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Sample records for stage iiib-iv non-small

  1. Nivolumab and Plinabulin in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV, Recurrent, or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    ALK Gene Translocation; EGFR Activating Mutation; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; ROS1 Gene Translocation; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  2. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Sun-Hwi; Yoon, Jeung-Won; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Shin, Ji-Eun; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2012-06-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus(HAP) has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC) from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD), and the other three showed progressive disease (PD). The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  3. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  4. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

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    Clements, Karen M.; Peltz, Gerson; Faries, Douglas E.; Lang, Kathleen; Nyambose, Joshua; Earle, Craig C.; Sugarman, Katherine P.; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Thompson, David; Marciniak, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N = 2,644) with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G) and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T) identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002). Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P = .018). No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction = .257). There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:22482053

  5. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Clements

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N=2,644 with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002. Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P=.018. No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction =.257. There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC.

  6. Our Experiences with Erlotinib in Second and Third Line Treatment Patients with Advanced Stage Iiib/ Iv Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available HeadHER1/EGFR is known to play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and is overexpressed in up to 80% of NSCLCs. The study of an Expanded Access Clinical Program of Erlotinib in NSCLC is a phase IV openlabel, non-randomized, multicenter trial in patients with advanced (inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC who were eligible for treatment with erlotinib but had no access to trial participation. Patients for the study from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H were selected from two Clinical centres (Sarajevo and Banja Luka. The aim of study was to evaluated efficacy and tolerability of erlotinib monotherapy in this setting. All patients who received at least one dose of erlotinib and data were entered in the database as of the CRF cut-off date of 14th May 2008 were included in analysis of data (n = 19. This population is defined as the Intent to Treat (ITT population and includes all patients who had at least one dose of erlotinib regardless of whether major protocol violations were incurred. The findings are consistent with the results of the randomized, placebo-controlled BR.21 study. Indicating that erlotinib is an effective option for patients with advanced NSCLC who are unsuitable for, or who have previously failed standard chemotherapy. In B&H group of patients DCR was almost 84%, and PFS was approximately 24,7 weeks (compared with 44% and 9,7 weeks for erlotinib reported in phase III. Almost three quarter of the patients received erlotinib as their second line of therapy. Overall, erlotinib was well tolerated; there were no patients who withdrew due to a treatment-related AE (mainly rash and there were few dose reductions. 24% of patients experienced an SAE (most commonly gastrointestinal (GI disorders.

  7. CIMAvax-EGF®: Therapeutic Vaccine Against Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in Advanced Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rosa Fernández Ruiz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is one of the scientific activities deployed by the Cuban State, which shows greater results and impact on the of the Cuban population health. It has increased the therapeutic repertoire in dealing with oncological diseases with products such as CIMAvax-EGF®, the first therapeutic vaccine of its kind, from the Molecular Immunology Center, against non-small cell lung cancer in advanced stages IIIB IV. The application of this product already extends to Primary Health Care with encouraging results, by prolonging the survival of patients with higher quality of life.

  8. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  9. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-29

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Nivolumab, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage I-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-22

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; WT1 Positive

  14. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer: What's trending?

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    McMurry, Timothy L; Shah, Puja M; Samson, Pamela; Robinson, Clifford G; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2017-09-01

    Stage I non-small cell lung cancer traditionally is treated with lobectomy. Sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy provide alternative treatments for higher-risk groups. The purpose of this study was to determine the national treatment trends for stage I lung cancer. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer between 1998 and 2012. Patients were compared across treatment groups, and trends in treatment and disease were evaluated over the 15-year time period. The National Cancer Database contained 369,931 patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. After removing patients who received chemotherapy as a first course of treatment and patients with pathologic stage IV, 357,490 patients were analyzed. The first recorded cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy are in 2003 and rapidly increased to 6.6% (2063) of all patients treated in 2012. The number of diagnoses of stage I non-small cell lung cancer steadily increased over the 15-year period, whereas the rate of lobectomy decreased from 55% in 1998 to 50% in 2012 (P lung cancer cases continues to increase, lobectomy rates are decreasing while sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy rates are increasing. Although the increasing popularity of alternative therapies to lobectomy for treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer should allow more patients to undergo treatment, we did not observe this trend in the data. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Guideline on 'non-small cell lung carcinoma; staging and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerbeeck, J.P. van; Koning, C.C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Boekema, A.G.; Kaandorp, C.J.; Burgers, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A national, evidence-based guideline on the staging and treatment of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has been compiled by the various disciplines involved. The initial diagnostic measures in patients with suspected lung cancer include history taking, physical examination and

  17. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  18. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC.......The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...

  19. Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Resected N2 Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Geol

    1993-01-01

    A total of forty patients with resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy between Jan. 1975 and Dec. 1990 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center were retrospectively analysed to evaluate whether postoperative radiation therapy improves survival. Patterns of failure and prognostic factors affecting survival were also analysed. The 5 year overall and disease free survival rate were 26.3%, 27.3% and median survival 23.5 months. The 5 year survival rates by T-stage were T1 66.7%, T2 25.6% and T3 12.5%. Loco-regional failure rate was 14.3% and distant metastasis rate was 42.9% and both 2.9%. Statistically significant factor affecting distant failure rate was number of positive lymph nodes(>= 4). This retrospective study suggests that postoperative radiation therapy in resected N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer can reduce loco-regional recurrence and may improve survival rate as compared with other studies which were treated by surgery alone. Further study of systemic control is also needed due to high rate of distant metastasis

  20. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT......%. At 2       years, 54% were without local or distant progression, and overall survival       was 47%. Within 6 months after treatment, one or more Grade >/=2 reactions       were observed in 48% of the patients. Conclusions: Stereotactic body       radiotherapy in patients with limited-stage NSCLC...

