiation drive generated in a gold cylindrical hohlraum. A strong shock wave compresses the package followed by an ∼2 ns period of roughly constant acceleration and the experiment is diagnosed via face-on radiography. Perturbations with wavelengths (ge) 20 (micro)m experienced substantial growth during the acceleration phase while shorter wavelengths showed a sharp drop off in overall growth. These experimental results compared favorably to calculations with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code, however, the growth is significantly affected by the rippled shock launched by the drive. We performed numerical simulations to elucidate the influence of the rippled shock wave on the eventual growth of the perturbations, allowing comparisons to the analytic model developed by Betti et al. This combination of experiments, simulations and analytic modeling illustrates the qualitative simplicity yet quantitative complexity of the compressible RT instability. We have measured the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) dispersion curve for a radiatively-driven sample in a series of experiments on the Nova laser facility. Planar aluminum foils were ablatively-accelerated and the subsequent perturbation growth was

  19. Direct numerical simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the spectral element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Tan Duowang

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows. (authors)

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livescu, D; Wei, T; Petersen, M R

    2011-01-01

    The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer is studied using data from an extensive new set of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), performed on the 0.5 Petaflops, 150k compute cores BG/L Dawn supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This includes a suite of simulations with grid size of 1024 2 × 4608 and Atwood number ranging from 0.04 to 0.9, in order to examine small departures from the Boussinesq approximation as well as large Atwood number effects, and a high resolution simulation of grid size 4096 2 × 4032 and Atwood number of 0.75. After the layer width had developed substantially, additional branched simulations have been run under reversed and zero gravity conditions. While the bulk of the results will be published elsewhere, here we present preliminary results on: 1) the long-standing open question regarding the discrepancy between the numerically and experimentally measured mixing layer growth rates and 2) mixing characteristics.

  1. New mitigation schemes of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Sakaiya, T.; Tamari, Y.; Ohtani, K.; Watari, T.; Murakami, M.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Izawa, Y.; Ohnishi, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through the unstable interface is the key physics that determines success or failure of inertial fusion energy (IFE) generation, as the RT instability potentially quenches ignition and burn by disintegrating the IFE target. We present two suppression schemes of the RT growth without significant degradation of the target density. The first scheme is to generate double ablation structure in high-Z doped plastic targets. In addition to the electron ablation surface, a new ablation surface is created by x-ray radiation from the high-Z ions. Contrary to the previous thought, the electron ablation surface is almost completely stabilized by extremely high flow velocity. On the other hand, the RT instability on the radiative ablation surface is significantly moderated. The second is to enhance the nonlocal nature of the electron heat transport by illuminating the target with long wavelength laser light, whereas the high ablation pressure is generated by irradiating short wavelength laser light. The significant suppression of the RT instability may increase the possibility of impact ignition which uses a high velocity fuel colliding with a preformed main fuel. (author)

  2. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, E. P.; Rosner, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible fluids: Final report for the period 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturtevant, B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this research program is to investigate fluid dynamic instabilities and mixing initiated by the interaction of shock waves with interfaces between light and heavy gases. In particular, the nonlinear stage of shock-initiated Rayleigh-Taylor instability (also known as the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability), the secondary instabilities (e.g., the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) arising therefrom and the resulting mixing of the two gases are of interest. This report describes activities during the performance period 1 October 1985 to 30 September 1986

  4. Effects of thermal conduction and compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Mima, Kunioki.

    1980-01-01

    In order to study the stability of the ablation front in laser driven implosion, the thermal conduction and compressibility effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are considered. It is found that the thermal conduction effect cannot stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor mode, but reduce the growth rate in the short wavelength case. But, the growth rate is found not to differ from the classical value √gk in the long wavelength limit, where the compressibility is essential. (author)

  5. Search for Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser irradiated layered thin foil targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Hares, J.D.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the vacuum-ablation surface of laser irradiated layered targets by time resolved x-ray spectroscopy is described. The time taken to burn through a layer of material is measured to be the same for massive targets as for thin foil accelerating targets. It is inferred that the thin foil targets might be Rayleigh-Taylor stable despite the values of γtauapproximately equal to15 calculated from classical theory. (author)

  6. Prominence Bubble Shear Flows and the Coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz — Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Hillier, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Prominence bubbles are large arched structures that rise from below into quiescent prominences, often growing to heights on the order of 10 Mm before going unstable and generating plume upflows. While there is general agreement that emerging flux below pre-existing prominences causes the structures, there is lack of agreement on the nature of the bubbles and the cause of the instability flows. One hypothesis is that the bubbles contain coronal temperature plasma and rise into the prominence above due to both magnetic and thermal buoyancy, eventually breaking down via a magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability to release hot plasma and magnetic flux and helicity into the overlying coronal flux rope. Another posits that the bubbles are actually just “arcades” in the prominence indicating a magnetic separator line between the bipole and the prominence fields with the observed upflows and downflows caused by reconnection along the separator. We analyze Hinode/SOT, SDO/AIA, and IRIS observations of prominence bubbles, focusing on characteristics of the bubble boundary layers that may discriminate between the two hypotheses. We find speeds on the order of 10 km/s in prominence plasma downflows and lateral shear flows along the bubble boundary. Inflows to the boundary gradually increase the thickness and brightness of the layer until plasma drains from there, apparently around the dome-like bubble domain. In one case, shear flow across the bubble boundary develops Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices that we use to infer flow speeds in the low-density bubble on the order of 100 km/sec. IRIS spectra indicate that plasma flows on the bubble boundary at transition region temperatures achieve Doppler speeds on the order of 50 km/s, consistent with this inference. Combined magnetic KH-RT instability analysis leads to flux density estimates of 10 G with a field angle of 30° to the prominence, consistent with vector magnetic field measurements. In contrast, we find no evidence

  7. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Tapan K., E-mail: tksen@iitk.ac.in; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S. [HPCL, Department of Aerospace Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, UP (India); Sengupta, Aditi [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sharma, Nidhi [Graduate Student, HPCL, Department of Aerospace Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, UP (India); Sengupta, Soumyo [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes’ hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes’ hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes’ hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface in an immiscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated using the mean field and Bogoliubov theories. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers are found to grow from the interface and mushroom patterns are formed. Quantized vortex rings and vortex lines are then generated around the mushrooms. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation can be observed in a trapped system.

  9. Potential flow model for the hydromagnetic Rayleigh--Taylor instability in cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, C.S.; Roderick, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    A potential flow model has been developed to study the linear behavior of the hydromagnetic equivalent of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in imploding cylindrical plasmas. Ordinary differential equations are obtained for both (r,z) and (r,θ) disturbances. The model allows the study of the dynamic effects of the moving plasma on the development of the instability. The perturbation equations separate into a geometric part associated with the motion of the interface and a nongeometric part associated with the stability of the interface. In both planes the geometric part shows growth of perturbations for imploding plasmas. The surface is also unstable in both planes for plasmas being imploded by magnetic fields. Analytic solutions are obtained for constant acceleration. These show that the short wavelength perturbations that are most damaging in the (r,z) plane are not affected by the motion of the interface. In the (r,θ) plane the growth of longer wavelength disturbances is affected by the interface motion

  10. Energy balance in a Z pinch with suppressed Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, R. B.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    At present Z-pinch has evolved into a powerful plasma source of soft x-ray. This paper considers the energy balance in a radiating metallic gas-puff Z pinch. In this type of Z pinch, a power-law density distribution is realized, promoting suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities that occur in the pinch plasma during compression. The energy coupled into the pinch plasma, is determined as the difference between the total energy delivered to the load from the generator and the magnetic energy of the load inductance. A calibrated voltage divider and a Rogowski coil were used to determine the coupled energy and the load inductance. Time-gated optical imaging of the pinch plasma showed its stable compression up to the stagnation phase. The pinch implosion was simulated using a 1D two-temperature radiative magnetohydrodynamic code. Comparison of the experimental and simulation results has shown that the simulation adequately describes the pinch dynamics for conditions in which RT instability is suppressed. It has been found that the proportion of the Ohmic heating in the energy balance of a Z pinch with suppressed RT instability is determined by Spitzer resistance and makes no more than ten percent.

  11. Linear theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the equatorial ionsophere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, D.A.; Ott, E.

    1979-01-01

    We present a liner theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the equatorial ionosphere. For a purely exponential density profile, we find that no unstable eigenmode solutions exist. For a particular model ionosphere with an F peak, unstable eigenmode solutions exist only for sufficiently small horizontal wave numbers. In the later case, purely exponential growth at a rate identical to that for the sharp boundary instability is found. To clarify the situation in the case that eigenmodes do not exist, we solve the initial value problem for the linearized ion equation of motion in the long time asymptotic limit. Ion inertia and ion-neutral collisions are included. Assuming straight magnetic field lines, we find that when eigenmodes do not exist the growth of the response to an impulse is slower than exponential viz, t=/sup -1/2/ exp (γ/sup t/) below the F peak and t/sup -3/2/ exp(γ/sup t/) above the peak; and we determine γ

  12. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  13. Stability of an expanding cylindrical plasma envelope: Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    The stability of a cylindrically symmetric plasma envelope driven outward by blast waves is considered. The plasma fluid is assumed to be a compressible, isentropic gas describable as an ideal gas ( p = arho/sup γ/, γ>1). The stability problem of such an envelope undergoing self-similar motion is solved by considering the initial-value problem. It is shown that in the early phase of an expansion, the envelope is unstable to Rayleigh--Taylor modes which develop at the inner surface. In the later phase of the expansion, the Rayleigh--Taylor modes are weakened due to the geometrical divergence effect. The implications of the time-dependent behavior of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability for plasma switches are discussed

  14. The analysis of harmonic generation coefficients in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Fan, Zhengfeng; Lu, Xinpei; Ye, Wenhua; Zou, Changlin; Zhang, Ziyun; Zhang, Wen

    2017-10-01

    In this research, we use the numerical simulation method to investigate the generation coefficients of the first three harmonics and the zeroth harmonic in the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability. It is shown that the interface shifts to the low temperature side during the ablation process. In consideration of the third-order perturbation theory, the first three harmonic amplitudes of the weakly nonlinear regime are calculated and then the harmonic generation coefficients are obtained by curve fitting. The simulation results show that the harmonic generation coefficients changed with time and wavelength. Using the higher-order perturbation theory, we find that more and more harmonics are generated in the later weakly nonlinear stage, which is caused by the negative feedback of the later higher harmonics. Furthermore, extending the third-order theory to the fifth-order theory, we find that the second and the third harmonics coefficients linearly depend on the wavelength, while the feedback coefficients are almost constant. Further analysis also shows that when the fifth-order theory is considered, the normalized effective amplitudes of second and third harmonics can reach about 25%-40%, which are only 15%-25% in the frame of the previous third-order theory. Therefore, the third order perturbation theory is needed to be modified by the higher-order theory when ηL reaches about 20% of the perturbation wavelength.

  15. Thin layer model for nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, K. G.; Wang, L. F.; Xue, C.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Ding, Y. K.; Zhang, W. Y.

    2018-03-01

    On the basis of the thin layer approximation [Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1429 (1972)], a revised thin layer model for incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been developed to describe the deformation and nonlinear evolution of the perturbed interface. The differential equations for motion are obtained by analyzing the forces (the gravity and pressure difference) of fluid elements (i.e., Newton's second law). The positions of the perturbed interface are obtained from the numerical solution of the motion equations. For the case of vacuum on both sides of the layer, the positions of the upper and lower interfaces obtained from the revised thin layer approximation agree with that from the weakly nonlinear (WN) model of a finite-thickness fluid layer [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 122710 (2014)]. For the case considering the fluids on both sides of the layer, the bubble-spike amplitude from the revised thin layer model agrees with that from the WN model [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052305 (2010)] and the expanded Layzer's theory [Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)] in the early nonlinear growth regime. Note that the revised thin layer model can be applied to investigate the perturbation growth at arbitrary Atwood numbers. In addition, the large deformation (the large perturbed amplitude and the arbitrary perturbed distributions) in the initial stage can also be described by the present model.

  16. Weakly nonlinear incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at cylindrically convergent interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; He, X. T.; Wu, J. F.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ye, W. H.

    2013-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear (WN) model has been developed for the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in cylindrical geometry. The transition from linear to nonlinear growth is analytically investigated via a third-order solutions for the cylindrical RTI initiated by a single-mode velocity perturbation. The third-order solutions can depict the early stage of the interface asymmetry due to the bubble-spike formation, as well as the saturation of the linear (exponential) growth of the fundamental mode. The WN results in planar RTI [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 112706 (2012)] are recovered in the limit of high-mode number perturbations. The difference between the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry and in planar geometry is discussed. It is found that the interface of the inward (outward) development spike/bubble is extruded (stretched) by the additional inertial force in cylindrical geometry compared with that in planar geometry. For interfaces with small density ratios, the inward growth bubble can grow fast than the outward growth spike in cylindrical RTI. Moreover, a reduced formula is proposed to describe the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry with an acceptable precision, especially for small-amplitude perturbations. Using the reduced formula, the nonlinear saturation amplitude of the fundamental mode and the phases of the Fourier harmonics are studied. Thus, it should be included in applications where converging geometry effects play an important role, such as the supernova explosions and inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  17. A numerical study of bubble interactions in Rayleigh--Taylor instability for compressible fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimm, J.; Li, X.L.; Menikoff, R.; Sharp, D.H.; Zhang, Q.

    1990-01-01

    The late nonlinear and chaotic stage of Rayleigh--Taylor instability is characterized by the evolution of bubbles of the light fluid and spikes of the heavy fluid, each penetrating into the other phase. This paper is focused on the numerical study of bubble interactions and their effect on the statistical behavior and evolution of the bubble envelope. Compressible fluids described by the two-fluid Euler equations are considered and the front tracking method for numerical simulation of these equations is used. Two major phenomena are studied. One is the dynamics of the bubbles in a chaotic environment and the interaction among neighboring bubbles. Another one is the acceleration of the overall bubble envelope, which is a statistical consequence of the interactions of bubbles. The main result is a consistent analysis, at least in the approximately incompressible case of these two phenomena. The consistency encompasses the analysis of experiments, numerical simulation, simple theoretical models, and variation of parameters. Numerical simulation results that are in quantitative agreement with laboratory experiment for one-and-one-half (1 1/2) generations of bubble merger are presented. To the authors' knowledge, computations of this accuracy have not previously been obtained

  18. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-like structures in a laser-accelerated foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, R.R.; Emery, M.H.; Stamper, J.A.; McLean, E.A.; Obenschain, S.P.; Peckerar, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-accelerated targets have been predicted to be subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability. The development of the instability was studied by introducing mass thickness variations in foil targets and observing the development of the target nonuniformities by side-on flash x radiography. Observations were made of target structures and mass redistribution effects which resemble Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles and spikes, including not only advanced broadening of the spike tips on the laser-irradiated side of the foil but also projections of mass on the unirradiated side. The observations compare well with numerical simulations

  19. Spread F bubbles - Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor mode in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses long-wavelength developed bottomside spread F which has been attributed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation amplitude and the k spectrum of the inertia-dominated Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found in two directions: east-west and vertical. As in the collisional case (Chaturvedi and Ossakow, 1977), the dominant nonlinearity is found to be two-dimensional. It is found that the linearly most unstable modes, which are primarily horizontal, saturate by the nonlinear generation of vertical spatial harmonics. The harmonics are damped by diffusion or recombination. The resulting amplitude spectrum indicates that bubbles are vertically elongated in both inertial and collisional regimes.

  20. Measurement of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in targets driven by optically smoothed laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desselberger, M.; Willi, O.; Savage, M.; Lamb, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Growth rates of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability were measured in targets with imposed sinusoidal modulations irradiated by optically smoothed 0.53-μm laser beams. A hybrid optical smoothing technique utilizing induced-spatial-incoherence and random-phase-plate technology was used for the first time. The wave-number dependence and the nonlinear behavior of Rayleigh-Taylor growth were investigated by using targets with a range of modulation periodicities and depths. The results are compared to 2D hydrodynamic-code simulations

  1. Suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to self-radiation in a multiablation target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Ikegawa, Tadashi; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nagai, Keiji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Azechi, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    A scheme to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been investigated for a direct-drive inertial fusion target. In a high-Z doped-plastic target, two ablation surfaces are formed separately--one driven by thermal radiation and the other driven by electron conduction. The growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is significantly suppressed on the radiation-driven ablation surface inside the target due to the large ablation velocity and long density scale length. A significant reduction of the growth rate was observed in simulations and experiments using a brominated plastic target. A new direct-drive pellet was designed using this scheme

  2. Hybrid simulations of radial transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamere, P. A.; Stauffer, B. H.; Ma, X.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma transport in the rapidly rotating giant magnetospheres is thought to involve a centrifugally-driven flux tube interchange instability, similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. In three dimensions, the convective flow patterns associated with the RT instability can produce strong guide field reconnection, allowing plasma mass to move radially outward while conserving magnetic flux (Ma et al., 2016). We present a set of hybrid (kinetic ion / fluid electron) plasma simulations of the RT instability using high plasma beta conditions appropriate for Jupiter's inner and middle magnetosphere. A density gradient, combined with a centrifugal force, provide appropriate RT onset conditions. Pressure balance is achieved by initializing two ion populations: one with fixed temperature, but varying density, and the other with fixed density, but a temperature gradient that offsets the density gradient from the first population and the centrifugal force (effective gravity). We first analyze two-dimensional results for the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by comparing growth rates as a function of wave vector following Huba et al. (1998). Prescribed perpendicular wave modes are seeded with an initial velocity perturbation. We then extend the model to three dimensions, introducing a stabilizing parallel wave vector. Boundary conditions in the parallel direction prohibit motion of the magnetic field line footprints to model the eigenmodes of the magnetodisc's resonant cavity. We again compare growth rates based on perpendicular wave number, but also on the parallel extent of the resonant cavity, which fixes the size of the largest parallel wavelength. Finally, we search for evidence of strong guide field magnetic reconnection within the domain by identifying areas with large parallel electric fields or changes in magnetic field topology.

  3. A numerical study of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability, with application of accreting X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.M.; Nepveu, M.

    1983-01-01

    With a view toward applications to accreting X-ray sources, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is followed numerically, using a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic code. The presence of a uniform magnetic field in the underlying medium is allowed for. The infalling plasma is found to develop elongated, trailing loops; at least when the initial perturbation is highly symmetric, a narrow neck also forms through the action of the surrounding ram pressure. It is suggested that the swirling motion present in the nonlinear phase could produce some effective large-scale mixing between accreting plasma and the magnetospheric field of a neutron star. Another potentially significant tendency is for the curvature of the infalling plasma pocket to sharpen as the instability develops: magnetic tension may therefore become increasingly effective as a stabilizing influence. (orig.)

  4. Nonlinear theory of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in equatorial spread F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, P.K.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in equatorial Spread F by including a dominant two-dimensional nonlinearity. It is found that on account of this nonlinearity the instability saturates by generating damped higher spatial harmonics. The saturated power spectrum for the density fluctuations is discussed. A comparison between experimental observations and theory is presented

  5. Self-consistent model of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.V.; Golberg, S.M.; Liberman, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A self-consistent approach to the problem of the growth rate of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in laser accelerated targets is developed. The analytical solution of the problem is obtained by solving the complete system of the hydrodynamical equations which include both thermal conductivity and energy release due to absorption of the laser light. The developed theory provides a rigorous justification for the supplementary boundary condition in the limiting case of the discontinuity model. An analysis of the suppression of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability by the ablation flow is done and it is found that there is a good agreement between the obtained solution and the approximate formula σ = 0.9√gk - 3u 1 k, where g is the acceleration, u 1 is the ablation velocity. This paper discusses different regimes of the ablative stabilization and compares them with previous analytical and numerical works

  6. Surfactants and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Couette type flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, A. L.; Halpern, D.; Schweiger, A. S.

    2011-11-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of slow Couette- type flows in the presence of insoluble surfactants. It is known that with zero gravity, the surfactant makes the flow unstable to longwave disturbances in certain regions of the parameter space; while in other parametric regions, it reinforces the flow stability (Frenkel and Halpern 2002). Here, we show that in the latter parametric sectors, and when the (gravity) Bond number Bo is below a certain threshold value, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is completely stabilized for a finite interval of Ma, the (surfactant) Marangoni number: MaL Ma2. For Ma Ma2, and also for MaL Ma2 as functions of the Bond number. We note that (for an interval of the Bond number) there are two distinct criticalities with nonzero (and distinct) critical wavenumbers.

  7. Evidence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in tri-layer targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galmiche, D.; Holstein, P.A.; Meyer, B.; Rostaing, M.; Wilke, N.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the experiments carried out on a laser system are reported. The work is performed in order to investigate the problem of target instability under ablative acceleration and to get direct evidence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Tri-layer experiments assert the validity of X-ray spectroscopy measurements as experimental method to investigate the problem. A mixing zone is evidenced and general trends of mixing development versus target acceleration are coherent with numerical simulations. Results obtained with optical smoothing demonstrate that the apparent mixing is not due to large scale illumination non uniformities. Numerical simulations confirm that Rayleigh-Taylor instability seems to be the dominant process responsible for the mixing. Benefit of time resolved spectroscopy appears attractive and gives a real knowledge of the mixing layer

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor and wind-driven instabilities of the nighttime equatorial ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Y.T.; Straus, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    We have made a thorough re-examination of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere from approx.100 km to the bottomside F region. We have taken into account explicitly the following effects which have been ignored by other workers in various combinations: (1) The eastward drift of the ionosphere caused by the nighttime polarization electric field, (2) the eastward nighttime neutral wind, and (3) recombination in the F and E regions. We found that, well below the bottomside F region, the Rayleigh-Taylor mode can be unstable and is driven by an eastward neutral wind rather than by gravitational drift. Formation of ionospheric bubbles below the bottomside F region is consistent with the observation of lower ionospheric ions in F region ionospheric holes; furthermore, seasonal and shorter term variations in spread-F occurrence may be associated with variations in the neutral wind and polarization electric field

  9. Three-dimensional single-mode nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, R.; Aluie, H.; Betti, R.; Sanz, J.; Liu, B.; Frank, A.

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the single-mode ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in three dimensions. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the three-dimensional (3D) terminal bubble velocity greatly exceeds both the two-dimensional (2D) value and the classical 3D bubble velocity. Unlike in 2D, the 3D short-wavelength bubble velocity does not saturate. The growing 3D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes to the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume

  10. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a self-gravitating two-layer viscous sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Puskar; Korenaga, Jun

    2018-03-01

    The dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the spherical geometry is of profound importance in the context of the Earth's core formation. Here we present a complete derivation of this dispersion relation for a self-gravitating two-layer viscous sphere. Such relation is, however, obtained through the solution of a complex transcendental equation, and it is difficult to gain physical insights directly from the transcendental equation itself. We thus also derive an empirical formula to compute the growth rate, by combining the Monte Carlo sampling of the relevant model parameter space with linear regression. Our analysis indicates that the growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability is most sensitive to the viscosity of inner layer in a physical setting that is most relevant to the core formation.

  11. Designs for highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Jacquet, L.; Loiseau, P.; Poujade, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Igumenshchev, I.; Chicanne, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present two designs relevant to ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008)]. The sensitivity of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability physics to ablation velocity is addressed with targets driven by indirect drive, with stronger ablative stabilization, and by direct drive, with weaker ablative stabilization. The indirect drive design demonstrates the potential to reach a two-dimensional bubble-merger regime with a 20 ns duration drive at moderate radiation temperature. The direct drive design achieves a 3 to 5 times increased acceleration distance for the sample in comparison to previous experiments allowing at least 2 more bubble generations when starting from a three-dimensional broadband spectrum.

  12. LASNEX simulations of the classical and laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, K.O.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of two-dimensional LASNEX simulations of the classical and laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our growth rates and eigenmodes for classical two- and three-fluid problems agree closely with the exact analytic expressions. We illustrate in several examples how perturbations feed through from one interface to another. For targets driven by a 1/4-μm laser at I=2x10 14 W/cm 2 our growth rates are 40--80 % of the classical case rates for wavelengths between 5 and 100 μm. We find that radiation transport has a stabilizing effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, particularly at high intensities. A brief comparison with a laser-driven experiment is also presented

  13. Designs for highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Jacquet, L.; Loiseau, P.; Poujade, O. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Smalyuk, V. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Igumenshchev, I. [Laboratory of Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Chicanne, C. [CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-08-15

    We present two designs relevant to ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008)]. The sensitivity of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability physics to ablation velocity is addressed with targets driven by indirect drive, with stronger ablative stabilization, and by direct drive, with weaker ablative stabilization. The indirect drive design demonstrates the potential to reach a two-dimensional bubble-merger regime with a 20 ns duration drive at moderate radiation temperature. The direct drive design achieves a 3 to 5 times increased acceleration distance for the sample in comparison to previous experiments allowing at least 2 more bubble generations when starting from a three-dimensional broadband spectrum.

  14. Nonlinear spectrum of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-accelerated planar plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskinen, M. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2007-01-01

    A model for the nonlinear spectrum of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-accelerated planar plasmas has been developed for a wide range of Froude numbers and scale sizes. It is found that the spectrum can be characterized by an inverse power law with spectral index of approximately 2 in the limit of small-wavenumber spectrum cutoffs and small-scale density gradient scale lengths. Comparison of the model spectrum with recent experimental observations is made with good agreement

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a self-similar spherical expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, I.B.; Book, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The self-similar motion of a spherically symmetric isentropic cloud of ideal gas driven outward by an expanding low-density medium (e.g., radiation pressure from a pulsar) is shown to be unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor modes which develop in the neighborhood of the interface. A complete solution of the linearized equations of motion is obtained. The implications for astrophysical phenomena are discussed

  16. Three-dimensional, nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability of a thin layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manheimer, W.; Colombant, D.; Ott, E.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical simulation scheme is developed to examine the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability of a thin sheet in three dimensions. It is shown that the erosion of mass at the top of the bubble is approximately as described by two-dimensional simulations. However, mass is lost into spikes more slowly in three-dimensional than in two-dimensional simulations

  17. A numerical and analytical investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a solid tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.C.; Swegle, J.W.

    1987-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability response of an elastic-plastic tungsten plate is investigated by numerical experiments and an approximate modal analysis. The so-called ''minimum amplitude'' instability criteria derived from plasticity analyses is shown to be incomplete as a general indicator of instability or stability at very large driving pressures. Model equations are derived which are able to reproduce the basic qualitative features of the observed instability response given by the numerical calculations. 11 refs., 29 figs

  18. Analytical approach to the investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor structures of the equatorial F region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.N.; Sazonov, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of approximation of a strong vertical extension the nonlinear dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor structures in the equatorial F region is analytically studied. The successive approximation method, proposed herein, is true for structures having longitudinal symmetry. Using this method it is managed to describe the mushroom-shaped bubble with a shock wave profile in its head part. The nonlinearity leads to bubble formation under conditions with aggravation, limiting the growth of positive disturbances at the same time

  19. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  20. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ablation driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdon, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of ablatively accelerated thin shells subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instability are presented. Results for both single wavelength and multiwavelength perturbations show that the nonlinear effects of the instability are evident mainly in the bubble rather than the spike. Approximate roles for predicting the dominant nonlinear mode-mode interactions, which limit shell performance, are also discussed. The work concludes with a discussion of recommendations for future work in this area

  1. Breakup of an accelerated shell owing to Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suydam, B.R.

    1978-06-01

    A simplified model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an accelerated shell is examined, and it is found that the most dangerous wavelength to be about that of the shell thickness. The shell material is assumed to be an inviscid, incompressible fluid. Effects of finite compressibility and of surface tension are found to be negligible, but the effects of viscosity are shown to be very large. The need for better knowledge of viscosity at high pressure is pointed out

  2. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-01

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition

  3. Coherent structures in ablatively compressed ICF targets and Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.C.; Desai, T.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major issues in laser induced inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a stable ablative compression of spherical fusion pellets. The main impediment in achievement of this objective is Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the pellet's ablation front. Under sufficiently high acceleration this instability can grow out of noise. However, it can also arise either due to non-uniform laser intensity distribution over the pellet surface or due to pellet wall areal mass irregularity. Coherent structures in the dense target behind the ablation front can be effectively utilised for stabilisation of the Rayleigh-Taylor phenomenon. Such coherent structures in the form of a super lattice can be created by doping the pellet pusher with high atomic number (Z) micro particles. A compressed-cool pusher under laser irradiation behaves like a strongly correlated non ideal plasma when compressed to sufficiently high density such that the non ideality parameter exceeds unity. Moreover, the nonideality parameter for high Z microinclusions may exceed a critical value of 180 and as a consequence they remain in the form of intact clusters, maintaining the superlattice intact during ablative acceleration. Micro-hetrogeneity and its superlattice plays an important role in stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, through a variety of mechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic stabilization of the imploding-shell Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boris, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A method for dynamic stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability on the surface of an imploding fusion pellet is discussed. The driving laser beams are modulated in intensity so the ablation layer is subject to a rapidly and strongly oscillating acceleration. A substantial band of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability spectrum can be stabilized by this oscillation even though the time average acceleration vector lies in the destabilizing direction. By adjusting the frequency, structure, and amplitude of the modulation, the band of dynamically stabilized modes can be made to include the most unstable and dangerous modes. Thus considerably higher aspect ratio shells (i.e., thinner shells) could implode successfully than had been previously considered stable enough. Both theory and numerical simulations support this conclusion for the case of laser-driven pellet implosions. Similar modulation via transverse beam oscillations or parallel bunching should also work to stabilize the most dangerous surface Rayleigh-Taylor modes in relativistic electron-, ion- and heavy ion-pellet fusion schemes. (U.K.)

  5. Analytical and numerical analysis of finite amplitude Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiron, D.I.; Saffman, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    We summarize the results obtained in the last year. These include a simple model of bubble competition in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flows which gives results which are in good agreement with experiment. In addition the model has been compared with two dimensional numerical simulations of inviscid Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the cloud-in-cell method. These simulations can now be run into the late time regime and can track the competition of as many as ten bubbles. The improvement in performance over previous applications of the cloud-in-cell approach is due to the application of finite difference techniques designed to handle shock-like structures in the vorticity of the interface which occur at late times. We propose to extend the research carried thus far to Rayleigh-Taylor problems in three dimensional and convergent geometries as well as to two-fluid instabilities in which interface roll-up is observed. Finally we present a budget for the fiscal year 1987-1988. 6 refs

  6. Dynamic evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles from sinusoidal, W-shaped, and random perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Zhang, You-Sheng; Tian, Bao-Lin

    2018-03-01

    Implicit large eddy simulations of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability at different density ratios (i.e., Atwood number A =0.05 , 0.5, and 0.9) are conducted to investigate the late-time dynamics of bubbles. To produce a flow field full of bounded, semibounded, and chaotic bubbles, three problems with distinct perturbations are simulated: (I) periodic sinusoidal perturbation, (II) isolated W-shaped perturbation, and (III) random short-wave perturbations. The evolution of height h , velocity v , and diameter D of the (dominant) bubble with time t are formulated and analyzed. In problem I, during the quasisteady stage, the simulations confirm Goncharov's prediction of the terminal speed v∞=Fr√{A g λ /(1 +A ) } , where Fr=1 /√{3 π } . Moreover, the diameter D at this stage is found to be proportional to the initial perturbation wavelength λ as D ≈λ . This differed from Daly's simulation result of D =λ (1 +A )/2 . In problem II, a W-shaped perturbation is designed to produce a bubble environment similar to that of chaotic bubbles in problem III. We obtain a similar terminal speed relationship as above, but Fr is replaced by Frw≈0.63 . In problem III, the simulations show that h grows quadratically with the bubble acceleration constant α ≡h /(A g t2)≈0.05 , and D expands self-similarly with a steady aspect ratio β ≡D /h ≈(1 +A )/2 , which differs from existing theories. Therefore, following the mechanism of self-similar growth, we derive a relationship of β =4 α (1 +A ) /Frw2 to relate the evolution of chaotic bubbles in problem III to that of semibounded bubbles in problem II. The validity of this relationship highlights the fact that the dynamics of chaotic bubbles in problem III are similar to the semibounded isolated bubbles in problem II, but not to that of bounded periodic bubbles in problem I.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities play an important role in a wide range of engineering, geophysical, and astrophysical flows. They represent a triggering event that, in many cases, leads to large-scale turbulent mixing. Much effort has been expended over the past 140 years, beginning with the seminal work of Lord Rayleigh, to predict the evolution of the instabilities and of the instability-induced mixing layers. The objective of Part I of this review is to provide the basic properties of the flow, turbulence, and mixing induced by RT, RM, and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. Historical efforts to study these instabilities are briefly reviewed, and the significance of these instabilities is discussed for a variety of flows, particularly for astrophysical flows and for the case of inertial confinement fusion. Early experimental efforts are described, and analytical attempts to model the linear, and nonlinear regimes of these mixing layers are examined. These analytical efforts include models for both single-mode and multi-mode initial conditions, as well as multi-scale models to describe the evolution. Comparisons of these models and theories to experimental and simulation studies are then presented. Next, attention is paid to the issue of the influence of stabilizing mechanisms (e.g., viscosity, surface tension, and diffuse interface) on the evolution of these instabilities, as well as the limitations and successes of numerical methods. Efforts to study these instabilities and mixing layers using group-theoretic ideas, as well as more formal notions of turbulence cascade processes during the later stages of the induced mixing layers, are inspected. A key element of the review is the discussion of the late-time self-similar scaling for the RT and RM growth factors, α and θ. These parameters are influenced by the initial conditions and much of the observed variation can be explained by this. In some cases, these instabilities

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in indirect laser drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums; Experiences d'instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en attaque indirecte avec des cavites rugby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.P.; Richard, A.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The mastering of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities is an important milestone on the way to perform efficient laser implosions. The complexity of these instabilities implies an experimental validation of the theoretical models and their computer simulations. An experimental platform involving the Omega laser has allowed us to perform indirect drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums. The experiments have validated the growth of 2- and 3-dimensional initial defects as predicted by theory. We have shown that the 3-dimensional defect saturates for an higher amplitude than the 2-dimensional one does. The experiments have been made by using a plastic shell doped with Germanium (CH:Ge). (A.C.)

  9. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  10. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability under electrical pulse discharge in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononov, A.V.; Porytskyy, P.V.; Starchyk, P.D.; Voitenko, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied on the interface between both the plasma channel and liquid medium under an electrical pulse discharge in water.It is shown that,growth of the irregularities of the contact interface leads to the increasing of heat flux from the discharge channel due to the growth of an interfacial area and the incoming of water matter into a discharge channel.As a result of these processes the characteristics of the discharge may be strongly varied

  11. Initial value problem for Rayleigh--Taylor instability of viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menikoff, R.; Mjolsness, R.C.; Sharp, D.H.; Zemach, C.; Doyle, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    The initial value problem associated with the development of small amplitude disturbances in Rayleigh--Taylor unstable, viscous, incompressible fluids is studied. Solutions to the linearized equations of motion which satisfy general initial conditions are obtained in terms of Fourier--Laplace transforms of the hydrodynamic variables, without restriction on the density or viscosity of either fluid. When the two fluids have equal kinematic viscosities, these transforms can be inverted explicitly to express the fluid variables as integrals of Green's functions multiplied by initial data. In addition to normal modes, a set of continuum modes, not treated explicitly in the literature, makes an important contribution to the development of the fluid motion

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in targets accelerated by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, M.H.; Gardner, J.H.; Boris, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    With use of the fast2d laser-shell model, the acceleration of a 20-μm-thick plastic foil up to 160 km/s has been simulated. It is possible to follow the Rayleigh-Taylor bubble-and-spike development far into the nonlinear regime and beyond the point of foil fragmentation. Strong shear flow develops which evolves into the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability causes the tips of the spikes to widen and as a result reduce their rate of ''fall.''

  13. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  14. A scheme for reducing deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Liu, Jie; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-05-01

    It is demonstrated that the growth of acceleration-phase instabilities in inertial confinement fusion implosions can be controlled, especially in the high-foot implosions [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility. However, the excessive growth of the deceleration-phase instabilities can still destroy the hot spot ignition. A scheme is proposed to retard the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by shock collision near the waist of the inner shell surface. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm the improved deceleration-phase hot spot stability properties without sacrificing the fuel compression.

  15. Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavin, P.; Almarcha, Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The instability of ablation fronts strongly accelerated toward the dense medium under the conditions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is addressed in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio. The analysis serves to demonstrate that the flow is irrotational to first order, reducing the nonlinear analysis to solve a two-potential flows problem. Vorticity appears at the following orders in the perturbation analysis. This result simplifies greatly the analysis. The possibility for using boundary integral methods opens new perspectives in the nonlinear theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ICF. A few examples are given at the end of the paper. (authors)

  16. Strong stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by material strength at Mbar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H S; Lorenz, K T; Cavallo, R M; Pollaine, S M; Prisbrey, S T; Rudd, R E; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V; Remington, B A

    2009-11-19

    Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure effective lattice viscosity are presented. Using a laser created ramped drive, vanadium samples are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at {approx}1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the sample in the solid-state. Comparisons with simulations and theory indicate that the high pressure, high strain rate conditions trigger a phonon drag mechanism, resulting in the observed high effective lattice viscosity and strong stabilization of the RT instability.

  17. Collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and shear-flow in equatorial Spread-F plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chakrabarti

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Collisional Rayleigh-Taylor (RT instability is considered in the bottom side of the equatorial F-region. By a novel nonmodal calculation it is shown that for an applied shear flow in equilibrium, the growth of the instability is considerably reduced. Finite but small amounts of diffusion enhances the stabilization process. The results may be relevant to the observations of long-lived irregularities at the bottom-side of the F-layer.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities, equatorial ionosphere, plasma waves and instabilities

  18. Measurements of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in solid liners on the 20 MA Z facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigman, Verle; Vesey, Roger Alan; Shores, Jonathon; Herrmann, Mark C.; Stamm, Robert; Killebrew, Korbie; Holt, Randy; Blue, Brent; Nakhleh, Charlie; McBride, Ryan D.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Smith, Ian Craig; Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Lopez, Mike R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Tomlinson, Kurt; Edens, Aaron D.; Savage, Mark Edward; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2010-01-01

    The magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability is the most important instability for determining whether a cylindrical liner can be compressed to its axis in a relatively intact form, a requirement for achieving the high pressures needed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other high energy-density physics applications. While there are many published RT studies, there are a handful of well-characterized MRT experiments at time scales >1 (micro)s and none for 100 ns z-pinch implosions. Experiments used solid Al liners with outer radii of 3.16 mm and thicknesses of 292 (micro)m, dimensions similar to magnetically-driven ICF target designs (1). In most tests the MRT instability was seeded with sinusoidal perturbations (λ = 200, 400 (micro)m, peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20 (micro)m, respectively), wavelengths similar to those predicted to dominate near stagnation. Radiographs show the evolution of the MRT instability and the effects of current-induced ablation of mass from the liner surface. Additional Al liner tests used 25-200 (micro)m wavelengths and flat surfaces. Codes being used to design magnetized liner ICF loads (1) match the features seen except at the smallest scales (<50 (micro)m). Recent experiments used Be liners to enable penetrating radiography using the same 6.151 keV diagnostics and provide an in-flight measurement of the liner density profile.