  1. Talimogene Laherparepvec in Combination With Ipilimumab in Previously Untreated, Unresectable Stage IIIB-IV Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzanov, Igor; Milhem, Mohammed M; Minor, David; Hamid, Omid; Li, Ai; Chen, Lisa; Chastain, Michael; Gorski, Kevin S; Anderson, Abraham; Chou, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Howard L; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2016-08-01

    Combining immunotherapeutic agents with different mechanisms of action may enhance efficacy. We describe the safety and efficacy of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC; an oncolytic virus) in combination with ipilimumab (a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 checkpoint inhibitor) in patients with advanced melanoma. In this open-label, multicenter, phase Ib trial of T-VEC in combination with ipilimumab, T-VEC was administered intratumorally in week 1 (10(6) plaque-forming units/mL), then in week 4 and every 2 weeks thereafter (10(8) plaque-forming units/mL). Ipilimumab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 3 weeks for four infusions, beginning in week 6. The primary end point was incidence of dose-limiting toxicities. Secondary end points were objective response rate by immune-related response criteria and safety. Median duration of treatment with T-VEC was 13.3 weeks (range, 2.0 to 95.4 weeks). Median follow-up time for survival analysis was 20.0 months (1.0 to 25.4 months). Nineteen patients were included in the safety analysis. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and no new safety signals were detected. Grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were seen in 26.3% of patients; 15.8% had AEs attributed to T-VEC, and 21.1% had AEs attributed to ipilimumab. The objective response rate was 50%, and 44% of patients had a durable response lasting ≥ 6 months. Eighteen-month progression-free survival was 50%; 18-month overall survival was 67%. T-VEC with ipilimumab had a tolerable safety profile, and the combination appeared to have greater efficacy than either T-VEC or ipilimumab monotherapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Radiotherapy alone for elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Furonaka, Osamu; Miyazu, Yuka; Hada, Yosihiro

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated solely with radiotherapy during the period 1986 to 1995. Our study was designed to assess the influence of age on survival and malnutrition in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) and patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). Radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival period of 11.5 months in the younger group and 6.3 months in the elderly group (p=0.0043). With the Cox multivariate model, good performance status, age less than 75 years, and good response were significant favorable independent predictors. Furthermore, the elderly group patients more frequently died of respiratory infections and had lower prognostic nutritional indexes than the younger group patients before and after radiotherapy. These findings suggested elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated with radiotherapy alone had a poor prognosis and that malnutrition caused by radiotherapy was a factor contributing to the risk of death from respiratory infection in such patients. (author)

  3. Radiation therapy alone for early stage non-small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with radiation therapy along and define the optimal radiotherapeutic regimen for these patients. A retrospective review was performed on patients with sage I or II non-small cell carcinoma of the lung that were treated at our institution between June, 1987 and May, 2000. A total of 21 patients treated definitively with radiation therapy alone were included in this study. The age of the patients ranged from 53 to 81 years with a median of 66 years. All the patients were male. The medical reasons for inoperability were lack of pulmonary reserve, cardiovascular disease, poor performance status, old age, and patient refusal in the decreasing order. Pathological evidence was not adequate to characterize the non-small cell subtype in two patients. Of the remaining 19 patients, 16 had squamous cell carcinoma and 3 had adenocarcinoma. Treatment was given with conventional fractionation, once a day, five times a week. The doses to the primary site ranged from 56 Gy to 69 Gy. No patients were lost to follow-up. The overall survival rates for the entire group at 2, 3 and 5 years were 41, 30 and 21%, respectively. The cause specific survivals at 2, 3 and 5 years were 55, 36 and 25%, respectively. An intercurrent disease was the cause of death in two patients. The cumulative local failure rate at 5 years was 43%. Nine of the 21 patients had treatment failures after the curative radiotherapy was attempted. Local recurrences as the first site of failure were documented in 7 patients. Therefore, local failure alone represented 78% of the total failures. Those patients whose tumor sizes were less than 4 cm had a significantly better 5 year disease free survival than those with tumors greater than 4 cm (0% vs 36%). Those patients with a Karnofsky performance status less than 70 did not differ significantly with respect to actuarial survival when compared to those with a status greater than 70

  4. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  5. A prognostic DNA methylation signature for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Juan; Mendez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Nadal, Ernest; Chen, Guoan; Carmona, F Javier; Sayols, Sergi; Moran, Sebastian; Heyn, Holger; Vizoso, Miguel; Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Assenov, Yassen; Müller, Fabian; Bock, Christoph; Taron, Miquel; Mora, Josefina; Muscarella, Lucia A; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Davies, Michael; Pollan, Marina; Pajares, Maria J; Torre, Wenceslao; Montuenga, Luis M; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Field, John K; Roz, Luca; Lo Iacono, Marco; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Rosell, Rafael; Beer, David G; Esteller, Manel

    2013-11-10

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a tumor in which only small improvements in clinical outcome have been achieved. The issue is critical for stage I patients for whom there are no available biomarkers that indicate which high-risk patients should receive adjuvant chemotherapy. We aimed to find DNA methylation markers that could be helpful in this regard. A DNA methylation microarray that analyzes 450,000 CpG sites was used to study tumoral DNA obtained from 444 patients with NSCLC that included 237 stage I tumors. The prognostic DNA methylation markers were validated by a single-methylation pyrosequencing assay in an independent cohort of 143 patients with stage I NSCLC. Unsupervised clustering of the 10,000 most variable DNA methylation sites in the discovery cohort identified patients with high-risk stage I NSCLC who had shorter relapse-free survival (RFS; hazard ratio [HR], 2.35; 95% CI, 1.29 to 4.28; P = .004). The study in the validation cohort of the significant methylated sites from the discovery cohort found that hypermethylation of five genes was significantly associated with shorter RFS in stage I NSCLC: HIST1H4F, PCDHGB6, NPBWR1, ALX1, and HOXA9. A signature based on the number of hypermethylated events distinguished patients with high- and low-risk stage I NSCLC (HR, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.61 to 6.54; P = .001). The DNA methylation signature of NSCLC affects the outcome of stage I patients, and it can be practically determined by user-friendly polymerase chain reaction assays. The analysis of the best DNA methylation biomarkers improved prognostic accuracy beyond standard staging.

  6. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  7. Novel treatment options in stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Svitlana; Lauwers, Patrick; Vandaele, Frederik; van Meerbeeck, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    In the last 5 years, the current management of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer has been challenged due to novel surgical approaches and advances in radiation technology. The outcome after a sublobar resection is promising, especially for tumors less than 2 cm. Other treatment opportunities are available for high risk patients with comorbidity and impaired pulmonary function. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is a good alternative treatment to surgery, especially in elderly and comorbid patients. However, randomized evidence comparing sublobar resection and stereotactic radiotherapy is presently lacking. The most recent development in radiotherapy is hadron therapy with a presumed reduced toxicity because of its peculiar physical and biological effects. Promising thermal and microwave ablative techniques are in development and have specific niche indications.

  8. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin; Chino, Junzo P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ready, Neal; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  9. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post

  10. GP88 (Progranulin): A novel tissue and circulating biomarker for non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Martin J.; Feliciano, Josephine; Yue, Binbin; Bejarano, Pablo; Ioffe, Olga; Reisman, David; Hawkins, Douglas; Gai, Qiwei; Hicks, David; Serrero, Ginette

    2014-01-01

    GP88 (progranulin) is a growth and survival factor implicated in tumorigenesis and drug resistance. Previous studies showed that GP88 was expressed in breast cancer tissue in inverse correlation with survival. This study evaluates GP88 tissue expression in localized/locally advanced lung cancer and GP88 serum levels in advanced disease. GP88 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in tumor tissue from non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients, 85 with localized (Stage I-II) and 40 with locally advanced disease (Stage IIIa) and correlated with clinical outcome. Serum GP88 levels from Stage IIIb/IV patients, quantified by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) were compared to GP88 levels from patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and healthy individuals. GP88 was expressed in >80% adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in contrast to normal lung or small cell lung cancer. There was a statistically significant inverse association of GP88 expression (GP88 Immunohistochemistry score 3+ vs. <3+) with survival for patients with localized resected NSCLC with Hazard Ratio (HR)=2.28 (p=0.0076) for DFS and HR=2.17 (p=0.014) for OS. A statistically significant decrease in progression-free survival (HR=2.9, p=0.022) for GP88 scores of 3+ vs. <3+ was observed for Stage IIIa after chemoradiotherapy. In addition, serum GP88 was significantly elevated in Stage IIIb/IV NSCLC compared to control subjects (49.9ng/ml vs. 28.4ng/ml, p<0.0001). This is the first study demonstrating GP88 tissue and serum expression as a prognostic biomarker in localized and advanced disease. Future research will determine utility of monitoring GP88 and the potential of GP88 expression as a predictive marker for anti-GP88 therapeutics. PMID:25033727

  11. Treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer in a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Shaun; Persad, Kamleish; Qiao, Xian; Guarino, Michael; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients diagnosed at stage IIIA have been analyzed in many studies, which generally involve patients younger and healthier than the average patient with this disease. To analyze demographics and treatment outcomes in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC at a community cancer center. We reviewed charts of 226 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC from January 2003 to December 2008 treated at our community cancer center. Results Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Study design was retrospective and some medical records were not available. However, this population is likely representative of patients treated in similar settings. In our population, advanced age and male gender were associated with lower median survival. Responses to concurrent and sequential chemoradiation seemed to differ based on age group, which may be useful as a prognostic guideline for similar populations. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  12. Survival Analysis of 1,742 Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong PENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective At present non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still the leading cause of death induced by cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors of advanced NSCLC. Methods Total 1,742 cases of stage IV NSCLC data from Jan 4, 2000 to Dec 25, 2008 in Shanghai Chest Hospital were collected, confirmed by pathological examinations. Analysis was made to observe the impact of treatment on prognosis in gender, age, smoking history, pathology, classification, clinical TNM stage. Survival rate, survival difference were evaluated by Kaplan-Meire method and Logrank test respectively. The prognosis were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression. Results The median survival time of 1,742 patients was 10.0 months (9.5 months-10.5 months. One, two, three, four, and five-year survival rates were 44%, 22%, 13%, 9%, 6% respectively. The median survivals of single or multiple metastasis were 11 months vs 7 months (P < 0.001. Survival time were different in metastasic organs, with the median survival time as follows: lung for about 12 months (11.0 months-12.9 months, bone for 9 months (8.3 months-9.6 months, brain for 8 months (6.8 months-9.1 months, liver, adrenal gland, distannt lymph node metastasis for 5 months (3.8 months-6.1 months, and subcutaneous for 3 months (1.7 months-4.3 months. The median survival times of adenocarcinoma (n=1,086, 62% and squamous cell carcinoma cases (n=305, 17.5% were 12 months vs 8 months (P < 0.001. The median survival time of chemotherapy and best supportive care were 11 months vs 6 months (P < 0.001; the median survival times of with and without radiotherapy were 11 months vs 9 months (P=0.017. Conclusion Gender, age, gross type, pathological type, clinical T stage, N stage, numbers of metastatic organ, smoking history, treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer were independent prognostic factors.