  19. Analytic theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a uniform density plasma-filled ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussey, T.W.; Payne, S.S.

    1987-04-01

    The J-vector x B-vector forces associated with the surface current of a plasma-filled ion diode will accelerate this plasma fill toward the anode surface. It is well known that such a configuration with a high I is susceptible to the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in certain geometries. A number of ion diode plasma sources have been proposed, most of which have a falling density going away from the wall. A somewhat more unstable case, however, is that of uniform density. In this report we attempt to establish an upper limit on this effect with a simple analytic model in which a uniform-density plasma is accelerated by the magnetic field anticipated in a PBFA-II diode. We estimate the number of linear e-foldings experienced by an unstable surface as well as the most damaging wavelength initial perturbation. This model, which accounts approximately for stabilization due to field diffusion, suggests that even with a uniform fill, densities in excess of a few 10 15 are probably not damaged by the instability. In addition, even lower densities might be tolerated if perturbations near the most damaging wavelength can be kept very small

  20. On stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the imploding liner on account of ion-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Alexander V.

    2002-01-01

    The stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the imploding cylindrical liner in the limit of a low plasma density Π ω pi 2 δ2/c2 << 1 (δ -- the characteristic size of the current layer) is investigated, when the electron currents are much greater than the ion currents. The stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the parameter diapason νii/ωBi < (Z2M/m)1/2 is considered, when the plasma dissipation connected with the ion-ion collisions considerably superior the usual dissipation due to the electron-ion collisions. For the electric conductivity, caused by the ion-ion collisions and resulted in the minimum value σ ∼ enc/B, the effect of the partial stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is demonstrated

  1. Analysis of weakly nonlinear three-dimensional Rayleigh--Taylor instability growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, M.J.; Haan, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the Rayleigh--Taylor instability, which develops at an interface where a low density fluid pushes and accelerates a higher density fluid, is important to the design, analysis, and ultimate performance of inertial confinement fusion targets. Existing experimental results measuring the growth of two-dimensional (2-D) perturbations (perturbations translationally invariant in one transverse direction) are adequately modeled using the 2-D hydrodynamic code LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 11, 51 (1975)]. However, of ultimate interest is the growth of three-dimensional (3-D) perturbations such as those initiated by surface imperfections or illumination nonuniformities. Direct simulation of such 3-D experiments with all the significant physical processes included and with sufficient resolution is very difficult. This paper addresses how such experiments might be modeled. A model is considered that couples 2-D linear regime hydrodynamic code results with an analytic model to allow modeling of 3-D Rayleigh--Taylor growth through the linear regime and into the weakly nonlinear regime. The model is evaluated in 2-D by comparison with LASNEX results. Finally the model is applied to estimate the dynamics of a hypothetical 3-D foil

  2. Method of generalized coordinates and an application to Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.

    1978-01-01

    The method of generalized coordinates is extended to the analysis of continuous bodies for which the degrees of freedom are independent velocity distributions in the spatial coordinates. The corresponding Lagrange equations contain generalized convective terms as well as the usual generalized forces and masses. Since the existence of a potential is not assumed, the equations of motion can be applied to media with arbitrary (possible dissipative) constitutive laws. Material deformation is characterized by the rate of strain, which is taken as the symmetric part of the velocity gradient, making the approach valid for arbitrarily large deformations. As an example, infinitesimal Rayleigh-Taylor instability is considered by analytic methods. Then, large amplitude Rayleigh-Taylor instability is represented with a single-degree-of-freedom analysis that shows the development (by numerical integration) of the known spike-and-bubble configuration of the unstable interface. The infinitesimal stability of a plastically deforming solid and the growth of the instability to large amplitudes are also considered

  3. Self-similarity in high Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaeil, Mark; Suchandra, Prasoon; Pathikonda, Gokul; Ranjan, Devesh

    2017-11-01

    Self-similarity is a critical concept in turbulent and mixing flows. In the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, theory and simulations have shown that the flow exhibits properties of self-similarity as the mixing Reynolds number exceeds 20000 and the flow enters the turbulent regime. Here, we present results from the first large Atwood number (0.7) Rayleigh-Taylor experimental campaign for mixing Reynolds number beyond 20000 in an effort to characterize the self-similar nature of the instability. Experiments are performed in a statistically steady gas tunnel facility, allowing for the evaluation of turbulence statistics. A visualization diagnostic is used to study the evolution of the mixing width as the instability grows. This allows for computation of the instability growth rate. For the first time in such a facility, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry is used to resolve three-component velocity information in a plane. Velocity means, fluctuations, and correlations are considered as well as their appropriate scaling. Probability density functions of velocity fields, energy spectra, and higher-order statistics are also presented. The energy budget of the flow is described, including the ratio of the kinetic energy to the released potential energy. This work was supported by the DOE-NNSA SSAA Grant DE-NA0002922.

  4. Ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    As shown elsewhere an ablatively imploded shell is hydrodynamically unstable, the dominant instability being the well known Rayleigh-Taylor instability with growth rate γ = √Akg where k = 2π/λ is the wave number, g is the acceleration and A the Attwood number (ρ hi - ρ lo )/(ρ hi + ρ lo ) where ρ hi is the density of the heavier fluid and ρ lo is the density of the lighter fluid. A theoretical understanding of ablative stabilization has gradually evolved, confirmed over the last five years by experiments. The linear growth is very well understood with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation for planar geometry with wavelengths in the region of 30--100μm. There is an accurate, albeit phenomenological dispersion relation. The non-linear growth has been measured and agrees with calculations. In this lecture, the authors go into the fundamentals of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the experimental measurements that show it is stabilized sufficiently by ablation in regimes relevant to ICF

  5. Study of three-dimensional Rayleigh--Taylor instability in compressible fluids through level set method and parallel computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.L.

    1993-01-01

    Computation of three-dimensional (3-D) Rayleigh--Taylor instability in compressible fluids is performed on a MIMD computer. A second-order TVD scheme is applied with a fully parallelized algorithm to the 3-D Euler equations. The computational program is implemented for a 3-D study of bubble evolution in the Rayleigh--Taylor instability with varying bubble aspect ratio and for large-scale simulation of a 3-D random fluid interface. The numerical solution is compared with the experimental results by Taylor

  6. Experiment of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a strongly non linear regime on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Delorme, B.; Jacquet, L.; Loiseau, P.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.; Remington, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    As the control of the development of Rayleigh-Taylor-type hydrodynamic instabilities is crucial to achieve efficient implosions on the Laser Megajoule, and as the complexity of these instabilities requires an experimental validation of theoretical models and of the associated numerical simulations, the authors briefly present a proposition of experiments aimed at studying the strongly non linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This should allow a regime of competition between bubbles to be achieved for the first time in direct attack. They evoke the first experiment performed in March 2013

  7. What is certain and what is not so certain in our knowledge of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, Sergei I.; Drake, R. Paul; Gauthier, Serge; Meshkov, Evgeny E.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-01-01

    Past decades significantly advanced our understanding of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing. We briefly review recent theoretical results and numerical modelling approaches and compare them with state of the art experiments focusing the reader's attention on qualitative properties of RT mixing. (authors)

  8. Finite-thickness effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A physical model has been developed for the linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a finite-thickness elastic slab laying on top of a semi-infinite ideal fluid. The model includes the nonideal effects of elasticity as boundary conditions at the top and bottom interfaces of the slab and also takes into account the finite transit time of the elastic waves across the slab thickness. For Atwood number AT=1 , the asymptotic growth rate is found to be in excellent agreement with the exact solution [Plohr and Sharp, Z. Angew. Math. Mech. 49, 786 (1998), 10.1007/s000330050121], and a physical explanation is given for the reduction of the stabilizing effectiveness of the elasticity for the thinner slabs. The feedthrough factor is also calculated.

  9. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability in partially ionized plasma and the equatorial spread - F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.K.; Das, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the collisional gravitation induced Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability in the equatorial F region is investigated taking into account the finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the complete ion inertial term in ion equation of motion. A special class of coherent weakly nonlinear modes as solutions to the wave equation describing R-T instability driven modes is obtained. The leading nonlinear effects in the wave equation are found to appear through Vsub(L), the ion diamagnetic drift which essentially gives the FLR corrections. It is shown that the R-T modes in the equatorial F region can evolve into coherent, nonlinear, almost sinusoidal, stationary wave structures. These structures are found to travel with a constant phase velocity and to have slightly distorted sinusoidal shapes. These results seem to have a good agreement with many of the recent rocket and satellite observations of the equatorial spread F irregularities. (author)

  10. Stabilization of the Rayleigh - Taylor instability with convection in an ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.; Liberman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the framework of WKB approximation the problem is studied of stabilizing the Rayleigh - Taylor instability with unhomogeneous convective flow, developing in the ablation zone during the ablative acceleration of the laser target plasma. The eigenvalue (instability growth rates) problem is reduced to solving an algebraic equation with the coefficients depending on the unperturbed profile structure of hydrodynamic variables. For the important case of the incompressible plasma subsonic flow, the instability growth rates is shown to vanish at k=k 0 =max(2(g|∇ ln p|) 1/2 /ν). The consistency condition of the model consists in the smallness of the local Froude number in the region of instability development. However, as seen from the comparison with the numerical calculations, the model is well appicable also for the case of the sufficiently abrupt density gradient provided the Froude number is of order of unity

  11. Design for solid-state Rayleigh-Taylor experiments in tantalum at Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Park, H S; Prisbrey, S T; Cavallo, R M

    2010-01-01

    We have designed an experiment for the Omega - EP laser facility to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth rate of solid-state Ta samples at ∼1 Mbar pressures and very high strain rates, 10 7 -10 8 s -1 . A thin walled, hohlraum based, ramp-wave, quasi-isentropic drive has been developed for this experiment. Thick samples (∼50 um) of Ta, with a pre-imposed sinusoidal rippled on the driven side, will be accelerated. The ripple growth due to the RT instability is greatly reduced due to the dynamic material strength. We will show detailed designs, and a thorough error analysis used to optimize the experiment and minimize uncertainty.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T., E-mail: marchdf@umich.edu; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Belof, J. L.; Cavallo, R. M.; Ancheta, D. S.; El-dasher, B. S.; Florando, J. N.; Gallegos, G. F.; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Raevsky, V. A.; Ignatova, O. N.; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-14

    We present a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiments for beryllium to produce data to distinguish predictions by various strength models. Design simulations using existing strength model parameterizations from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, suggests growth consistent with little material strength. We focus mostly on efforts to simulate the data using published strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. The results of the strength experiments indicate weak influence of strength in mitigating the growth with the RING model coming closest to predicting the material behavior. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments.

  13. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H., E-mail: ye-wenhua@iapcm.ac.cn; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-15

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  14. Jet-like long spike in nonlinear evolution of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wenhua; He Xiantu; Wang Lifeng

    2010-01-01

    We report the formation of jet-like long spike in the nonlinear evolution of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) experiments by numerical simulations. A preheating model κ(T) = κ SH [1 + f(T)], where κ SH is the Spitzer-Haerm (SH) electron conductivity and f(T) interprets the preheating tongue effect in the cold plasma ahead of the ablative front [Phys. Rev. E 65 (2002) 57401], is introduced in simulations. The simulation results of the nonlinear evolution of the ARTI are in general agreement with the experiment results. It is found that two factors, i.e., the suppressing of ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (AKHI) and the heat flow cone in the spike tips, contribute to the formation of jet-like long spike in the nonlinear evolution of the ARTI. (authors)

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in indirect laser drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.P.; Richard, A.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-01-01

    The mastering of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities is an important milestone on the way to perform efficient laser implosions. The complexity of these instabilities implies an experimental validation of the theoretical models and their computer simulations. An experimental platform involving the Omega laser has allowed us to perform indirect drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums. The experiments have validated the growth of 2- and 3-dimensional initial defects as predicted by theory. We have shown that the 3-dimensional defect saturates for an higher amplitude than the 2-dimensional one does. The experiments have been made by using a plastic shell doped with Germanium (CH:Ge). (A.C.)

  16. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; Belof, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Cavallo, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Raevsky, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ignatova, O. N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; El-dasher, B. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  17. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial fusion, astrophysical plasma and flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V; Modestov, M; Akkerman, V; Eriksson, L-E

    2007-01-01

    Previous results are reviewed and new results are presented on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confined fusion, flames and supernovae including gravitational and thermonuclear explosion mechanisms. The instability couples micro-scale plasma effects to large-scale hydrodynamic phenomena. In inertial fusion the instability reduces target compression. In supernovae the instability produces large-scale convection, which determines the fate of the star. The instability is often accompanied by mass flux through the unstable interface, which may have either a stabilizing or a destabilizing influence. Destabilization happens due to the Darrieus-Landau instability of a deflagration front. Still, it is unclear whether the instabilities lead to well-organized large-scale structures (bubbles) or to relatively isotropic turbulence (mixing layer)

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements of three-dimensional modulations in a nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of the nonlinear evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is essential in inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The nonlinear RT growth of three-dimensional (3-D) broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial 3-D target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and subsequently amplified by the RT instability. The measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in excellent agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [S. Haan, Phys. Rev. A 39, 5812 (1989)]. These spectra and growth velocities are insensitive to initial conditions. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions, in agreement with the Alon-Oron-Shvarts theoretical predictions [D. Oron et al. Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883 (2001)

  19. Observation of Self-Similar Behavior of the 3D, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadot, O.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Delettrez, J.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Goncharov, V.N.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Betti, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor unstable growth of laser-seeded, 3D broadband perturbations was experimentally measured in the laser-accelerated, planar plastic foils. The first experimental observation showing the self-similar behavior of the bubble size and amplitude distributions under ablative conditions is presented. In the nonlinear regime, the modulation σ rms grows as α σ gt 2 , where g is the foil acceleration, t is the time, and α σ is constant. The number of bubbles evolves as N(t)∝(ωt√(g)+C) -4 and the average size evolves as (t)∝ω 2 gt 2 , where C is a constant and ω=0.83±0.1 is the measured scaled bubble-merging rate

  20. Designing cylindrical implosion experiments on NIF to study deceleration phase of Rayleigh-Taylor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirani, N.; Kline, J. L.; Loomis, E.; Sauppe, J. P.; Palaniyappan, S.; Flippo, K.; Srinivasan, B.; Malka, E.; Bose, A.; Shvarts, D.

    2017-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) hydrodynamic instability occurs when a lower density fluid pushes on a higher density fluid. This occurs in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at each of the capsule interfaces during the initial acceleration and the deceleration as it stagnates. The RT instabilities mix capsule material into the fusion fuel degrading the Deuterium-Tritium reactivity and ultimately play a key role in limiting target performance. While significant effort has focused on understanding RT at the outer capsule surface, little work has gone into understanding the inner surface RT instability growth during the deceleration phase. Direct measurements of the RT instability are difficult to make at high convergence in a spherical implosion. Here we present the design of a cylindrical implosion system for the National Ignition Facility for studying deceleration phase RT. We will discuss the experimental design, the estimated instability growth, and our outstanding concerns.

  1. Linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an accelerated Newtonian fluid with finite width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, S. A.; Piriz, A. R.; Tahir, N. A.

    2018-04-01

    The linear theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability is developed for the case of a viscous fluid layer accelerated by a semi-infinite viscous fluid, considering that the top interface is a free surface. Effects of the surface tensions at both interfaces are taken into account. When viscous effects dominate on surface tensions, an interplay of two mechanisms determines opposite behaviors of the instability growth rate with the thickness of the heavy layer for an Atwood number AT=1 and for sufficiently small values of AT. In the former case, viscosity is a less effective stabilizing mechanism for the thinnest layers. However, the finite thickness of the heavy layer enhances its viscous effects that, in general, prevail on the viscous effects of the semi-infinite medium.

  2. A line driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability in hot stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.D.; Hearn, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    The existence of a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability in the atmosphere of hot stars, driven by the radiative force associated with impurity ion resonance lines, is demonstrated. In a hot star with an effective temperature of 50 000 K, the instability will grow exponentially with a time scale of approximately 50 s in the layers where the stellar wind velocity is 5% of the thermal velocity of the ion. As a result, radially symmetric stellar winds driven by resonance line radiative forces will break up in small horizontal scale lengths. The energy fed into the instability provides a possible source of mechanical heating in the atmosphere for a chromosphere or corona. (orig.) [de

  3. Stabilization of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to change of the Atwood number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wenhua; He, X.T.; Zhang Weiyan

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiment [S.G. Glendinning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3318 (1997)] showed that the measured growth rate of laser ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with preheating is about 50% of the classic value and is reduced by about 18% compared with the simulated value obtained with the computer code LASNEX. By changing the temperature variation of the electron thermal conductivity at low temperatures, the density profile from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation is recovered in the simulation, and the simulated RT growth rate is in good agreement with the experimental value from Glendinning et al. The preheated density profile on ablative RT stablization is studied numerically. A change of the Atwood number in the preheating case also leads to RT stabilization. The RT growth formula γ=√(Akg/(1+AkL))-2kV a agrees well with experiment and simulation, and is appropriate for the preheating case

  4. Approximate evaluation of viscous effects in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of viscosity in the Rayleigh--Taylor instability are very important in many instances of interest but, although they have been investigated in some simple cases, the extensive algebraic complexities that are involved in the treatment of the problem tend to becloud the analysis and prevent generalizations of the results. In the paper a simple approximate method which improves a previous one by Plesset and Whipple is discussed. The viscous effects are accounted in an intuitive and transparent way, and can be easily estimated. The results are compared with exact calculations showing good agreement. For this purpose a method of analysis of the exact dispersion relation is developed, which circumvents most of the algebraic complications of the usual procedures. Both the approximate method and the novel treatment of the exact dispersion relation can be generalized to other problems of the same family

  5. Study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the ablation front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion in indirect drive consists in irradiating with ultra powerful laser beams the internal wall of a heating cavity which contains a capsule enclosing the thermonuclear fuel. During laser-matter interaction, laser light is converted into x-rays onto the hohlraum walls. The x-rays capsule heating produces a matter expansion, this one induces a pressure accelerating the capsule wall which implodes and compresses the fuel. The limit between the expanded plasma and the accelerated one is named ablation front. A light fluid (the ablated plasma) accelerating a heavy one (the shell) seeds Rayleigh-Taylor instability. To perform experiments, we used the Phebus facility at Limeil-Valenton CEA (the most powerful laser in Europe). After frequency conversion, each laser beam can deliver onto a target an energy up to 3 kJ at 0.35μm wavelength. In the United States of America and in France, more powerful laser facilities are planned to deliver an energy about 1 MJ: the National Ignition Facility (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California) and the Laser MegaJoule (CEA, Bordeaux). Hydrodynamic instabilities take an important part in the definition of these facilities. Two main experiments were carried out on the Phebus laser. We studied the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the ablation front with a modulated CHBr plane target stuck on the gold hohlraum wall. During the september-october 1996 experiment, a x-ray device was used. We observed the temporal evolution of the target modulations by x-ray imaging cinematography which recorded face-on radiographs. The second experiment was performed with collaboration of the Imperial College of London. Two high spatial resolution devices (less than 5 μm) were used in order to study short wavelengths modulations. The first diagnostic recorded side-on observations of target acceleration, the second one was used to measure the instability growth with face-on radiography. We studied this growth in a modulation

  6. On the ""early-time"" evolution of variables relevant to turbulence models for Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We present our progress toward setting initial conditions in variable density turbulence models. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on the BHR turbulence model for turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our approach is to predict profiles of relevant parameters before the fully turbulent regime and use them as initial conditions for the turbulence model. We use an idealized model of the mixing between two interpenetrating fluids to define the initial profiles for the turbulence model parameters. Velocities and volume fractions used in the idealized mixing model are obtained respectively from a set of ordinary differential equations modeling the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and from an idealization of the density profile in the mixing layer. A comparison between predicted initial profiles for the turbulence model parameters and initial profiles of the parameters obtained from low Atwood number three dimensional simulations show reasonable agreement.

  7. On the ""early-time"" evolution of variables relevant to turbulence models for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We present our progress toward setting initial conditions in variable density turbulence models. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on the BHR turbulence model for turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our approach is to predict profiles of relevant variables before fully turbulent regime and use them as initial conditions for the turbulence model. We use an idealized model of mixing between two interpenetrating fluids to define the initial profiles for the turbulence model variables. Velocities and volume fractions used in the idealized mixing model are obtained respectively from a set of ordinary differential equations modeling the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and from an idealization of the density profile in the mixing layer. A comparison between predicted profiles for the turbulence model variables and profiles of the variables obtained from low Atwood number three dimensional simulations show reasonable agreement.

  8. First observation of density profile in directly laser-driven polystyrene targets for ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Shigemori, Keisuke; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the density profile of a directly laser-driven polystyrene target was observed for the first time using an x-ray penumbral imaging technique coupled with side-on x-ray backlighting at the GEKKO XII [C. Yamanaka et al., IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-17, 1639 (1981)]-High Intensity Plasma Experimental Research laser facility (I L =0.7x10 14 W/cm 2 , λ L =0.35 μm). This density measurement makes it possible to experimentally confirm all physical parameters [γ(k),k,g,m,ρ a ,L m ] appearing in the modified Takabe formula for the growth rate of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The measured density profiles were well reproduced by a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code. The density measurement contributes toward fully understanding the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  9. Power Laws and Similarity of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Mixing Fronts at All Density Ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alon, U.; Hecht, J.; Ofer, D.; Shvarts, D.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of large structure in Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov bubble and spike fronts is studied numerically and explained theoretically on the basis of single-mode and two-bubble interaction physics at Atwood numbers (A). Multimode Rayleigh-Taylor bubble (spike) fronts are found as h B =α B Agt 2 [h s =α s (A)gt 2 ] with α B =0.05, while Richtmyer-Meshkov bubble (spike) fronts are found as h B =a B t θ B (h s =a s t θ s (A) ) with θ B =0.4 at all A's. The dependence of these scaling laws and parameters on A and on initial conditions is explained

  10. Evidence for a bubble-competition regime in indirectly driven ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D A; Smalyuk, V A; Kane, J O; Casner, A; Liberatore, S; Masse, L P

    2015-05-29

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130  μm thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  11. Using the self-learning intellectual models for predicting the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzhnyj, A.S.; Rozanov, V.B.; Stepanov, R.V.; Shumskij, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Stability of target compression in the laser thermonuclear synthesis is discussed. The process is determined by developing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RNI). A program unit for description of the RNI evolution by its initial distributions is developed. The results of statistical analysis of the RT mixing calculations are given. The analysis is carried out by means of learning base system and is substantiated on the generalization of great number of data, fulfilled by means of the neural network methods [ru

  12. The method of characteristic for nonlinear generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability associated with equatorial spread F: An analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekar, R.; Kherani, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for the nonlinear generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring over the night-time equatorial F region of the terrestrial ionosphere. The time and spatial domain characteristic methods are adopted to describe the evolutions of plasma density and particle flux, respectively. The analysis efficiently describes the known nonlinear features of instability as suggested by many numerical simulations. The existence of shock or steepened structures and their dynamics are discussed by studying the evolution of the characteristics

  13. Evidence for a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability and upwelling of depleted density regions during equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Haerendel, G.; Kappler, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.; Ecklund, W. L.; Carlson, C. W.; Haeusler, B.; Torbert, R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent rocket probe, barium cloud and radar measurements conducted during equatorial spread F conditions are interpreted in terms of a Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability operating on the bottomside of the F peak. The persistent theoretical problems associated with strong radar echoes typically observed in patch-like structures at high altitudes are explained in terms of regions of depleted plasma density which buoyantly rise against the gravitational field.

  14. Evidence for a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability and upwelling of depleted density regions during equatorial spread F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.; Haerendel, G.; Kappler, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Balsley, B.B.; Carter, D.A.; Ecklund, W.L.; Carlson, C.W.; Hausler, B.; Torbert, R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent rocket probe, barium cloud and radar measurements conducted during equatorial spread F conditions are interpreted in terms of a Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability operating on the bottomside of the F peak. The persistent theoretical problems associated with strong radar echoes typically observed in patch-like structures at high altitudes are explained in terms of regions of depleted plasma density which bouyantly rise against the gravitational field

  15. Ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities resulting from a laser-driven radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, C. M.; Shimony, A.; Trantham, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Flippo, K. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Klein, S. R.; Kline, J. L.; MacLaren, S. A.; Malamud, G.; Miles, A. R.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Raman, K. S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Wan, W. C.; Park, H.-S.

    2018-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a common occurrence in nature, notably in astrophysical systems like supernovae, where it serves to mix the dense layers of the interior of an exploding star with the low-density stellar wind surrounding it, and in inertial confinement fusion experiments, where it mixes cooler materials with the central hot spot in an imploding capsule and stifles the desired nuclear reactions. In both of these examples, the radiative flux generated by strong shocks in the system may play a role in partially stabilizing RT instabilities. Here, we present experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility, designed to isolate and study the role of radiation and heat conduction from a shock front in the stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. By varying the laser power delivered to a shock-tube target with an embedded, unstable interface, the radiative fluxes generated at the shock front could be controlled. We observe decreased RT growth when the shock significantly heats the medium around it, in contrast to a system where the shock did not produce significant heating. Both systems are modeled with a modified set of buoyancy-drag equations accounting for ablative stabilization, and the experimental results are consistent with ablative stabilization when the shock is radiative. This result has important implications for our understanding of astrophysical radiative shocks and supernova radiative hydrodynamics [Kuranz et al., Nature Communications 9(1), 1564 (2018)].

  16. A heuristic model for the nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability in fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussey, T.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Spielman, R.B.; Deeney, C.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, heuristic model for the early nonlinear phase of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability (RTI) in thin-cylindrical-shell Z-pinch implosions has been developed. This model is based on the fact that, as the field--plasma interface is deformed, there is a component of the applied force that acts to move mass from the low mass per unit area bubble region into the higher mass per unit area spike region. The resulting reduced mass per unit area of the bubble causes it to be preferentially accelerated ahead of the spike. The pinch begins to radiate as the bubble mass first reaches the axis, and it continues to radiate while the mass that is entrained within the spikes and within unperturbed parts of the shell also arrives on axis. This model relates the time at which the bubble arrives on axis to an initial wavelength and amplitude of a single mode of the RTI. Then, by comparing this to the time at which the unperturbed mass reaches the axis, one estimates pinch thermalization time, a quantity that is determined experimentally. Experimental data, together with analytic models, have been used to choose appropriate initial wavelength and amplitude both for foils and for certain gas puff implosions. By noting that thermalization time is a weak function of these parameters, it is argued that one may use the same values for an extrapolative study of qualitatively similar implosions

  17. Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by convection in an ablatively accelerated laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bul'ko, A.B.; Liberman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors use the WKB-approximation to treat the problem of the stabilization by an inhomogeneous convective current of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability developing in the ablation zone when the plasma of laser targets is accelerated by ablation. The problem of the eigenvalues - the instability growth rates - is reduced to the solution of an algebraic equation with coefficients which depend on the structure of the unperturbed profiles of the hydrodynamic variables. They show for the practically important case of subsonic flow of an incompressible plasma that the instability growth rate vanishes for k = k o = max[2(g|∇lnρ|) 1/2 /v]. The condition for the self-consistency of the model is that the local Froude number be small in the region where the instability develops; however, comparison with numerical calculations shows that the model is also applicable in the case of rather steep density gradients when the Froude number is of order unity. 32 refs., 2 figs

  18. Progress in understanding turbulent mixing induced by Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ye; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Cook, A.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Dimits, A.; Buckingham, A.C.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Burke, E.W.; Peyser, T.A.; Cabot, W.; Eliason, D.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent hydrodynamic mixing induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities occurs in settings as varied as exploding stars (supernovae), inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, and macroscopic flows in fluid dynamics facilities such as shock tubes. Turbulence theory and modeling have been applied to RT and RM induced flows and developed into a quantitative description of turbulence from the onset to the asymptotic end-state. The treatment, based on a combined approach of theory, direct numerical simulation (DNS), and experimental data analysis, has broad generality. Three areas of progress will be reported. First, a robust, easy to apply criteria will be reported for the mixing transition in a time-dependent flow. This allows an assessment of whether flows, be they from supernova explosions or ICF experiments, should be mixed down to the molecular scale or not. Second, through DNS, the structure, scaling, and spectral evolution of the RT instability induced flow will be inspected. Finally, using these new physical insights, a two-scale, dynamic mix model has been developed that can be applied to simulations of ICF experiments and astrophysics situations alike

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and resulting failure modes of ablatively imploded inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montierth, L.; Morse, R.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses small amplitude growth of the outside surface instability and modes of failure resulting from nonlinear development of the inside surface instability. It is demonstrated that pellets with initial pellet aspect ratio, A /SUB p/ >5 may have difficulty with Rayleigh-Taylor instability and that shells with A /SUB p/ greater than or equal to10 will probably demand stringent smoothness specification in order not to experience failure in the final implosion. The linear amplification of the outside surface instability can easily exceed 10 3 for A /SUB p/ and resulting A values in the range of programmatic interest. Amplifications of this order, starting from attainable surface finishes, can then penetrate to the inside shell surface, producing perturbations there which approach the nonlinear development amplitude and at the start of the final deceleration. It is shown that such inside surface perturbations can be amplified to large amplitude by the inside instability and cause failure through reduction of the maximum fuel temperature achieved. Insight into the scaling of failure mechanisms is offered

  20. Spanwise homogeneous buoyancy-drag model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing and experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimonte, Guy

    2000-01-01

    A buoyancy-drag model for Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is developed on the premise that the bubble and spike regions behave as distinct and spanwise homogeneous fluids. Then, mass conservation is applied accross the mixing zone to obtain their average mixture densities dynamically. These are used to explicitly calculate the inertia and buoyancy terms in the evolutionary equation. The only unknown parameter in the model is the Newtonian drag constant C∼2.5±0.6, which is determined from turbulent RT experiments over various Atwood numbers A and acceleration histories g(t). The bubble (i=2) and spike (i=1) amplitudes are found to obey the familiar h i =α i Agt 2 for a constant g and h i ∼t θ i for an impulsive g. For bubbles, both α 2 and θ 2 are insensitive to A. For the spikes, both α 1 and θ 1 increase as a power law with the density ratio. However, θ 1 is not universal because it depends on the initial value of h 1 /h 2 . (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  1. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10 14 W/cm 2 . Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%endash 7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under curved substrates: An optimal transient growth analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Gioele; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability of thin viscous films coated on the inside of a horizontal cylindrical substrate. In such a case, gravity acts both as a stabilizing force through the progressive drainage of the film and as a destabilizing force prone to form droplets via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The drainage solution, derived from lubrication equations, is found asymptotically stable with respect to infinitesimally small perturbations, although in reality, droplets often form. To resolve this paradox, we perform an optimal transient growth analysis for the first-order perturbations of the liquid's interface, generalizing the results of Trinh et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 051704 (2014), 10.1063/1.4876476]. We find that the system displays a linear transient growth potential that gives rise to two different scenarios depending on the value of the Bond number (prescribing the relative importance of gravity and surface tension forces). At low Bond numbers, the optimal perturbation of the interface does not generate droplets. In contrast, for higher Bond numbers, perturbations on the upper hemicircle yield gains large enough to potentially form droplets. The gain increases exponentially with the Bond number. In particular, depending on the amplitude of the initial perturbation, we find a critical Bond number above which the short-time linear growth is sufficient to trigger the nonlinear effects required to form dripping droplets. We conclude that the transition to droplets detaching from the substrate is noise and perturbation dependent.

  3. Finite plate thickness effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Rinosh; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    The majority of theoretical studies have tackled the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) problem in solids using an infinitely thick plate. Recent theoretical studies by Piriz et al. (PRE 95, 053108, 2017) have explored finite thickness effects. We seek to validate this recent theoretical estimate experimentally using our rotating wheel RTI experiment in an accelerated elastic-plastic material. The test section consists of a container filled with air and mayonnaise (a non-Newtonian emulsion) with an initial perturbation between two materials. The plate thickness effects are studied by varying the depth of the soft-solid. A set of experiments is run by employing different initial conditions with different container dimensions. Additionally, the effect of acceleration rate (driving pressure rise time) on the instability threshold with reference to the finite thickness will also be inspected. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared to the analytical strength models related to finite thickness effects on RTI. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA Grant # DE-NA0003195 and LANL subcontract #370333.

  4. Suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability and its implication for the impact ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Sakaiya, T.; Tamari, Y.; Ohtani, K.; Murakami, M.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Izawa, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through an unstable interface is the key physics that determines the success or failure of inertial fusion energy (IFE) generation, as the RT instability potentially quenches ignition and burn by disintegrating the IFE target. We present two suppression schemes of the RT growth without significant degradation of the target density. The first scheme is to generate a double ablation structure in high-Z doped plastic targets. In addition to the electron ablation surface, a new ablation surface is created by x-ray radiation from the high-Z ions. Contrary to the previous thought, the electron ablation surface is almost completely stabilized by extremely high flow velocity. On the other hand, the RT instability on the radiative ablation surface is significantly moderated. The second is to enhance the nonlocal nature of the electron heat transport by illuminating the target with long wavelength laser light, whereas the high ablation pressure is generated by irradiating with short wavelength laser light. The significant suppression of the RT instability may increase the possibility of impact ignition which uses a high-velocity fuel colliding with a preformed main fuel.

  5. Suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and its implication for the impact ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azechi, H; Shiraga, H; Nakai, M; Shigemori, K; Fujioka, S; Sakaiya, T; Tamari, Y; Ohtani, K; Murakami, M; Sunahara, A; Nagatomo, H; Nishihara, K; Miyanaga, N; Izawa, Y

    2004-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through an unstable interface is the key physics that determines the success or failure of inertial fusion energy (IFE) generation, as the RT instability potentially quenches ignition and burn by disintegrating the IFE target. We present two suppression schemes of the RT growth without significant degradation of the target density. The first scheme is to generate a double ablation structure in high-Z doped plastic targets. In addition to the electron ablation surface, a new ablation surface is created by x-ray radiation from the high-Z ions. Contrary to the previous thought, the electron ablation surface is almost completely stabilized by extremely high flow velocity. On the other hand, the RT instability on the radiative ablation surface is significantly moderated. The second is to enhance the nonlocal nature of the electron heat transport by illuminating the target with long wavelength laser light, whereas the high ablation pressure is generated by irradiating with short wavelength laser light. The significant suppression of the RT instability may increase the possibility of impact ignition which uses a high-velocity fuel colliding with a preformed main fuel

  6. Influence of gradual density transition and nonlinear saturation on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.

    1984-08-01

    Linear theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at a density profile which varies exponentially between regions of constant density is discussed in detail. The exact theory provides an approximate but conservative simple formula for the growth constant and it shows that a hitherto widely used theory erroneously underestimates the growth constant. A simple but effective ''synthetical model'' of nonlinear bubble growth is obtained from a synthesis of linear theory and constant terminal bubble speed. It is applied to pusher shell break-up in an inertial confinement fusion pellet to determine the maximum allowable initial perturbations and the most dangerous wavelength. In a situation typical of heavy ion drivers it is found that the allowable initial perturbations are increased by a few orders of magnitude by the gradual density transition and another order of magnitude by nonlinear saturation of the bubble speed. The gradual density transition also shifts the most dangerous wavelength from about once to about four times the minimum pusher shell thickness. The following topics are treated briefly: Reasons conflicting with use of the synthetical model to decide whether the pusher shell in a certain simulation will be broken up; other nonlinear theories available in the literature; further realistic effects that might aggravate instability growth. (orig.) [de

  7. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Planar Rayleigh-Taylor and Feed-through experiments with CH(Ge) on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.P.; Liberatore, S.; Galmiche, D.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2006-01-01

    Germanium-doped CH (CHGe) is one nominal ablator for the laser Megajoule (LMJ) target design. In order to investigate its properties we performed indirect drive planar Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. An innovative hohlraum with an internal 'rugby-ball' shape has been experimentally characterized for the first time. On each shot foil motion and modulations growth were simultaneously measured by side-on and face-on radiography, while drive was assessed by measuring radiation escaping through the hohlraum laser-entrance-hole. Modulations growth and foil motion are fully consistent with each other, and also with hydro-code simulations accounting for the effective acceleration of the sample. This complete set of data allows a more stringent comparison between the hydro-code simulations and the experimental results. We compare CHGe perturbations growth with those acquired on CHBr in the same experimental configuration. These preliminary results are the first step toward a test-bed validation of CH(Ge) as an ablator on OMEGA and further on the laser integration line (LIL) at LMJ

  9. Influence of real gas effects on ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in plastic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengfeng; Xue Chuang; Ye Wenhua; Zhu Shaoping; Wang Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    In this research, real gas effects on ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability are investigated in a plastic target. The real gas effects are included by adopting the quotidian equation of state (QEOS) model. Theoretical solutions for both QEOS and ideal gas EOS are obtained and compared, based on a same set of ablation parameters. It is found that when real gas effects are considered, the density gradient becomes less steep than that of ideal gas assumption, even though this cannot be used directly to draw a stabilization conclusion for the real gas effects. Further analysis shows that when real gas effects are considered, lower ∂p/∂T in the dense shell region has the effect of stabilization, whereas the dependence of the internal energy on the density, lower specific heat (at constant volume) in the dense shell region, and higher specific heat in the low-density ablation region contribute to stronger destabilization effects. Overall, when real gas effects are considered, the destabilization effects are dominant for long wavelength perturbations, and the growth rates become much higher than the results of ideal gas assumption. In our specific case, the maximum relative error reaches 18%.

  10. The Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability using a Linear Induction Motor Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The experiments to be presented utilize an incompressible system of two stratified miscible liquids of different densities that are accelerated in order to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Three liquid combinations are used: isopropyl alcohol with water, a calcium nitrate solution or a lithium polytungstate solution, giving Atwood numbers of 0.11, 0.22 and 0.57, respectively. The acceleration required to drive the instability is produced by two high-speed linear induction motors mounted to an 8 m tall drop tower. The motors are mounted in parallel and have an effective acceleration length of 1.7 m and are each capable of producing 15 kN of thrust. The liquid system is contained within a square acrylic tank with inside dimensions 76 x76x184 mm. The tank is mounted to an aluminum plate, which is driven by the motors to create constant accelerations in the range of 1-20 g's, though the potential exists for higher accelerations. Also attached to the plate are a high-speed camera and an LED backlight to provide continuous video of the instability. In addition, an accelerometer is used to provide acceleration measurements during each experiment. Experimental image sequences will be presented which show the development of a random three-dimensional instability from an unforced initial perturbation. Measurements of the mixing zone width will be compared with traditional growth models.