  13. Micrometastasis in non-small-cell lung cancer: Detection and staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical relevance of bone marrow micrometastasis (BMM in non-small-cell lung cancer is undetermined, and the value of such analyses in advanced stage patients has not been clearly assessed previously. This study was conducted to estimate the accuracy of both polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC in micrometastases detection and determine the best site for bone marrow biopsy in order to find micrometastasis. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was performed in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Alzahra University Hospital from September 2008 to June 2009. To evaluate the bone marrow, a 3-cm rib segment and an aspirated specimen from the iliac bone prior to tumor resection were taken. PCR and IHC were performed for each specimen to find micrometastasis. Results: Of 41 patients, 14 (34% were positive for BMM by PCR compared with two positive IHC (4.8%. All BMMs were diagnosed in rib segments, and iliac specimens were all free from metastatic lesion. Our data showed no significant association between variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, side of tumor, involved lobe, smoking, or weight loss and presence of BMM. Conclusion: PCR could use as a promising method for BMM detection. BMM in a sanctuary site (rib is not associated with advanced stages of lung cancer. In addition, when predictor variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, smoking, or weight loss are analyzed, no correlation can be found between micrometastasis prevalence and any of those variables.

  14. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Nakagawa, Kazuo; Suzuki, Kenji; Takamochi, Kazuya; Ito, Hiroyuki; Okami, Jiro; Aokage, Keiju; Saji, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Zenke, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Tadashi; Tsutani, Yasuhiro; Okada, Morihito

    2017-12-01

    The treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should control both local and microscopic systemic disease, because the 5-year survival of patients with Stage III NSCLC who underwent surgical resection alone has been dismal. One way to improve surgical outcome is the administration of chemotherapy before or after the surgical procedure. During the last two decades, many clinical studies have focused on developing optimal adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens that can be combined with surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Based on the results of those clinical studies, multimodality therapy is considered to be an appropriate treatment approach for Stage IIIA NSCLC patients; although, optimal treatment strategies are still evolving. When N2 nodal involvement is discovered postoperatively, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy confers an overall survival benefit. The addition of postoperative radiotherapy might be considered for patients with nodal metastases. Although definitive chemoradiation remains a standard of care for cN2 NSCLC, alternative approaches such as induction chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and surgery can be considered for a selective group of patients. When surgical resection can be performed after induction therapy with low risk and a good chance of complete resection, the outcome may be optimal. The decision to proceed with resection after induction therapy must include a detailed preoperative pulmonary function evaluation as well as a critical intraoperative assessment of the feasibility of complete resection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Dept. of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents a consolidated treatment option for patients with medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical evidence accumulated in the past decade supports its use as an alternative to surgery with comparable survival outcomes. Due to its limited toxicity, SBRT is also applicable to elderly patients with very poor baseline pulmonary function or other severe comorbidities. Recent comparative studies in operable patients raised the issue of the possible use of SBRT also for this subgroup, with quite promising results that still should be fully confirmed by prospective trials with long-term follow-up. Aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the major studies conducted over the years on SBRT and to provide data on the efficacy and toxicity of this radiotherapy technique for stage I NSCLC. Technical aspects and quality of life related issues are also discussed, with the goal to provide information on the current role and limitations of SBRT in clinical practice.

  16. Percutaneous cryoablation for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikane Yamauchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous cryoablation for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between January 2004 and June 2010, 160 patients underwent computer tomography guided percutaneous cryoablation for lung tumors at our institution. Of these patients, histologically proven stage I lung cancer patients with more than one year of follow-up, were retrospectively reviewed. All of these patients were considered to be medically inoperable with Charlson comorbidity index of 3 or greater. Follow-up was based primarily on computed tomography. There were 22 patients with 34 tumors who underwent 25 sessions of cryoablation treatment. Complications were pneumothoraces in 7 treatments (28%, chest tube required in one treatment, and pleural effusions in 8 treatments (31%. The observation period ranged from 12-68 months, average 29±19 months, median 23 months. Local tumor progression was observed in one tumor (3%. Mean local tumor progression-free interval was 69±2 months. One patient died of lung cancer progression at 68 months. Two patients died of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis which were not considered to be directly associated with cryoablation, at 12 and 18 months, respectively. The overall 2- and 3-year survivals were 88% and 88%, respectively. Mean overall survival was 62±4 months. Median overall survival was 68 months. The disease-free 2- and 3-year survivals were 78% and 67%, respectively. Mean disease-free survival was 46±6 months. Pulmonary function tests were done in 16 patients (18 treatments before and after cryoablation. Percentage of predicted vital capacity, and percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, did not differ significantly before and after cryoablation (93±23 versus 90±21, and 70±11 versus 70±12, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although further accumulation of data is necessary regarding efficacy

  17. Comparative effectiveness of surgery and radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, James B; Soulos, Pamela R; Cramer, Laura D; Decker, Roy H; Kim, Anthony W; Gross, Cary P

    2015-07-15

    Although surgery is the standard treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been disseminated as an alternative therapy. The comparative mortalities and toxicities of these treatments for patients of different life expectancies are unknown. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database was used to identify patients who were 67 years old or older and underwent SBRT or surgery for stage I NSCLC from 2007 to 2009. Matched patients were stratified into short life expectancies (treatment, there was no difference (69.7% vs 73.9%, P = .31). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for toxicity from SBRT versus surgery was 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-0.87). Overall mortality was lower with SBRT versus surgery at 3 months (2.2% vs 6.1%, P = .005), but by 24 months, overall mortality was higher with SBRT (40.1% vs 22.3%, P lung cancer mortality (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.40-2.56). However, for patients with long life expectancies, there was greater overall mortality (IRR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.11-2.01) as well as a trend toward greater lung cancer mortality (IRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 0.95-2.79) with SBRT versus surgery. SBRT was associated with lower immediate mortality and toxicity in comparison with surgery. However, for patients with long life expectancies, there appears to be a relative benefit from surgery versus SBRT. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Holt, Bronno van der; Braat, Cora; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of stereotactic radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Overall survival, local tumor control, and toxicity were also evaluated in this prospective study. Methods and Materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, quality of life, overall survival, and local tumor control were assessed in 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1 to 2N0M0 NSCLC. These patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30 and the QLQ LC13 lung cancer-specific questionnaire were used to investigate changes in quality of life. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, and at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, until death or progressive disease. Toxicity was evaluated using common terminology criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Emotional functioning improved significantly after treatment. Other function scores and QLQ C30 and QLQ LC13 lung symptoms (such as dyspnea and coughing) showed no significant changes. The overall 2-year survival rate was 62%. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 1 patient had a local recurrence (3%). No grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicity occurred. Grade 3 toxicity consisted of thoracic pain, which occurred in 1 patient within 4 months of treatment, while it occurred thereafter in 2 patients. Conclusions: Quality of life was maintained, and emotional functioning improved significantly after stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I NSCLC, while survival was acceptable, local tumor control was high, and toxicity was low.

  19. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy in stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, E.H.; Ang, P.T.; Leong, S.S.; Khoo, K.S.; Wee, J.; Fong, K.W.; Tan, T.; Lee, K.S.; Chua, E.J.; Eng, P.; Hsu, A.; Tan, Y.K.; Ong, Y.Y.

    1999-01-01

    che favourable experience with the combination regimen of vinorelbine, ifosfamide and cisplatin (NIP) in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has led to a protocol assessing this regimen as an induction treatment in patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC, followed by thoracic radiotherapy with concurrent daily cisplatin as a radiosensitizer. Two cycles of NIP were administered 21 days apart; each cycle comprised i.v. vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8, i.v. ifosfamide 3 g/m 2 on day 1 with MESNA as uroprotection, and i.v. cisplatin 50 mg/m 2 on day 1. Radical thoracic radiotherapy commenced on day 43 to a total dose of 64 Gy and i.v. cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 was given concurrently prior to each fraction of radiation as a sensitiser. Two more cycles of NIP were given to patients who responded favourably to the induction treatment about 2 weeks after completion of radiation. Between July 1995 and July 1997, 44 patients were treated with this protocol. This treatment schedule was generally well tolerated. Grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in 50% of the patients and neutropenic sepsis was seen in 8. Grade 3-4 oesophagitis was uncommon. Most of the patients were able to complete the induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy phase. Major response occurred in 75% of the patients with 2 (4.5%) complete responses (CR). A total of 6 patients achieved CR after chemoradiotherapy. At a median follow-up of 35 months, the median overall survival for all patients was 15 months with a 3-year survival rate of 24%. The median overall survival for stage IIIA patients was 19 months with a 3-year survival rate of 39% in contrast to 13 months' median overall survival and only 15% 3-year survival rate for stage IIIB. The NIP regimen results in a high response rate in NSCLC and this treatment programme seems to benefit selected patients with stage III disease. (orig.)

  1. Crizotinib in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery and ALK Fusion Mutations (An ALCHEMIST Treatment Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    ALK Gene Rearrangement; ALK Gene Translocation; ALK Positive; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  2. Quality of life after curative radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Jong, Jos M.A. de; Velde, Guul P.M. ten; Muller, Martin J.; Slotman, Ben J.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QOL) among medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: The study sample was composed of 46 patients irradiated for Stage I NSCLC. Quality of life was assessed before, during, and after radiotherapy using the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13. Changes in symptom and QOL scores over time were evaluated with a repeated measurement analysis of variance using the mixed effect modeling procedure, SAS Proc Mixed. Twenty-seven patients were treated only at the primary site, whereas for 19 patients, the regional lymph nodes were included in the target volume as well. Results: The median follow-up time of patients alive was 34 months. The median survival was 19.0 months. None of the locally treated patients developed regional recurrence. A significant, gradual increase over time was observed for dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss. A significant, gradual deterioration was observed also for role functioning. No significant changes were noted for the other symptoms or the functioning scales. Significantly higher levels of dysphagia, which persisted up to 12 months, were observed in those in which the regional lymph nodes were treated, as compared to the locally treated patients. Radiation-induced pulmonary changes assessed with chest radiograph were more pronounced in the group treated with locoregional radiotherapy. Conclusions: After curative radiotherapy for Stage I medically inoperable NSCLC, a gradual increase in dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss, together with a significant deterioration of role functioning, was observed, possibly because of pre-existing, slowly progressive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and radiation-induced pulmonary changes. Taking into account the low incidence of regional recurrences after local irradiation, the higher incidence