  11. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  12. Multiscale character of the nonlinear coherent dynamics in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.; Nishihara, K.; Rosner, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report nonlinear solutions for a system of conservation laws describing the dynamics of the large-scale coherent structure of bubbles and spikes in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) for fluids with a finite density ratio. Three-dimensional flows are considered with general type of symmetry in the plane normal to the direction of gravity. The nonlocal properties of the interface evolution are accounted for on the basis of group theory. It is shown that isotropic coherent structures are stable. For anisotropic structures, secondary instabilities develop with the growth rate determined by the density ratio. For stable structures, the curvature and velocity of the nonlinear bubble have nontrivial dependencies on the density ratio, yet their mutual dependence on one another has an invariant form independent of the density ratio. The process of bubble merge is not considered. Based on the obtained results we argue that the large-scale coherent dynamics in RTI has a multiscale character and is governed by two length scales: the period of the coherent structure and the bubble (spike) position

  13. Bubble velocity in the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a deflagration front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modestov, Mikhail; Bychkov, Vitaly; Betti, Riccardo; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a deflagration front is studied systematically using extensive direct numerical simulations. It is shown that, for a sufficiently large gravitational field, the effects of bubble rising dominate the deflagration dynamics. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the deflagration speed is described asymptotically by the Layzer theory in the limit of large acceleration. In the opposite limit of small and zero gravitational field, intrinsic properties of the deflagration front become important. In that case, the deflagration speed is determined by the velocity of a planar front and by the Darrieus-Landau instability. Because of these effects, the deflagration speed is larger than predicted by the Layzer theory. An analytical formula for the deflagration speed is suggested, which matches two asymptotic limits of large and small acceleration. The formula is in good agreement with the numerical data in a wide range of Froude numbers. The present results are also in agreement with previous numerical simulations on this problem

  14. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  15. Drive development for an 10 Mbar Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiment on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisbrey, Shon; Park, Hye-Sook; Huntington, Channing; McNaney, James; Smith, Raym; Wehrenberg, Christopher; Swift, Damian; Panas, Cynthia; Lord, Dawn; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2017-10-01

    Strength can be inferred by the amount a Rayleigh-Taylor surface deviates from classical growth when subjected to acceleration. If the acceleration is great enough, even materials highly resistant to deformation will flow. We use the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to create an acceleration profile that will cause sample metals, such as Mo or Cu, to reach peak pressures of 10 Mbar without inducing shock melt. To create such a profile we shock release a stepped density reservoir across a large gap with the stagnation of the reservoir on the far side of the gap resulting in the desired pressure drive history. Low density steps (foams) are a necessary part of this design and have been studied in the last several years on the Omega and NIF facilities. We will present computational and experimental progress that has been made on the 10 Mbar drive designs - including recent drive shots carried out at the NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734781.

  16. Investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardo Bonazza

    2006-01-01

    The present research program is centered on the experimental and numerical study of two instabilities that develop at the interface between two different fluids when the interface experiences an impulsive or a constant acceleration. The instabilities, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instability, respectively (RMI and RTI), adversely affect target implosion in experiments aimed at the achievement of nuclear fusion by inertial confinement by causing the nuclear fuel contained in a target and the ablated shell material to mix, leading to contamination of the fuel, yield reduction or no ignition at all. Specifically, our work is articulated in three main directions: study of impulsively accelerated spherical gas inhomogeneities; study of impulsively accelerated 2-D interfaces; study of a liquid interface under the action of gravity. The objectives common to all three activities are to learn some physics directly from our experiments and calculations; and to develop a database at previously untested conditions to be used to calibrate and verify some of the computational tools being developed within the RTI/RMI community at the national laboratories and the ASCI centers

  17. The internal waves and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible quantum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, H. L.; Qiu, X. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the quantum effect on internal waves and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in compressible quantum plasmas. First of all, let us consider the case of the limit of short wavelength perturbations. In the case, the dispersion relation including quantum and compressibility effects and the RT instability growth rate can be derived using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method. The results show that the internal waves can propagate along the transverse direction due to the quantum effect, which was first pointed out by Bychkov et al.[Phys. Lett. A 372, 3042 (2008)], and the coupling between it and compressibility effect, which is found out in this paper. Then, without making the approximation assumption of short wavelength limit, we examine the linearized perturbation equation following Qiu et al.'s solving process [Phys. Plasmas 10, 2956 (2003)]. It is found that the quantum effect always stabilizes the RT instability in either incompressible or compressible quantum plasmas. Moreover, in the latter case, the coupling between it and compressibility effect makes this stabilization further enhance.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the deceleration phase of spherical implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Delettrez, J.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Marshall, F.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Town, R.P.J.; Yaakobi, B.

    2002-01-01

    The temporal evolution of inner-shell modulations, unstable during the deceleration phase of a laser-driven spherical implosion, has been measured through K-edge imaging [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3727 (2000)] of shells with titanium-doped layers. The main study was based on the implosions of 1 mm diam, 20 μm thick shells filled with either 18 atm or 4 atm of D 3 He gas driven with 23 kJ, 1 ns square laser pulses on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These targets have similar modulation levels at the beginning of the deceleration phase due to similar modulation growths in the acceleration phase, but different modulation growths throughout the deceleration phase due to different fill pressures (convergence ratios). At peak compression, the measured inner surface, areal-density nonuniformity σ rms levels were 23±5 % for more-stable 18 atm fill targets and 53±11 % for less-stable 4 atm fill targets. The inner-surface modulations grow throughout the deceleration phase due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Bell-Plesset convergence effects. The nonuniformity at peak compression is sensitive to the initial perturbation level as measured in implosions with different laser-smoothing conditions

  19. Algorithm and exploratory study of the Hall MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardiner, Thomas Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report is concerned with the influence of the Hall term on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. This begins with a review of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the Hall term and the wave modes which are present in the system on time scales short enough that the plasma can be approximated as being stationary. In this limit one obtains what are known as the electron MHD (EMHD) equations which support two characteristic wave modes known as the whistler and Hall drift modes. Each of these modes is considered in some detail in order to draw attention to their key features. This analysis also serves to provide a background for testing the numerical algorithms used in this work. The numerical methods are briefly described and the EMHD solver is then tested for the evolution of whistler and Hall drift modes. These methods are then applied to study the nonlinear evolution of the MHD RT instability with and without the Hall term for two different configurations. The influence of the Hall term on the mixing and bubble growth rate are analyzed.

  20. Stationary solution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for spatially periodic flows: questions of uniqueness, dimensionality, and universality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarzhi, S.I.

    1996-01-01

    The stationary solutions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for spatially periodic flows with general symmetry are investigated here for the first time. The existence of a set of stationary solutions is established. The question of its dimensionality in function space is resolved on the basis of an analysis of the symmetry of the initial perturbation. The interrelationship between the dimensionality of the solution set and the symmetry of the flow is found. The dimensionality of the solution set is established for flows invariant with respect to one of five symmorphic two-dimensional groups. The nonuniversal character of the set of stationary solutions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is demonstrated. For flows in a tube, on the contrary, universality of the solution set, along with its independence of the symmetry of the initial perturbation, is assumed. The problem of the free boundary in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is solved in the first two approximations, and their convergence is investigated. The dependence of the velocity and Fourier harmonics on the parameters of the problem is found. Possible symmetry violations of the flow are analyzed. Limits to previously studied cases are investigated, and their accuracy is established. Questions of the stability of the solutions obtained and the possibility of a physically correct statement of the problem are discussed

  1. Developpement of a numerical method for Navier-Stokes equations in anelastic approximation: application to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouch, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The 'anelastic' approximation allows us to filter the acoustic waves thanks to an asymptotic development of the Navier-Stokes equations, so increasing the averaged time step, during the numerical simulation of hydrodynamic instabilities development. So, the anelastic equations for a two fluid mixture in case of Rayleigh-Taylor instability are established.The linear stability of Rayleigh-Taylor flow is studied, for the first time, for perfect fluids in the anelastic approximation. We define the Stokes problem resulting from Navier-Stokes equations without the non linear terms (a part of the buoyancy is considered); the ellipticity is demonstrated, the Eigenmodes and the invariance related to the pressure are detailed. The Uzawa's method is extended to the anelastic approximation and shows the decoupling speeds in 3D, the particular case k = 0 and the spurious modes of pressure. Passing to multi-domain allowed to establish the transmission conditions.The algorithms and the implementation in the existing program are validated by comparing the Uzawa's operator in Fortran and Mathematica languages, to an experiment with incompressible fluids and results from anelastic and compressible numerical simulations. The study of the influence of the initial stratification of both fluids on the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. (author) [fr

  2. Cyclic and seasonal features in the behaviour of linear growth increment of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in equatorial F-region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkullin, M.N.; Nikitin, M.A.; Kashchenko, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations of linear increment of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for various geophysical conditions are presented. It is shwn that space-time characteristics of increment depend strongly on conditions of solar activity and seasons. The calculation results are in a good agreement with statistical regularities of F-scattering observation in equatorial F-area, which points to the Rayleigh-Taylor natur of the penomena

  3. Saturation and postsaturation phenomena of Rayleigh-Taylor instability with adjacent modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegawa, Tadashi; Nishihara, Katsunobu

    2003-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory has been developed for the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability with a finite bandwidth taken into account self-consistently. The theory includes up to third order nonlinearity, which results in the saturation of linear growth and determines subsequent weakly nonlinear growth. Analytical results are shown to agree fairly well with two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. There are generally many local peaks of a perturbation with a finite bandwidth due to the interference of modes. Since a local amplitude is determined from phases among the modes as well as the bandwidth, we have investigated an onset of the linear growth saturation and the subsequent weakly nonlinear growth for different bandwidths and phases. It is shown that the saturation of the linear growth occurs locally, i.e., each of the local maximum amplitudes (LMAs) grows exponentially until it reaches almost the same saturation amplitude. In the random phase case, the root mean square amplitude thus saturates with almost the same amplitude as the LMA, after most of the LMAs have saturated. The saturation amplitude of the LMA is found to be independent of the bandwidth and depends on the Atwood number. We derive a formula of the saturation amplitude of modes based on the results obtained, and discuss its relation with Haan's formula [Phys. Rev. A 39, 5812 (1989)]. The LMAs grow linearly in time after the saturation and their speeds are approximated by the product of the linear growth rate and the saturation amplitude. We investigate the Atwood number dependence of both the saturation amplitude and the weakly nonlinear growth

  4. Lateral movements in Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities due to frontiers. Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, L.; Fernández, D.; El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A.; D'Onofrio, A.

    2018-01-01

    Lateral movements of the fingers in Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface between two fluids are studied. We show that transverse movements appear when a physical boundary is present; these phenomena have not been explained until now. The boundary prevents one of the fluids from crossing it. Such frontiers can be buoyancy driven as, for example, the frontier to the passage of a less dense solution through a denser solution or when different aggregation states coexist (liquid and gaseous phases). An experimental study of the lateral movement velocity of the fingers was performed for different Rayleigh numbers (Ra), and when oscillations were detected, their amplitudes were studied. Liquid-liquid (L-L) and gas-liquid (G-L) systems were analysed. Aqueous HCl and Bromocresol Green (sodium salt, NaBCG) solutions were used in L-L experiments, and CO2 (gas) and aqueous NaOH, NaHCO3, and CaCl2 solutions were employed for the G-L studies. We observed that the lateral movement of the fingers and finger collapses near the interface are more notorious when Ra increases. The consequences of this, for each experience, are a decrease in the number of fingers and an increase in the velocity of the lateral finger movement close to the interface as time evolves. We found that the amplitude of the oscillations did not vary significantly within the considered Ra range. These results have an important implication when determining the wave number of instabilities in an evolving system. The wave number could be strongly diminished if there is a boundary.

  5. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-01-01

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MegaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength λ=35, 50, and 70 μm) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength λ=35 and 70 μm, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.

  6. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-09-01

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MégaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength λ =35, 50, and 70 μm) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength λ =35 and 70 μm, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.

  7. Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, J.; Andrews, Ph.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project has two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. Also, studies of multi-layer mixing with the existing water channel facility. Over the last twelve (12) months there has been excellent progress, detailed in this report, with both tasks. As of December 10, 2004, the air/helium facility is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Currently experiments with air/helium up to Atwood numbers of 0.25 (the maximum is 0.75, but the highest Reynolds numbers are at 0.25) are being performed. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget, and we expect this to continue for 2005. With interest expressed from LLNL we have continued with initial condition studies using the water channel. This work has also progressed well, with one of the graduate Research Assistants (Mr. Nick Mueschke) visiting LLNL the past two summers to work with Dr. O. Schilling. Several journal papers are in preparation that describe the work. Two MSc.'s have been completed (Mr. Nick Mueschke, and Mr. Wayne Kraft, 12/1/03). Nick and Wayne are both pursuing Ph.D.s' funded by this DOE Alliances project. Presently three (3) Ph.D. graduate Research Assistants are supported on the project, and two (2) undergraduate Research Assistants. During the year two (2) journal papers and two (2) conference papers have been published, ten (10) presentations made at conferences, and three (3) invited presentations

  8. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  9. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10 14 W/cm 2 . Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. Preheating ablation effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Don, Wai-Sun; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    The two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with and without thermal conduction is investigated by numerical simulation in the weakly nonlinear regime. A preheat model κ(T)=κ SH [1+f(T)] is introduced for the thermal conduction [W. H. Ye, W. Y. Zhang, and X. T. He, Phys. Rev. E 65, 057401 (2002)], where κ SH is the Spitzer-Haerm electron thermal conductivity coefficient and f(T) models the preheating tongue effect in the cold plasma ahead of the ablation front. The preheating ablation effects on the RTI are studied by comparing the RTI with and without thermal conduction with identical density profile relevant to inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is found that the ablation effects strongly influence the mode coupling process, especially with short perturbation wavelength. Overall, the ablation effects stabilize the RTI. First, the linear growth rate is reduced, especially for short perturbation wavelengths and a cutoff wavelength is observed in simulations. Second, the second harmonic generation is reduced for short perturbation wavelengths. Third, the third-order negative feedback to the fundamental mode is strengthened, which plays a stabilization role. Finally, on the contrary, the ablation effects increase the generation of the third harmonic when the perturbation wavelengths are long. Our simulation results indicate that, in the weakly nonlinear regime, the ablation effects are weakened as the perturbation wavelength is increased. Numerical results obtained are in general agreement with the recent weakly nonlinear theories as proposed in [J. Sanz, J. Ramirez, R. Ramis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 195002 (2002); J. Garnier, P.-A. Raviart, C. Cherfils-Clerouin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 185003 (2003)].

  11. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Collins, T. J. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Verdon, C. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 {mu}m diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 {mu}m wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Experimental study on ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laser-irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Keisuke; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiko; Otani, Kazuto; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Tamari, Yohei; Okuno, Kazuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2004-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are key issues of the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Among the instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is the most important because it gives the largest growth factor in the ICF targets. Perturbations on the laser irradiated surface grow exponentially, but the growth rate is reduced by ablation flow. The growth rate γ is written as Takabe-Betti formula: γ = [kg/(1+kL)]1/2-βkm/pa, where k is wave number of the perturbation, g is acceleration, L is density scale-length, β is a coefficient, m is mass ablation rate per unit surface, and ρa is density at the ablation front. We experimentally measured all the parameters in the formula for polystyrene (CH) targets. Experiments were done on the HIPER laser facility at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. We found that the β value in the formula is ~ 1.7, which is in good agreements with the theoretical prediction, whereas the β for certain perturbation wavelengths are larger than the prediction. This disagreement between the experiment and the theory is mainly due to the deformation of the cutoff surface, which is created by non-uniform ablation flow from the ablation surface. We also found that high-Z doped plastic targets have multiablation structure, which can reduce the RT growth rate. When a low-Z target with high-Z dopant is irradiated by laser, radiation due to the high-Z dopant creates secondary ablation front deep inside the target. Since, the secondary ablation front is ablated by x-rays, the mass ablation rate is larger than the laser-irradiated ablation surface, that is, further reduction of the RT growth is expected. We measured the RT growth rate of Br-doped polystyrene targets. The experimental results indicate that of the CHBr targets show significantly small growth rate, which is very good news for the design of the ICF targets.

  13. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smitherman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}m aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.

  14. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the “feedout” of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  15. Density gradient effects in weakly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T.

    2012-01-01

    In this research, density gradient effects (i.e., finite thickness of ablation front effects) in ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI), in the presence of preheating within the weakly nonlinear regime, are investigated numerically. We analyze the weak, medium, and strong ablation surfaces which have different isodensity contours, respectively, to study the influences of finite thickness of ablation front on the weakly nonlinear behaviors of ARTI. Linear growth rates, generation coefficients of the second and the third harmonics, and coefficients of the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode are obtained. It is found that the linear growth rate which has a remarkable maximum, is reduced, especially when the perturbation wavelength λ is short and a cut-off perturbation wavelength λ c appears when the perturbation wavelength λ is sufficiently short, where no higher harmonics exists when λ c . The phenomenon of third-order positive feedback to the fundamental mode near the λ c [J. Sanz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 195002 (2002); J. Garnier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 185003 (2003); J. Garnier and L. Masse, Phys. Plasmas 12, 062707 (2005)] is confirmed in numerical simulations, and the physical mechanism of the third-order positive feedback is qualitatively discussed. Moreover, it is found that generations and growths of the second and the third harmonics are stabilized (suppressed and reduced) by the ablation effect. Meanwhile, the third-order negative feedback to the fundamental mode is also reduced by the ablation effect, and hence, the linear saturation amplitude (typically ∼0.2λ in our simulations) is increased significantly and therefore exceeds the classical prediction 0.1λ, especially for the strong ablation surface with a small perturbation wavelength. Overall, the ablation effect stabilizes the ARTI in the weakly nonlinear regime. Numerical results obtained are in general agreement with the recent weakly nonlinear theories and simulations

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor Gravity Waves and Quasiperiodic Oscillation Phenomenon in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto compact objects in X-ray binaries (black hole, neutron star (NS), white dwarf) is characterized by non-uniform flow density profiles. Such an effect of heterogeneity in presence of gravitational forces and pressure gradients exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor gravity waves (RTGW). They should be seen as quasiperiodic wave oscillations (QPO) of the accretion flow in the transition (boundary) layer between the Keplerian disk and the central object. In this paper the author shows that the main QPO frequency, which is very close to the Keplerian frequency, is split into separate frequencies (hybrid and low branch) under the influence of the gravitational forces in the rotational frame of reference. The RTGWs must be present and the related QPOs should be detected in any system where the gravity, buoyancy and Coriolis force effects cannot be excluded (even in the Earth and solar environments). The observed low and high QPO frequencies are an intrinsic signature of the RTGW. The author elaborates the conditions for the density profile when the RTGW oscillations are stable. A comparison of the inferred QPO frequencies with QPO observations is presented. The author finds that hectohertz frequencies detected from NS binaries can be identified as the RTGW low branch frequencies. The author also predicts that an observer can see the double NS spin frequency during the NS long (super) burst events when the pressure gradients and buoyant forces are suppressed. The Coriolis force is the only force which acts in the rotational frame of reference and its presence causes perfect coherent pulsations with a frequency twice of the NS spin. The QPO observations of neutron binaries have established that the high QPO frequencies do not go beyond of the certain upper limit. The author explains this observational effect as a result of the density profile inversions. Also the author demonstrates that a particular problem of the gravity waves in the rotational frame of reference in the

  17. An Experimental Study of the Turbulent Development of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this three-year research program is to study the development of turbulence in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Incompressible RT and RM instabilities are studied in an apparatus in which a box containing two unequal density liquids is accelerated on a linear rail system either impulsively (by bouncing it off of a spring) to produce RM instability, or at a constant downward rate (using a weight and pulley system) to produce RT instability. These experiments are distinguished from others in the field in that they are initialized with well defined, measurable initial perturbations and are well visualized utilizing planar laser induced fluorescence imaging. New experiments are proposed aimed at generating fully turbulent RM and RT instabilities and quantifying the turbulent development once fully turbulent flows are achieved. The proposed experiments focus on the development and the subsequent application of techniques to accelerate the production of fully turbulent instabilities and the quantification of the turbulent instabilities once they are achieved. The proposed tasks include: the development of RM and RT experiments utilizing fluid combinations having larger density ratios than those previously used; the development of RM experiments with larger acceleration impulse than that previously used; and the investigation of the multi-mode and three-dimensional instabilities by the development of new techniques for generating short wavelength initial perturbations. Progress towards fulfilling these goals is currently well on track. Recent results have been obtained on experiments that utilize Faraday resonance for the production of a nearly single-mode three-dimensional perturbation with a short enough wavelength to yield a self-similar instability at late-times. Last year we reported that we can reliably generate Faraday internal waves on the interface in our experimental apparatus by oscillating the tank containing the

  18. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, R.; Hatori, T.; Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  19. Design and implementation plan for indirect-drive highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.; Jacquet, L.; Liberatore, S.; Smalyuk, V.; Martinez, D.; Seugling, R.; Park, H.S.; Remington, B.A.; Moore, A.; Igumenshev, I.; Chicanne, C.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of National Ignition Facility Basic Science program we propose to study on the NIF ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. Based on the analogy between flame front and ablation front, highly nonlinear RT instability measurements at the ablation front can provide important insights into the initial deflagration stage of thermonuclear supernovae of type Ia. NIF provides a unique platform to study the rich physics of nonlinear and turbulent mixing flows in High Energy Density plasmas because it can accelerate targets over much larger distances and longer time periods than previously achieved on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers. In one shot, growth of RT modulations can be measured from the weakly nonlinear stage near nonlinear saturation levels to the highly nonlinear bubble-competition, bubble-merger regimes and perhaps into a turbulent-like regime. The role of ablation on highly-nonlinear RT instability evolution will be comprehensively studied by varying ablation velocity using indirect and direct-drive platforms. We present a detailed hydro-code design of the indirect-drive platform and discuss the implementation plan for these experiments which only use NIF diagnostics already qualified. (authors)

  20. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  1. What extent will small-scale laser-beam fluctuations seed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in direct-drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    The nonuniformity in laser energy deposition on a spherical target is calculated for multiple overlapping beams having small-scale fluctuations. Such nonuniformities can imprint themselves on the target surface and ''seed'' the Rayleigh-Taylor instability early in the pulse before an adequate, smoothing plasma-atmosphere has been established. The resulting growth of target deformation during the implosion is estimated

  2. Investigation of single-mode and multi-mode hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in planar geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Cochrane, K.; Douglas, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous investigations carried out to study various methods of seeding the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in magnetohydrodynamic simulations showed features similar to those seen in hydrodynamic calculations. For periodic single-mode initiations the results showed the appearance of harmonics as the single modes became nonlinear. For periodic multi-mode initiations new modes developed that indicated the presence of mode coupling. The MHD simulations used parameters of the high velocity large radius z-pinch experiments performed in the Z-accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. The cylindrical convergent geometry and variable acceleration of these configurations made comparison with analytic, developed for planar geometry with constant acceleration, difficult. A set of calculations in planar geometry using constant current to produce acceleration and parameters characteristic of the cylindrical implosions has been performed to allow a better comparison. Results of these calculations, comparison with analytic theory, and comparison with the cylindrical configuration calculations will be discussed

  3. Preliminary report of numerical simulatons of intermediate wavelength collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in equatorial spread F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskinen, M.J.; Ossakow, S.L.; Chaturvedi, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations of the intermediate wavelength (100--1000 m) collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in local unstable regions of the postsunset bottomside (300 km) equatorial F region ionosphere have been performed. For ambient electron density gradient scale lengths L=5, 10, 15 km we find that the linearly unstable horizontal modes saturate by nonlinear generation of linearly damped vertical modes with the result that in the nonlinear regime, power laws are observed in the horizontal P(k/sub x/) proportional k/sub x//sup -n/ and vertical P(k/sub y/) proportional k/sub y//sup -n/ one-dimensional power spectra with n=2--2.5. These results are consistent both with in situ experimental data and with theoretical prediction

  4. Scaling laws of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvarts, D.; Oron, D.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Sadot, O.; Srebro, Y.; Yedvab, Y.; Ofer, D.; Levin, A.; Sarid, E.; Shvarts, D.; Oron, D.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Sadot, O.; Srebro, Y.; Yedvab, Y.; Ben-Dor, G.; Erez, L.; Erez, G.; Yosef-Hai, A.; Alon, U.; Arazi, L.

    2000-01-01

    The late-time nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities for random initial perturbations is investigated using a statistical mechanics model based on single-mode and bubble-competition physics at al Atwood numbers (A) and full numerical simulations in two and three dimensions. It is shown that the RT mixing zone bubble and spike fronts evolve as h∼α.A.gt 2 with different values of α for the bubble and spike fronts. The RM mixing zone fronts evolve as h∼θ with different values of θ for bubbles and spikes. Similar analysis yields a linear growth with time of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing zone. The dependence of the RT and RM scaling parameters on A and the dimensionality will be discussed. The 3-D predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent Linear Electric Motor (LEM) experiments. (authors)

  5. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Ma, W. J., E-mail: wenjun.ma@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gu, Y. Q. [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Yan, X. Q., E-mail: x.yan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2016-08-15

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor Type Instabilities in the Reconnection Exhaust Jet as a Mechanism for Supra-arcade Downflows in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.-J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Innes, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (hereafter referred to as SADs) are low-emission, elongated, finger-like features observed in active region coronae above post-eruption flare arcades. Observations exhibit downward moving SADs intertwined with bright upward growing spikes. Whereas SADs are dark voids, spikes are brighter, denser structures. Although SADs have been observed for more than a decade, the mechanism of the formation of SADs remains an open issue. Using three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities develop in the downstream region of a reconnecting current sheet. The instabilities result in the formation of low-density coherent structures that resemble SADs, and high-density structures that appear to be spike-like. Comparison between the simulation results and observations suggests that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities in the exhaust of reconnecting current sheets provide a plausible mechanism for observed SADs.

  7. Hot-spot dynamics and deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability of imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, R.; Umansky, M.; Lobatchev, V.; Goncharov, V.N.; McCrory, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    A model for the deceleration phase of imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules is derived by solving the conservation equations for the hot spot. It is found that heat flux leaving the hot spot goes back in the form of internal energy and pdV work of the material ablated off the inner shell surface. Though the hot-spot temperature is reduced by the heat conduction losses, the hot-spot density increases due to the ablated material in such a way that the hot-spot pressure is approximately independent of heat conduction. For direct-drive National Ignition Facility-like capsules, the ablation velocity off the shell inner surface is of the order of tens μm/ns, the deceleration of the order of thousands μm/ns2, and the density-gradient scale length of the order a few μm. Using the well-established theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability, it is shown that the growth rates of the deceleration phase instability are significantly reduced by the finite ablative flow and the unstable spectrum exhibits a cutoff for mode numbers of about l≅90

  8. A review of the ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to Inertial Confinement Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.

    1993-12-01

    It has been recognized for many year's that the most significant limitation of ICF is the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. It limits the distance an ablatively driven shell can be moved to several times its initial thickness. Fortunately material flow through the unstable region at velocity v A reduces the growth rate to √ 1+kL / kg -βkv A with β from 2-3. In recent years experiments using both x-ray drive and smoothed laser drive to accelerate foils have confirmed our understanding of the ablative R-T instability in planar geometry. The growth of small initial modulations on the foils is measured for growth factors up to 60 for direct drive and 80 for indirect drive. For x-ray drive large stabilization is evident. After some growth, the instability enters the non-linear phase when mode coupling and saturation are also seen and compare well with modeling. Normalized growth rates for direct drive are measured to be higher, but strategies for reduction by raising the isentrope are being investigated. For direct drive, high spatial frequencies are imprinted from the laser beam and amplified by the R-T instability. Modeling shows an understanding of this ''laser imprinting.''

  9. A review of the ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Hammel, B.A.; Lindl, J.D.; Munro, D.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-12-01

    It has been recognized for many years that the most significant limitation of ICF is the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. It limits the distance an ablatively driven shell can be moved to several times its initial thickness. Fortunately material flow through the unstable region at velocity v A reduces the growth rate to √ 1+kL / kg -βkv A with β from 2-3. In recent years experiments using both x-ray drive and smoothed laser drive to accelerate foils have confirmed our understanding of the R-T instability. The growth of small initial modulations on the foils is measured for growth factors up to 60 for direct drive and 80 for indirect drive. For x-ray drive large stabilization is evident After some growth, the instability enters the non-linear phase when mode coupling and saturation are also seen and compare well with modeling. Normalized growth rates for direct drive are measured to be higher, but strategies for reduction by raising the isentrope are being investigated. For direct drive, high spatial frequencies are imprinted from the laser beam and amplified by the R-T instability. Modeling shows an understanding of this ''laser imprinting.''

  10. Numerical investigation on the effects of acceleration reversal times in Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with multiple reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Zachary; Aslangil, Denis; Banerjee, Arindam; Lawrie, Andrew G. W.

    2017-11-01

    An implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) code, MOBILE, is used to explore the growth rate of the mixing layer width of the acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) under variable acceleration histories. The sets of computations performed consist of a series of accel-decel-accel (ADA) cases in addition to baseline constant acceleration and accel-decel (AD) cases. The ADA cases are a series of varied times for the second acceleration reversal (t2) and show drastic differences in the growth rates. Upon the deceleration phase, the kinetic energy of the flow is shifted into internal wavelike patterns. These waves are evidenced by the examined differences in growth rate in the second acceleration phase for the set of ADA cases. Here, we investigate global parameters that include mixing width, growth rates and the anisotropy tensor for the kinetic energy to better understand the behavior of the growth during the re-acceleration period. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  11. Dimensionality dependence of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability late-time scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oron, D.; Arazi, L.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Alon, U.; Shvarts, D.

    2001-01-01

    The late-time nonlinear evolution of the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities for random initial perturbations is investigated. Using full 3D numerical simulations, a statistical mechanics bubble-competition model, and a Layzer-type drag-buoyancy model, it is shown that the RT scaling parameters, α B and α S , are similar in two and three dimensions, but the RM exponents, θ B and θ S are lower by a factor of 2 in three dimensions. The similarity parameter h B / is higher by a factor of 3 in the 3D case compared to the 2D case, in very good agreement with recent Linear Electric Motor (LEM) experiments. A simple drag-buoyancy model, similar to that proposed by Youngs [see J. C. V. Hanson et al., Laser Part. Beams 8, 51 (1990)], but using the coefficients from the A=1 Layzer model, rather than phenomenological ones, is introduced

  12. Measurements of laser-imprinted perturbations and Rayleigh--Taylor growth with the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawley, C.J.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R.H.; McLean, E.A.; Mostovych, A.N.; Obenschain, S.P.; Sethian, J.D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J.A.; Sullivan, C.A.; Bodner, S.E.; Colombant, D.; Dahlburg, J.P.; Schmitt, A.J.; Gardner, J.H.; Brown, C.; Seely, J.F.; Lehecka, T.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Deniz, A.V.; Chan, Y.; Metzler, N.; Klapisch, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nike is a 56 beam Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser system using Induced Spatial Incoherence (ISI) beam smoothing with a measured focal nonuniformity left-angle ΔI/I right-angle of 1% rms in a single beam [S. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1996 (2098)]. When 37 of these beams are overlapped on the target, we estimate that the beam nonuniformity is reduced by √(37), to (ΔI/I)congruent 0.15% (excluding short-wavelength beam-to-beam interference). The extraordinary uniformity of the laser drive, along with a newly developed x-ray framing diagnostic, has provided a unique facility for the accurate measurements of Rayleigh--Taylor amplified laser-imprinted mass perturbations under conditions relevant to direct-drive laser fusion. Data from targets with smooth surfaces as well as those with impressed sine wave perturbations agree with our two-dimensional (2-D) radiation hydrodynamics code that includes the time-dependent ISI beam modulations. A 2-D simulation of a target with a 100 Angstrom rms randomly rough surface finish driven by a completely uniform beam gives final perturbation amplitudes similar to the experimental data for the smoothest laser profile. These results are promising for direct-drive laser fusion

  13. Multiple eigenmodes of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed for a fluid interface with smoothly varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. X.; Xue, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, X. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Ye, W. H.; Wang, L. F.; Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, multiple eigen-systems including linear growth rates and eigen-functions have been discovered for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) by numerically solving the Sturm-Liouville eigen-value problem in the case of two-dimensional plane geometry. The system called the first mode has the maximal linear growth rate and is just extensively studied in literature. Higher modes have smaller eigen-values, but possess multi-peak eigen-functions which bring on multiple pairs of vortices in the vorticity field. A general fitting expression for the first four eigen-modes is presented. Direct numerical simulations show that high modes lead to appearances of multi-layered spike-bubble pairs, and lots of secondary spikes and bubbles are also generated due to the interactions between internal spikes and bubbles. The present work has potential applications in many research and engineering areas, e.g., in reducing the RTI growth during capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion.

  14. Nonlinear hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for strong viscous fluids in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    El-Dib, Y O

    2003-01-01

    In the present work a weakly nonlinear stability for magnetic fluid is discussed. The research of an interface between two strong viscous homogeneous incompressible fluids through porous medium is investigated theoretically and graphically. The effect of the vertical magnetic field has been demonstrated in this study. The linear form of equation of motion is solved in the light of the nonlinear boundary conditions. The boundary value problem leads to construct nonlinear characteristic equation having complex coefficients in elevation function. The nonlinearity is kept to third-order expansion. The nonlinear characteristic equation leads to derive the well-known nonlinear Schroedinger equation. This equation having complex coefficients of the disturbance amplitude varies in both space and time. Stability criteria have been performed for nonlinear Chanderasekhar dispersion relation including the porous effects. Stability conditions are discussed through the assumption of equal kinematic viscosity. The calculati...

  15. The effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on the thickness of undifferentiated crust on Kuiper Belt Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark E.; Desch, Steven J.; Neveu, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Previous calculations of the internal structure and thermal evolution of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) by Desch et al. (Desch, S.J., Cook, J.C., Doggett, T.C., Porter, S.B. [2009]. Icarus 202, 694-714) have predicted that KBOs should only partially differentiate, with rock and ice separating into a rocky core and icy mantle, below an undifferentiated crust of ice and rock. This crust is thermally insulating and enhances the ability of subsurface liquid to persist within KBOs. A dense rock/ice layer resting on an icy mantle is gravitationally unstable and prone to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities, and may potentially overturn. Here we calculate the ability of RT instabilities to act in KBOs, and determine the thickness of undifferentiated crusts. We have used previously calculated growth rates of the RT instability to determine the critical viscosity of ice needed for the RT instability to operate. We calculate the viscosity of ice at the cold temperatures and long timescales relevant to KBOs. We find that crustal overturn is only possible where the temperature exceeds about 150 K, and that RT instabilities cannot act on geological timescales within about 60 km of the surfaces of a KBO like Charon. Although this crustal thickness is less than the 85 km previously calculated by Desch et al. (Desch, S.J., Cook, J.C., Doggett, T.C., Porter, S.B. [2009]. Icarus 202, 694-714), it is still significant, representing ≈25% of the mass of the KBO. We conclude that while RT instabilities may act in KBOs, they do not completely overturn their crusts. We calculate that Saturn’s moon Rhea should only partially differentiate, resulting in a moment of inertia C/MR2≈0.38.

  16. Effects of initial radius of the interface and Atwood number on nonlinear saturation amplitudes in cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wanhai; Yu, Changping; Li, Xinliang

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear saturation amplitudes (NSAs) of the first two harmonics in classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in cylindrical geometry for arbitrary Atwood numbers have been analytically investigated considering nonlinear corrections up to the fourth-order. The NSA of the fundamental mode is defined as the linear (purely exponential) growth amplitude of the fundamental mode at the saturation time when the growth of the fundamental mode (first harmonic) is reduced by 10% in comparison to its corresponding linear growth, and the NSA of the second harmonic can be obtained in the same way. The analytic results indicate that the effects of the initial radius of the interface (r 0 ) and the Atwood number (A) play an important role in the NSAs of the first two harmonics in cylindrical RTI. On the one hand, the NSA of the fundamental mode first increases slightly and then decreases quickly with increasing A. For given A, the smaller the r 0 /λ (with λ perturbation wavelength) is, the larger the NSA of the fundamental mode is. When r 0 /λ is large enough (r 0 ≫λ), the NSA of the fundamental mode is reduced to the prediction of previous literatures within the framework of third-order perturbation theory [J. W. Jacobs and I. Catton, J. Fluid Mech. 187, 329 (1988); S. W. Haan, Phys. Fluids B 3, 2349 (1991)]. On the other hand, the NSA of the second harmonic first decreases quickly with increasing A, reaching a minimum, and then increases slowly. Furthermore, the r 0 can reduce the NSA of the second harmonic for arbitrary A at r 0 ≲2λ while increase it for A ≲ 0.6 at r 0 ≳2λ. Thus, it should be included in applications where the NSA has a role, such as inertial confinement fusion ignition target design

  17. A variable-coefficient unstable nonlinear Schroedinger model for the electron beam plasmas and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in nonuniform plasmas: Solutions and observable effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yitian; Tian Bo

    2003-01-01

    A variable-coefficient unstable nonlinear Schroedinger model is hereby investigated, which arises in such applications as the electron-beam plasma waves and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in nonuniform plasmas. With computerized symbolic computation, families of exact analytic dark- and bright-soliton-like solutions are found, of which some previously published solutions turn out to be the special cases. Similarity solutions also come out, which are expressible in terms of the elliptic functions and the second Painleve transcendent. Some observable effects caused by the variable coefficient are predicted, which may be detected in the future with the relevant space or laboratory plasma experiments with nonuniform background existing

  18. Effect of viscosity and surface tension on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability under nonlinear domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahul Banerjee; Khan, M.; Mandal, L.K.; Roy, S.; Gupta, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability are well known problems in the formation of some astrophysical structures such as the supernova remnants in the Eagle and Crab nebula. A core collapse supernova is driven by an externally powerful shock, and strong shocks are the breeding ground of hydrodynamic instability such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability or Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. These instabilities are also important issues in the design of targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In an ICF target, a high density fluid is frequently accelerated by the pressure of a low density fluid and after ablation the density quickly decays. So, small ripples at such an interface will grow. Under potential flow model, the perturbed interface between heavier fluid and lighter fluid form bubble and spike like structures. The bubbles are in the form of columns of lighter fluid interleaved by falling spike of heavy fluid. In this paper, we like to presented the effect of viscosity and surface tension on Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability under the non-linear Layzer's approach and described the displacement curvature, growth and velocity of the tip of the bubble as well as spike. It is seen that, in absence of surface tension the lowering of the asymptotic velocity of the tip of the bubble which is formed when the lighter fluid penetrates into the denser fluid and thus encounters the viscous drag due to the denser fluid, which depends only on the denser fluid's viscosity coefficient. On the other hand the asymptotic velocity of the tip of the spike formed as the denser fluid penetrates into the lighter fluid is reduced by an amount which depends only on the viscosity coefficient of the lighter fluid and the spike is resisted by the viscous drag due to the lighter fluid. However, in presence of surface tension the asymptotic velocity of the tip of the bubble (spike) and

  19. Experimental study of the initial conditions of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the ablation front in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, Barthelemy

    2015-01-01

    Numerous designs and experiments in the domain of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) show that, in both direct and indirect drive approaches, one of the main limitations to reach the ignition is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI). It may lead to shell disruption and performance degradation of spherically imploding targets. Thus, the understanding and the control of the initial conditions of the RTI is of crucial importance for the ICF program. In this thesis, we present an experimental and theoretical study of the initial conditions of the ablative RTI in direct drive, by means of two experimental campaigns performed on the OMEGA laser facility (LLE, Rochester). The first campaign consisted in studying the laser-imprinted ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) which starts at the beginning of the interaction and seeds the ablative RTI. We set up an experimental configuration that allowed to measure for the first time the temporal evolution of the laser-imprinted ablative RMI. The experimental results have been interpreted by a theoretical model and numerical simulations performed with the hydrodynamic code CHIC. We show that the best way to control the ablative RMI is to reduce the laser intensity inhomogeneities. This can be achieved with targets covered by a layer of a low density foam. Thus, in the second campaign, we studied for the first time the effect of underdense foams on the growth of the ablative RTI. A layer of low density foam was placed in front of a plastic foil, and the perturbation was imprinted by an intensity modulated laser beam. Experimental data are presented: backscattered laser energy, target dynamic obtained by side-on self emission measurement, and face-on radiographs showing the effect of the foams on the target areal density modulations. These data were interpreted using the CHIC code and the laser-plasma interaction code PARAX. We show that the foams noticeably reduce the amplitude of the laser intensity inhomogeneities and the

  20. Numerical study and modeling of hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of inertial confinement fusion in the presence of self-generated magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of inertial confinement fusion we investigate effects of magnetic fields on the development in the linear regime of two hydrodynamic instabilities: Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using ideal magnetohydrodynamics and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in both acceleration and deceleration stages. Direct numerical simulations with a linear perturbation code enable us to confirm the stabilizing effect of the component of the magnetic field along the perturbations wave vector. The amplitude doesn't grow linearly in time but experiences oscillations instead. The compressibility taken into account in the code does not affect predictions given by an already existing impulsive and incompressible model. As far as Rayleigh-Taylor instability is concerned we study the effects of self-generated magnetic fields that arise from the development of the instability itself. In the acceleration stage we perform two dimensional simulations in planar geometry. We show that magnetic fields of about 1 T can be generated and that the instability growth transits more rapidly into nonlinear growth with the enhancement of the development of the third harmonic. We also propose an adaptation of an existing model that aims at studying thermal conductivity anisotropy effects, to take into account the effects of the self-generated magnetic fields on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate. Finally, in the deceleration stage, we perform two dimensional simulations in cylindrical geometry that take into account self-generation of magnetic fields due to the instability development. It reveals magnetic fields of about several thousands of Teslas that are not strong enough though to affect the instability behavior. (author) [fr

  1. Secondary Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities in the Reconnection Exhaust Jet: A Mechanism for Supra-Arcade Downflows in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y. M.; Innes, D.

    2014-12-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (hereafter referred to as SADs) are low-emission, elongated, finger-like features usually observed in active-region coronae above post-eruption flare arcades. Observations exhibit downward moving SADs intertwined with bright, upward moving spikes. Whereas SADs are dark voids, spikes are brighter, denser structures. Although SADs have been observed for decades, the mechanism for formation of SADs remains an open issue. Using high-Lundquist-number three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations, we demonstrate that secondary Rayleigh-Taylor type instabilities develop in the downstream region of a reconnecting current sheet. The instability results in the formation of low-density coherent structures that resemble SADs, intertwined with high-density structures that appear to be spike-like. Using SDO/AIA images, we highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with siumlations suggest that secondary Rayleigh-Taylor type instabilities in the exhaust of reconnecting current sheets provide a plausible mechanism for observed SADs and spikes. Although the plasma conditions are vastly different, analogous phenomena also occur in the Earth's magnetotail during reconnection.

  2. A propagator matrix method for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of multiple layers: a case study on crustal delamination in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Puskar; Korenaga, Jun

    2018-03-01

    The dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a gravitational instability associated with unstable density stratification, is of profound importance in various geophysical contexts. When more than two layers are involved, a semi-analytical technique based on the biharmonic formulation of Stokes flow has been extensively used to obtain such dispersion relation. However, this technique may become cumbersome when applied to lithospheric dynamics, where a number of layers are necessary to represent the continuous variation of viscosity over many orders of magnitude. Here, we present an alternative and more efficient method based on the propagator matrix formulation of Stokes flow. With this approach, the original instability problem is reduced to a compact eigenvalue equation whose size is solely determined by the number of primary density contrasts. We apply this new technique to the stability of the early crust, and combined with the Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis, we derive an empirical formula to compute the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for this particular geophysical setting. Our analysis indicates that the likelihood of crustal delamination hinges critically on the effective viscosity of eclogite.

  3. Development of surface perturbation target and thin silicon foil target used to research Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bin; Sun Qi; Huang Yaodong; Shen Jun; Wu Guangming; Wang Jue

    2004-01-01

    The developments of the surface perturbation target and the thin silicon foil target used to research Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the resolved experiments of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are carried out. Based on the laser interference process combined with the figure-transfer process, the surface perturbation target with sine modulated perturbation is gotten, the wavelength is in the range of 20-100 μm and the amplitude is several micrometers. The thin silicon foil within the thickness about 3-4 μm is prepared by semiconductor process together with heavy-doped self-stop etching. Combined with ion beam etching, the check or the stripe patterns are transferred to the surface of thin silicon foils, and then the silicon grating foil is obtained

  4. The nature of the Vela X-ray ``jet". The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the origin of filamentary structures in the Vela supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii

    1999-12-01

    The nature of the Vela X-ray ``jet", recently discovered by Markwardt & Ögelman (1995), is examined. It is suggested that the ``jet" arises along the interface of domelike deformations of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable shell of the Vela supernova remnant; thereby the ``jet" is interpreted as a part of the general shell of the remnant. The origin of deformations as well as the general structure of the remnant are discussed in the framework of a model based on a cavity explosion of a supernova star. It is suggested that the shell deformations viewed at various angles appear as filamentary structures visible throughout the Vela supernova remnant at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. A possible origin of the nebula of hard X-ray emission detected by Willmore et al. (1992) around the Vela pulsar is proposed.

  5. Nonlinear stage of a Z-pinch instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garanin, S.F.; Chernyshev, Y.D.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the sausage instability is analyzed for a Z-pinch with a fully developed skin effect in the current. Two-dimensional numerical calculations carried out on the sausage instability show that its occurrence leads to a stage describable by a self-similar solution when the length of the neck is fixed and the plasma compression is isentropic. At a perturbation wavelength small in comparison with the pinch radius, this stage is preceded by a stage which reduces to a nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability. The dynamics of the motion of magnetic field ''bubbles'' and of plasma ''jets'' is analyzed in this case. The plasma jets emerging from the pinch do not block the pinch from the current source

  6. Recent ACE 4 Z-pinch experiments: Long implosion time argon loads, uniform fill versus annular shell distributions and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, P.; Rauch, J.; Rix, W.; Thompson, J.; Wilson, R.

    1997-01-01

    Hammer (1996) and Velikovich (1996) have discussed ways to mitigate the growth of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability in z-pinch (PRS) implosions. They predict that initial mass distributions more complex than a simple annular shell will reduce instability development. Sanford (1996) reported experimental data showing a benefit for a uniform mass distribution compared to a shell; those tests used ''conventional'' load radii of 2.25 and 1.25 cm respectively, and implosion times under 100 ns. However, the instability problem is expected to grow exponentially as the implosion time, or alternatively the initial radius, increases. Thus we made a comparison of a uniform fill load with a shell but at larger radii, 3.6 and 2.5 cm respectively, and at implosion times well above 100 ns. We see nearly a factor of 10X improvement in peak K-shell power and 2X increase in K-shell yield for the uniform mass load. Hence it appears that suitable tailoring of the imploding mass distribution can significantly limit the instability growth

  7. Laser imprint reduction with a shaping pulse, oscillatory Richtmyer-Meshkov to Rayleigh-Taylor transition and other coherent effects in plastic-foam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, N.; Velikovich, A.L.; Schmitt, A.J.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Mostovych, A.N.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gardner, J.H.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial reduction of the laser imprint with a short, low-energy 'shaping' laser pulse incident upon a foam-plastic sandwich target prior to the main laser pulse has been demonstrated to be possible [Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5050 (2002)]. Nonuniformity of this shaping pulse, however, produces standing sonic waves in the target. Laser-imprinted seeds for the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth then emerge from the interaction of these waves with the strong shock wave launched by the drive laser pulse. Such coherent interaction between different waves and modes perturbed at the same wavelength is shown to be important in a variety of situations relevant to the inertial confinement fusion studies. As an example, an oscillatory transition from the classical Richtmyer-Meshkov shock-interface instability development to the RT growth exhibiting a characteristic phase reversal in a target of finite thickness is described. Another example refers to the feedout mechanism of seeding the perturbations that come from the nonuniformities of the rear (inner) surface of the laser target. The coherent interaction between the strong shock wave from the main laser pulse and the rippled rarefaction wave produced by a low-intensity foot of the pulse produces observable effects, such as an extra phase reversal compared to the case of no foot. Some of these predictions are shown to be consistent with our new experimental results obtained in the feedout geometry on the Nike laser facility [S. P. Obenschain et al. Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)

  8. Measurements of the growth rate of the short wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor instability of foam foil packages driven by a soft x-ray pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willi, O.; Pasley, J.; Iwase, A.; Nazarov, W.; Rose, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability was studied in the short wavelength regime using single mode targets that were driven by hohlraum radiation allowing the Takabe-Morse roll-over due to ablative stabilisation to be investigated. A temporally shaped soft x-ray drive was generated by focusing one of the PHEBUS laser beams into a gold hohlraum with a maximum radiation temperature of about 120 eV. Thin plastic foils with sinusoidal modulations with wavelengths between 12 and 50 μm, and a perturbation amplitude of about 10% of the wavelength, were used. A low density 50 mg/cc tri-acrylate foam 150 μm in length facing the hohlraum was attached to the modulated foam target. The targets were radiographed face-on at an x-ray energy of about 1.3 keV with a spatial resolution of about 5 μm using a Wolter-like x-ray microscope coupled to an x-ray streak camera with a temporal resolution of 50 ps. The acceleration was obtained from side-on radiography. 2-D hydrodynamic code simulations have been carried out to compare the experimental results with the simulations. (authors)

  9. Effect of initial conditions on two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and transition to turbulence in planar blast-wave-driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, A.R.; Edwards, M.J.; Greenough, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, the results from a computational study of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution for multiple amplitude and phase realizations of a variety of multimode spectral types is considered. Compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Certain aspects of the initial conditions, including the rms amplitude, are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime

  10. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  11. Plasma dynamics in a staged pinch device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, N.A.D.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, A.M.; Murtaza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma parameters in fiber initiated fast and dense theta-pinch plasma driven by an annular finite-thickness gas-puff Z-pinch are studied. The imploding gas-puff Z-pinch plasma traps an axial magnetic field B/sub z/, compressing it to large values (of the order of several megagauss) in an extremely short time. The rapidly changing magnetic flux of this field induces an azimuthal current on the surface of the coaxially placed fiber, with a rise time an order of magnitude shorter than the applied Z-pinch current. The shorter rise time of the current stabilizes the pinch against sausage mode of MHD instabilities. Our numerical results demonstrate that for a relatively thick gas-puff layer, the compression occurs before the current saturates. At the peak compression the fuel densities of the order of 10/sup 25/ cm/sup -3/ and temperature above 10 keV can be achieved on a time scale of 0.1 nanoseconds, yielding the Lawson Criterion parameters n tau is approximately equal to 10/sup 14/ sec cm/sup -3/ for D-T fuel. The snow-plow effect incorporated in our model exercise a strong influence on the onset and growth rate of sausage and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) modes of instabilities. Imposing a rotational velocity on the outer thin gas-puff plasma can control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical results indicate that the choice of the spin velocity is critical. Large values of the spin velocity, though provide stabilization against the R-T instability at the final stage of compression, however, it adversely reduce the plasma parameters so essential to achieve controlled fusion. Our analysis, therefore, suggests that a judicious choice of the spin velocity is necessary to obtain the desired temperature and density, especially when we seed D-T fiber plasma with a small fraction of high-Z Kr impurity to initiate the radiative collapse. (author)

  12. Territorial characteristics of low frequency electrostatic fluctuations in a simple magnetized torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, R.; Singh, R.; Sarada Sree, A.; Mattoo, S. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of turbulence in simple toroidal plasma devices without rotational transform. It is argued that Rayleigh-Taylor (flute interchange) mode may be one of the source mechanisms for the observed turbulence but is not sufficient to explain its observed global characteristics. Taking BETA device as an example, we show that pure Rayleigh-Taylor mode cannot explain (i) the observation of mode maximum at the location other than where density scale length is minimum, (ii) the comparable value of amplitude level of fluctuations in good curvature region, and (iii) the decrease in the mode amplitude with increasing magnetic field. Investigations have revealed that there exists not only poloidal plasma flow but also that it is sheared. Including this effect explains the first observation. However, modification brought about by velocity shear in the Rayleigh-Taylor mode still does not explain our second and third observations. We have taken an approach that since Rayleigh-Taylor is not excited in a good curvature region, it cannot be the source of turbulence there. Nor is it defensible to say that turbulence born in a bad curvature region is carried over through ExB rotation to the good curvature region. Consequently, we have invoked cross-field Simon-Hoh instability for this region. Experimental evidence supporting our proposal is presented. This paper concludes that toroidal devices have simultaneous existence of different self-consistent sources of turbulence in different regions of the device.

  13. On coupled development of MHD instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz types in nonuniform gas-plasmas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhachev, A P; Medin, S A

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous development of the MHD instabilities of Raylegh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz types at the interface between high-conducting plasmoid and surrounding non- or low-conducting gas is considered. The linear stage of the RTI development is studied analytically for incompressible and compressible fluids. The nonlinear stage of the individual development of the RTI and the coupled development of both instabilities has been investigated numerically. The time-dependent two-dimensional numerical model based on the solution of the Euler gasdynamic equations with body momentum and energy sources of MHD origin has been developed and used in calculations. A disturbance introducing in the background flow has been periodic with varied assignment type and wave length. Fundamental difference between the results of linear and nonlinear analysis has been revealed. In particular, the increment of the RTI development at nonlinear stage is one-two order of magnitude less than that predicted by linear theory and rather weakly depends on initial disturbance mode. In linear analysis the coupled development of the RTI and the KHI is determined by simple summing of the two effects in the expression of wave increment, whereas in nonlinear case the mutual influence of the instabilities leads to essential alterations in their development, main of which is the intensive 'layer-by-layer' destruction of the plasmoid surface.

  14. In search of late time evolution self-similar scaling laws of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov hydrodynamic instabilities - recent theorical advance and NIF Discovery-Science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities, and the mixing that they cause, are of crucial importance in describing many phenomena, from very large scales such as stellar explosions (supernovae) to very small scales, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Such mixing causes the ejection of stellar core material in supernovae, and impedes attempts at ICF ignition. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at an accelerated interface between two fluids with the lower density accelerating the higher density fluid. The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a shock wave passes an interface between the two fluids of different density. In the RTI, buoyancy causes ``bubbles'' of the light fluid to rise through (penetrate) the denser fluid, while ``spikes'' of the heavy fluid sink through (penetrate) the lighter fluid. With realistic multi-mode initial conditions, in the deep nonlinear regime, the mixing zone width, H, and its internal structure, progress through an inverse cascade of spatial scales, reaching an asymptotic self-similar evolution: hRT =αRT Agt2 for RT and hRM =αRM tθ for RM. While this characteristic behavior has been known for years, the self-similar parameters αRT and θRM and their dependence on dimensionality and density ratio have continued to be intensively studied and a relatively wide distribution of those values have emerged. This talk will describe recent theoretical advances in the description of this turbulent mixing evolution that sheds light on the spread in αRT and θRM. Results of new and specially designed experiments, done by scientists from several laboratories, were performed recently using NIF, the only facility that is powerful enough to reach the self-similar regime, for quantitative testing of this theoretical advance, will be presented.

  15. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm J. Andrews

    2006-01-01

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also complete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.'s and three (3) MS's, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow)

  16. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  17. Analysis of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Yoshimi, Naofumi; Nakama, Yuji; Muranaka, Takanobu; Mayumi, Takao; Nakashima, Hideki

    1997-01-01

    A magnetic nozzle concept in a laser fusion rocket is suitable for controlling the fusion plasma flow and it has an advantage that thermalization with wall structures in a thrust chamber can be avoided. Rayleigh-Taylor instability would occur at the surface of expanding plasma and it would lead to the degradation of thrust efficiency, due to diffusion of the plasma through ambient decelerating magnetic field. A 3D hybrid particle-in-cell code has been developed to analyze the plasma instability in the magnetic nozzle. The resultant linear growth rate γ of the instability is found to be 2.96 x 10 6 and it is in good agreement with the theoretical value from conventional Rayleigh Taylor instability. (author)

  18. Evolution of sausage and helical modes in magnetized thin-foil cylindrical liners driven by a Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, P.; Campbell, P. C.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; McBride, R. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present experimental results on axially magnetized (Bz = 0.5 - 2.0 T), thin-foil (400 nm-thick) cylindrical liner-plasmas driven with ˜600 kA by the Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-Pinch Experiments, which is a linear transformer driver at the University of Michigan. We show that: (1) the applied axial magnetic field, irrespective of its direction (e.g., parallel or anti-parallel to the flow of current), reduces the instability amplitude for pure magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes [defined as modes devoid of the acceleration-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability]; (2) axially magnetized, imploding liners (where MHD modes couple to MRT) generate m = 1 or m = 2 helical modes that persist from the implosion to the subsequent explosion stage; (3) the merging of instability structures is a mechanism that enables the appearance of an exponential instability growth rate for a longer than expected time-period; and (4) an inverse cascade in both the axial and azimuthal wavenumbers, k and m, may be responsible for the final m = 2 helical structure observed in our experiments. These experiments are particularly relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion program pursued at Sandia National Laboratories, where helical instabilities have been observed.

  19. Analysis of staged Z-pinch implosion trajectories from experiments on Zebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mike P.; Conti, F.; Darling, T. W.; Ruskov, E.; Valenzuela, J.; Wessel, F. J.; Beg, F.; Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.

    2017-10-01

    The Staged Z-pinch plasma confinement concept relies on compressing an annular liner of high-Z plasma onto a target plasma column of deuterium fuel. The interface between the liner and target is stable against the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, which leads to effective fuel compression and makes the concept interesting as a potential fusion reactor. The liner initiates as a neutral gas puff, while the target plasma is a partially ionized (Zeff coaxial plasma gun. The Zebra pulsed power generator (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) provides the discharge that ionizes the liner and drives the Z-pinch implosion. Diverse diagnostics observe the 100-300 km/s implosions including silicon diodes, photo-conducting detectors (PCDs), laser shadowgraphy, an XUV framing camera, and a visible streak camera. The imaging diagnostics track instabilities smaller than 0.1 mm, and Z-pinch diameters below 2.5 mm are seen at peak compression. This poster correlates the data from these diagnostics to elucidate implosion behavior dependencies on liner gas, liner pressure, target pressure, and applied, axial-magnetic field. Funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  20. Hydrodynamic instability of elastic-plastic solid plates at the early stage of acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Sun, Y B; Tahir, N A

    2015-03-01

    A model is presented for the linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place at the early stage of acceleration of an elastic-plastic solid, when the shock wave is still running into the solid and is driven by a time varying pressure on the interface. When the the shock is formed sufficiently close to the interface, this stage is considered to follow a previous initial phase controlled by the Ritchmyer-Meshkov instability that settles new initial conditions. The model reproduces the behavior of the instability observed in former numerical simulation results and provides a relatively simpler physical picture than the currently existing one for this stage of the instability evolution.

  1. Dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat for measurements at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul; Das, Ritesh K.; Weinstein, Roy

    2015-04-14

    A method and a dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat apparatus are provided for implementing enhanced measurements at high magnetic fields. The dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat system includes a trapped-flux magnet (TFM). A sample, for example, a single crystal, is adjustably positioned proximate to the surface of the TFM, using a translation stage such that the distance between the sample and the surface is selectively adjusted. A cryostat is provided with a first separate thermal stage provided for cooling the TFM and with a second separate thermal stage provided for cooling sample.

  2. Magnetic activity effect on equatorial spread-F under high and low solar activity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbarao, K S.V.; Somayajulu, V V; Krishna Murthy, B V

    1986-08-01

    The effect of magnetic activity on spread-F at two equatorial stations, Trivandrum and Huancayo, separated in longitude by about 150 deg, under high and low solar activity conditions has been investigated. Magnetic activity produces strong inhibition effect on spread-F at Huancayo compared to that at Trivandrum especially during high solar activity period. This results in a decrease of spread-F with solar activity at Huancayo in contrast to Trivandrum. These findings are explained in terms of F-region electrodynamics and Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism for spread-F.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Hiroichi; Umeda, Takashi; Niijima, Tadao; Yashiro, Naobumi; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1987-07-01

    Eighteen patients with renal neoplasm underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 1.5 Tesla superconducting magnetic system and spin echo images were obtained by quick scan technique under holding breath. MR images were interpreted independently of the computerized tomography (CT) findings. The preoperative stagings of the 18 renal carcinomas, as judged by MRI, were compared with those obtained at laparotomy. The anatomic staging was correctly performed by MRI in 13 patients (72 %). In the patients who had intrarenal small tumor with normal renal contour, MRI demonstrated a solid mass clearly distinguishable from surrounding renal parenchyma using the paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium-DTPA). When compared with results of evaluation by CT in staging, MRI appeared to have several advantages in determination of whole mass; the detection of tumor thrombus into renal vein and inferior vena cava; and the evaluation of direct tumor invasion of adjacent organs. MRI should play an important role in the staging of renal cell carcinoma.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hiroichi; Umeda, Takashi; Niijima, Tadao; Yashiro, Naobumi; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen patients with renal neoplasm underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 1.5 Tesla superconducting magnetic system and spin echo images were obtained by quick scan technique under holding breath. MR images were interpreted independently of the computerized tomography (CT) findings. The preoperative stagings of the 18 renal carcinomas, as judged by MRI, were compared with those obtained at laparotomy. The anatomic staging was correctly performed by MRI in 13 patients (72 %). In the patients who had intrarenal small tumor with normal renal contour, MRI demonstrated a solid mass clearly distinguishable from surrounding renal parenchyma using the paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium-DTPA). When compared with results of evaluation by CT in staging, MRI appeared to have several advantages in determination of whole mass; the detection of tumor thrombus into renal vein and inferior vena cava; and the evaluation of direct tumor invasion of adjacent organs. MRI should play an important role in the staging of renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  5. Multimode modelling of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Town, R.P.J.; Findlay, J.D.; Bell, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of Haan's mode coupling model with two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. In the light of these results, a new saturation criterion is developed that is used in a new, extended mode coupling model. The new extended model accurately follows the mode development to amplitudes 2 to 3 times larger than Haan's model. (Author)

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarises the main results of theoretical analysis on the problem of Rayleigh-Tylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Work presented in this report essentially covers four basic problems. Firstly, an analytical formulation to analyse the effects of plasma density inhomogeneities on the growth of the instability in plane geometry is presented. As a result of this analysis it is concluded that, for minimizing the growth rate of the instability, it may be advantageous to use the driver laser beams of higher irradiance and an optimum wave length in an ICF experiment. Secondly, a new formulation for the analysis of the instability in curved (cylindrical and spherical) geometries is presented. A general eigenvalue equation for the growth rate of the instability which is applicable for both plane and curved geometries is derived. A comparative study is made between the plane, cylindrical and spherical geometries. Also analytical expressions for the growth rates are obtained in the cases of spherical and cylindrical shell targets and their variations with respect to the aspect ratios of the shells are discussed. Thirdly, a semi-analytical analysis of the instability where the growth rate is obtained by solving numerically a (2N-1)x(2N-1) determinantal equation is presented. The semi-analytical analysis developed is applicable for the study of the growth of the instability in the present day multi-structured spherical shell targets. Finally, a dynamic analysis of the growth of the instability for a representative spherical solid target driven by laser beams symmetrically from all the sides is carried out numerically using a computer code developed for this purpose. This study confirms analytical predictions. Further, it is observed that an approximate analytical analysis with time independent density profile gives conservative estimates for the growth rate. In passing, the computer code is also used to estimate the pellet gain for spin-polarized D-T nuclei. 80 refs. (author)

  7. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses topics on hydrodynamics instabilities in inertial confinement: linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ablation-surface instability; bubble rise in late-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability; and saturation and multimode interactions in intermediate-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  8. Staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma investigated by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jincheng; Wei Baoqing; Chen Wenzhan; Qian Pudong; Zhang Yiqin; Wei Qing; Cha Wenwu; Li Feng; Ni Ming

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) sixth edition staging system of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-nine non-disseminated biopsy-proven NPC patients were studied with MRI before treatment. Retrieval of MRI information enabled us to restage all patients accurately according to the sixth edition of the AJCC staging system. Splitting the respective T and N stages by the significant defining factors identified, the cancer death hazard ratios were modeled by the Cox model in SPSS 10.0 for windows (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Results: Single site of skull base abnormality (HR=3.91, 95% CI: 0.74-20.56) has a superior result to others involved in T3 (HR=5.83, 95% CI: 1.24-27.29). Involvement of either anterior or posterior cranial nerves solely (HR=6.02, 95% CI: 1.55-35.60) was not found to be as a poor prognostic indicator as others involved in T4 (HR=7.81, 95% CI: 1.81-33.63). Less than or equal to 3 cm of N1 (HR=4.01, 95% CI: 0.48-33.83) and N2 (HR=4.72, 95% CI: 0.62-35.78) have a better result than >3 cm of N1 (HR=8.09, 95% CI: 0.95-68.97) and N2 (HR=10.58, 95% CI: 1.32-84.62), respectively. Conclusions: Perhaps, it is better to down-stage single site of skull base abnormality from T3 to T2, and involvement of either anterior or posterior cranial nerves solely from T4 to T3, meanwhile, ≤3 cm of N2 down-stage to N1, >3 cm of N1 up-stage to N2

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the acute stage of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Sakai, Tsuneo; Fujishima, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Uemura, Kenichi; Teramura, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with acute cerebrovascular disease were evaluated by both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The 17 patients with cerebral infarction (CI) were evaluated within 24 hours and the 13 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. All ICHs were detected in T2-weighted images and appeared as perifocal, ring-like areas of high signal intensity. T2-weighted images also demonstrated a ruptured aneurysm and an arteriovenous malformation. In T1-weighted images, all ICHs displayed high signal intensity, which paralleled the CT images and is characteristic of MR imaging with an ultra-low magnetic filed. These findings were obtained as early as 90 minutes from the onset of symptoms. In cases of CI, T2-weighted images obtained 3 - 7 hours after onset demonstrated the pathology more clearly than did CT. This study proved MR imaging useful in the evaluation of both ICH and CI in the acute stage. In addition, it was possible to differentiate ICH from CI in the acute stage by T2-weighted images alone. (author)

  10. Three-stage linear, split-Stirling cryocooler for 1 to 2K magnetic cold stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longsworth, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    A long-life, linear, high efficiency 8K split Stirling cycle cryocooler was designed, built, and tested. The refrigerator is designed for cooling a 50 mW, 1.5K magnetic cold stage. Dual opposed piston compressors are driven by moving-coil linear motors. The three stage expander, although not completed, is also driven by a linear motor and is designed to produce 1 SW at 60K, 4W at 16K, and 1.2W at 8K. The cold regenerator employs a parallel gap construction for high efficiency. The key technology areas addressed include warm and cold flexible suspension bearings and a new cold regenerator geometry for high efficiency at 8K

  11. Dynamics of self-generated magnetic fields in stagnation phase and their effects on hot spark formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Akiro; Mima, Kunioki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nishiguchi, Akio

    2006-01-01

    The generalized temporal evolution equation of a magnetic field is derived for high density laser-fusion plasmas. Magnetic field generation and convection are simulated by using the 2D hydrodynamic code together with the magnetic field equation. It is found that magnetic fields are generated and compressed in association with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of an imploding shell. In particular, the magnetic field convection by the Nernst effect is found to play an important role in the amplification of magnetic fields. The maximum magnetic field reaches 30 MG at maximum compression. This magnetic field may reduce the electron heat conduction around the hot spark. Therefore, it is concluded that the ignition condition for non-uniform implosion is influenced by self-generated magnetic fields. (author)

  12. Uterine cervical cancer. Preoperative staging with magnetic resonance imaging; Zervixkarzinom. Praeoperatives Staging mittels Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, F.; Hamm, B. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Klinik fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma is largely dependent on the tumor stage. Despite significant inaccuracies in the clinical examination, uterine cervical cancer remains the only gynecological form of cancer still largely staged according to clinical findings. Although imaging is still not included in the staging the recently published revised FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) system encourages the use of modern cross-sectional imaging (magnetic resonance imaging MRI and computed tomography CT). Due to its high soft tissue contrast MRI allows excellent non-invasive assessment of the cervix with direct tumor delineation as well as assessment of the prognosis based on morphological factors. Studies in the literature report an accuracy of 93% for MRI in the preoperative assessment of tumor size and in the differentiation of operable from advanced cervical cancer. Therefore MRI is considered to be the optimal modality for diagnostic evaluation starting from FIGO stage IB1, for radiation therapy planning, and for exclusion of recurrence in follow-up. In this paper we give an overview of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in preoperative staging of uterine cervical cancer. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieplanung beim Zervixkarzinom ist weitgehend von der Stadieneinteilung nach FIGO (Federation International de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) abhaengig, die trotz erheblicher Ungenauigkeiten bei der klinischen Stadieneinteilung weiterhin aufgrund klinischer Untersuchungsbefunde erfolgt. Obwohl bildgebende Verfahren nach wie vor fuer die Stadieneinteilung nicht vorgesehen sind, wird im kuerzlich erschienen revidierten Stagingsystem der FIGO zum ersten Mal die Verwendung moderner Schnittbilddiagnostik (MRT und CT) befuerwortet. Die MRT ermoeglicht dank ihres hohen Weichteilkontrasts ein ausgezeichnetes nichtinvasives Staging des Zervixkarzinoms mit direkter Tumordarstellung sowie einer Prognoseabschaetzung anhand

  13. The influence of magnetic field strength in ionization stage on ion transport between two stages of a double stage Hall thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Daren; Song Maojiang; Li Hong; Liu Hui; Han Ke

    2012-01-01

    It is futile for a double stage Hall thruster to design a special ionization stage if the ionized ions cannot enter the acceleration stage. Based on this viewpoint, the ion transport under different magnetic field strengths in the ionization stage is investigated, and the physical mechanisms affecting the ion transport are analyzed in this paper. With a combined experimental and particle-in-cell simulation study, it is found that the ion transport between two stages is chiefly affected by the potential well, the potential barrier, and the potential drop at the bottom of potential well. With the increase of magnetic field strength in the ionization stage, there is larger plasma density caused by larger potential well. Furthermore, the potential barrier near the intermediate electrode declines first and then rises up while the potential drop at the bottom of potential well rises up first and then declines as the magnetic field strength increases in the ionization stage. Consequently, both the ion current entering the acceleration stage and the total ion current ejected from the thruster rise up first and then decline as the magnetic field strength increases in the ionization stage. Therefore, there is an optimal magnetic field strength in the ionization stage to guide the ion transport between two stages.

  14. Staging of cervical endometrial carcinoma using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, A. C.; Oleaga, L.; Cura del, J. L.; Grande, J.; Grande, D.

    1999-01-01

    To demonstrate the benefits of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the staging of endometrial carcinoma and to compare the results of the spin echo (SE) sequence in T2 with the results of the pos gadolinium intravenous study. We have studied 51 women diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma by means of a D and C and confirmed surgically using T1 equipment. All of them have had SE T1 axial sequences, SE in protonic density (PD) and T'' on an axial and sagittal plane carried out on them and 32 cases were studied after the administration of gadolinium intravenously (i. V.). We have valued the depth of the myometrial infiltration and the cervical invasion. The positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (VPV) of the MRI to value the deep infiltration of the endometrium were 87.9% and 77.8% respectively. In the 32 cases where we administered gadolinium we obtained a PPV of 90% and a NPV of 83.8%, in both the SE T2 study and the contrast study. In the diagnosis of the cervical invasion we have obtained PPV and NPV values of 75% and 88.1% respectively. In the group of the 32 cases that had the contrast agent administered, we have obtained the same results in both the series: PPV of 80% and NPV of 85.2%. We have found a high correlation index between the staging using MRI and pathological anatomy, especially in stages I and II of the IFGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstretics) classification. The use of gadolinium has not varied the results obtained with the SE T2 series. (Author) 18 refs

  15. Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. P. [A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS, 109017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pavlov, V. I. [UFR des Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées, Univ. Lille, CNRS FRE 3723 - LML, F-59000 Lille (France)

    2016-08-15

    The formation of pulsating jet-like structures has been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model of a magnetized plasma with horizontally nonuniform density. We discuss two mechanisms which are capable of stopping the gravitational spreading appearing to grace the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and to lead to the formation of stationary or oscillating localized structures. One of them is caused by the Coriolis effect in the rotating frames, and another is connected with the Lorentz effect for magnetized fluids. Magnetized jets/drops with a positive buoyancy must oscillate in transversal size and can manifest themselves as “radio pulsars.” The estimates of their frequencies are made for conditions typical for the neutron star's ocean.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute stage of cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Sen; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Ihara, Ikuo

    1986-01-01

    The value of the nuclear magnetic resonance image (MRI) was investigated in the acute stage of experimental cerebral ischemia. The MRI system employed was designed for clinical use, and the superconducting magnet was operated at a field strength of 1.5 tesla. Ischemic insult was made by transorbital occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) permanently in 4 cats and temporarily in 2 cats. After MCA occlusion the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured on the affected cortex, and 5 cats with rCBF below 10 ml/100 g/min and one with rCBF over 15 ml/100 g/min were studied. In the permanent occlusion group, MRI was performed every 2 hours from 4 to 12 hours after MCA occlusion and another MRI was carried out 20 min after gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) intravenous administration. The earliest changes were found 6 to 8 hours after MCA occlusion on the spin echo image (repetition time = 1.4 sec, echo time = 70 msec) in 3 cats with severe ischemia. It was postulated that the ischemic lesion could be depicted less than 6 hours on more T 2 -weighted images. The increased intensity area was markedly enhanced with Gd-DTPA 12 hours after occlusion. In the recirculation group, the increased intensity area was observed on enhanced MRI in a cat with recirculation as early as one hour after MCA occlusion, although it was not found on the plain MRI. In the other cat with recirculation after 2 hours' occlusion, definite lesion was found in all parameter images without enhancement. The results suggest that changes in cerebral ischemia can be obtained on the MRI earlier than X-ray computed tomography, and that it may be possible to determine the severity of the ischemic brain injury by the MRI findings. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of carbon monoxide poisoning in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Shibata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Nobuyoshi; Hirayama, Keizo

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in three patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in chronic stage by comparison with serial X-ray computed tomography (CT). In Case 1 and 3, no pallidal lesions believed to be the most common lesion of the gray matter in CO poisoning were found in the serial X-ray CT scans. In the other case (Case 2), the typical initial bilateral symmetrical low density areas in the globus pallidus were found to have decreased markedly in size and finally disappeared in the latter X-ray CT scan. But MRI using inversion recovery (IR) or spin echo (SE) pulse sequence clearly showed bilateral symmetrical decreased or increased signal intensity areas in the globus pallidus in all three cases. In Case 3, chronic CO poisoning was confirmed by the bilateral symmetrical pallidal lesions on MRI, although differential diagnosis was difficult. Furthermore, in Case 2, with pure alexia, MRI using IR or SE pulse sequence demonstrated a patchy decreased or increased signal intensity area in the subcortical white matter at the left angular gyrus, although X-ray CT scan showed no abnormal findings. MRI is useful in the diagnosis of CO poisoning, especially chronic CO poisoning, because necrosis, cavitation, demyelination, gliosis and so on due to hypoxia of CO poisoning were sensitively detected from changes in the proton density and the T1 or T2 relaxation time value on MRI. (J.P.N.)

  18. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two stage pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Mohamad Javad; Sasada, Ichiro; Kim, Jin Mok; Lee, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic noise of a two stage pulse tube cryocooler(PT) has been measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS SQUID gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a Dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm apart from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the PT. The magnetic noise shows a clear peak at 1.8 Hz which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise took a peak, during the cooling process, when the cold stage temperature was at (or close to) 12 K, which resembles the variation of the temperature of the second cold stage of 1.8 Hz. Hence we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature dependency of magnetic susceptibility of magnetic regenerative materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 used at the second stage. We pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield by lead sheets reduced the interfering magnetic noise generated from this part. With this scheme, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the first order gradiometer DROS, mounted in the vicinity of the magnetic regenerator, when the noise amplitude is minimum, which could be found from the fluxgate measurement results, was less than 500 pT peak to peak. Whereas without lead shielding the noise level was higher than the dynamic range of SQUID instrumentations which is around ±10nT. (author)

  19. High-energy monoenergetic proton beams from two stage acceleration with a slow laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new regime to generate high-energy quasimonoenergetic proton beams in a “slow-pulse” regime, where the laser group velocity v_{g}stages are connected by the onset of Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT instability. The usual ion energy spectrum broadening by RT instability is controlled and high quality proton beams can be generated. It is shown by multidimensional particle-in-cell simulation that quasimonoenergetic proton beams with energy up to hundreds of MeV can be generated at laser intensities of 10^{21}  W/cm^{2}.