  3. Radiotherapy in medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Kyoung; Park, Charn II [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    For early stage non-small-cell lung cancer, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. But when the patients are not able to tolerate it because of medical problem and when refuse surgery, radiation therapy is considered an acceptable alternative. We report on the treatment results and the effect of achieving local control of primary tumors on survival end points and analyze factors that may influence survival and local control. We reviewed the medical records of 32 patients with medically inoperable non--small cell lung cancer treated at our institution from June, 1987 through June, 1997. All patients had a pathologic diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer and were not. candidate for surgical resection because of either patients refusal (4), old age (2), lung problem (21), chest wall invasion (3) and heart problems (3). In 8 patients, there were more than 2 problems. The median age of the patients was 68 years (ranging from 60 to 86 years). Histologic cell type included squamous (24), adenocarcinoma (6) and unclassified squamous cell (2). The clinical stages of the patients were T1 in 5. T2 in 25, T3 in 2 patients. Initial tumor size was {<=}3.0 cm in 11, between 3.0 cm and 5.0 cm in 13 and more than 5.0 em in 8 patients. All patients had taken chest x-rays, chest CT, abdomen USG and bone scan. Radiotherapy was delivered using 6 MV or 10 MV linear accelerators. The doses of primary tumor were the ranging from 54.0 Gy to 68.8 Gy (median; 61.2 Gy). The duration of treatment was from 37 days through 64 days (median; 48.5 days) and there was no treatment interruption except 1 patient due to poor general status. In 12 patients, concomitant boost technique was used. There were no neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments such as surgery or chemotherapy. The period of follow-up was ranging from 2 months through 93 months (median; 23 months). Survival was measured from the date radiation therapy was initiated. The overall survival rate was 44.6% at 2 years and 24.5% at 5

  4. A phase I study of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy in stage III, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, JWG; Price, A; van der Leest, AHD; Gregor, A; Little, FA; Groen, HJM

    Purpose: Our goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of gemcitabine administered concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC and a radiation planning volume less than 2000 cm(3) were included.

  5. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Prognostic biomarker study in pathologically staged N1 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Milas, Luka; Ro, Jae Y.; Fujii, Takashi; Perkins, Penny; Allen, Pamela; Sikes, Charles R.; Mountain, Clifton F.; Ordonez, Nelson G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic influence of 6 biomarkers correlated to histologic subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on loco-regional control, overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and distant disease control (DDC) rates, all measured at 5 years, were examined. Materials and Methods: Cell blocks from the primary tumors of 137 patients with pathologically staged N1 NSCLC at MDACC were analyzed by 6-biomarker status correlated to histological subtypes and their outcomes. Results: The ranges of biomarker values were as follows: apoptotic index, 0.2-2.8%; mitotic index, 0-1.8%; the proportion of cells in S+G2M, 3-36%; p53 status, 0-100%; Ki-67, 0-9.3%; DNA index, 1.0-2.74. Subtypes of 137 cases from the postoperative pathology specimen showed that 74 patients had squamous carcinoma and 63 patients had adenocarcinoma. Mean and median lengths of follow-up were 4.21 years and 2.43 years, respectively. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had a better 5-year survival (p = 0.006), DFS (pp = 0.002) than patients with adenocarcinoma (AC). Among patients with AC, the DNA index was a significant predictor of 5-year DFS (p = 0.02), DDC rate (p = 0.04), and local-regional control (p < 0.05). Higher apoptosis (p 0.03) and mitosis indices (p = 0.03) were also univariate predictors of increased distant disease among patients with AC. Multivariate analysis of patients with AC revealed that the DNA index and Ki-67 were the only significant independent predictors of distant metastasis (p < 0.04 and p < 0.02, respectively) and DFS (p < 0.04 for both). Among patients with SCC, univariate analysis showed that S+G2M proportion (p < 0.05) and Ki-67 levels (p < 0.02) were significant predictors for local-regional control; for SC, multivariate analysis showed that only mitosis was a significant predictor in this case for overall survival (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Spontaneous apoptotic index and Ki-67 were significantly higher in SC than in AC. Patients with SC had less

  7. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D.P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; Heuvel, M. van den; Ciuleanu, T.E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Nair, S.; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J.M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; umenschein GR, J.r. Bl; Villaruz, L.C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; rral Jaime, J. Co; Chang, H.; Geese, W.J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, A.C.; Socinski, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  8. Baseline elevated leukocyte count in peripheral blood is associated with poor survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prognostic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, C; Vasile, E; Bernardini, I; Orlandini, C; Andreuccetti, M; Falcone, A

    2008-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of several baseline variables in stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer to create a model based on independent prognostic factors. A total of 320 patients were treated with last generation chemotherapy regimens. The majority of patients received treatment with cisplatin + gemcitabine or gemcitabine alone if older than 70 years or with an ECOG performance status (PS) = 2. Performance status of 2, squamous histology, number of metastatic sites >2, presence of bone, brain, liver and contralateral lung metastases and elevated leukocyte count in peripheral blood were all statistically significant prognostic factors in univariate analyses whereas the other tested variables (sex, stage, age, presence of adrenal gland and skin metastases) were not. Subsequently, a multivariate Cox's regression analysis identified PS 2 (P leukocyte count (P Leukocyte count resulted the stronger factor after performance status. If prospectly validated, the proposed prognostic model could be useful to stratify performance status 2 patients in specific future trials.

  9. Is stereotactic ablative radiotherapy an alternative to surgery in operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Ricardi, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Surgery is the gold therapeutic standard for patients affected with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is currently considered the preferred treatment option for inoperable patients, representing approximately 25%. Limited data are available directly comparing surgery and SABR in operable patients, none of them prospective. Preliminary results are encouraging, showing that the two treatment modalities are equally effective in terms of tumour control, with e...

  10. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  11. Prognosis and Treatment Decision Making in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhles, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and it is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses (12% of total new cancer cases) and to death from cancer (18% of total cancer deaths). There are two major groups of lung cancer that arise from the cells of the respiratory epithelium: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer, accounting for approximately 85% and 15% of lung cancer cases, respectively. The 5 year survival rate is 70-85% for l...

  12. Influence of comorbidity on survival, toxicity and health-related quality of life in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer receiving platinum-doublet chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Sundstrøm, Stein; Kaasa, Stein

    2010-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate whether patients with severe comorbidity receiving platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a shorter overall survival, experience more toxicity or more deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than other...... patients during treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients enrolled onto a phase III trial comparing pemetrexed/carboplatin with gemcitabine/carboplatin as first-line therapy of stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were analysed. Eligible patients had performance status 0-2 and adequate kidney/liver/bone-marrow function....... Comorbidity was assessed from hospital medical records using the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G). Toxicity was graded using the CTCAE v3.0 and the patients reported HRQoL on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30...

  13. Docetaxel plus nintedanib versus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (LUME-Lung 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The phase 3 LUME-Lung 1 study assessed the efficacy and safety of docetaxel plus nintedanib as second-line therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Patients from 211 centres in 27 countries with stage IIIB/IV recurrent NSCLC progressing after first-line chemotherapy...... to treat after 714 events in all patients. The key secondary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat after 1121 events had occurred, in a prespecified stepwise order: first in patients with adenocarcinoma who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line therapy, then in all...... a median follow-up of 31·7 months (IQR 27·8-36·1), overall survival was significantly improved for patients with adenocarcinoma histology who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line treatment in the docetaxel plus nintedanib group (206 patients) compared with those in the docetaxel plus...

  14. A Model to Predict the Use of Surgical Resection for Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Andersen, Stina W; Beckett, Laurel A; Melnikow, Joy; Kelly, Karen; Cooke, David T; Brown, Lisa M; Canter, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    For advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy are the primary treatments. Although surgical intervention in these patients is associated with improved survival, the effect of selection bias is poorly defined. Our objective was to characterize selection bias and identify potential surgical candidates by constructing a Surgical Selection Score (SSS). Patients with clinical stage IIIA, IIIB, or IV non-small cell lung cancer were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2012. Logistic regression was used to develop the SSS based on clinical characteristics. Estimated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess discrimination performance of the SSS. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare patients with similar SSSs. We identified 300,572 patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, or IV non-small cell lung cancer without missing data; 6% (18,701) underwent surgical intervention. The surgical cohort was 57% stage IIIA (n = 10,650), 19% stage IIIB (n = 3,483), and 24% stage IV (n = 4,568). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve from the best-fit logistic regression model in the training and validation sets were not significantly different, at 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.83) and 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.83). The range of SSS is 43 to 1,141. As expected, SSS was a good predictor of survival. Within each quartile of SSS, patients in the surgical group had significantly longer survival than nonsurgical patients (p < 0.001). A prediction model for selection of patients for surgical intervention was created. Once validated and prospectively tested, this model may be used to identify patients who may benefit from surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for nodal staging in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Coutinho

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer staging has recently evolved to include endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA for nodal assessment. Aim: Evaluate the performance and safety of EBUS-TBNA as a key component of a staging algorithm for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC and as a single investigation technique for diagnosis and staging of NSCLC. Methods: Patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for NSCLC staging at our institution between April 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014 were consecutively included with prospective data collection. EBUS-TBNA was performed under general anesthesia through a rigid scope. Results: A total of 122 patients, 84.4% males, mean age 64.2 years. Histological type: 78 (63.9% adenocarcinoma, 33 (27.0% squamous cell carcinoma, 11 (8.9% undifferentiated/other NSCLC. A total of 435 lymph node stations were punctured. Median number of nodes per patient was 4. EBUS-TBNA nodal staging: 63 (51.6% N0; 8 (6.5% N1; 34 (27.9% N2, and 17 (13.9% N3. EBUS-TBNA was the primary diagnostic procedure in 27 (22.1% patients. EBUS-TBNA NSCLC staging had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy rate of 83.3, 100, 100, 86.1, and 91.8%, respectively. No complications were attributable to the procedure. Conclusion: A comprehensive lung cancer staging strategy that includes EBUS-TBNA seems to be safe and effective. Our EBUS-TBNA performance and safety in this particular setting was in line with previously published reports. Additionally, our study showed that, in selected patients, lung cancer diagnosis and staging are achievable with a single endoscopic technique. Keywords: EBUS-TBNA, Non-small cell lung carcinoma, Nodal staging