  20. Linear Analysis of Converging Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in the Presence of an Azimuthal Magnetic Field

    KAUST Repository

    Bakhsh, Abeer

    2017-11-17

    We investigate the linear stability of both positive and negative Atwood ratio interfaces accelerated either by a fast magnetosonic or hydrodynamic shock in cylindrical geometry. For the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) case, we examine the role of an initial seed azimuthal magnetic field on the growth rate of the perturbation. In the absence of a magnetic field, the Richtmyer-Meshkov growth is followed by an exponentially increasing growth associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the MHD case, the growth rate of the instability reduces in proportion to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The suppression mechanism is associated with the interference of two waves running parallel and anti-parallel to the interface that transport of vorticity and cause the growth rate to oscillate in time with nearly a zero mean value.

  1. Transition from flute modes to drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments performed on the low β plasma device Mirabelle [T. Pierre, G. Leclert, and F. Braun, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 6 (1987)] using a limiter have shown that transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occurred on increasing the magnetic field strength. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ExB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the ExB velocity is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio ρ s /L perpendicular of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime

  2. Linear Analysis of Converging Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in the Presence of an Azimuthal Magnetic Field

    KAUST Repository

    Bakhsh, Abeer; Samtaney, Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the linear stability of both positive and negative Atwood ratio interfaces accelerated either by a fast magnetosonic or hydrodynamic shock in cylindrical geometry. For the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) case, we examine the role of an initial seed azimuthal magnetic field on the growth rate of the perturbation. In the absence of a magnetic field, the Richtmyer-Meshkov growth is followed by an exponentially increasing growth associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the MHD case, the growth rate of the instability reduces in proportion to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The suppression mechanism is associated with the interference of two waves running parallel and anti-parallel to the interface that transport of vorticity and cause the growth rate to oscillate in time with nearly a zero mean value.

  3. A six-degree-of-freedom magnetic levitation fine stage for a high-precision and high-acceleration dual-servo stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, MyeongHyeon; Jeong, Jae-heon; Gweon, DaeGab; Kim, HyoYoung

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel six-degree-of-freedom magnetic levitation fine stage for a dual-servo stage. The proposed fine stage is levitated and actuated, using a voice coil motor actuator with a Halbach magnet array. For a dual-servo stage, fine stage performance is deeply intertwined with coarse stage performance. Because the fine stage is installed over the coarse stage, the overall size of the fine stage can be limited by the moving plate of the coarse stage. Therefore, magnetic flux modeling and optimization are performed to manufacture optimal fine stages. To control the fine stage, actuator kinetics and sensor kinematics are proposed. Homing control is implemented by using linear variable differential transformers, whereas fine control is implemented by capacitance sensors and laser interferometers. Finally, experimental results of in-position stability, moving range, and repeatability are presented. (paper)

  4. Magnetic Reconnection at the Earliest Stage of Solar Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Peter, Hardi; Zhao, Jie; Samanta, Tanmoy; Chen, Yajie

    2018-02-01

    On 2016 September 20, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observed an active region during its earliest emerging phase for almost 7 hr. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory observed continuous emergence of small-scale magnetic bipoles with a rate of ∼1016 Mx s‑1. The emergence of magnetic fluxes and interactions between different polarities lead to the frequent occurrence of ultraviolet (UV) bursts, which exhibit as intense transient brightenings in the 1400 Å images. In the meantime, discrete small patches with the same magnetic polarity tend to move together and merge, leading to the enhancement of the magnetic fields and thus the formation of pores (small sunspots) at some locations. The spectra of these UV bursts are characterized by the superposition of several chromospheric absorption lines on the greatly broadened profiles of some emission lines formed at typical transition region temperatures, suggesting heating of the local materials to a few tens of thousands of kelvin in the lower atmosphere by magnetic reconnection. Some bursts reveal blue- and redshifts of ∼100 km s‑1 at neighboring pixels, indicating the spatially resolved bidirectional reconnection outflows. Many such bursts appear to be associated with the cancellation of magnetic fluxes with a rate of the order of ∼1015 Mx s‑1. We also investigate the three-dimensional magnetic field topology through a magnetohydrostatic model and find that a small fraction of the bursts are associated with bald patches (magnetic dips). Finally, we find that almost all bursts are located in regions of large squashing factor at the height of ∼1 Mm, reinforcing our conclusion that these bursts are produced through reconnection in the lower atmosphere.

  5. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  6. Overview of current multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging approach in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Aydın

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is primarily based on the utility and validity of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and staging of prostate gland tumors. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging, useful approach for evaluating and detecting prostate cancers. It also aids in the management of a tumor and improve the care and follow-up of patients.

  7. A novel Planar Magnetic Bearing and Motor Configuration applied in a Positioning Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, A.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a fully contactless high precision magnetically suspended position stage with large planar stroke. This stage is the first which is suitable for practical application in vacuum. The underlying electromechanical working principles, modelling and

  8. A two-stage heating scheme for heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shaomin; Kim, Jeongmin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Bogy, David

    2014-05-01

    Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) has been proposed to extend the storage areal density beyond 1 Tb/in.2 for the next generation magnetic storage. A near field transducer (NFT) is widely used in HAMR systems to locally heat the magnetic disk during the writing process. However, much of the laser power is absorbed around the NFT, which causes overheating of the NFT and reduces its reliability. In this work, a two-stage heating scheme is proposed to reduce the thermal load by separating the NFT heating process into two individual heating stages from an optical waveguide and a NFT, respectively. As the first stage, the optical waveguide is placed in front of the NFT and delivers part of laser energy directly onto the disk surface to heat it up to a peak temperature somewhat lower than the Curie temperature of the magnetic material. Then, the NFT works as the second heating stage to heat a smaller area inside the waveguide heated area further to reach the Curie point. The energy applied to the NFT in the second heating stage is reduced compared with a typical single stage NFT heating system. With this reduced thermal load to the NFT by the two-stage heating scheme, the lifetime of the NFT can be extended orders longer under the cyclic load condition.

  9. Forensic age estimation based on magnetic resonance imaging of third molars: converting 2D staging into 3D staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tobel, Jannick; Hillewig, Elke; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-03-01

    Established methods to stage development of third molars for forensic age estimation are based on the evaluation of radiographs, which show a 2D projection. It has not been investigated whether these methods require any adjustments in order to apply them to stage third molars on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which shows 3D information. To prospectively study root stage assessment of third molars in age estimation using 3 Tesla MRI and to compare this with panoramic radiographs, in order to provide considerations for converting 2D staging into 3D staging and to determine the decisive root. All third molars were evaluated in 52 healthy participants aged 14-26 years using MRI in three planes. Three staging methods were investigated by two observers. In sixteen of the participants, MRI findings were compared with findings on panoramic radiographs. Decisive roots were palatal in upper third molars and distal in lower third molars. Fifty-seven per cent of upper third molars were not assessable on the radiograph, while 96.9% were on MRI. Upper third molars were more difficult to evaluate on radiographs than on MRI (p third molars were equally assessable on both imaging techniques (93.8% MRI, 98.4% radiograph), with no difference in level of difficulty (p = .375). Inter- and intra-observer agreement for evaluation was higher in MRI than in radiographs. In both imaging techniques lower third molars showed greater inter- and intra-observer agreement compared to upper third molars. MR images in the sagittal plane proved to be essential for staging. In age estimation, 3T MRI of third molars could be valuable. Some considerations are, however, necessary to transfer known staging methods to this 3D technique.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  11. Spatial statistics of magnetic field in two-dimensional chaotic flow in the resistive growth stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolokolov, I.V., E-mail: igor.kolokolov@gmail.com [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334, Kosygina 2, Moscow (Russian Federation); NRU Higher School of Economics, 101000, Myasnitskaya 20, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-18

    The correlation tensors of magnetic field in a two-dimensional chaotic flow of conducting fluid are studied. It is shown that there is a stage of resistive evolution where the field correlators grow exponentially with time. The two- and four-point field correlation tensors are computed explicitly in this stage in the framework of Batchelor–Kraichnan–Kazantsev model. They demonstrate strong temporal intermittency of the field fluctuations and high level of non-Gaussianity in spatial field distribution.

  12. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G. J.; Barentsz, J. O.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI.

  13. Studying the initial stages of film electrodeposition of magnetic cobalt-tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachinskas, V.S.; Orlovskaya, L.V.; Parfenov, V.A.; Yasulajtene, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Initial stages of magnetic film electrodeposition by recording potentiodynamic polarization and j c ,t-curves, determination of surface structure of electrolytically deposited films by the method of XPS and study of thin coating properties have been considered. It is shown that at initial stage of electrodeposition of magnetic Co-W-films a sharp decrease in cathode process rate and formation of Co(OH) 2 , WO 3 and/or WO 4 2- occur on Cu-cathode surface. Electrodeposition of metallic magnetic Co-W-alloy, consisting of Co, W and containing basic compounds of co-deposited metals, takes place after a certain time period depending on deposition E c . 6 refs.; 3 figs

  14. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage.

  15. Validation of Wendelstein 7-X fabrication and assembly stages by magnetic field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, T.; Kislinger, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald, is a 5-period machine, and many of the planned operational plasma scenarios are characterized by a rotational transform t/2p =1 at the plasma boundary. Such magnetic configurations are very sensitive to the symmetry breaking perturbations caused by fabrication and assembly errors, which can occur at different stages of the device construction. As a consequence, new islands at any periodicity can be produced, existing islands can be modified, stochastic regions can be enhanced and power load onto the divertor plates can be increased. Therefore the high precision of the machine construction is a very important issue, and evaluation of the magnetic field is necessary for the continuous validation of the fabrication and assembly stages with respect to their impact on the magnetic field perturbation. Analysis of the first fabricated winding packs (WPs) has shown that the fabrication errors can be divided into the systematical and statistical parts [1]. The systematic deviations add only negligible field components and don't perturb 5-fold symmetry of the machine, whilst the statistical deviations cause the disturbance of the machine periodicity. For that estimation of the magnetic field perturbation the numerical procedure has been developed [2], which describes statistically the randomly distributed errors, taken within the given tolerances or uses the actual measurements available as an input parameter. Since the construction of the magnet system of W7-X is subdivided into two main phases fabrication of components by industrial contractors and assembly of these components into the magnet system at the Greifswald site, the analysis of the magnetic field perturbation starts from the consideration of the impact of the WPs geometry deviations during the manufacturing stage. (Author)

  16. Repair of esophageal atresia with proximal fistula using endoscopic magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis) after staged lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Robert M; Vali, Kaveh; Harmon, Carroll M; Zaritzky, Mario; Bass, Kathryn D

    2016-05-01

    We describe the treatment of a patient with long-gap esophageal atresia with an upper pouch fistula, mircogastria and minimal distal esophageal remnant. After 4.5 months of feeding via gastrostomy, a proximal fistula was identified by bronchoscopy and a thoracoscopic modified Foker procedure was performed reducing the gap from approximately 7-5 cm over 2 weeks of traction. A second stage to ligate the fistula and suture approximate the proximal and distal esophagus resulted in a gap of 1.5 cm. IRB and FDA approval was then obtained for endoscopic placement of 10-French catheter mounted magnets in the proximal and distal pouches promoting a magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis). Magnetic coupling occurred at 4 days and after magnet removal at 13 days an esophagram demonstrated a 10 French channel without leak. Serial endoscopic balloon dilation has allowed drainage of swallowed secretions as the baby learns bottling behavior at home.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Nigrostriatal System: Biomarkers of Parkinson’s Disease Stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopes, Lucie; Grolez, Guillaume; Moreau, Caroline; Lopes, Renaud; Ryckewaert, Gilles; Carrière, Nicolas; Auger, Florent; Laloux, Charlotte; Petrault, Maud; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Bordet, Regis; Defebvre, Luc; Jissendi, Patrice; Delmaire, Christine; Devos, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD); R2* values reflect iron content related to high levels of oxidative stress, whereas volume and/or shape changes reflect neuronal death. We sought to assess iron overload in the nigrostriatal system and characterize its relationship with focal and overall atrophy of the striatum in the pivotal stages of PD. Methods Twenty controls and 70 PD patients at different disease stages (untreated de novo patients, treated early-stage patients and advanced-stage patients with L-dopa-related motor complications) were included in the study. We determined the R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus, together with striatal volume and shape analysis. We also measured R2* in an acute MPTP mouse model and in a longitudinal follow-up two years later in the early-stage PD patients. Results The R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly higher in de novo PD patients than in controls. Early-stage patients displayed significantly higher R2* values in the substantia nigra (with changes in striatal shape), relative to de novo patients. Measurements after a two-year follow-up in early-stage patients and characterization of the acute MPTP mouse model confirmed that R2* changed rapidly with disease progression. Advanced-stage patients displayed significant atrophy of striatum, relative to earlier disease stages. Conclusion Each pivotal stage in PD appears to be characterized by putative nigrostriatal MRI biomarkers: iron overload at the de novo stage, striatal shape changes at early-stage disease and generalized striatal atrophy at advanced disease. PMID:27035571

  18. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  19. TANGLED MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    Solar prominences are an important tool for studying the structure and evolution of the coronal magnetic field. Here we consider so-called hedgerow prominences, which consist of thin vertical threads. We explore the possibility that such prominences are supported by tangled magnetic fields. A variety of different approaches are used. First, the dynamics of plasma within a tangled field is considered. We find that the contorted shape of the flux tubes significantly reduces the flow velocity compared to the supersonic free fall that would occur in a straight vertical tube. Second, linear force-free models of tangled fields are developed, and the elastic response of such fields to gravitational forces is considered. We demonstrate that the prominence plasma can be supported by the magnetic pressure of a tangled field that pervades not only the observed dense threads but also their local surroundings. Tangled fields with field strengths of about 10 G are able to support prominence threads with observed hydrogen density of the order of 10 11 cm -3 . Finally, we suggest that the observed vertical threads are the result of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Simulations of the density distribution within a prominence thread indicate that the peak density is much larger than the average density. We conclude that tangled fields provide a viable mechanism for magnetic support of hedgerow prominences.

  20. Dynamics of Magnetized Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of dense magnetized plasma, either collimated with mainly azimuthal B-field (jet) or toroidal with closed B-field (bubble), in a background plasma occurs in a number of solar and astrophysical cases. Such cases include coronal mass ejections moving in the background solar wind and extragalactic radio lobes expanding into the extragalactic medium. Understanding the detailed MHD behavior is crucial for correctly modeling these events. In order to further the understanding of such systems, we are investigating the injection of dense magnetized jets and bubbles into a lower density background magnetized plasma using a coaxial plasma gun and a background helicon or cathode plasma. In both jet and bubble cases, the MHD dynamics are found to be very different when launched into background plasma or magnetic field, as compared to vacuum. In the jet case, it is found that the inherent kink instability is stabilized by velocity shear developed due to added magnetic tension from the background field. In the bubble case, rather than directly relaxing to a minimum energy Taylor state (spheromak) as in vacuum, there is an expansion asymmetry and the bubble becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable on one side. Recent results will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  1. Different weathering stages indicated by the magnetization of limestones: An example from the southeast Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, P.; Gehring, A. U.

    1992-06-01

    Paleomagnetic and structural data from the Pedraforca thrust sheet in the southeast Pyrenees show that the chemical weathering of the late Cretaceous limestones is a multistage process. The first weathering stage, of latest Eocene to early Oligocene age, is indicated by a chemical remanent magnetization carried by hematite. The formation of hematite as the dominant weathering product suggests a subtropical climate in northeast Spain during this period. The second weathering stage is indicated by the presence of goethite, which carries a chemical remanent magnetization parallel to the present earth field. This suggests formation of the goethite since the late Pleistocene under cooler climatic conditions similar to the present-day climate in the Pyrenees.

  2. The plasma formation stage in magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Chrien, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    In early 1992, emerging governmental policy in the US and Russia began to encourage ''lab-to-lab'' interactions between the All- Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As nuclear weapons stockpiles and design activities were being reduced, highly qualified scientists become for fundamental scientific research of interest to both nations. VNIIEF and LANL found a common interest in the technology and applications of magnetic flux compression, the technique for converting the chemical energy released by high-explosives into intense electrical pulses and intensely concentrated magnetic energy. Motivated originally to evaluate any possible defense applications of flux compression technology, the two teams worked independently for many years, essentially unaware of the others' accomplishments. But, an early US publication stimulated Soviet work, and the Soviets followed with a report of the achievement of 25 MG. During the cold war, a series of conferences on Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation and Related Topics became a forum for scientific exchange of ideas and accomplishments. Because of relationships established at the Megagauss conferences, VNIIEF and LANL were able to respond quickly to the initiatives of their respective governments. In late 1992, following the Megagauss VI conference, the two institutions agreed to combine resources to perform a series of experiments that essentially could not be performed by each institution independently. Beginning in September, 1993, the two institutions have performed eleven joint experimental campaigns, either at VNIIEF or at LANL. Megagauss- VII has become the first of the series to include papers with joint US and Russian authorship. In this paper, we review the joint LANL/VNIIEF experimental work that has relevance to a relatively unexplored approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion

  3. The progress in diagnostic imaging for staging of bladder and prostate cancer. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization transfer contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Kiminobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yanagawa, Makoto; Kawamura, Juichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with transrectal ultrasound examination (TRUS) for 71 localized bladder cancers and 19 localized prostate cancers (PC) radically resected. The accuracy of clinical staging for bladder cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 85.9% and 69.2%, respectively. The presence or absence of the continuity of submucosal enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images could be useful for the staging of bladder cancer. The accuracy of the seminal vesicular invasion for prostate cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 95% and 63%, respectively. To determine whether magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) provides additional information in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) were calculated in 22 patients with PC, 5 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 controls. The mean MTR in the peripheral zone of the normal prostate (8.0%±3.4 [standard deviation]) showed a statistically significant decrease relative to that in the inner zone of the normal prostate (27.4%±3.4, p<0.01), BPH (25.5%±3.7, p<0.01), pre-treatment PC (30.6%±5.9, p<0.01), and PC after hormonal therapy (20.3%±6.3, p<0.01). The mean MTR in pre-treatment PC was significantly higher than that in BPH, or in PC after hormonal therapy (p<0.01). MTC was considered to be useful for conspicuity of prostate cancer lesion. (author)

  4. Differential diagnosis and staging of urological tumors by magnetic resonance imaging compared with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Okada, Yusaku; Takeuchi, Hideo; Miyakawa, Mieko; Okada, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kazumasa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 49 urological tumors (11 renal cell carcinomas, 3 renal pelvic cancers, 2 renal angiomyolipomas, 1 renal leiomyosarcoma, 1 large renal cvst, 4 adrenal tumors, 11 bladder cancers, 2 bone metastasis from bladder cancer, 10 prostatic cancers, 1 prostatic sarcoma, 1 urethral cancer, 1 penile cancer and 1 perivesical granuloma) since October 1985 to September 1986. MRI was performed using a Signa (G.E.) with a 1.5 T superconductive magnet and 3 images, including T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and proton density image, were obtained. In conclusion MRI is a noninvasive examination and gives more information than computed tomography despite its high cost. In renal cell carcinoma, the chemical shift in MRI and clear visualization of tumor thrombus enable accurate staging. Differential diagnosis from other renal mass lesions may be possible by the T2 weighted image. In adrenal disease, most of the adrenal masses can be differentiated, but in some cases it is impossible. In bladder cancer, wall invasion of tumor may be evaluated in T2 weighted image, and MRI is suitable for staging of locally advanced tumor. In prostatic cancer, visualization of periprostatic plexus and differentiation between internal and external gland may enable local staging and identification of low stage tumors. (author)

  5. First stage of INTRAMAP: INtegrated Transantarctic Mountains and Ross Sea Area Magnetic Anomaly Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Damaske

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRAMAP (INtegrated Transantarctic Mountains and Ross Sea Area Magnetic Anomaly Project is an international effort to merge the magnetic data acquired throughout the "Ross Sea Antarctic Sector" (south of 60°S between 135°-255°E including the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM, the Ross Sea, Marie Byrd Land, and the Pacific coast, and also to begin the compilation efforts for new data over the Wilkes Basin. This project is a component of the continental scale Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project (ADMAP. The first stage of INTRAMAP addresses the analysis and merging of GITARA (1991-1994 and GANOVEX (1984 aeromagnetic surveys together with ground magnetic data (1984-1989. The combined data sets cover an area of approximately 30 km2 over Victoria Land and adjacent Ross Sea. Map and profile gridding were implemented to integrate the data sets. These approaches are studied for improving existing strategies to adopt for the whole magnetic compilation effort. The final microlevelled grid that we produce is a new tool for regional interpretation of the main tectonic and geologic features of this sector of Antarctica.

  6. Magnetic resonance for T-staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The most informative pair of sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Kam Y.; Kan, Wai K.; Sze, Wai M.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the most informative pair of sequences in magnetic resonance (MR) for T-staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The MR images of 134 patients with newly diagnosed NRC, from 1996 to 2002, were retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were scanned using 1.5 Tesla MR systems. The images of the nasopharynx were reviewed by two qualified radiologists to determine the positive findings and the T-stage by Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) (6th edition) System, using each sequence separately. The T-stage derived from a single MR sequence was then compared with the T-stage based on the five selected sequences to assess the number and percentage of patients who were being understaged. Therefore, the overall percentage accuracy of each single sequence could be determined. A pair of sequences providing information to achieve almost 100% diagnostic accuracy was then derived. The overall percentage accuracy of five individual sequences of the nasopharynx is as follows: contrast-enhanced (CE) fat suppression (FS) axial T1 (94.8%), CE FS coronal T1 (88.1%), FS axial T2 (85.8%), non-contrast enhanced (NE) axial T1 (78.4%) and NE coronal T1 (77.6%). CE FS axial T1 has the best accuracy. All the structures that are missed in CE FS axial T1 which lead to apparent understaging, are appreciated in NE axial T1-weighted images. Individual sequences supplement each other in the NPC staging. CE FS axial T1 is the most informative individual sequence. Combination of CE FS axial T1 and NE axial T1 of the nasopharynx provides sufficient information to achieve almost 100% diagnostic accuracy in T-staging; therefore, both should be included in the MR-staging protocol. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma: diagnostic performance, pitfalls, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandrino, Franco; La Paglia, Ernesto; Musante, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma, and to review the results and pitfalls described in the literature. Thirty women with a histological diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Unenhanced T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced Ti-weighted sequences were obtained. Hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy was performed in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated for the detection of deep myometrial and cervical infiltration. For deep myometrial infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 76%, PPV of 73%, NVP of 87%, and accuracy of 80%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 80%, PPV of 82%, NPV of 89%, and accuracy of 85%. For cervical infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 88%, PPV of 50%, NPV of 96%, and accuracy of 87%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 75%, NPV of 100%, and accuracy of 95%. Unenhanced and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance allows accurate assessment of myometrial and cervical infiltration. Information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can define prognosis and management.

  8. Electric and magnetic properties of the stage-2 FeBr{sub 2} graphite intercalation compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, P A; Barati, M; Ummat, P K; Luke, G; Datars, W R [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2003-01-22

    The stage-2 FeBr{sub 2} graphite intercalation compound (GIC) was prepared by reacting FeBr{sub 2} powder and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in a bromine atmosphere at 500 deg. C for 40 weeks. The dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, specific heat, resistivity and Hall effect were measured. The GIC is paramagnetic at temperatures above 14.5 K. There is short-range ordering at 14.5 K and longer-range magnetic ordering at 8.5 K. There is a spin glass phase below 3.2 K in which the ac susceptibility is frequency dependent. The in-plane and c-axis resistivities result from in-plane and out-of-plane electron-phonon scattering. The Hall coefficient is independent of temperature between 4.2 and 300 K and is explained by the single-carrier model.

  9. Electric and magnetic properties of the stage-2 FeBr2 graphite intercalation compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, P A; Barati, M; Ummat, P K; Luke, G; Datars, W R

    2003-01-01

    The stage-2 FeBr 2 graphite intercalation compound (GIC) was prepared by reacting FeBr 2 powder and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in a bromine atmosphere at 500 deg. C for 40 weeks. The dc magnetization, ac susceptibility, specific heat, resistivity and Hall effect were measured. The GIC is paramagnetic at temperatures above 14.5 K. There is short-range ordering at 14.5 K and longer-range magnetic ordering at 8.5 K. There is a spin glass phase below 3.2 K in which the ac susceptibility is frequency dependent. The in-plane and c-axis resistivities result from in-plane and out-of-plane electron-phonon scattering. The Hall coefficient is independent of temperature between 4.2 and 300 K and is explained by the single-carrier model

  10. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary bladder carcinoma: tumor staging and gadolinium contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doringer, E.; Joos, H.; Forstner, R.; Schmoller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with urinary bladder carcinomas underwent pre-operative examinations using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The results of the MR examinations were correlated with the clinical-pathological findings following transurethral resection (TUR) and bimanual palpation (n = 47) or radical cystectomy (n = 2). The results of pre-contrast MR tumor staging (T1, T2), viewing stages Tis-T2 collectively, and subsequent to separate assessments of stages T3b-T4b, were correct 76.6% of the time. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced examinations (pre-contrast T1 and after Gd-DTPA) showed a staging accuracy rate of 85.7%. T2-weighted images did not indicate any advantage when compared to T1-weighted images following Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity ratios of tumor/fat and tumor/muscle tissue were measured on T1-weighted pre-contrast images and following Gd-DTPA and then evaluated statistically, whereby the increased tumor signal intensity was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.01). Due to the relatively short examination time needed for T1-weighted images and the specific tumor enhancement, the administration of Gd-DTPA proves valuable in the diagnosis of bladder carcinomas. T2-weighted images are not necessary. (orig.)

  13. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  14. Observations and modeling of magnetized plasma jets and bubbles launched into a transverse B-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward B., IV; van der Holst, Bart; Rogers, Barrett N.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-10-01

    Hot, dense, plasma structures launched from a coaxial plasma gun on the HelCat dual-source plasma device at the University of New Mexico drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the chamber's background magnetic field providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, shocks, as well as CME-like dynamics possibly relevant to the solar corona. Vector magnetic field data from an eleven-tipped B-dot rake probe and images from an ultra-fast camera will be presented in comparison with ongoing MHD modeling using the 3-D MHD BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid (AMR) that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets and is uniquely suited for flux-rope expansion modeling. Recent experiments show a possible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability that appears asymmetrically at the interface between launched spheromaks (bubbles) and their entraining background magnetic field. Efforts to understand this instability using in situ measurements, new chamber boundary conditions, and ultra-fast camera data will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor stability for a shock wave-density discontinuity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraley, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Shells in inertial fusion targets are typically accelerated and decelerated by two or three shocks followed by continuous acceleration. The analytic solution for perturbation growth of a shock wave striking a density discontinuity in an inviscid fluid is investigated. The Laplace transform of the solution results in a functional equation, which has a simple solution for weak shock waves. The solution for strong shock waves may be given by a power series. It is assumed that the equation of state is given by a gamma law. The four independent parameters of the solution are the gamma values on each side of the material interface, the density ratio at the interface, and the shock strength. The asymptotic behavior (for large distances and times) of the perturbation velocity is given. For strong shocks the decay of the perturbation away from the interface is much weaker than the exponential decay of an incompressible fluid. The asymptotic value is given by a constant term and a number of slowly decaying discreet frequencies. The number of frequencies is roughly proportional to the logarithm of the density discontinuity divided by that of the shock strength. The asymptotic velocity at the interface is tabulated for representative values of the independent parameters. For weak shocks the solution is compared with results for an incompressible fluid. The range of density ratios with possible zero asymptotic velocities is given

  16. Analytic solutions for Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates in smooth density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The growth rate of perturbations on the shell of a laser fusion target can be estimated as √gk , where g is the shell acceleration and k is the transverse wave number of the perturbation. This formula overestimates the growth rate, and should be modified for the effects of density gradients and/or ablation of the unstable interface. The density-gradient effect is explored here analytically. With the use of variational calculus to explore all possible density profiles, the growth rate is shown to exceed √gk/(1+kL) , where L is a typical density-gradient scale length. Density profiles actually exhibiting this minimum growth rate are found

  17. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Paul R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockefeller, Gabriel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kares, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  18. Long-wave analysis and control of the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability with electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpeanu, Radu; Anderson, Thomas; Petropoulos, Peter; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the electrostatic stabilization of a viscous thin film wetting the underside of a solid surface in the presence of a horizontally acting electric field. The competition between gravity, surface tension and the nonlocal effect of the applied electric field is captured analytically in the form of a nonlinear evolution equation. A semi-spectral solution strategy is employed to resolve the dynamics of the resulting partial differential equation. Furthermore, we conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations and assess the accuracy of the obtained solutions when varying the electric field strength from zero up to the point when complete stabilization at the target finite wavelengths occurs. We employ DNS to examine the limitations of the asymptotically derived behavior in the context of increasing liquid film heights, with agreement found to be excellent even beyond the target lengthscales. Regimes in which the thin film assumption is no longer valid and droplet pinch-off occurs are then analyzed. Finally, the asymptotic and computational approaches are used in conjunction to identify efficient active control mechanisms allowing the manipulation of the fluid interface in light of engineering applications at small scales, such as mixing.

  19. Influence of nonlinear effects on the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of F layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, A.F.; Krivorutskij, Eh.N.

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of weak turbulence in the approximation of accidental phases the influence of different nonlinear effects on the level and anisotropy of the F layer inhomogeneities is considered. To describe the F layer plasma, approximation of two-liquid hydrodynamics is used. The inertia of electrons and ions, as well as temperature inhomogeneity are neglected. The considered processes are assumed to be isothermal

  20. Singularities in the Classical Rayleigh-Taylor Flow: Formation and Subsequent Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    NASA Contractor Report 189690 AD-A255 609 ICASE Report No. 92-37 1 IiIIII1 1 1 1 11 1 11111 lIl i DTIC ELECTEICASE S A D ICASE S SP 2 11992DA...already known lower order ternis, provided globlal terms such as /d ((,( t). t) and [h ( (. (t). t) are known. This is an important ob)servat :1l as it...they were initially (Recalling ((i, 0) =). Since the image ((c, t) defines the motion of characteristic, it is clear that information from the

  1. Ablative Rayleigh Taylor instability in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavin, Paul; Almarcha, Christophe

    2005-05-01

    The instability of ablation fronts strongly accelerated toward the dense medium under the conditions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is addressed in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio. The analysis serves to demonstrate that the flow is irrotational to first order, reducing the nonlinear analysis to solve a two-potential flows problem. Vorticity appears at the following orders in the perturbation analysis. This result simplifies greatly the analysis. The possibility for using boundary integral methods opens new perspectives in the nonlinear theory of the ablative RT instability in ICF. A few examples are given at the end of the Note. To cite this article: P. Clavin, C. Almarcha, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  2. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the K-shell radiation yield for imploding liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baksht, R B; Datsko, I M; Labetskij, A Yu; Russkikh, A G; Fedyunin, A V [High Current Electronics Inst., Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Experiments were carried out on the GIT-4 1.5 MA inductive generator with a 1.2 {mu}s current delivery to the inductive store. A single gas puff with an initial diameter of 28 mm was used as the load. Three different kinds of gas, Kr, Ar, and Ne, were used. The dependence of the X-ray yield on the gas liner mass was investigated. Experimental investigation of the RT-instability was carried out with the help of a streak camera. The RT wave amplitude and X-ray yield were correlated. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a density transition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, A.; Tskhakaya, D.D.; Tsintsadze, N.L.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of symmetry for the Rayleigh equation is found. For small Atwood number an analytic solution is obtained for a smoothly varying density profile. The spectra of unstable modes are defined. It is shown that a transition layer with finite width can undergo stratification, and velocity shear between new-formed sublayers forms. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Lattice Boltzmann methods for thermal flows: Continuum limit and applications to compressible Rayleigh Taylor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scagliarini, Andrea; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Toschi, F.

    2010-01-01

    We compute the continuum thermohydrodynamical limit of a new formulation of lattice kinetic equations for thermal compressible flows, recently proposed by Sbragaglia et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 628, 299 (2009)] . We show that the hydrodynamical manifold is given by the correct compressible

  5. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the K-shell radiation yield for imploding liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksht, R.B.; Datsko, I.M.; Labetskij, A.Yu.; Russkikh, A.G.; Fedyunin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on the GIT-4 1.5 MA inductive generator with a 1.2 μs current delivery to the inductive store. A single gas puff with an initial diameter of 28 mm was used as the load. Three different kinds of gas, Kr, Ar, and Ne, were used. The dependence of the X-ray yield on the gas liner mass was investigated. Experimental investigation of the RT-instability was carried out with the help of a streak camera. The RT wave amplitude and X-ray yield were correlated. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  6. Evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture by using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Zhou Xiangping; Liu Rongbo; Song Bin; Yan Zhihan; Chen Xian; Wang Wentao; Xiong Yan; Xu Minsheng; Gu Jianping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreagraphy (MRCP) in the preoperative evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture. Methods: Eighteen cases, which were diagnosed as late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct strictures only by MRCP and proved by surgery and pathology, were classified according to Bismuth classification and the surgical operation strategy was planed on the basis of MR cholangiopancreagraphic findings before surgery. The results were compared with surgery. Results: Diagnostic MR Cholangiopancreagrams were acquired in 18 patients. Among all 18 patients, the level of stricture was classified as Bismuth I in 3 patients, Bismuth II in 7 patients, Bismuth III in 3 patients, and Bismuth IV in 3 patients. A Bismuth II stricture was incorrectly classified as a Bismuth III lesion. On the basis of MR cholangiopancreagraphic findings, a surgical operation strategy can be planed. The therapeutic plan anticipated with MRCP matched the actually used procedure in 16 of 18 patients. conclusion: MRCP plays an important role in the evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture

  7. Fueling of magnetically confined plasmas by single- and two-stage repeating pneumatic pellet injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic fusion confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets to speeds in the kilometer-per-second range using single shot and repetitive pneumatic (light-gas gun) pellet injectors. The millimeter-to-centimeter size pellets enter the plasma and continuously ablate because of the plasma electron heat flux, depositing fuel atoms along the pellet trajectory. This fueling method allows direct fueling in the interior of the hot plasma and is more efficient than the alternative method of injecting room temperature fuel gas at the wall of the plasma vacuum chamber. Single-stage pneumatic injectors based on the light-gas gun concept have provided hydrogenic fuel pellets in the speed range of 1--2 km/s in single-shot injector designs. Repetition rates up to 5 Hz have been demonstrated in repetitive injector designs. Future fusion reactor-scale devices may need higher pellet velocities because of the larger plasma size and higher plasma temperatures. Repetitive two-stage pneumatic injectors are under development at ORNL to provide long-pulse plasma fueling in the 3--5 km/s speed range. Recently, a repeating, two-stage light-gas gun achieved repetitive operation at 1 Hz with speeds in the range of 2--3 km/s

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the active second stage of labour: Proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettler, F.V.; Heinrich, A.; Rump, J.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.K.; Schnackenburg, B.; Bamberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    To prove that magnetic resonance imaging of foetal anatomy during the active second stage of vaginal delivery is feasible. Initially, five pregnant volunteers around the 30th week of gestation were examined in an open MRI. Based on the findings, one vaginal delivery was acquired under real-time imaging. To monitor the birth status during image acquisition, an MR-compatible wireless cardiotocography (CTG) system was built. Single-shot sequence parameters were optimised to compensate motion artefacts during labour. Safety requirements to monitor the birth process under real-time MR imaging were met. High-resolution MR images were acquired immediately before and after delivery. In one patient, TSE single-shot cinematic sequences of the active second stage of labour were obtained. All sequences were adapted to tolerate movement of the mother and infant, as well as residual noise from the CTG. Furthermore, the MR imaging during labour showed only minor image artefacts. CTG-monitored acquisition of MRI series during the active second stage of delivery is feasible. Image quality should allow various further studies to improve models for birth simulation as well as potential investigation of obstructed labour and obstetric complications. (orig.)

  9. Accretion on to Magnetic White Dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickramasinghe Dayal

    2014-01-01

    The polars have no counterparts in neutron star systems and their study provides unique insights into the complex nature of the magnetospheric boundary. The observed properties of accretion shocks at the white dwarf surface such as the anomalous soft-X-ray excess and its time variability provide strong support for the hypothesis that under certain circumstances the field channelled funnel flow is “blobby”. This has been attributed to interchange instabilities such as the Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the shocked gas at the stream-magnetosphere boundary where the stream fragments into discrete clumps of gas. As the clumps penetrate into the magnetosphere, they are shredded into smaller mass blobs via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that then couple on to field lines over an extended inner transition region in the orbital plane. The more massive blobs penetrate deep into the photosphere of the white dwarf releasing their energy as a reprocessed soft-X-ray black body component. Although similar instabilities are expected in the inner transition region in disced accretion albeit on a different scale there has been no direct observational evidence for blobby accretion in the generally lower field and disced IPs.

  10. Magnetic resonance elastography is as accurate as liver biopsy for liver fibrosis staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaka, Hiroyuki; Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Tadao; Kondo, Tetsuo; Funayama, Satoshi; Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    Liver MR elastography (MRE) is available for the noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis; however, no previous studies have compared the diagnostic ability of MRE with that of liver biopsy. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of liver fibrosis staging between MRE-based methods and liver biopsy using the resected liver specimens as the reference standard. A retrospective study at a single institution. In all, 200 patients who underwent preoperative MRE and subsequent surgical liver resection were included in this study. Data from 80 patients were used to estimate cutoff and distributions of liver stiffness values measured by MRE for each liver fibrosis stage (F0-F4, METAVIR system). In the remaining 120 patients, liver biopsy specimens were obtained from the resected liver tissues using a standard biopsy needle. 2D liver MRE with gradient-echo based sequence on a 1.5 or 3T scanner was used. Two radiologists independently measured the liver stiffness value on MRE and two types of MRE-based methods (threshold and Bayesian prediction method) were applied. Two pathologists evaluated all biopsy samples independently to stage liver fibrosis. Surgically resected whole tissue specimens were used as the reference standard. The accuracy for liver fibrosis staging was compared between liver biopsy and MRE-based methods with a modified McNemar's test. Accurate fibrosis staging was achieved in 53.3% (64/120) and 59.1% (71/120) of patients using MRE with threshold and Bayesian methods, respectively, and in 51.6% (62/120) with liver biopsy. Accuracies of MRE-based methods for diagnoses of ≥F2 (90-91% [108-9/120]), ≥F3 (79-81% [95-97/120]), and F4 (82-85% [98-102/120]) were statistically equivalent to those of liver biopsy (≥F2, 79% [95/120], P ≤ 0.01; ≥F3, 88% [105/120], P ≤ 0.006; and F4, 82% [99/120], P ≤ 0.017). MRE can be an alternative to liver biopsy for fibrosis staging. 3. Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1268-1275. © 2017

  11. Forensic age estimation based on development of third molars: a staging technique for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tobel, J; Phlypo, I; Fieuws, S; Politis, C; Verstraete, K L; Thevissen, P W

    2017-12-01

    The development of third molars can be evaluated with medical imaging to estimate age in subadults. The appearance of third molars on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) differs greatly from that on radiographs. Therefore a specific staging technique is necessary to classify third molar development on MRI and to apply it for age estimation. To develop a specific staging technique to register third molar development on MRI and to evaluate its performance for age estimation in subadults. Using 3T MRI in three planes, all third molars were evaluated in 309 healthy Caucasian participants from 14 to 26 years old. According to the appearance of the developing third molars on MRI, descriptive criteria and schematic representations were established to define a specific staging technique. Two observers, with different levels of experience, staged all third molars independently with the developed technique. Intra- and inter-observer agreement were calculated. The data were imported in a Bayesian model for age estimation as described by Fieuws et al. (2016). This approach adequately handles correlation between age indicators and missing age indicators. It was used to calculate a point estimate and a prediction interval of the estimated age. Observed age minus predicted age was calculated, reflecting the error of the estimate. One-hundred and sixty-six third molars were agenetic. Five percent (51/1096) of upper third molars and 7% (70/1044) of lower third molars were not assessable. Kappa for inter-observer agreement ranged from 0.76 to 0.80. For intra-observer agreement kappa ranged from 0.80 to 0.89. However, two stage differences between observers or between staging sessions occurred in up to 2.2% (20/899) of assessments, probably due to a learning effect. Using the Bayesian model for age estimation, a mean absolute error of 2.0 years in females and 1.7 years in males was obtained. Root mean squared error equalled 2.38 years and 2.06 years respectively. The performance to

  12. Experimental investigation of coaxial-gun-formed plasmas injected into a background transverse magnetic field or plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Fisher, Dustin M.; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott C.; Lynn, Alan G.

    2018-05-01

    Injection of coaxial-gun-formed magnetized plasmas into a background transverse vacuum magnetic field or into a background magnetized plasma has been studied in the helicon-cathode (HelCat) linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico [M. Gilmore et al., J. Plasma Phys. 81, 345810104 (2015)]. A magnetized plasma jet launched into a background transverse magnetic field shows emergent kink stabilization of the jet due to the formation of a sheared flow in the jet above the kink stabilization threshold 0.1kVA [Y. Zhang et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 110702 (2017)]. Injection of a spheromak-like plasma into a transverse background magnetic field led to the observation of finger-like structures on the side with a stronger magnetic field null between the spheromak and the background field. The finger-like structures are consistent with magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Jets or spheromaks launched into a background, low-β magnetized plasma show similar behavior as above, respectively, in both cases.

  13. Modeling the fine fragmentation following the triggering stage of a vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbord, I.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of PWR severe accidents, where the core melt, this thesis studies one of the stages of an FCI (fuel coolant interaction) or vapor explosion. An FCI is a rapid evaporation of a coolant when it comes into contact with a hot liquid. More precisely, the subject of this study is the triggering stage of the FCI, when a fuel drop of diameter around one centimeter breaks up into many fragments, diameter of which is around a hundred micrometers. The model describes the cyclic collapse and growth of a vapor bubble around the fuel droplet and its fragmentation. The main features of the model are: - the destabilization of the film or the vapor bubble due to the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (those form coolant jets that contact the fuel surface); - The mechanisms of fragmentation, following the contacts (in the case of entrapment of a certain amount of coolant in the fuel, the entrapped coolant evaporates violently after it has been heated to the homogeneous nucleation temperature); - the transient heat transfer from the fragments to the coolant and the elevated vapor production, which leads to an important expansion of the bubble (about this point, the cooling of the fragments has been described by a transient heat transfer coefficient linked to nucleate boiling). The results of the model show good agreement with experimental data. (Author)

  14. Investigation of magnetic flux transport and shock formation in a staged Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Wessel, F. J.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-10-01

    Target preheating is an integral component of magnetized inertial fusion in reducing convergence ratio. In the staged Z-pinch concept, it is achieved via one or more shocks. Previous work [Narkis et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 122706 (2016)] found that shock formation in the target occurred earlier in higher-Z liners due to faster flux transport to the target/liner interface. However, a corresponding increase in magnitude of magnetic pressure was not observed, and target implosion velocity (and therefore shock strength) remained unchanged. To investigate other means of increasing the magnitude of transported flux, a Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation from the 1-D single-fluid, resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations is obtained. Solutions to the nondispersive (i.e., Burgers) equation depend on nondimensional coefficients, whose dependence on liner density, temperature, etc., suggests an increase in target implosion velocity, and therefore shock strength, can be obtained by tailoring the mass of a single-liner gas puff to a double-liner configuration. In the selected test cases of 1-D simulated implosions of krypton on deuterium, the peak Mach number increased from ˜ 5 to ˜ 8 . While a notable increase was seen, Mach numbers exceeding 10 (implosion velocities exceeding ˜25 cm/μs) are necessary for adequate shock preheating.

  15. Single-Stage Step up/down Driver for Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. R.; Juan, Y. L.; Huang, C. Y.; Kuo, C. T.

    2017-11-01

    The two-stage circuit composed of a step up/down dc converter and a three-phase voltage source inverter is usually adopted as the electric vehicle’s motor driver. The conventional topology is more complicated. Additional power loss resulted from twice power conversion would also cause lower efficiency. A single-stage step up/down Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor driver for Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor is proposed in this study. The number components and circuit complexity are reduced. The low frequency six-step square-wave control is used to reduce the switching losses. In the proposed topology, only one active switch is gated with a high frequency PWM signal for adjusting the rotation speed. The rotor position signals are fed back to calculate the motor speed for digital close-loop control in a MCU. A 600W prototype circuit is constructed to drive a BLDC motor with rated speed 3000 rpm, and can control the speed of six sections.

  16. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, G.H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). Materials and methods: A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI. All patients underwent laparoscopic or open lymph-node dissection prior to surgery. Four patients had positive lymph nodes at operation. A total of 19 underwant radical prostatectomy, allowing comparison of the MRI data with the surgical pathologic findings. Results: Twelve patients had extraglandular spread of ACP (T3) and 7 had locally confined ACP (T2). ERC-MRI predicted correctly a T3 tumor in 10 of 12 cases and a T2 tumor in 4 of 7 cases. ERC-MRI was 74% accurate in differentiating T2 from T3 tumor. Three cases of overestimation were in studies with poor image quality because of bowel movement motion artifacts. Conclusion: ERC-MRI was found to be a sensitive modality in staging clinically localized ACP. (orig.) [de

  17. [Carcinoma of the uterine cervical canal. Staging and biometric assessment with magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetti, S G; Politi, G; Lomeo, E; Garozzo, G; Di Leo, S; Nuciforo, G

    1994-10-01

    In uterine cervical canal carcinoma, the current clinical FIGO criteria often fail not only to differentiate stage IA2 from stage IB but also to demonstrate possible parametrial involvement. Moreover, the analysis of tumor volume and of the depth of neoplastic stromal invasion is not very reliable. The authors investigated MR accuracy in the definition of such variables: to this purpose, 24 patients with histologically confirmed endocervical adenocarcinoma were submitted to MRI, which was performed with an 0.5-T superconductive magnet. Sagittal and oblique transverse or sometimes coronal SE images, oriented so as to be perpendicular to longitudinal cervical major axis were obtained with T2 weighting (TR 1800 ms, TE 25-90 ms). MR data were correlated with pathologic findings. MR accuracy in demonstrating parametrial involvement was 92%, its sensitivity was 86% and specificity 97%. Volumetric MR data showed a high correlation (r = 0.970) with those derived from pathologic findings. In 92% of cases stromal invasion exceeded 5 mm. MRI, thanks to its high accuracy, should be included in diagnostic pretreatment protocols, even though FIGO criteria do not require it yet, especially in the presence of an endocervical adenocarcinoma. Moreover, the accurate definition of tumor volume can allow less extensive surgery with the same survival rates and fewer complications, which are frequently observed after radical hysterectomy.

  18. Stagnation morphology in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E. C.; Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Glinsky, M. E.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Jones, B.; Knapp, P. F.; Martin, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schmit, P. F.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Weis, M. R.; Yu, E. P.

    2017-10-01

    In Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z facility, an axial current of 15-20 MA is driven through a thick metal cylinder containing axially-magnetized, laser-heated deuterium fuel. The cylinder implodes, further heating the fuel and amplifying the axial B-field. Instabilities, such as magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor, develop on the exterior of the liner and may feed through to the inner surface during the implosion. Monochromatic x-ray emission at stagnation shows the stagnation column is quasi-helical with axial variations in intensity. Recent experiments demonstrated that the stagnation emission structure changed with modifications to the target wall thickness. Additionally, applying a thick dielectric coating to the exterior of the target modified the stagnation column. A new version of the x-ray self-emission diagnostic has been developed to investigate stagnation with higher resolution. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  19. Rotation and toroidal magnetic field effects on the stability of two-component jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, Dimitrios; Keppens, Rony; Meliani, Zakaria

    2017-09-01

    Several observations of astrophysical jets show evidence of a structure in the direction perpendicular to the jet axis, leading to the development of 'spine and sheath' models of jets. Most studies focus on a two-component jet consisting of a highly relativistic inner jet and a slower - but still relativistic - outer jet surrounded by an unmagnetized environment. These jets are believed to be susceptible to a relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, depending on the effective inertia ratio of the two components. We extend previous studies by taking into account the presence of a non-zero toroidal magnetic field. Different values of magnetization are examined to detect possible differences in the evolution and stability of the jet. We find that the toroidal field, above a certain level of magnetization σ, roughly equal to 0.01, can stabilize the jet against the previously mentioned instabilities and that there is a clear trend in the behaviour of the average Lorentz factor and the effective radius of the jet when we continuously increase the magnetization. The simulations are performed using the relativistic MHD module from the open source, parallel, grid adaptive, mpi-amrvac code.

  20. Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Mark [Sandia National Laboratory

    2012-05-09

    The recently refurbished Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is the world’s largest pulsed power driver. Z can efficiently deliver currents as large as 26 Million Amperes to centimeter scale loads. These large currents create large magnetic fields that, in turn, create very large pressures in conducting materials. These very large pressures have been used to create unique conditions for high energy density science experiments for a variety of applications. Recently, we have been exploring the use of very strong magnetic fields to significantly relax the requirements for achieving inertial confinement fusion self heating1. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept relies on a cylindrically imploding liner, an axial magnetic field, and a laser heated fuel region. We hope to achieve significant fusion yield on the Z facility with this concept. Initial experiments assessing the growth of the Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability are promising and recent calculational work has identified an approach to achieving high gain with this concept.

  1. How I report breast magnetic resonance imaging studies for breast cancer staging and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2016-07-25

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is the most sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis and local staging of primary breast cancer and yet, despite the fact that it has been in use for 20 years, there is little evidence that its widespread uncritical adoption has had a positive impact on patient-related outcomes.This has been attributed previously to the low specificity that might be expected with such a sensitive modality, but with modern techniques and protocols, the specificity and positive predictive value for malignancy can exceed that of breast ultrasound and mammography. A more likely explanation is that historically, clinicians have acted on MRI findings and altered surgical plans without prior histological confirmation. Furthermore, modern adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has improved so much that it has become a very tall order to show a an improvement in outcomes such as local recurrence rates.In order to obtain clinically useful information, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the technique and the physiological processes reflected in breast MRI. An appropriate indication for the scan, proper patient preparation and good scan technique, with rigorous quality assurance, are all essential prerequisites for a diagnostically relevant study.The use of recognised descriptors from a standardised lexicon is helpful, since assessment can then dictate subsequent recommendations for management, as in the American College of Radiology BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) lexicon (Morris et al., ACR BI-RADS® Atlas, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 2013). It also enables audit of the service. However, perhaps the most critical factor in the generation of a meaningful report is for the reporting radiologist to have a thorough understanding of the clinical question and of the findings that will influence management. This has never been more important than at present, when we are in the throes of a

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with early stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivak, Stefan [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Jessenius Medical Faculty, Clinic of Neurology, Martin (Slovakia); Bittsansky, Michal; Dobrota, Dusan [Comenius University, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Turcanova-Koprusakova, Monika; Grofik, Milan; Nosal, Vladimir [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [Comenius University, Clinic of Radiodiagnostics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia)

    2010-12-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Due to relative fast progression of the disease, early diagnosis is essential. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) is used for objectivization of upper motor neuron (UMN) lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the use of {sup 1}H-MRS in the early stages of ALS. Eleven patients with clinically definite (n = 2), probable (n = 7), and probable laboratory-supported (n = 2) diagnosis of ALS with disease duration of less than 14 months were studied. Control group consists of 11 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent assessment of functional disability using revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and single-voxel {sup 1}H-MRS examination of both precentral gyri, pons, medulla oblongata, and occipital lobe. Spectra were evaluated with LCModel software. The mean disease duration was 6.5 {+-} 3.5 months. The median ALSFRS-R was 42. Significant decrease between patient and control groups was found in the NAA/Cre ratio in the left and right precentral gyri (p = 0.008, p = 0.040). Other metabolite ratios in other areas did not show significant differences. Total ALSFRS-R score weakly positively correlated with NAA/Cre ratio in the left precentral gyrus (p = 0.047). {sup 1}H-MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes caused by neurodegeneration processes during ALS and can be used for detection of UMN dysfunction. These MRS changes in the early stages of ALS are most prominent in motor cortex. (orig.)

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with early stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivak, Stefan; Bittsansky, Michal; Dobrota, Dusan; Kurca, Egon; Turcanova-Koprusakova, Monika; Grofik, Milan; Nosal, Vladimir; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Due to relative fast progression of the disease, early diagnosis is essential. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) is used for objectivization of upper motor neuron (UMN) lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the use of 1 H-MRS in the early stages of ALS. Eleven patients with clinically definite (n = 2), probable (n = 7), and probable laboratory-supported (n = 2) diagnosis of ALS with disease duration of less than 14 months were studied. Control group consists of 11 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent assessment of functional disability using revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and single-voxel 1 H-MRS examination of both precentral gyri, pons, medulla oblongata, and occipital lobe. Spectra were evaluated with LCModel software. The mean disease duration was 6.5 ± 3.5 months. The median ALSFRS-R was 42. Significant decrease between patient and control groups was found in the NAA/Cre ratio in the left and right precentral gyri (p = 0.008, p = 0.040). Other metabolite ratios in other areas did not show significant differences. Total ALSFRS-R score weakly positively correlated with NAA/Cre ratio in the left precentral gyrus (p = 0.047). 1 H-MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes caused by neurodegeneration processes during ALS and can be used for detection of UMN dysfunction. These MRS changes in the early stages of ALS are most prominent in motor cortex. (orig.)

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, S.; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of

  6. Evaluation of carcinoma cervix using magnetic resonance imaging: correlation with clinical FIGO staging and impact on management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhoot, Nilu Malpani; Bhuyan, Utpal; Kumar, Vinay; Shinagare, Atul; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Barmon, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate carcinoma of the cervix using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correlate with clinical approach of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system and to study the impact of MRI findings on patient management. Pathologically confirmed, 75 cases of carcinoma cervix referred to our institute from April 2007 to March 2008 were prospectively studied. Clinical FIGO stage was assigned to each patient by gynaecologists blinded to MRI findings. MRI stage (based on FIGO and TNM) was allotted by radiologists blinded to clinicopathological details. For patients who were operated, histopathological stage was taken as gold standard. For patients who were not operated, gynaecologists decided on a gold standard stage based on all available clinical and imaging data. MR staging was correlated with FIGO staging, with focus on significant alterations in treatment strategy caused due to MRI findings. MRI staging had an accuracy of 89.3% (67/75), while clinical FIGO staging had 61.3% (46/75) accuracy. MRI staging and FIGO staging concurred in 65.6% of the patients and differed in 34.4% of the patients. In about 30.6% (23/75) of the patients, there were relevant additional MRI findings not suspected clinically. The common significant MRI findings were detection of pelvic lymphadenopathy and clinically unsuspected bowel/bladder invasion. The management protocol was significantly altered in 86.9% (20/23) of the patients with additional MRI findings constituting 26.6% (20/75) of the total population. MRI is highly accurate in evaluating carcinoma of the cervix. MRI findings significantly altered therapeutic decisions in 26.6% of the patients. MRI should be considered prior to treatment planning in every patient.

  7. Two-stage magnetic orientation of uric acid crystals as gout initiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the magnetic behavior of uric acid crystals, which are responsible for gout. Under a sub-Tesla (T)-level magnetic field, rotational motion of the crystals, which were caused by diamagnetic torque, was observed. We used horizontal magnetic fields with a maximum magnitude of 500 mT generated by an electromagnet to observe the magnetic orientation of the uric acid microcrystals by a microscope. The uric acid crystals showed a perpendicular magnetic field orientation with a minimum threshold of 130 mT. We speculate that the distinct diamagnetic anisotropy in the uric acid crystals resulted in their rotational responses.

  8. Myometrial invasion and overall staging of endometrial carcinoma: assessment using fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Guo,1,2 Ping Wang,2 Penghui Wang,2 Wei Gao,1 Fenge Li,3 Xueling Yang,1 Hongyan Ni,2 Wen Shen,2 Zhi Guo1 1Department of Interventional Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, Tianjin’s Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, 2Department of Radiology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, The First Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 3Department of Gynecology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Background: The age of onset of endometrial carcinoma has been decreasing in recent years. In endometrial carcinoma, it is important to accurately assess invasion depth and preoperative staging. Fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI may contribute to the improvement of anatomical localization of lesions.Materials and methods: In our study, a total of 58 endometrial carcinoma cases were included. Based on the revised 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system, a fusion of T2WI and DWI was utilized for the evaluation of invasion depth and determination of the overall stage. Postoperative pathologic assessment was considered as the reference standard. The consistency of T2WI image staging and pathologic staging, and the consistency of fused T2WI and DWI and pathologic staging were all analyzed using Kappa statistics.Results: Compared with the T2WI group, a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy was observed for myometrial invasion with fusion of T2WI and DWI (77.6% for T2WI; 94.8% for T2WI-DWI. For the identification of deep invasion, we calculated values for diagnostic sensitivity (69.2% for T2WI; 92.3% for T2WI-DWI, specificity (80% for T2WI; 95.6% for T2WI-DWI, positive predictive value (50% for T2WI; 85.7% for T2WI-DWI, and negative predictive value (90% for

  9. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart; Holm, Torbjorn; Glimelius, Bengt; Loerinc, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion

  10. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: erik.rollven@ki.se; Holm, Torbjorn [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Loerinc, Esther [Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Solna, Sweden (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion.

  11. Spleen dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a new method for staging liver fibrosis in a piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore spleen hemodynamic alteration in liver fibrosis with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI, and to determine how to stage liver fibrosis with spleen DCE-MRI parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen piglets were prospectively used to model liver fibrosis staged by liver biopsy, and underwent spleen DCE-MRI on 0, 5th, 9th, 16th and 21st weekend after modeling this disease. DCE-MRI parameters including time to peak (TTP, positive enhancement integral (PEI, maximum slope of increase (MSI and maximum slope of decrease (MSD of spleen were measured, and statistically analyzed to stage this disease. RESULTS: Spearman's rank correlation tests showed that TTP tended to increase with increasing stages of liver fibrosis (r = 0.647, P0.05, and decreased from stage 2 to 4 (P0.05. Mann-Whitney tests demonstrated that TTP and PEI could classify fibrosis between stage 0 and 1-4, between 0-1 and 2-4, between 0-2 and 3-4, or between 0-3 and 4 (all P<0.01. MSD could discriminate between 0-2 and 3-4 (P = 0.006, or between 0-3 and 4 (P = 0.012. MSI could not differentiate between any two stages. Receiver operating characteristic analysis illustrated that area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of TTP was larger than of PEI for classifying stage ≥1 and ≥2 (AUC = 0.851 and 0.783, respectively. PEI could best classify stage ≥3 and 4 (AUC = 0.903 and 0.96, respectively. CONCLUSION: Spleen DCE-MRI has potential to monitor spleen hemodynamic alteration and classify liver fibrosis stages.

  12. Observation of magnetically anisotropic defects during stage I recovery in nickel after low-temperature electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsch, K.; Hemmerich, J.; Knoll, H.; Lucki, G.

    1974-01-01

    The measurement of defect-induced changes of magnetic anisotropy in a nickel single crystal after low-temperature electron irradiation was undertaken. A dynamic measuring method was used after reorienting a certain fraction of the radiation-induced defects in an external magnetic field of 5 kOe. In the temperature range of recovery stage I sub(C,D,E) (45 to 60 k) the crystallographic direction dependence of defect-induced anisotropy could be determined. The results show that in this temperature range the (100) split interstitial is mobile and able to reorient. The obtained data are further discussed with respect to existing information on magnetic after effect and resistivity annealing in electron-irradiated nickel

  13. A diagnostic model for equatorial spread F. 2. The effect of magnetic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.; Maruyama, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    By using a numerical model the authors have studied electric field effects on the generation of equatorial spread F (ESF) in the postmidnight hours. Equatorial electric fields are zonally westward during late evening and postmidnight hours on normal days, while they sometimes reverse to eastward in magnetically disturbed days. The quiet time westward configuration and typical low altitude of the layer results in stable bottomside gradient or at most one with a very low generalized Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. The model calculation shows that the growth rate becomes significant when the electric field reverses to eastward and may remain so even when the electric field disturbance weakens due to the upward altitude excursion of the layer. These results account for the correlation of ESF occurrence penetration of magnetospheric electric fields during such magnetic activity. The results also show the crucial role of layer height in the physics. They have calculated the growth rates for specific nights in which perturbation of electric fields and plumes were observed at Jicamarca. These case studies suggest that a quantitative requirement for the generation of plumes is that about 10 e-folding times of the linear instability growth occur. They also suggest that a statistical study using ionosonde data could be very valuable in a testing whether a local version of this quantitative measure of event intensity could be useful in predicting plume activity

  14. [Using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics and gene ontology to establish pathological staging model for esophageal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Wang, K; Chen, W; Jiang, H; Deng, P C; Li, Z J; Peng, J; Zhou, Z Y; Yang, H; Huang, G X; Zeng, J

    2016-07-01

    By combining the metabolomics and computational biology, to explore the relationship between metabolic phenotype and pathological stage in esophageal cancer patients, to find the mechanism of metabolic network disturbance and develop a new method for fast preoperative clinical staging. A prospective cohort study (from April 2013 to January 2016) was conducted. The preoperative patients from Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, who were diagnosed with esophageal cancer from May 2013 to April 2014 were included, and their serum samples were collected to detect (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics for the purpose of drawing the metabolic fingerprinting in different stages of patients with esophageal cancer. The data were processed with these methods-principal components analysis: partial least squares regression and support vector machine, for the exploration of the enzyme-gene network regulatory mechanism in abnormal esophageal cancer metabolic network regulation and to build the quantitative prediction model of esophageal cancer staging in the end. All data were processed on high-performance computing platforms Matalab. The comparison of data had used Wilcoxon test, variance analysis, χ(2) test and Fisher exact test. Twenty patients with different stages of esophageal cancer were included; and their serum metabolic fingerprinting could differentiate different tumor stages. There were no difference among the five teams in the age (F=1.086, P>0.05), the body mass index (F=1.035, P>0.05), the distance from the incisors to tumor (F=1.078, P>0.05). Among the patients with different TNM stages, there was a significant difference in plasma metabolome. Compared to ⅡB, ⅢA, Ⅳstage patients, increased levels of butanone, ethanol amine, homocysteine, hydroxy acids and estriol, together with decreased levels of glycoprotein, creatine, choline, isobutyricacid, alanine, leucine, valine, were observed inⅠB, ⅡA stage patients. Four metabolic markers

  15. Preliminary investigation on the use of low current pulsed power Z-pinch plasma devices for the study of early stage plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaselouris, E.; Dimitriou, V.; Fitilis, I.; Skoulakis, A.; Koundourakis, G.; Clark, E. L.; Chatzakis, J.; Bakarezos, Μ; Nikolos, I. K.; Papadogiannis, N. A.; Tatarakis, M.

    2018-01-01

    This article addresses key features for the implementation of low current pulsed power plasma devices for the study of matter dynamics from the solid to the plasma phase. The renewed interest in such low current plasma devices lies in the need to investigate methods for the mitigation of prompt seeding mechanisms for the generation of plasma instabilities. The low current when driven into thick wires (skin effect mode) allows for the simultaneous existence of all phases of matter from solid to plasma. Such studies are important for the concept of inertial confinement fusion where the mitigation of the instability seeding mechanisms arising from the very early moments within the target’s heating is of crucial importance. Similarly, in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept it is an open question as to how much surface non-uniformity correlates with the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which develops during the implosion. This study presents experimental and simulation results, which demonstrate that the use of low current pulsed power devices in conjunction with appropriate diagnostics can be important for studying seeding mechanisms for the imminent generation of plasma instabilities in future research.

  16. No Escape from the Supernova! Magnetic Imprisonment of Dusty Pinballs by a Supernova Remnant arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Brian J.; Ellis, John R.

    Motivated by recent measurements of deposits of $^{60}$Fe on the ocean floor and the lunar surface, we model the transport of dust grains containing $^{60}$Fe from a near-Earth (i.e., within 100 pc) supernova (SN). We inject dust grains into the environment of a SN remnant (SNR) and trace their trajectories using a magnetohydrodynamic description. We assume the interstellar medium (ISM) magnetic fields are turbulent, and are amplified by the SNR shock, while the SN wind and ejecta fields are negligible. We examine the various influences on the dust grains within the SNR to determine when/if the dust decouples from the plasma, how much it is sputtered, and where within the SNR the dust grains are located. We find that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are important for dust survival, as they influence the location of the SN's reverse shock. We find that the presence of a magnetic field within the shocked ISM material limits the passage of SN dust grains, with the field either reflecting or trapping the grains with...

  17. Enhancing Understanding of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas from Solid Liner Implosions Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Hansen, David; Held, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Recent results from experiments and simulations of magnetically driven pulsed power liners have explored the role of early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the MRT (magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor) instability. Understanding the development of these instabilities can lead to potential stabilization mechanisms; thereby providing a significant role in the success of fusion concepts such as MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion). For MagLIF the MRT instability is the most detrimental instability toward achieving fusion energy production. Experiments of high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions have shown the requirement for more advanced physics modeling than that of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The overall focus of this project is on using a multi-fluid extended-MHD model with kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity. The extended-MHD model has been updated to include the SESAME equation-of-state tables and numerical benchmarks with this implementation will be presented. Simulations of MRT growth and evolution for MagLIF-relevant parameters will be presented using this extended-MHD model with the SESAME equation-of-state tables. This work is supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant Number DE-SC0016515.

  18. Anal carcinomas: the role of endoanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in staging, response evaluation and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Jyoti; Shaw, Aidan; Griffin, Nyree [Guys and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Grant, Lee A. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Schizas, Alexis M.P.; Datta, Vivek; Williams, Andrew B. [Guys and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of General Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Anal carcinoma is an important but rare condition, managed in specialist centres. Both endoanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used in the locoregional staging and follow-up of patients with anal cancer, and both may assist in treatment planning and prognosis. Recent guidelines published by the European Society for Medical Oncology have recommended MRI as the technique of choice for assessment of locoregional disease. This paper describes the techniques for both endoanal ultrasound and MRI, and compares the relative merits and disadvantages of each in the local assessment of anal carcinoma. (orig.)

  19. THE NONISOTHERMAL STAGE OF MAGNETIC STAR FORMATION. I. FORMULATION OF THE PROBLEM AND METHOD OF SOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the problem of the formation and subsequent evolution of fragments (or cores) in magnetically supported, self-gravitating molecular clouds in two spatial dimensions. The six-fluid (neutrals, electrons, molecular and atomic ions, positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral grains) physical system is governed by the radiation, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. The magnetic flux is not assumed to be frozen in any of the charged species. Its evolution is determined by a newly derived generalized Ohm's law, which accounts for the contributions of both elastic and inelastic collisions to ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation. The species abundances are calculated using an extensive chemical-equilibrium network. Both MRN and uniform grain size distributions are considered. The thermal evolution of the protostellar core and its effect on the dynamics are followed by employing the gray flux-limited diffusion approximation. Realistic temperature-dependent grain opacities are used that account for a variety of grain compositions. We have augmented the publicly available Zeus-MP code to take into consideration all these effects and have modified several of its algorithms to improve convergence, accuracy, and efficiency. Results of magnetic star formation simulations that accurately track the evolution of a protostellar fragment from a density ≅10 3 cm -3 to a density ≅10 15 cm -3 , while rigorously accounting for both nonideal MHD processes and radiative transfer, are presented in a separate paper.

  20. Modeling the fine fragmentation following the triggering stage of a vapor explosion; Modelisation de la fragmentaton fine lors de la phase de declenchement d`une explosion de vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbord, I [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France). Service d` Etudes et de Modelisation Thermohydraulique

    1997-06-11

    In the frame of PWR severe accidents, where the core melt, this thesis studies one of the stages of an FCI (fuel coolant interaction) or vapor explosion. An FCI is a rapid evaporation of a coolant when it comes into contact with a hot liquid. More precisely, the subject of this study is the triggering stage of the FCI, when a fuel drop of diameter around one centimeter breaks up into many fragments, diameter of which is around a hundred micrometers. The model describes the cyclic collapse and growth of a vapor bubble around the fuel droplet and its fragmentation. The main features of the model are: - the destabilization of the film or the vapor bubble due to the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (those form coolant jets that contact the fuel surface); - The mechanisms of fragmentation, following the contacts (in the case of entrapment of a certain amount of coolant in the fuel, the entrapped coolant evaporates violently after it has been heated to the homogeneous nucleation temperature); - the transient heat transfer from the fragments to the coolant and the elevated vapor production, which leads to an important expansion of the bubble (about this point, the cooling of the fragments has been described by a transient heat transfer coefficient linked to nucleate boiling). The results of the model show good agreement with experimental data. (Author) 68 refs.

  1. A Method to Determine Supply Voltage of Permanent Magnet Motor at Optimal Design Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matustomo, Shinya; Noguchi, So; Yamashita, Hideo; Tanimoto, Shigeya

    The permanent magnet motors (PM motors) are widely used in electrical machinery, such as air conditioner, refrigerator and so on. In recent years, from the point of view of energy saving, it is necessary to improve the efficiency of PM motor by optimization. However, in the efficiency optimization of PM motor, many design variables and many restrictions are required. In this paper, the efficiency optimization of PM motor with many design variables was performed by using the voltage driven finite element analysis with the rotating simulation of the motor and the genetic algorithm.

  2. Influence of Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields on the Circadian System: Current Stage of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żak, Arkadiusz

    2014-01-01

    One of the side effects of each electrical device work is the electromagnetic field generated near its workplace. All organisms, including humans, are exposed daily to the influence of different types of this field, characterized by various physical parameters. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine the effects of an electromagnetic field on the physiological and pathological processes occurring in cells, tissues, and organs. Numerous epidemiological and experimental data suggest that the extremely low frequency magnetic field generated by electrical transmission lines and electrically powered devices and the high frequencies electromagnetic radiation emitted by electronic devices have a potentially negative impact on the circadian system. On the other hand, several studies have found no influence of these fields on chronobiological parameters. According to the current state of knowledge, some previously proposed hypotheses, including one concerning the key role of melatonin secretion disruption in pathogenesis of electromagnetic field induced diseases, need to be revised. This paper reviews the data on the effect of electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol rhythms—two major markers of the circadian system as well as on sleep. It also provides the basic information about the nature, classification, parameters, and sources of these fields. PMID:25136557

  3. Effect of magnetic field on ablatively driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by interfacial nonlinear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labakanta Mandal; Banerjee, R.; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) situation, laser driven ablation front of an imploding capsule is subjected to the fluid instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In this case dense core is compressed and accelerated by low density ablating plasma. During this process laser driven shocks interact the interface and hence it becomes unstable due to the formation of nonlinear structure like bubble and spike. The nonlinear structure is called bubble if the lighter fluid pushes inside the heavier fluid and spike, if opposite takes place. R-M instability causes non-uniform compression of ICF fuel pellets and needs to be mitigated. Scientists and researchers are much more interested on RM instability both from theoretical and experimental points of view. In this article, we have presented the analytical expression for the growth rate and velocity for the nonlinear structures due to the effect of magnetic field of fluid using potential flow model. The magnetic field is assumed to be parallel to the plane of two fluid interfaces. If the magnetic field is restricted only to either side of interface the R-M instability can be stabilized or destabilized depending on whether the magnetic pressure on the interface opposes the instability driving shock pressure or acts in the same direction. An interesting result is that if both the fluids are magnetized, interface as well as velocity of bubble and spike will show oscillating stabilization and R-M instability is mitigated. All analytical results are also supported by numerical results. Numerically it is seen that magnetic field above certain minimum value reduces the instability for compression the target in ICF.

  4. Endometrial carcinoma: merit of magnetic resonance in pre-surgical staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, E.; Barrera, M. C.; Gervas, C.; Salvador, E.; Rivero, B.; Sentis, M.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate MR capacity in assessing deep myometrial and cervical infiltrations in cases of endometrial carcinoma. A series of 30 consecutively diagnosed endometrial cancer patients was pre-surgically evaluated by means of magnetic resonance (MR). TSE-T2 sequences with fat saturation and dynamic FFe sequence were used after gadolinium administration. A correlation with post-surgical histological stating was made. There were then determined sensitivity (S), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the deep myometrial infiltration and cervical invasion. Cases of overestimation and underestimation were analyzed. Values obtained for myometrium and cervix were, respectively, S of 67% and 63%, SP of 89% and 91%, PPV of 80% and 71% and NPV of 80% and 87%. Two cases each were over valued for myometrial infiltration and cervix: four cases and 3 cases, respectively, were undervalues. MR stating in cases of endometrial carcinoma is a highly reliable diagnostic technique, but it does present certain limitations. (Author) 19 refs

  5. Multi-modal investigations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in stratified media Project: w17_multirti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wieland, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Reckinger, Scott [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2018-02-27

    The simulations compare, for the first time, three practically important background stratifications under thermal equilibrium and out of equilibrium (isentropic, isopycnic) and show significant differences on the instability growth

  6. Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by convection and thermal conduction in smooth density gradient: WKB analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.; Liberman, M.A.; Bondarenko, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Since development of the RT modes in the ablatively accelerated plasma of laser targets imposes crucial limitations on symmetry of spherical implosions and hence on energy cumulation, it has been the subject of intensive numerical and analytical analysis in the recent years, particularly in the context of inertial confinement fusion. Recent thin-foil ablative-acceleration experiments as well as the results of 2D numerical simulations demonstrated substantial reduction of the instability growth rates compared with the classical theory predictions up to the total stabilization in the short-wavelength limit. The numerical results indicated that the main stabilization mechanism is convection. To derive the scaling laws for the RT growth rates and cut-off wavenumbers in the wide range of flow parameters, analytical solutions attract special interest. The analytical approach based on the discontinuity model was developed to analyze the reduction of the RT growth rates by the plasma convective flow and the thermal conductivity effects. The following major problem arises in the discontinuity approximation, which leaves the solution undetermined: the number of the boundary conditions on the perturbed ablation surface is not sufficient to derive the dispersion equation. One needs additional boundary conditions not associated with the conservation laws on the discontinuity surface to close the system of linearized equations for small perturbations. The stabilization effect of highly structured hydrodynamic profiles was studied by Mikaelian and Munro for a stationary plasma. Nevertheless, no reasonable analytical model was constructed taking into account the combined convective, thermal conductivity and density gradient reduction of the RT growth rates. In this report we develop the analytical approach based on the WKB approximation to analyze the stabilization of the RT modes in plasma with smooth density and velocity gradients. (author) 9 refs., 1 fig

  7. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  8. [Clinical randomized controlled trial on ultrashort wave and magnetic therapy for the treatment of early stage distal radius fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Jie; Liu, Jia

    2012-07-01

    To explore the effect of application of ultrashort wave and magnetic therapy instrument on the swelling regression in distal radius fractures treated by splint external fixation in initial stage. From March 2007 to May 2010,90 patients with distal radial fracture were treated by manual reduction and splint external fixation. After manual reduction and small splints external fixation, these patients were randomly divided into electrical physical therapy group, western medicine group and the control group by the order of calling number, with 30 cases each group. In control group, there were 9 males and 21 females with an average age of (61.29 +/- 1.97) years, the patients raised and exercise the limb and fingers only. The other two groups also carried out this treatment. In electrical physical therapy group, there were 9 males and 21 females with an average age of (62.37 +/- 2.48) years, the patients were treated with ultrashort wave and magnetic therapy instrument for early intervention, once a day, 5 days for a course of treatment and three cycle were operated. In western medicine group,there were 8 males and 22 females with an average age of (60.12 +/- 2.87) years, the patients were injected with beta-aescin (20 mg, intravenous injection,once a day) for 5 days, followed by Danshen injection (20 ml, intravenous injection, once a day) for 10 days. The limb swelling of patients were assessed every day for 20 days after manual reduction and small splints external fixation. The time of swelling regression in electrical physical therapy group, western medicine group and the control group were respectively (9.62 +/- 3.32), (10.05 +/- 3.05) and (14.57 +/- 2.93) days. Both of that in electrical physical therapy group and western medicine group were shorter than that in the control group (P0.05). The effective rate of swelling regression in electrical physical therapy group, western medicine group and the control group were 86.67%, 80.00%, 46.66% respectively. There was no

  9. Examining the Electric Fields of the Evening Equatorial Ionosphere When the Solar Terminator is Aligned and Not Aligned with the Magnetic Meridian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    The electric field structure of the equatorial ionosphere near sunset has implications on the development of plasma irregularities. The details of the development of the electric fields are examined using a global ionosphere-electrodynamics model. The results of simulations of simplified conditions show the influence of the arrangement of the solar terminator with the magnetic meridian. The relationships of the Curl-Free mechanism, the Hall Current Divergence mechanism, and the role of the Equatorial Electorjet region control the magnitude and timing of the Prereversal Enhancement of the zonal electric field as well as its altitude profile above the F region bottomside. Realistic conditions for 'equinox' and 'solstice' solar terminator arrangments are presented. The stability of the low-latitude ionosphere has a demonstrated relationship with the solar terminator alignment [Tsunoda, JGR, 1981]. The profile of the vertical and zonal electric field below the bottomside is then examined using the global model to explore the controlling elements of the electric field structure and the growth rates of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Collisional Shear instability.Tsunoda, R. T. (1985), Control of the seasonal and longitudinal occurrence of equatorial scintillations by the longitudinal gradient in integrated E region Pedersen conductivity, J. Geophys. Res., 90(A1),447-456, doi:10.1029/JA090iA01p00447.

  10. Human developmental anatomy: microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) of four human embryos (from Carnegie Stage 10 to 20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuaire, Martin; Martinez, Agathe; Kaplan, Hervé; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Renard, Yohann; Tonnelet, Romain; Braun, Marc; Avisse, Claude; Labrousse, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Technological advances in the field of biological imaging now allow multi-modal studies of human embryo anatomy. The aim of this study was to assess the high magnetic field μMRI feasibility in the study of small human embryos (less than 21mm crown-rump) as a new tool for the study of human descriptive embryology and to determine better sequence characteristics to obtain higher spatial resolution and higher signal/noise ratio. Morphological study of four human embryos belonging to the historical collection of the Department of Anatomy in the Faculty of Medicine of Reims was undertaken by μMRI. These embryos had, successively, crown-rump lengths of 3mm (Carnegie Stage, CS 10), 12mm (CS 16), 17mm (CS 18) and 21mm (CS 20). Acquisition of images was performed using a vertical nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a Bruker Avance III, 500MHz, 11.7T equipped for imaging. All images were acquired using 2D (transverse, sagittal and coronal) and 3D sequences, either T1-weighted or T2-weighted. Spatial resolution between 24 and 70μm/pixel allowed clear visualization of all anatomical structures of the embryos. The study of human embryos μMRI has already been reported in the literature and a few atlases exist for educational purposes. However, to our knowledge, descriptive or morphological studies of human developmental anatomy based on data collected these few μMRI studies of human embryos are rare. This morphological noninvasive imaging method coupled with other techniques already reported seems to offer new perspectives to descriptive studies of human embryology.

  11. In Vivo1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Lactate in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Koong, Albert; Lieskovsky, Yee Yie; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Graves, Edward; Pinto, Harlan; Brown, J. Martin; Spielman, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate in vivo 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging of lactate for assessing tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers and to determine its utility in predicting the response and outcomes. Methods and Materials: Volume-localized lactate-edited 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was performed in vivo on involved neck nodes and control subcutaneous tissues in 36 patients with Stage IV head and neck cancer. The signal intensities (SIs) of lactate, choline, and creatine and the choline/creatine ratio were measured. The tumor partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) was obtained in the same lymph node before MRS. Patients were treated with either two cycles of induction chemotherapy (tirapazamine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) followed by simultaneous chemoradiotherapy or the same regimen without tirapazamine. The lactate SI and the choline/creatine ratio correlated with the tumor pO 2 , nodal response, and locoregional control. Results: The lactate SI was greater for the involved nodes (median, 0.25) than for the subcutaneous tissue (median, 0.04; p = 0.07). No significant correlation was found between the lactate SI and tumor pO 2 (mean, 0.46 ± 0.10 for hypoxic nodes [pO 2 ≤10 mm Hg, n = 15] vs. 0.36 ± 0.07 for nonhypoxic nodes [pO 2 >10 mm Hg, n = 21], p = 0.44). A significant correlation was found between the choline/creatine ratios and tumor pO 2 (mean, 2.74 ± 0.34 for hypoxic nodes vs. 1.78 ± 0.31 for nonhypoxic nodes, p = 0.02). No correlation was found between the lactate SI and the complete nodal response (p = 0.52) or locoregional control rates. Conclusions: The lactate SI did not correlate with tumor pO 2 , treatment response, or locoregional control. Additional research is needed to refine this technique

  12. Concept of a staged FEL enabled by fast synchrotron radiation cooling of laser-plasma accelerated beam by solenoidal magnetic fields in plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei; Lesz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal fields in a laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper, we present an outline of what a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like, and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  13. Two-stage preparation of magnetic sorbent based on exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases for sorption of oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Julia A.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Maksimova, Natalia V.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Vasiliev, Alexander V.; Malakho, Artem P.; Avdeev, Victor V.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the macropore structure and the hydrophobic properties, exfoliated graphite (EG) is considered as a perspective sorbent for oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface. However, there is the problem of EG collection from the water surface. One of the solutions is the modification of EG by a magnetic compound and the collection of EG with sorbed oil using the magnetic field. In this work, the method of the two-stage preparation of exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases is proposed. This method includes the impregnation of expandable graphite in the mixed solution of iron (III) chloride and cobalt (II) or nickel (II) nitrate in the first stage and the thermal exfoliation of impregnated expandable graphite with the formation of exfoliated graphite containing cobalt and nickel ferrites in the second stage. Such two-stage method makes it possible to obtain the sorbent based on EG modified by ferrimagnetic phases with high sorption capacity toward oil (up to 45-51 g/g) and high saturation magnetization (up to 42 emu/g). On the other hand, this method allows to produce the magnetic sorbent in a short period of time (up to 10 s) during which the thermal exfoliation is carried out in the air atmosphere.

  14. Research cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in end stage renal disease - incidence, significance and implications of unexpected incidental findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Elaine; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Houston, J.G.; Struthers, Allan D. [Ninewells Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Medicine, Dundee (United Kingdom); Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.; Mark, Patrick B. [Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Roditi, Giles [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Radiology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) at cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a frequent end point in clinical trials in nephrology. Trial participants with end stage renal disease (ESRD) may have a greater frequency of incidental findings (IF). We retrospectively investigated prevalence of IF in previous research CMR and reviewed their subsequent impact on participants. Between 2002 and 2006, 161 ESRD patients underwent CMR in a transplant assessment study. Images were used to assess LV mass and function. In the current study a radiologist reviewed the scans for IF. Review of patient records determined the subsequent clinical significance of IF. There were 150 IF in 95 study participants. Eighty-four (56 %) were new diagnoses. One hundred and two were non-cardiac. Fifteen were suspicious of malignancy. There was a clinically significant IF for 14.9 % of the participants. In six cases earlier identification of an IF may have improved quality of life or survival. Without radiology support clinically important IF may be missed on CMR. Patients undergoing CMR in trials should be counselled about the frequency and implications of IF. Patients with ESRD have a higher prevalence of IF than reported in other populations. Nephrology studies require mechanisms for radiologist reporting and strategies for dealing with IF. (orig.)

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals two functionally distinct stages of motor cortex involvement during perception of emotional body language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Studies indicate that perceiving emotional body language recruits fronto-parietal regions involved in action execution. However, the nature of such motor activation is unclear. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) we provide correlational and causative evidence of two distinct stages of motor cortex engagement during emotion perception. Participants observed pictures of body expressions and categorized them as happy, fearful or neutral while receiving TMS over the left or right motor cortex at 150 and 300 ms after picture onset. In the early phase (150 ms), we observed a reduction of excitability for happy and fearful emotional bodies that was specific to the right hemisphere and correlated with participants' disposition to feel personal distress. This 'orienting' inhibitory response to emotional bodies was also paralleled by a general drop in categorization accuracy when stimulating the right but not the left motor cortex. Conversely, at 300 ms, greater excitability for negative, positive and neutral movements was found in both hemispheres. This later motor facilitation marginally correlated with participants' tendency to assume the psychological perspectives of others and reflected simulation of the movement implied in the neutral and emotional body expressions. These findings highlight the motor system's involvement during perception of emotional bodies. They suggest that fast orienting reactions to emotional cues--reflecting neural processing necessary for visual perception--occur before motor features of the observed emotional expression are simulated in the motor system and that distinct empathic dispositions influence these two neural motor phenomena. Implications for theories of embodied simulation are discussed.

  16. The association between histological, macroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging assessed synovitis in end-stage knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, R G C; Gudbergsen, H; Simonsen, O

    2017-01-01

    the DCE-MRI variable MExNvoxel (surrogate of the volume and degree of synovitis) and the macroscopic score showed correlations above the pre-specified threshold for acceptance with histological inflammation. The maximum R2-value obtained in Model 1 was R2 = 0.39. In Model 2, where the CE......-MRI-variables were added, the highest R2 = 0.52. In Model 3, a four-variable model consisting of the gender, one CE-MRI and two DCE-MRI-variables yielded a R2 = 0.71. CONCLUSION: DCE-MRI is correlated with histological synovitis in end-stage KOA and the combination of CE and DCE-MRI may be a useful, non......-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI prior to (TKR) and correlated with microscopic and macroscopic assessments of synovitis obtained intraoperatively. Multiple bivariate correlations were used with a pre-specified threshold of 0.70 for significance. Also, multiple...

  17. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  18. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative staging of rectal adenocarcinoma: Experience from a regional Australian cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rohen; Ung, Kim Ann; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal treatment pathway in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma relies on accurate locoregional staging. This study aims to assess the accuracy of staging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in particular, its accuracy in differentiating patients with early stage disease from those with more advanced disease who benefit from a different treatment approach. Patients who were staged with MRI and received surgery as the first line of treatment for biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified. Comparison was made between the clinical stage on MRI and the pathological stage of the surgical specimen. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of MRI was assessed. In all, 58 eligible patients were identified. In 31% of patients, the extent of disease was underrepresented on preoperative MRI. Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of anorectal MRI in detecting stage II/III disease status in this cohort was 59, 71 and 62%, respectively. MRI underestimated the pathological stage in many patients in this series who may have benefited from the addition of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to their management. This study supports further refinement of preoperative staging and demonstrates that impressive results from highly controlled settings may be difficult to reproduce in community practice. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Mapping the extent of disease by multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and sentinel node evaluation in stage I and II cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaram S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: (1 To map the extent of disease in women with stage I and II carcinoma cervix by multislice spiral computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sentinel nodes. (2 To assess accuracy of each modality individually and in conjunction with FIGO clinical staging. Design and Setting: Prospective, single-blind study. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radiodiagnosis, and Pathology, UCMS and GTBH and Division of Radiological Imaging and Bioinformatics, INMAS, Delhi. Material and Method: The study was conducted on 25 women with cervical cancer FIGO stage I and II. Each woman underwent clinical staging, multislice spiral CT and MRI which was compared to the gold-standard histopathology/cytology. The overall accuracy of each modality and improvement of clinical staging by CT/MRI were noted. Sentinel nodes were evaluated by intracervical Patent Blue V dye injection. Statistical Analysis: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated by 2Χ2 contingency tables. Results: The accuracy of staging by FIGO, CT and MRI was 68%, 52% and 80%, respectively. MRI and CT improved the overall accuracy of FIGO staging to 96% and 80%, respectively. Sentinel nodes were identified in 89% of patients with 91% accuracy. Conclusion: MRI emerges as the most valuable stand-alone modality improving accuracy of FIGO staging to 96%. Sentinel lymph-node evaluation appears promising in evaluating spread beyond cervix.

  20. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient’s quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist’s role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients’ life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  1. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-07-22

    High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient's quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist's role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients' life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer.

  2. Classification and localization of early-stage Alzheimer's disease in magnetic resonance images using a patch-based classifier ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, Rita; Slump, Cornelis H.; Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie van

    2014-01-01

    Classification methods have been proposed to detect Alzheimer's disease (AD) using magnetic resonance images. Most rely on features such as the shape/volume of brain structures that need to be defined a priori. In this work, we propose a method that does not require either the segmentation of specific brain regions or the nonlinear alignment to a template. Besides classification, we also analyze which brain regions are discriminative between a group of normal controls and a group of AD patients. We perform 3D texture analysis using Local Binary Patterns computed at local image patches in the whole brain, combined in a classifier ensemble. We evaluate our method in a publicly available database including very mild-to-mild AD subjects and healthy elderly controls. For the subject cohort including only mild AD subjects, the best results are obtained using a combination of large (30 x 30 x 30 and 40 x 40 x 40 voxels) patches. A spatial analysis on the best performing patches shows that these are located in the medial-temporal lobe and in the periventricular regions. When very mild AD subjects are included in the dataset, the small (10 x 10 x 10 voxels) patches perform best, with the most discriminative ones being located near the left hippocampus. We show that our method is able not only to perform accurate classification, but also to localize discriminative brain regions, which are in accordance with the medical literature. This is achieved without the need to segment-specific brain structures and without performing nonlinear registration to a template, indicating that the method may be suitable for a clinical implementation that can help to diagnose AD at an earlier stage.

  3. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  4. Comparison of Pelvic Phased-Array versus Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla for Local Staging of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Materials and Methods Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radi...

  5. Contrast-enhanced dynamic and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T to assess early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Liangping; Liu, Ying

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to assess early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3.0 T. A total of 44 patients newly diagnosed with NPC were included in the present study. All patients underwent MR examination at 3.0 T using DCE-MRI and DWI. The volume transfer constant ( K trans ), flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma ( K ep ), the volume of extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue ( V e ) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tumours were investigated. Furthermore, the correlation between clinical stages and ADC value and K trans were analysed. The diagnostic accuracy of K trans and ADC were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curves. NPC stage correlated positively with K trans and negatively with ADC values. Additionally, tumour K trans negatively correlated with ADC value. The sensitivity and accuracy of combined K trans and ADC in distinguishing between stage II and stage III and stage III and IV were higher than the values of either measurement used separately. The present study suggested that K trans and ADC derived from DCE-MRI and DWI may be useful to detect stage early NPC accurately. K trans and ADC in combination were superior than either alone.

  6. Dynamics of Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Transverse Background Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue

    2017-10-01

    A coaxial magnetized plasma gun has been utilized to launch both plasma jets (open B-field) and plasma bubbles (closed B-field) into a transverse background magnetic field in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) linear device at the University of New Mexico. These situations may have bearing on fusion plasmas (e.g. plasma injection for tokamak fueling, ELM pacing, or disruption mitigation) and astrophysical settings (e.g. astrophysical jet stability, coronal mass ejections, etc.). The magnetic Reynolds number of the gun plasma is 100 , so that magnetic advection dominates over magnetic diffusion. The gun plasma ram pressure, ρjetVjet2 >B02 / 2μ0 , the background magnetic pressure, so that the jet or bubble can easily penetrate the background B-field, B0. When the gun axial B-field is weak compared to the gun azimuthal field, a current-driven jet is formed with a global helical magnetic configuration. Applying the transverse background magnetic field, it is observed that the n = 1 kink mode is stabilized, while magnetic probe measurements show contrarily that the safety factor q(a) drops below unity. At the same time, a sheared axial jet velocity is measured. We conclude that the tension force arising from increasing curvature of the background magnetic field induces the measured sheared flow gradient above the theoretical kink-stabilization threshold, resulting in the emergent kink stabilization of the injected plasma jet. In the case of injected bubbles, spheromak-like plasma formation is verified. However, when the spheromak plasma propagates into the transverse background magnetic field, the typical self-closed global symmetry magnetic configuration does not hold any more. In the region where the bubble toroidal field opposed the background B-field, the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability has been observed. Details of the experiment setup, diagnostics, experimental results and theoretical analysis will be presented. Supported by the National Science Foundation

  7. Laser light and magnetic field stimulation effect on biochemical, enzymes activities and chlorophyll contents in soybean seeds and seedlings during early growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Tehseen; Jamil, Yasir; Iqbal, Munawar; Zia-Ul-Haq; Abbas, Mazhar

    2016-12-01

    Laser and magnetic field bio-stimulation attracted the keen interest of scientific community in view of their potential to enhance seed germination, seedling growth, physiological, biochemical and yield attributes of plants, cereal crops and vegetables. Present study was conducted to appraise the laser and magnetic field pre-sowing seed treatment effects on soybean sugar, protein, nitrogen, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) ascorbic acid (AsA), proline, phenolic and malondialdehyde (MDA) along with chlorophyll contents (Chl "a" "b" and total chlorophyll contents). Specific activities of enzymes such as protease (PRT), amylase (AMY), catalyst (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxides (POD) were also assayed. The specific activity of enzymes (during germination and early growth), biochemical and chlorophyll contents were enhanced significantly under the effect of both laser and magnetic pre-sowing treatments. Magnetic field treatment effect was slightly higher than laser treatment except PRT, AMY and ascorbic acid contents. However, both treatments (laser and magnetic field) effects were significantly higher versus control (un-treated seeds). Results revealed that laser and magnetic field pre-sowing seed treatments have potential to enhance soybean biological moieties, chlorophyll contents and metabolically important enzymes (degrade stored food and scavenge reactive oxygen species). Future study should be focused on growth characteristics at later stages and yield attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Corticospinal tract damage in patients with severe diffuse axonal injury in a chronic stage on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and motor evoked potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasokawa, Yu-to; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Iwama, Toru; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the disturbed motor function of the corticospinal tract (CST) of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and motor evoked potential (MEP) examination, and to analyze these comparatively. Forty-three patients (86 sides of the CST) with severe DAI in a chronic stage underwent DTMR imaging and MEP examination using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Fractional anisotrophy (FA) values of 6 regions of interests (ROIs) in the CST were measured on FA map obtained from DTMR imaging. The lowest FA value among the FA values of the 6 ROIs in each of the CSTs was defined as the minimum FA value. And the lowest magnetic stimulation strength that could derive MEP was defined as the minimum threshold of MEP. The mean minimum FA value of the CSTs in which MEP could not be obtained even by the maximum strength of magnetic stimulation (the MEP (-) group) was significantly lower than that of the CSTs in which MEP could be obtained (the MEP (+) group). In the MEP (+) group, the minimum FA value decreased with the increase of the minimum threshold of MEP with a significant correlation. These results demonstrate that physiological motor dysfunction disclosed on MEP is significantly correlated with morphological damage of the CST observed on DTMR imaging in patients with DAI in a chronic stage. DTMR imaging is strongly suggested to be helpful to evaluate disturbed motor function and to infer its severity in DAI. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and histologic findings of acute and subacute stage of experimental cerebral fat embolism in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong; Rark, Byung Rae; Kim, Sang Sik; Kim, Yong Woo

    2002-01-01

    To determine the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and natural history of cerebral fat embolism in a cat model, and to correlate the MRI and histologic findings. Using the femoral arterial approach, the internal carotid artery of 11 cats was injected with 0.1 ml of triolein, T2-weighted (T2WI), T1-weighted (T1WI) and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted (Gd-T1WI) images were obtained serially at 2 hours, 1 and 4 days and 1,2 and 3 weeks after embolization. Any abnormal signal intensity (SI) was evaluated. After MR imaging at 3 weeks, brain tissue was obtained for light microscopic (LM) examination using hematoxylin-eosin and Luxol fast blue staining, and for electron microscopic (EM) examination. The histologic and MRI findings were correlated. At 2 hours, lesions showed high SI at T2WI, iso-or low SI at T1WI, and strong enhancement at Gd-T1WI. The high SI seen at T2WI decreased thereafter, and most lesions became iso-intense. At week 3, however, small focal areas of high SI were seen in the grey matter of eight cats and in the white matter of three. The low SI noted at acute-stage T1WI subsequently became normal, though in the areas in which T2WI had depicted high SI, focal areas of low SI remained. Lesion enhancement demonstrated by Gd-T1WI decreased continuously from day 1, and at week 3, weak enhancement was seen at the margin of the remained hypointense lesions in the gray matter in five cats. At LM examination with hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed normal histologic findings in the greater park of an embolized lesion. Cystic change was observed in the gray matter of eight cats, and in the gray and white matter of three of the eight. At LM examination, Luxol fast blue, staining demonstrated demyelination around the cystic change occurring in the matter, and EM examination of the embolized cortex revealed sporadic intracapillary fat vacuoles (n=11) and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (n=4). Most lesions were normal, however, and perivascular interstitial

  10. Experiments on helical modes in magnetized thin foil-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, David

    2017-10-01

    This paper gives an in-depth experimental study of helical features on magnetized, ultrathin foil-plasmas driven by the 1-MA linear transformer driver at University of Michigan. Three types of cylindrical liner loads were designed to produce: (a) pure magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes (defined as being void of the acceleration-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability, MRT) using a non-imploding geometry, (b) pure kink modes using a non-imploding, kink-seeded geometry, and (c) MRT-MHD coupled modes in an unseeded, imploding geometry. For each configuration, we applied relatively small axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2-2.0 T (compared to peak azimuthal fields of 30-40 T). The resulting liner-plasmas and instabilities were imaged using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission on a fast framing camera. The azimuthal mode number was carefully identified with a tracking algorithm of self-emission minima. Our experiments show that the helical structures are a manifestation of discrete eigenmodes. The pitch angle of the helix is simply m / kR , from implosion to explosion, where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Thus, the pitch angle increases (decreases) during implosion (explosion) as R becomes smaller (larger). We found that there are one, or at most two, discrete helical modes that arise for magnetized liners, with no apparent threshold on the applied Bz for the appearance of helical modes; increasing the axial magnetic field from zero to 0.5 T changes the relative weight between the m = 0 and m = 1 modes. Further increasing the applied axial magnetic fields yield higher m modes. Finally, the seeded kink instability overwhelms the intrinsic instability modes of the plasma. These results are corroborated with our analytic theory on the effects of radial acceleration on the classical sausage, kink, and higher m modes. Work supported by US DOE award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories

  11. Preoperative lymph-node staging of invasive urothelial bladder cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Holt, Per; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The treatment and prognosis of bladder cancer are based on the depth of primary tumour invasion and the presence of metastases. A highly accurate preoperative tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) staging is critical to proper patient management and treatment. This study retrospectively...... investigated the value of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative N staging of bladder cancer. Material and methods. From June 2006 to January 2008, 48 consecutive patients diagnosed with bladder......) for MRI and ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT, respectively. The differences in specificity and negative predictive values were not statistically significant. Conclusions. No significant statistical difference between ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for preoperative N staging of urothelial bladder cancer was found in the study...

  12. A two-stage evolution of Visakhapatnam-Paradip Shelf, east coast of India, from magnetic studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Rao, T.C.S.; Rao, M.M.M.; Lakshminarayana, S.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    A detailed analysis of bathymetry and magnetic data of Visakhapatnam-Paradip shelf, east coast of India revealed three major structural lineaments over the shelf/slope of the area. Models derived from the anomalies associated with the trends...

  13. Comparison of pelvic phased-array versus endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radical prostatectomy. All patients were evaluated with either pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil prostate MRI prior to surgery (63 endorectal coils and 88 pelvic phased-array coils). Tumor stage based on MRI was compared with pathologic stage. We calculated the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each group in the evaluation of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Both endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI achieved high specificity, low sensitivity and moderate accuracy for the detection of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. There were statistically no differences in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between the two groups. Overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI.

  14. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  15. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetically Choked Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Blandford, Roger D.

    2012-04-26

    Black hole (BH) accretion flows and jets are qualitatively affected by the presence of ordered magnetic fields. We study fully three-dimensional global general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of radially extended and thick (height H to cylindrical radius R ratio of |H/R| {approx} 0.2-1) accretion flows around BHs with various dimensionless spins (a/M, with BH mass M) and with initially toroidally-dominated ({phi}-directed) and poloidally-dominated (R-z directed) magnetic fields. Firstly, for toroidal field models and BHs with high enough |a/M|, coherent large-scale (i.e. >> H) dipolar poloidal magnetic flux patches emerge, thread the BH, and generate transient relativistic jets. Secondly, for poloidal field models, poloidal magnetic flux readily accretes through the disk from large radii and builds-up to a natural saturation point near the BH. While models with |H/R| {approx} 1 and |a/M| {le} 0.5 do not launch jets due to quenching by mass infall, for sufficiently high |a/M| or low |H/R| the polar magnetic field compresses the inflow into a geometrically thin highly non-axisymmetric 'magnetically choked accretion flow' (MCAF) within which the standard linear magneto-rotational instability is suppressed. The condition of a highly-magnetized state over most of the horizon is optimal for the Blandford-Znajek mechanism that generates persistent relativistic jets with and 100% efficiency for |a/M| {approx}> 0.9. A magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetospheric interface forms between the compressed inflow and bulging jet magnetosphere, which drives a new jet-disk oscillation (JDO) type of quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) mechanism. The high-frequency QPO has spherical harmonic |m| = 1 mode period of {tau} {approx} 70GM/c{sup 3} for a/M {approx} 0.9 with coherence quality factors Q {approx}> 10. Overall, our models are qualitatively distinct from most prior MHD simulations (typically, |H/R| << 1 and poloidal flux is

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  17. Health economics evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of prostate cancer for Austria and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, A.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen; Bernt, R.; Salomonowitz, E.; Plas, E.; Strunk, G.; Eberhardt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was the health economics analysis of MR imaging in the preoperative staging of patients with prostate carcinoma (PCa). Materials and Methods: The health economics analysis consisted of the following steps: modeling, determination of probabilities and parameters based on a detailed literature search, evaluation using the averages of the parameters, and sensitivity analyses of the results over the ranges of values. We performed a cost-utility analysis from health insurance's perspective for Austria and Germany. The population under investigation included patients with confirmed PCa. The alternative was a decision for therapy with or without staging using MR imaging. A localized PCa was treated by prostatectomy and locally advanced PCa by radiation/hormone therapy. The result parameters were quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs per patient. Results: The evaluation showed that MR imaging is useful regarding costs and utilities prior to radical prostatectomy which is expensive and may be associated with serious clinical consequences. The costs per patient were lower by Euro 2635 and the utilities were higher by 0.099 QALYs. The strategy without MR imaging for staging was dominated by the strategy using MR imaging for staging in the evaluation using the base values and in almost all sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: For the parameters used and almost all scenarios of the sensitivity analysis, our decision-analytic model revealed a higher cost-utility ratio for the strategy using MR imaging for the staging of PCa. (orig.)

  18. Unravelling Orbital Climatic Cycles from Devonian Magnetic Susceptibility Signal - The Quest for a Better Age Model for the Lochkovian and Pragian Stages (Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, A. C.; Chadimova, L.; Hladil, J.; Slavik, L.; Hilgen, F. J.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The uncertainties on the Devonian stage boundaries are currently in the order of several millions of years. When shown to reflect a detrital signal, which is influenced by climatic variations, Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) has been proven as a useful tool for identifying climatic cycles; which can subsequently be used to improve the time scale. Here, we focus on two sections from the Prague Synform (Czech Republic) cutting through the Lochkovian, Pragian and the lower part of the Emsian. Sedimentation is rhythmic, dominated by slightly clayey offshore limestones, being mostly calciturbidites and hemipelagites. We provide hysteresis analysis in order to get insight into the nature and the origin of the magnetic minerals driving the variation in the MS signal. The results point to a MS signal mostly carried by clay minerals. Subsequently, to improve estimation of the duration of the stages, we apply different spectral analysis techniques on this MS signal. From the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT), Evolutive Harmonic Analysis (EHA) and field observations, we subdivide the section into portions with a steady sedimentation rate (a first estimate of this rate is also delivered by these analyzes). Then, we apply Multitaper Method (MTM) and Multitaper harmonic Analysis (F-test) and extract the frequencies reaching 95% Confidence Level. These frequencies are then implemented into the Average Spectral Misfit procedures (ASM) which enables comparison with orbital targets. By combining these different techniques, 405 kyr cyclicty is identifed, a powerful duration paleochronometer. These new results indicate a duration of 7.7 ± 2 Myr for the Lochkovian stage and of 1.7 Myr ± 1.4 for the Pragian stage (compared to respectively 8.4 ± 6 Myr and 3.2 ± 5.4 Myr in the 2012 Geological Time Scale).

  19. Disparities in staging prostate magnetic resonance imaging utilization for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayobami Ajayi, BA

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: In this urban, academic center cohort, older patients across all risk groups and black or nonprivate insurance patients in the low risk group were less likely to undergo staging prostate MRI scans. Further research should investigate these differences to ensure equitable utilization across all demographic groups considering the burden of prostate cancer disparities.

  20. ''SMILE'': A Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission LinE adder for the 8-stage RADLAC II accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Frost, C.A.; Turman, B.N.; Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.; Pankuch, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The RADLAC II Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission LinE ''SMILE'' is a coaxial wave guide structure that is composed of two regions: (a) a 9.5-m voltage adder and (b) a 3-m long extension section. The adder section provides for the addition of the input voltages from the individual water-dielectric pulse forming line feeds. The extension section isolates the adder from the magnetically immersed foilless diode electron source load and efficiently transports the pulsed power out from the deionized water tank of the device. The SMILE modification of the RADLAC II accelerator enabled us to produce high quality beams of up to 14 MV, 100 kA. The design and the experimental evaluation of SMILE will be presented and compared with numerical simulation predictions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  4. Bone marrow abnormality associated with painful osteoarthritis of the knee. A cross-sectional study of magnetic resonance imaging findings with the radiographic stage and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Mitsuaki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Takazawa, Yuji; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kim, Song-Gon; Seto, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow abnormalities (BMAs) are frequently found in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Some reports have suggested BMA was correlated with the X-ray stage of OA and also with knee pain, but the reports depended on two-dimensional images without considering the spatial expansion of BMAs. To determine whether three-dimensional expansion of a BMA with MRI in patient with medial-type OA of the knee is correlated with the radiographic stage of OA and clinical findings using a semi-quantitative method. Cross-sectional study. This study enrolled 238 patients with medial-type OA. Radiography and MRI of the knee were taken in all participants. X-rays were graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) grade (1-4). T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI images were used to score the size of the BMA according to the whole-organ MRI score (WORMS). A new scoring system defined as the spatial BMA score (s-score), which specifically addressed the spatial expansion of BMAs, was examined to assess the size of the BMA. BMA frequency was examined in subdivisions of the articular surfaces of the knee according to the X-ray stages of the K/L grade and the correlation of the s-score to the clinical findings. BMA frequency in the medial femorotibial joint (MFTJ; 74%) was significantly higher than in the lateral femorotibial joint (LFTJ; 14%) and patellofemoral joint (PFJ; 14%; P<0.01). The s-score of the MFTJ was strongly correlated with the X-ray stage assessed by the K/L grade. The s-score of the MFTJ was also correlated with the clinical findings. The frequency and spatial expansion of BMAs in the MFTJ are strongly correlated with the X-ray stage of medial-type OA as well as the clinical findings. (author)

  5. Eyes in the sky. Interactions between asymptotic giant branch star winds and the interstellar magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, A. J.; Cox, N. L. J.; Decin, L.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The extended circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of evolved low-mass stars display a large variety of morphologies. Understanding the various mechanisms that give rise to these extended structures is important to trace their mass-loss history. Aims: Here, we aim to examine the role of the interstellar magnetic field in shaping the extended morphologies of slow dusty winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in an effort to pin-point the origin of so-called eye shaped CSEs of three carbon-rich AGB stars. In addition, we seek to understand if this pre-planetary nebula (PN) shaping can be responsible for asymmetries observed in PNe. Methods: Hydrodynamical simulations are used to study the effect of typical interstellar magnetic fields on the free-expanding spherical stellar winds as they sweep up the local interstellar medium (ISM). Results: The simulations show that typical Galactic interstellar magnetic fields of 5 to 10 μG are sufficient to alter the spherical expanding shells of AGB stars to appear as the characteristic eye shape revealed by far-infrared observations. The typical sizes of the simulated eyes are in accordance with the observed physical sizes. However, the eye shapes are transient in nature. Depending on the stellar and interstellar conditions, they develop after 20 000 to 200 000 yrs and last for about 50 000 to 500 000 yrs, assuming that the star is at rest relative to the local interstellar medium. Once formed, the eye shape develops lateral outflows parallel to the magnetic field. The explosion of a PN in the centre of the eye-shaped dust shell gives rise to an asymmetrical nebula with prominent inward pointing Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Conclusions: Interstellar magnetic fields can clearly affect the shaping of wind-ISM interaction shells. The occurrence of the eyes is most strongly influenced by stellar space motion and ISM density. Observability of this transient phase is favoured for lines-of-sight perpendicular to the

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  10. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  12. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F; Bluemm, R G; Beyer, H K

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  13. Regional lymph node staging using lymphotropic nanoparticle enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with ferumoxtran-10 in patients with penile cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Shahin; Harisinghani, Mukesh; McDougal, W Scott

    2005-09-01

    We evaluated lymphotropic nanoparticle enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LNMRI) with ferumoxtran-10 in determining the presence of regional lymph node metastases in patients with penile cancer. Seven patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis underwent LNMRI. All patients subsequently underwent groin dissection and the nodal images were correlated with histology. We found that LNMRI had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, 97%, 81.2% and 100%, respectively, in predicting the presence of regional lymph node metastases in patients with penile cancer. Lymph node scanning using LNMRI accurately predicts the pathological status of regional lymph nodes in patients with cancer of the penis. LNMRI may accurately triage patients for regional lymphadenectomy.

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  18. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Sik; Yu, Mi Hye; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Eun Sun; Sohn, Ji Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Boon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung [Dept. of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-01-01

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT

  1. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Predicting Myometrial Invasion, Lymphovascular Space Invasion, and Tumor Grade: Is It Valuable in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage I Endometrial Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hilal; Sarioglu, Fatma Ceren; Bagci, Mustafa; Karadeniz, Tugba; Uluer, Hatice; Sanci, Muzaffer

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to evaluate the relationship between maximum tumor size, tumor volume, tumor volume ratio (TVR) based on preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry, and negative histological prognostic parameters (deep myometrial invasion [MI], lymphovascular space invasion, tumor histological grade, and subtype) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer. Preoperative pelvic MR imaging studies of 68 women with surgical-pathologic diagnosis of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer were reviewed for assessment of MR volumetry and qualitative assessment of MI. Volume of the tumor and uterus was measured with manual tracing of each section on sagittal T2-weighted images. Tumor volume ratio was calculated according to the following formula: TVR = (total tumor volume/total uterine volume) × 100. Receiver operating characteristics curve was performed to investigate a threshold for TVR associated with MI. The Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and linear regression analysis were applied to evaluate possible differences between tumor size, tumor volume, TVR, and negative prognostic parameters. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis of TVR for prediction of deep MI was statistically significant (P = 0.013). An optimal TVR threshold of 7.3% predicted deep myometrial invasion with 85.7% sensitivity, 46.8% specificity, 41.9% positive predictive value, and 88.0% negative predictive value. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses of TVR, tumor size, and tumor volume for prediction of tumor histological grade or lymphovascular space invasion were not significant. The concordance between radiologic and pathologic assessment for MI was almost excellent (κ value, 0.799; P volumetry, seems to predict deep MI independently in stage I endometrial cancer with insufficient sensitivity and specificity. Its value in clinical practice for

  2. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang C

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caiyuan Zhang,1,* Huanhuan Liu,1,* Yanfen Cui,1,* Xiaoming Li,1 Zhongyang Zhang,1 Yong Zhang,2 Dengbin Wang1 1Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2MR Advanced Application and Research Center, GE Healthcare China, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO specifically targeting integrin αvβ3.Materials and methods: All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10 received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2* pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation.Results: Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cell types expressing integrin αvβ3 during liver fibrogenesis. The protein level of integrin αv and β3 subunit expressed on activated HSCs was upregulated and correlated well with the progression of liver fibrosis (r=0.954, P<0.001; r=0.931, P<0.001, respectively. After injection of RGD-USPIO, there is significant difference in ΔR2* among rats treated with 0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks of CCl4 (P<0.001. The accumulation of iron particles in fibrotic liver specimen is

  3. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  6. Stages of Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ultrasound monitor . The picture can be printed to be looked at later. MRI (magnetic resonance ... procedures may be used in the staging process: Bone scan : A procedure to check if there are ...

  7. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  11. Range shortening, radiation transport, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena in ion-beam-driven inertial-fusion-reactor-size targets: Implosion, ignition, and burn phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the theory of the energy deposition of ions in cold materials and hot dense plasmas together with numerical calculations for heavy and light ions of interest to ion-beam fusion. We have used the gorgon computer code of Long, Moritz, and Tahir (which is an extension of the code originally written for protons by Nardi, Peleg, and Zinamon) to carry out these calculations. The energy-deposition data calculated in this manner has been used in the design of heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion targets suitable for a reactor, by its inclusion in the medusa code of Christiansen, Ashby, and Roberts as extended by Tahir and Long. A number of other improvements have been made in this code and these are also discussed. Various aspects of the theoretical analysis of such targets are discussed including the calculation of the hydrodynamic stability, the hydrodynamic efficiency, and the gain. Various different target designs have been used, some of them new. In general these targets are driven by Bi + ions of energy 8--12 GeV, with an input energy of 4--6.5 MJ, with output energies in the range 600--900 MJ, and with gains in the range 120--180. The peak powers are in the range of 500--750 TW. We present detailed calculations of the ablation, compression, ignition, and burn phases. By the application of a new stability analysis which includes ablation and density-gradient effects we show that these targets appear to implode in a stable manner. Thus the targets designed offer working examples suited for use in a future inertial-confinement fusion reactor

  12. Staging Hemodynamic Failure With Blood Oxygen-Level-Dependent Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cerebrovascular Reactivity: A Comparison Versus Gold Standard (15O-)H2O-Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstra, Jorn; van Niftrik, Christiaan; Warnock, Geoffrey; Wegener, Susanne; Piccirelli, Marco; Pangalu, Athina; Esposito, Giuseppe; Valavanis, Antonios; Buck, Alfred; Luft, Andreas; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca

    2018-03-01

    Increased stroke risk correlates with hemodynamic failure, which can be assessed with ( 15 O-)H 2 O positron emission tomography (PET) cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements. This gold standard technique, however, is not established for routine clinical imaging. Standardized blood oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging+CO 2 is a noninvasive and potentially widely applicable tool to assess whole-brain quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR). We examined the agreement between the 2 imaging modalities and hypothesized that quantitative CVR can be a surrogate imaging marker to assess hemodynamic failure. Nineteen data sets of subjects with chronic cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease (age, 60±11 years; 4 women) and unilaterally impaired perfusion reserve on Diamox-challenged ( 15 O-)H 2 O PET were studied and compared with a standardized BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging+CO 2 examination within 6 weeks (8±19 days). Agreement between quantitative CBF- and CVR-based perfusion reserve was assessed. Hemodynamic failure was staged according to PET findings: stage 0: normal CBF, normal perfusion reserve; stage I: normal CBF, decreased perfusion reserve; and stage II: decreased CBF, decreased perfusion reserve. The BOLD CVR data set of the same subjects was then matched to the corresponding stage of hemodynamic failure. PET-based stage I versus stage II could also be clearly separated with BOLD CVR measurements (CVR for stage I 0.11 versus CVR for stage II -0.03; P the affected hemisphere and middle cerebral artery territory ( P the affected hemisphere and middle cerebral artery territory and for identifying hemodynamic failure stage II. BOLD CVR may, therefore, be considered for prospective studies assessing stroke risk in patients with chronic cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease, in particular because it can potentially be implemented in routine clinical imaging. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyoung Geun [Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Division of Biotechnology, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Hee Jung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Anyang (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  14. Morphology and morphometry of fetal liver at 16-26 weeks of gestation by magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison with embryonic liver at Carnegie stage 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamabe, Yui; Hirose, Ayumi; Yamada, Shigehito; Uwabe, Chigako; Okada, Tomohisa; Togashi, Kaori; Kose, Katsumi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    Normal liver growth was described morphologically and morphometrically using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of human fetuses, and compared with embryonic liver to establish a normal reference chart for clinical use. MRI images from 21 fetuses at 16-26 weeks of gestation and eight embryos at Carnegie stage (CS)23 were investigated in the present study. Using the image data, the morphology of the liver as well as its adjacent organs was extracted and reconstructed three-dimensionally. Morphometry of fetal liver growth was performed using simple regression analysis. The fundamental morphology was similar in all cases of the fetal livers examined. The liver tended to grow along the transversal axis. The four lobes were clearly recognizable in the fetal liver but not in the embryonic liver. The length of the liver along the three axes, liver volume and four lobes correlated with the bodyweight (BW). The morphogenesis of the fetal liver on the dorsal and caudal sides was affected by the growth of the abdominal organs, such as the stomach, duodenum and spleen, and retroperitoneal organs, such as the right adrenal gland and right kidney. The main blood vessels such as inferior vena cava, portal vein and umbilical vein made a groove on the surface of the liver. Morphology of the fetal liver was different from that of the embryonic liver at CS23. The present data will be useful for evaluating the development of the fetal liver and the adjacent organs that affect its morphology. © 2012 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  15. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma: comparison of different sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, Daniel; Oliveira, Heverton Cesar de

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to compare the performance of the T1, T2, STIR and DWIBS (diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression) sequences in the staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma in lymph node chains, parenchymal organs and bone marrow, and to evaluate interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: the authors studied 12 patients with confirmed diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patients were referred for whole body magnetic resonance imaging with T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and DWIBS sequences. Results: the number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease on T1- and T2-weighted sequences showed similar results (8 sites for both sequences), but lower than DWIBS and STIR sequences (11 and 12 sites, respectively). The bone marrow involvement by lymphoma showed the same values for the T1-, T2-weighted and DWIBS sequences (17 lesions), higher than the value found on STIR (13 lesions). A high rate of interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. Conclusion: STIR and DWIBS sequences detected the highest number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease. Similar results were demonstrated by all the sequences in the evaluation of parenchymal organs and bone marrow. A high interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. (author)

  16. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young; Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae; Lee, Kyoung Geun; Kang, Hee Jung

    2008-01-01

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  17. Equipartition and transport in two-dimensional electrostatic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Nycander, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Turbulent equipartition is investigated for the nonlinear evolution of pressure driven flute modes of a plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is recovered by linear stability analysis, and occurs when the pressure profile is more peaked than the profile of the...

  18. Integrated code development for studying laser driven plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsusi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Naruo, Syuji; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-03-01

    Present status and plan for developing an integrated implosion code are briefly explained by focusing on motivation, numerical scheme and issues to be developed more. Highly nonlinear stage of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of ablation front by laser irradiation has been simulated so as to be compared with model experiments. Improvement in transport and rezoning/remapping algorithms in ILESTA code is described. (author)

  19. Multiple stage railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaland, K.; Hawke, R.S.; Scudder, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator for accelerating a projectile by movement of a plasma arc along the rails. The railgun is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources as the projectile moves through the bore of the railgun. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can be prevented by connection of the energy sources to the rails through isolation diodes. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails into electrically isolated rail sections. In such case means are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse or laser device is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage

  20. Health economics evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of prostate cancer for Austria and Germany; Gesundheitsoekonomische Evaluation der Magnetresonanzbildgebung im Staging von Prostatakarzinomen fuer Oesterreich und Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, A. [Landesklinikum St. Poelten (Germany). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiologie, Diagnostik und Interventionelle Therapie; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik; Bernt, R. [Hanusch Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Salomonowitz, E. [Landesklinikum St. Poelten (Germany). Zentrales Inst. fuer Radiologie, Diagnostik und Interventionelle Therapie; Plas, E. [Hanusch Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Urologie; Strunk, G. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Wirtschaftwissenschaft und Oekonomische Bildung; Eberhardt, K. [Krankenhaus Schloss Werneck (Germany). MRT-Kompetenzzentrum

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was the health economics analysis of MR imaging in the preoperative staging of patients with prostate carcinoma (PCa). Materials and Methods: The health economics analysis consisted of the following steps: modeling, determination of probabilities and parameters based on a detailed literature search, evaluation using the averages of the parameters, and sensitivity analyses of the results over the ranges of values. We performed a cost-utility analysis from health insurance's perspective for Austria and Germany. The population under investigation included patients with confirmed PCa. The alternative was a decision for therapy with or without staging using MR imaging. A localized PCa was treated by prostatectomy and locally advanced PCa by radiation/hormone therapy. The result parameters were quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs per patient. Results: The evaluation showed that MR imaging is useful regarding costs and utilities prior to radical prostatectomy which is expensive and may be associated with serious clinical consequences. The costs per patient were lower by Euro 2635 and the utilities were higher by 0.099 QALYs. The strategy without MR imaging for staging was dominated by the strategy using MR imaging for staging in the evaluation using the base values and in almost all sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: For the parameters used and almost all scenarios of the sensitivity analysis, our decision-analytic model revealed a higher cost-utility ratio for the strategy using MR imaging for the staging of PCa. (orig.)

  1. Stage theta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Staged Theta Pinch program is designed to study the technological and physics problems associated with producing fat plasmas and separating the implosion heating from the adiabatic compression. Several methods of implosion heating are discussed. Circuit diagrams and theoretical magnetic field behavior are described for the STP and resonant heating experiments. (MOW)

  2. Stage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shacter, J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage

  3. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  4. Equatorial spread F: a review of recent experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the authors review an intense research effort aimed at understanding the large scale disruption of the equatorial F layer which often commences just after sunset, and lasts for most of the night. A very attractive explanation for the phenomena, although one not universally accepted, is that the F layer is unstable to the classic Rayleigh-Taylor condition in which a heavy fluid, the plasma, is supported against gravity by a light 'fluid', the Earth's magnetic field. It is concluded that a reasonable case has been made for this explanation provided that the concept is extended to include nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor like buoyancy effects above the F peak where linear process is stable. Internal gravity waves in neutral atmosphere seem to play an important role in seeding the Rayleigh-Taylor process with large scale finite amplitude perturbations. One of the remarkable features of this phenomena is the nearly simultaneous generation of structure with scale sizes spanning five orders of magnitude. These results may have applications in astrophysical processes where the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is thought to play a role. (Auth.)

  5. Are stage IV vestibular schwannomas preoperatively different from other stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Stéphane; Dubreuil, Christian; Zaouche, Sandra; Ferber-Viart, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on the clinical and paraclinical symptoms of patients suffering from Stage IV vestibular schwannomas (VSs). In this prospective study, we included 734 patients who have VS and candidates for operation. Patients were classified as having Stage I, II, III, or IV tumors according to Tos criteria as evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. PREOPERATIVE CLINICAL EVALUATION: We recorded the occurrence of complaints (%) and duration (yr) of hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorder. Preoperative paraclinical evaluation included pure-tone (PTA) and speech audiometry, auditory brainstem response (ABR) patterns, and vestibular deficit at videonystamography (VNG). Continuous variables were compared between Stage IV and other stages using analysis of variance. Qualitative variables expressed as a percentage of presence were compared between Stage IV and other stages using percentage comparison. Quantitative Parameters. Patients with Stage IV VS were significantly younger as compared with patients with other stages. Stage IV hearing loss was greater compared with other stages at 250 and 500 Hz but smaller at 2,000 and 8,000 Hz. We found no difference in the loss of PTA between Stage IV and the other stages. Speech discriminancy score was smaller in Stage IV. The durations of hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders were similar whatever the tumor stage. Auditory brainstem response patterns showed no difference in Wave III latency between Stage IV VS and other stages, whereas Wave V latency and V-I interval were higher in Stage IV. Both ABR threshold and VNG caloric deficit were higher in Stage IV VS compared with other stages. Qualitative Parameters. The percentage of patients with Stage IV was lower than that with Stages II and III. The percentage of men and women was similar in all stages. The occurrence of hearing loss was similar in all stages, whereas that of tinnitus was lower in Stage IV compared with Stages I and II. In

  6. The build oxygenation T{sub 2}{sup *} values of resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinomas as measured by 3T magnetic resonance imaging: Association with tumor stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yu Lian; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Huang, Yu Cheng; Chen, Tian Wu; Chen, Yan Il; Chen, Fan; Zeng, Nan Lin; Li, Rui [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong (China); Yang, Zhi Gang [Dept. of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Hu, Jiani [Dept. of Radiology, Wayne State University, Detroit (United States)

    2017-08-01

    To explore the association between the blood oxygenation T{sub 2}{sup *} values of resectable esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) and tumor stages. This study included 48 ESCC patients and 20 healthy participants who had undergone esophageal T{sub 2}{sup *} -weighted imaging to obtain T{sub 2}{sup *} values of the tumors and normal esophagus. ESCC patients underwent surgical resections less than one week after imaging. Statistical analyses were performed to identify the association between T{sub 2}{sup *} values of ESCCs and tumor stages. One-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests revealed that the T{sub 2}{sup *} value could differentiate stage T1 ESCCs (17.7 ± 3.3 ms) from stage T2 and T3 tumors (24.6 ± 2.7 ms and 27.8 ± 5.6 ms, respectively; all ps < 0.001). Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis showed the suitable cutoff T{sub 2}{sup *} value of 21.3 ms for either differentiation. The former statistical tests demonstrated that the T{sub 2}{sup *} value could not differentiate between stages T2 and T3 (24.6 ± 2.7 ms vs. 27.8 ± 5.6 ms, respectively, p > 0.05) or between N stages (N1 vs. N2 vs. N3: 24.7 ± 6.9 ms vs. 25.4 ± 4.5 ms vs. 26.8 ± 3.9 ms, respectively; all ps > 0.05). The former tests illustrated that the T{sub 2}{sup *} value could differentiate anatomic stages I and II (18.8 ± 4.8 ms and 26.9 ± 5.9 ms, respectively) or stages I and III (27.3 ± 3.6 ms). ROC analysis depicted the same cutoff T{sub 2}{sup *} value of 21.3 ms for either differentiation. In addition, the Student's t test revealed that the T{sub 2}{sup *} value could determine grouped T stages (T0 vs. T1–3: 17.0 ± 2.9 ms vs. 25.2 ± 6.2 ms; T0–1 vs. T2–3: 17.3 ± 3.0 ms vs. 27.1 ± 5.3 ms; and T0–2 vs. T3: 18.8 ± 4.2 ms vs. 27.8 ± 5.6 ms, all ps < 0.001). ROC analysis indicated that the T{sub 2}{sup *} value could detect ESCCs (cutoff, 20 ms), and discriminate between stages T0–1 and T2–3 (cutoff, 21.3 ms) and between T0–2 and T3 (cutoff, 20.4 ms

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow following treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Stenver, D; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study vertebral bone marrow in hemodialysis patients during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). We found changes in T1 relaxation times and image contrast within 14 days after starting treatment, before any response was seen in the...

  8. Symmetric aluminum-wire arrays generate high-quality Z pinches at large array radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.; Mock, R.C.; Spielman, R.B.; Peterson, D.L.; Mosher, D.; Roderick, N.F.

    1998-01-01

    A Saturn-accelerator study of annular, aluminum-wire array, Z-pinch implosions, in the calculated high-wire-number plasma-shell regime [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996)], shows that the radiated x-ray pulse width increases from about 4 nsec to about 7 nsec, when the radius of the array is increased from 8.75 to 20 mm at a fixed array mass of 0.6 mg. Eulerian radiation- magnetohydrodynamic code (E-RMHC) simulations in the r-z plane suggest that this pulse-width increase with radius is due to the faster growth of the shell thickness (that arises from a two-stage development in the magnetic Rayleigh - Taylor instability) relative to the increase in the shell implosion velocity. Over the array radii explored, the measured peak total x-ray power of ∼40 TW and energy of ∼325 kJ show little change outside of a ±15% shot-to-shot fluctuation and are consistent with the E-RMHC simulations. Similarly, the measured peak K-shell (lines plus continuum) power of ∼8 TW and energy of ∼70 kJ show little change with radius. The minimal change in K-shell yield is in agreement with simple K-shell radiation scaling models that assume a fixed radial compression for all initial array radii. These results suggest that the improved uniformity provided by the large number of wires in the initial array reduces the disruptive effects of the Rayleigh - Taylor instability observed in small-wire-number imploding loads. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. Symmetric aluminum-wire arrays generate high-quality Z pinches at large array radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T. W. L.; Mock, R. C.; Spielman, R. B.; Peterson, D. L.; Mosher, D.; Roderick, N. F.

    1998-10-01

    A Saturn-accelerator study of annular, aluminum-wire array, Z-pinch implosions, in the calculated high-wire-number plasma-shell regime [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996)], shows that the radiated x-ray pulse width increases from about 4 nsec to about 7 nsec, when the radius of the array is increased from 8.75 to 20 mm at a fixed array mass of 0.6 mg. Eulerian radiation- magnetohydrodynamic code (E-RMHC) simulations in the r-z plane suggest that this pulse-width increase with radius is due to the faster growth of the shell thickness (that arises from a two-stage development in the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability) relative to the increase in the shell implosion velocity. Over the array radii explored, the measured peak total x-ray power of ˜40 TW and energy of ˜325 kJ show little change outside of a ±15% shot-to-shot fluctuation and are consistent with the E-RMHC simulations. Similarly, the measured peak K-shell (lines plus continuum) power of ˜8 TW and energy of ˜70 kJ show little change with radius. The minimal change in K-shell yield is in agreement with simple K-shell radiation scaling models that assume a fixed radial compression for all initial array radii. These results suggest that the improved uniformity provided by the large number of wires in the initial array reduces the disruptive effects of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in small-wire-number imploding loads.

  10. Quantitative Ultrasound for Staging of Hepatic Steatosis in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition Validated with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, G.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Thijssen, J.M.; Graaf, M. van der; Korte, C.L. de

    2016-01-01

    Patients on home parenteral nutrition are at risk for developing liver dysfunction, which is due partly to the accumulation of lipids in the liver (steatosis) and may progress to end-stage liver disease with overt liver failure. Therefore, a timely diagnosis with easy access to repeated assessment

  11. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied ...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  12. [The initial (I and II) and advanced (III and IV) stages of juvenile patellar chondromalacia. Its diagnosis by magnetic resonance using a 1.5-T magnet with FLASH sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macarini, L; Rizzo, A; Martino, F; Zaccheo, N; Angelelli, G; Rotondo, A

    1998-06-01

    Juvenile patellar chondromalacia is a common orthopedic disorder which can mimic other conditions; early diagnosis is mandatory to prevent its evolution into osteoarthrosis. In the early stages of patellar chondromalacia (I and II), the lesions originate in the deep cartilage layer and the joint surface is not affected. Arthroscopy can demonstrate joint surface changes only and give indirect information about deeper lesions. We investigated the yield of 2D FLASH MRI with 30 degrees flip angle and a dedicated coil in the diagnosis of patellar chondromalacia, especially in its early stages. Eighteen patients (mean age: 21 years) with clinically suspected patellar chondromalacia were examined with MRI; 13 of them were also submitted to arthroscopy. A 1.5 T unit with a transmit-and-receive extremity coil was used. We acquired T1 SE sequences (TR/TE: 500-700/15/20) and 2D T2* FLASH sequence (TR/TE/FA: 500-800/18/30 degrees). The field of view was 160-180 mm and the matrix 192 x 256, with 2-3 NEX. The images were obtained on the axial plane. The lesions were classified in 4 stages according to Shahriaree classification. Agreement between MR and arthroscopic findings was good in both early and advanced lesions in 12/13 cases. Early lesions appeared as hyperintense focal thickening of the hyaline cartilage (stage I) or as small cystic lesions within the cartilage and no articular surface involvement (stage II). The medial patellar facet was the most frequent site. Advanced lesions appeared as articular surface ulcerations, thinning and cartilage hypointensity (stage III); stage IV lesions presented as complete erosions of the hyaline cartilage and hypointense underlying bone. 2D FLASH MRI with 30 degrees flip angle can show the differences in water content in the cartilage and thus permit to detect early chondromalacia lesions in the deep cartilage.

  13. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI-guided surgery in the evaluation of patients with early stage breast cancer for breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Jacqueline E.; Orel, Susan G.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography is the primary imaging modality for the detection of breast cancer and the evaluation of patients with early stage breast cancer for breast conserving therapy (BCT). MRI may be more sensitive than mammography for detecting breast cancer and may have an adjunctive role in assessing patients with early stage disease for BCT. Our experience with 83 patients undergoing breast MRI during consideration for breast conserving therapy is analyzed. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 83 consecutive cases of patients undergoing breast MRI during standard work-up and evaluation for BCT from 1993 to 1996. Analysis of cases was limited to women who were AJCC clinical Stage 0, I, or II and who received definitive therapy at our institution. All patients signed informed consent. MRI of the breast was performed at 1.5 Tesla. Sagittal T1 and T2 and 3-D gradient pre- and post-contrast images were obtained. All MRI studies were reviewed by two radiologists. All patients were evaluated by one radiation oncologist. The records of these 83 patients were reviewed for patient age, tumor size, AJCC stage, histology, physical examination findings, mammographic findings, ultrasound findings, MRI findings, timing of first MRI study with respect to excisional surgery, findings from MRI-guided surgery (when done), and whether the patient underwent BCT. Results: The median age at the time of presentation was 51.5 years (range 26-77 years). Of the 83 patients, 16% were AJCC clinical stage 0, 65% were stage I, and 19% were stage II. No patient presented with synchronous bilateral carcinoma. Two patients had a history of prior contralateral breast carcinoma; both received BCT for their initial disease. Sixteen percent of patients had intraductal carcinoma, 39% had intraductal and infiltrating carcinoma, 28% had infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 7% had infiltrating lobular carcinoma, 4% had tubular carcinoma, 2% had adenoid cystic carcinoma, 2% had medullary carcinoma, 1% had colloid

  14. High gradient magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prothero, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    In a process in which magnetic material is trapped in a filter disposed in a magnetic field, and is unloaded by passing a fluid through the filter in the absence of the initial magnetic field, the magnetic field is first reduced to an intermediate value to allow unloading of the more weakly magnetic particles, the more strongly magnetic particles being retained and subsequently unloaded by further reduction of the magnetic field. Stage by stage reduction of the magnetic field during unloading allows separation of different species from the mixture. As an example the method can be applied to the separation of uranium compounds from mine ores. The uranium compounds are magnetic, while most of the other constituents of the ore are non-magnetic. The starting material is a suspension of the ore. Water is used for unloading. The filter material in this case is stainless steel balls. (author)

  15. Transitions to spatiotemporal chaos and turbulence of flute instabilities in a low-β magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2006-01-01

    The spatiotemporal transition scenario of flute instabilities from a regular to a turbulent state is experimentally investigated in the low-β plasma column of a thermionic discharge. The same transition scenario, i.e., the Ruelle-Takens route to turbulence, is found for both the Kelvin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. It is demonstrated that the transition can be more or less smooth, according to the discharge mode. In both cases, a strong radial dependence is observed, which is linked to the velocity shear layer in the case of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

  16. Comparison of PET-CT and magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging with body suppression (DWIBS) for initial staging of malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stéphane, Velasco, E-mail: stephane.velasco@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Radiology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Samuel, Burg, E-mail: s.burg@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris CHU Saint Louis, 40 rue de Bichat, 75 010 Paris (France); Vincent, Delwail, E-mail: v.delwail@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Joelle, Guilhot, E-mail: j.guilhot@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Remy, Perdrisot, E-mail: r.perdrisot@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Francois, Guilhot Gaudeffroy, E-mail: f.guilhot-gaudeffroy@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Jean-Pierre, Tasu, E-mail: j.p.tasu@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Radiology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in staging of malignant lymphoma. Methods: Twenty-three patients with proven malignant lymphomas were prospectively enrolled. DWIBS (b = 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) examinations and PET-CT were performed respectively on an Intera 1.5 T unit and a Gyroscan PET-CT scan (Philips Medical system, Best, the Netherland). The criteria for positive node involvement were a size over 10 mm or an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value under 0.75 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for nodes under 10 mm. For extranodal analysis, a high or heterogeneous signal on DWIBS was considered as positive. In cases of discordance, the reference standard for each region or organ was established at 6 months after the diagnosis according to all available clinical, biological information, as well as histological evidence or follow-up to prove or disprove the presence of disease. Results: DWIBS and PET-CT results were congruent in 333 node regions on the 345 areas analyzed, with excellent agreement (κ = 0.97, P < 0.0001). From 433 organs analyzed (one patient had splenectomy) extranodal disease was detected in 22 organs on DWIBS. The two imaging techniques agreed on 430 organs (κ = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Finally, Ann Arbor stages based on DWIBS and those of PET/CT were in agreement for 23 patients. Conclusions: For malignant lymphoma in a pre-therapeutic context, agreement between diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging and PET/CT is high for Ann Arbor staging.

  17. Comparison of PET-CT and magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging with body suppression (DWIBS) for initial staging of malignant lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stéphane, Velasco; Samuel, Burg; Vincent, Delwail; Joelle, Guilhot; Remy, Perdrisot; Francois, Guilhot Gaudeffroy; Jean-Pierre, Tasu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in staging of malignant lymphoma. Methods: Twenty-three patients with proven malignant lymphomas were prospectively enrolled. DWIBS (b = 0, 1000 s/mm 2 ) examinations and PET-CT were performed respectively on an Intera 1.5 T unit and a Gyroscan PET-CT scan (Philips Medical system, Best, the Netherland). The criteria for positive node involvement were a size over 10 mm or an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value under 0.75 10 −3 mm 2 /s for nodes under 10 mm. For extranodal analysis, a high or heterogeneous signal on DWIBS was considered as positive. In cases of discordance, the reference standard for each region or organ was established at 6 months after the diagnosis according to all available clinical, biological information, as well as histological evidence or follow-up to prove or disprove the presence of disease. Results: DWIBS and PET-CT results were congruent in 333 node regions on the 345 areas analyzed, with excellent agreement (κ = 0.97, P < 0.0001). From 433 organs analyzed (one patient had splenectomy) extranodal disease was detected in 22 organs on DWIBS. The two imaging techniques agreed on 430 organs (κ = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Finally, Ann Arbor stages based on DWIBS and those of PET/CT were in agreement for 23 patients. Conclusions: For malignant lymphoma in a pre-therapeutic context, agreement between diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging and PET/CT is high for Ann Arbor staging

  18. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  19. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F.; Bluemm, R.G.; Beyer, H.K.

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  20. Endometrial carcinoma: merit of magnetic resonance in pre-surgical staging; Carcinoma de endometrio: valor de la estadificacion prequirurgica por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Barrera, M. C.; Gervas, C.; Salvador, E.; Rivero, B. [Hospital Donostia. San sebastian (Spain); Sentis, M. [Corporacio Sanitaria Pare Tauli. Sabadell (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate MR capacity in assessing deep myometrial and cervical infiltrations in cases of endometrial carcinoma. A series of 30 consecutively diagnosed endometrial cancer patients was pre-surgically evaluated by means of magnetic resonance (MR). TSE-T2 sequences with fat saturation and dynamic FFe sequence were used after gadolinium administration. A correlation with post-surgical histological stating was made. There were then determined sensitivity (S), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the deep myometrial infiltration and cervical invasion. Cases of overestimation and underestimation were analyzed. Values obtained for myometrium and cervix were, respectively, S of 67% and 63%, SP of 89% and 91%, PPV of 80% and 71% and NPV of 80% and 87%. Two cases each were over valued for myometrial infiltration and cervix: four cases and 3 cases, respectively, were undervalues. MR stating in cases of endometrial carcinoma is a highly reliable diagnostic technique, but it does present certain limitations. (Author) 19 refs.

  1. Impact of the integration of proton magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy to PI-RADS 2 for prediction of high grade and high stage prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leapman, Michael S.; Wang, Zhen J.; Behr, Spencer C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Westphalen, Antonio C., E-mail: antonio.westphalen@ucsf.edu [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Objective: To compare the predictions of dominant Gleason pattern ≥ 4 or non-organ confined disease with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS v2) with or without proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ({sup 1}H-MRSI). Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine men underwent 3-tesla endorectal multiparametric MRI including {sup 1}H-MRSI and prostatectomy. Two radiologists assigned PI-RADS v2 and {sup 1}H-MRSI scores to index lesions. Statistical analyses used logistic regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and 2 x 2 tables for diagnostic accuracies. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of {sup 1}H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) were 85.7% (57.1%) and 92.9% (100%), and 56% (68.0%) and 24.0% (24.0%). The sensitivity and specificity of {sup 1}H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for extra-prostatic extension (EPE) were 64.0% (40%) and 20.0% (48%), and 50.0% (57.1%) and 71.4% (64.3%). The area under the ROC curves (AUC) for prediction of high-grade prostate cancer were 0.65 and 0.61 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.72 and 0.70 when combined with {sup 1}H-MRSI (readers 1 and 2, p = 0.04 and 0.21). For prediction of EPE the AUC were 0.54 and 0.60 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.55 and 0.61 when combined with {sup 1}H-MRSI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: {sup 1}H-MRSI might improve the discrimination of high-grade prostate cancer when combined to PI-RADS v2, particularly for PI-RADS v2 score 4 lesions, but it does not affect the prediction of EPE. (author)

  2. Impact of the integration of proton magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy to PI-RADS 2 for prediction of high grade and high stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leapman, Michael S.; Wang, Zhen J.; Behr, Spencer C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Westphalen, Antonio C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the predictions of dominant Gleason pattern ≥ 4 or non-organ confined disease with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS v2) with or without proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ("1H-MRSI). Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine men underwent 3-tesla endorectal multiparametric MRI including "1H-MRSI and prostatectomy. Two radiologists assigned PI-RADS v2 and "1H-MRSI scores to index lesions. Statistical analyses used logistic regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and 2 x 2 tables for diagnostic accuracies. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of "1H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) were 85.7% (57.1%) and 92.9% (100%), and 56% (68.0%) and 24.0% (24.0%). The sensitivity and specificity of "1H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for extra-prostatic extension (EPE) were 64.0% (40%) and 20.0% (48%), and 50.0% (57.1%) and 71.4% (64.3%). The area under the ROC curves (AUC) for prediction of high-grade prostate cancer were 0.65 and 0.61 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.72 and 0.70 when combined with "1H-MRSI (readers 1 and 2, p = 0.04 and 0.21). For prediction of EPE the AUC were 0.54 and 0.60 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.55 and 0.61 when combined with "1H-MRSI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: "1H-MRSI might improve the discrimination of high-grade prostate cancer when combined to PI-RADS v2, particularly for PI-RADS v2 score 4 lesions, but it does not affect the prediction of EPE. (author)

  3. Patterns of Primary Tumor Invasion and Regional Lymph Node Spread Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Early-Stage Nasal NK/T-cell Lymphoma: Implications for Clinical Target Volume Definition and Prognostic Significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Run-Ye [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Liu, Kang [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Song, Yong-Wen; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Liu, Qing-Feng; Yang, Yong; Chen, Bo; Qi, Shu-Nan; Lu, Ning-Ning; Tang, Yu; Tang, Yuan; Li, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Ouyang, Han [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong12@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine the pathways of primary tumor invasion (PTI) and regional lymph node (LN) spread based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in early-stage nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL), to improve clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and evaluate the prognostic value of locoregional extension patterns. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with newly diagnosed early-stage nasal NKTCL who underwent pretreatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Results: The incidences of PTI and regional LN involvement were 64.7% and 25.7%, respectively. Based on the incidence of PTI, involved sites surrounding the nasal cavity were classified into 3 risk subgroups: high-risk (>20%), intermediate-risk (5%-20%), and low-risk (<5%). The most frequently involved site was the nasopharynx (35.2%), followed by the maxillary (21.9%) and ethmoid (21.9%) sinuses. Local disease and regional LN spread followed an orderly pattern without LN skipping. The retropharyngeal nodes (RPNs) were most frequently involved (19.0%), followed by level II (11.4%). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and locoregional control (LRC) rates for all patients were 72.8%, 65.2%, and 90.0%, respectively. The presence of PTI and regional LN involvement based on MRI significantly and negatively affected PFS and OS. Conclusions: Early-stage nasal NKTCL presents with a high incidence of PTI but a relatively low incidence of regional LN spread. Locoregional spread followed an orderly pattern, and PTI and regional LN spread are powerful prognostic factors for poorer survival outcomes. CTV reduction may be feasible for selected patients.

  4. Usefulness of composite methionine-positron emission tomography/3.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging to detect the localization and extent of early-stage Cushing adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Abe, Takehiko; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    Fifty to eighty percent of Cushing disease is diagnosed by typical endocrine responses. Recently, the number of diagnoses of Cushing disease without typical Cushing syndrome has been increasing; therefore, improving ways to determine the localization of the adenoma and making an early diagnosis is important. This study was undertaken to determine the present diagnostic accuracy for Cushing microadenoma and to compare the differences in diagnostic accuracy between MR imaging and PET/MR imaging. During the past 3 years the authors analyzed the diagnostic accuracy in a series of 35 patients with Cushing adenoma that was verified by surgical pituitary exploration. All 35 cases of Cushing disease, including 20 cases of "overt" and 15 cases of "preclinical" Cushing disease, were studied. Superconductive MR images (1.5 or 3.0 T) and composite images from FDG-PET or methionine (MET)-PET and 3.0-T MR imaging were compared with the localization of adenomas verified by surgery. The diagnostic accuracy of superconductive MR imaging for detecting the localization of Cushing microadenoma was only 40%. The causes of unsatisfactory results for superconductive MR imaging were false-negative results (10 cases), false-positive results (6 cases), and instances of double pituitary adenomas (3 cases). In contrast, the accuracy of microadenoma localization using MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 100% and that of FDG-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 73%. Moreover, the adenoma location was better delineated on MET-PET/MR images than on FDG-PET/MR images. There was no significant difference in maximum standard uptake value of adenomas evaluated by MET-PET between preclinical Cushing disease and overt Cushing disease. Composite MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging is useful for the improvement of the delineation of Cushing microadenoma and offers high-quality detectability for early-stage Cushing adenoma.

  5. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  6. The magnet database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, M.J.; Delagi, N.; Horton, B.; Ivey, J.C.; Leedy, R.; Li, X.; Marshall, B.; Robinson, S.L.; Tompkins, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Test Department of the Magnet Systems Division of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is developing a central database of SSC magnet information that will be available to all magnet scientists at the SSCL or elsewhere, via network connections. The database contains information on the magnets' major components, configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet), measurements made at major fabrication stages, and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. Recent efforts have focused on the development of procedures for user-friendly access to the data, including displays in the format of the production open-quotes travelerclose quotes data sheets, standard summary reports, and a graphical interface for ad hoc queues and plots

  7. MAGNETIC CIRCUIT EQUIVALENT OF THE SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR WITH INCORPORATED MAGNETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fyong Le Ngo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic circuitry computation is one of the central stages of designing a synchronous motor with incorporated magnets, which can be performed by means of a simplified method of the magnetic-circuits equivalent modeling. The article studies the magnetic circuit of the motor with the rotor-incorporated magnets, which includes four sectors: constant magnets with the field pole extension made of magnetically soft steel, magniflux dispersion sections containing air barriers and steel bridges; the air gap; the stator grooves, cogs and the frame yoke. The authors introduce an equivalent model of the magnetic circuit. High-energy magnets with a linear demagnetization curve are employed in the capacity of constant magnets. Two magnets create the magnetic flux for one pole. The decline of magnetic potential in the steel of the pole is negligible consequent on the admission that the poles magnetic inductivity µ = ∞. The rotor design provides for the air barriers and the steel bridges that close leakage flux. The induction-permeability curve linearization serves for the bridges magnetic saturation accountability and presents a polygonal line consisting of two linear sections. The estimation of the magnet circuit section including the cogs and the frame yoke is executed with account of the steel saturation, their magnetic conductivities thereat being dependent on the saturation rate. Relying on the equivalent model of the magnetic circuit, the authors deduce a system of two equations written from the first and the second Kirchhoff laws of the magnetic circuits. These equations allow solving two problems: specifying dimensions of the magnets by the preset value of the magnetic flow in the clearance and determining the clearance magnetic flow at the preset motor rotor-and-stator design.

  8. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  9. MR staging accuracy for endometrial cancer based on the new FIGO stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Eun; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Bae, Duk Soo; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Bohyun

    2011-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been frequently used to determine a preoperative treatment plan for gynecologic cancers. However, the MR accuracy for staging an endometrial cancer is not satisfactory based on the old FIGO staging system. Purpose: To evaluate MR accuracy for staging endometrial cancer using the new FIGO staging system. Material and Methods: Between January 2005 and May 2009, 199 women underwent surgery due to endometrial cancer. In each patient, an endometrial cancer was staged using MR findings based on the old FIGO staging system and then repeated according to the new FIGO staging system for comparison. Histopathologic findings were used as a standard of reference. Results: The accuracy of MRI in the staging of endometrial carcinoma stage I, II, III, and IV using the old FIGO staging system were 80% (159/199), 89% (178/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, compared to 87% (174/199), 97% (193/199), 90% (179/199), and 99% (198/199), respectively, when using the new FIGO staging criteria. The overall MR accuracy of the old and new staging systems were 51% (101/199) and 81% (161/199), respectively. Conclusion: MRI has become a more useful tool in the preoperative staging of endometrial cancers using the new FIGO staging system compared to the old one with increased accuracy

  10. Hybrid Fluid/Kinetic Modeling Of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2017-10-01

    MHD modeling with an equation of state (EOS) of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabily in Z indicates that it is seeded by the electro-thermal instability. Large thermodynamic drives associated with gradients at the interface between the liner and the coronal regions distort distribution functions and likely lead to non-local transport effects in a plasma which varies from weakly to strongly coupled. In this work, we discuss using effective potential theory along with a Chapman-Ensksog-like (CEL) formalism to develop hybrid fluid/kinetic modeling capabilities for these plasmas. Effective potential theory addresses the role of Coulomb collisions on transport across coupling regimes and the CEL approach bridges the gap between full-blow kinetic simulations and the EOS tables, which only depend locally on density and temperature. Quantitative results on the Spitzer problem across coupling coupling regimes will be presented as a first step. DOE Grant No. DE-SC0016525.

  11. Magnets and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, Ch.; Rifflet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest highest-energy particle collider that the CERN plans to commission in 2008, gets a double boost from superconducting magnet technology. Superconducting magnets are first used to guide the particles scheduled for collision through the accelerator, and then to observe the events triggered by the collision inside giant detectors in a known magnetic field. Despite the installation's massive dimensions, all this is done with minimal expenditure of energy. (author)

  12. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  13. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process

  14. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Praeoperatives Staging des Rektumkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wiech, T. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  15. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE (1)-(4). This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A (5), magnet 2A (6), and magnet 2B (7). Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  16. Magnetism and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    It describes the actual status of physics in Brazil concerning the study of magnetism and magnetic materials. It gives an overview of different research groups in Brazil, their needs, as well as the investments needed to improve the area. (A.C.A.S.)

  17. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio

  18. Summary Stage 2018 - SEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access this manual of codes and coding instructions for the summary stage field for cases diagnosed January 1, 2018 and forward. 2018 version applies to every site and/or histology combination, including lymphomas and leukemias. Historically, also called General Staging, California Staging, and SEER Staging.

  19. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  20. Key issues review: numerical studies of turbulence in stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David; Meakin, Casey

    2016-10-01

    Three major problems of single-star astrophysics are convection, magnetic fields and rotation. Numerical simulations of convection in stars now have sufficient resolution to be truly turbulent, with effective Reynolds numbers of \\text{Re}>{{10}4} , and some turbulent boundary layers have been resolved. Implications of these developments are discussed for stellar structure, evolution and explosion as supernovae. Methods for three-dimensional (3D) simulations of stars are compared and discussed for 3D atmospheres, solar rotation, core-collapse and stellar boundary layers. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis of the numerical simulations has been shown to provide a novel and quantitative estimate of resolution errors. Present treatments of stellar boundaries require revision, even for early burning stages (e.g. for mixing regions during He-burning). As stellar core-collapse is approached, asymmetry and fluctuations grow, rendering spherically symmetric models of progenitors more unrealistic. Numerical resolution of several different types of three-dimensional (3D) stellar simulations are compared; it is suggested that core-collapse simulations may be under-resolved. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in explosions has a deep connection to convection, for which the abundance structure in supernova remnants may provide evidence.

  1. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  2. The physics of fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references

  3. Specialty magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials

  4. Seven Stages of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease > Stages Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Myths Clinical Studies Research Brain Donation ...

  5. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  6. Late-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  7. Stages and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  8. Early-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the cancer. This blockage can cause the kidney to enlarge or stop working. Stage IIIB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  10. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  11. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the omentum. The cancer ... lymph nodes behind the peritoneum. In stage IIIC, cancer is found in one or both ovaries or fallopian tubes and has spread to the ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  18. Internal structure of magnetic endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, C.; Wilhelm, C.; Cousin, F.; Dupuis, V.; Gazeau, F.; Perzynski, R.

    2007-01-01

    The internal structure of biological vesicles filled with magnetic nanoparticles is investigated using the following complementary analyses: electronic transmission microscopy, dynamic probing by magneto-optical birefringence and structural probing by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). These magnetic vesicles are magnetic endosomes obtained via a non-specific interaction between cells and anionic magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Thanks to a magnetic purification process, they are probed at two different stages of their formation within HeLa cells: (i) adsorption of nanoparticles onto the cellular membrane and (ii) their subsequent internalisation within endosomes. Differences in the microenvironment of the magnetic nanoparticles at those two different stages are highlighted here. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles adsorbed onto cellular membranes and confined within endosomes is respectively 3 and 5 orders of magnitude slower than for isolated magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous media. Interestingly, SANS experiments show that magnetic endosomes have an internal structure close to decorated vesicles, with magnetic nanoparticles locally decorating the endosome membrane, inside their inner-sphere. These results, important for future biomedical applications, suggest that multiple fusions of decorated vesicles are the biological processes underlying the endocytosis of that kind of nanometric materials.

  19. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  20. Staging of Cervical Lymph Nodes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norling, Rikke; Buron, Birgitte Marie Due; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical staging of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is crucial for the choice of treatment. Computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically recommended and used for staging of the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). Although ultrasonography (US...