  17. Socioeconomic position and surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard Starr, Laila; Osler, Merete; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Register 2001-2008 (date of diagnosis, histology, stage, and treatment), the Central Population Register (vital status), the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research (socioeconomic position), and the Danish Hospital Discharge Register (comorbidity). Logistic regression analyses were performed overall...... was associated with greater odds for no surgery in stage I and stage II patients as was living alone for stage I patients. Comorbidity, a short diagnostic interval and small diagnostic volume were all associated with higher odds for not undergoing surgery; but these factors did not appear to explain...... the association with income or living alone for early-stage NSCLC patients. CONCLUSION: Early-stage NSCLC patients with low income or who live alone are less likely to undergo surgery than those with a high income or who live with a partner, even after control for possible explanatory factors. Thus, even...

  18. EGFR mutation positive stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer : Treatment beyond progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrijn eVan Assche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of death from cancer for both men en women. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease, but is only marginally effective. In about 30% of patients with advanced NSCLC in East Asia and in 10-15% in Western countries, EGFR mutations are found. In this population, first-line treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI erlotinib, gefitinib or afatinib is recommended. The treatment beyond progression is less well-defined. In this paper we present 3 patients, EGFR mutation positive, with local progression after an initial treatment with TKI. These patients were treated with local radiotherapy. TKI was temporarily stopped and restarted after radiotherapy. We give an overview of the literature and discuss the different treatment options in case of progression after TKI: TKI continuation with or without chemotherapy, TKI continuation with local therapy, alternative dosing or switch to next-generation TKI or combination therapy. There are different options for treatment beyond progression in EGFR mutation positive metastatic NSCLC, but the optimal strategy is still to be defined. Further research on this topic is ongoing.

  19. Clinical Prognosis of Superior Versus Basal Segment Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Yoshinori; Tsutani, Yasuhiro; Tsubokawa, Norifumi; Misumi, Keizo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Okada, Morihito

    2017-12-01

    Despite its extensive size, variations in the clinicopathologic features of tumors in the lower lobe have been little studied. The present study investigated the prognostic differences in tumors originating from the superior and basal segments of the lower lobe in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Data of 134 patients who underwent lobectomy or segmentectomy with systematic nodal dissection for clinical stage I, radiologically solid-dominant, non-small cell lung cancer in the superior segment (n = 60) or basal segment (n = 74) between April 2007 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Factors affecting survival were assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analyses. Prognosis in the superior segment group was worse than that in the basal segment group (5-year overall survival rates 62.6% versus 89.9%, p = 0.0072; and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates 54.4% versus 75.7%, p = 0.032). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, a superior segment tumor was an independent factor for poor overall survival (hazard ratio 3.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 13.5, p = 0.010) and recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 2.90, 95% confidence interval: 1.20 to 7.00, p = 0.008). The superior segment group tended to have more pathologic mediastinal lymph node metastases than the basal segment group (15.0% versus 5.4%, p = 0.080). Tumor location was a prognostic factor for clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer in the lower lobe. Patients with superior segment tumors had worse prognosis than patients with basal segment tumors, with more metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hou (Jun)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNSCLC is a highly heterogeneous malignancy with a poor prognosis. Treatment for NSCLC is currently based on a combination of pathological staging and histological classification. Recently, gene expression-based NSCLC profiling is proven a superior approach to stratify cancer cases with

  1. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  2. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Hyoung Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Uiversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication.

  3. The Quality of Staging Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Netherlands: Data From the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, David Jonathan; Ten Berge, Martijn Geert; Daniels, Johannes Marlene; Versteegh, Michaël Ignatius; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla Jacqueline; Wouters, Michael Wilhelmus; Schreurs, Wilhelmina Hendrika

    2016-11-01

    Clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) determines the initial treatment offered to a patient. The similarity between clinical and pathologic staging in some studies is as low as 50%, and others publish results as high as 91%. The Dutch Lung Surgery Audit is a clinical database that registers the clinical and pathologic TNM of almost all NSCLC patients who undergo operations in the Netherlands. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of clinical staging of NSCLC. Prospective data were derived from the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit in 2013 and 2014. Patients were included if they had undergone a surgical resection for stage IA to IIIB NSCLC without neoadjuvant treatment and had a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan as part of the clinical workup. Clinical (c)TNM and pathologic (p)TNM were compared, and whether discrepancy was based on tumor or nodal staging was determined. From 2,834 patients identified, 2,336 (82.4%) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and had complete data. Of these 2,336, 1,276 (54.6%) were staged accurately, 707 (30.3%) were clinically understaged, and 353 (15.1%) were clinically overstaged. In the understaged group, 346 patients had a higher pN stage (14.8%), of which 148 patients had unforeseen N2 disease (6.3%). In the overstaged group, 133 patients had a cN that was higher than the pN (5.7%). Accuracy of NSCLC staging in the Netherlands is low (54.6%), even in the era of positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Especially accurate nodal staging remains challenging. Future efforts should include the identification of specific pitfalls in NSCLC staging. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Stage N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang DU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The clinical value of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in stage N2 nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is controversy. The aim of this study is to analyze the efficacy of PORT in subgroup of stage N2 NSCLC, which can help clinicians to choose proper patients for PORT. Methods Clinical data of 359 patients with stage N2 NSCLC treated with radical surgery between Mar. 2000 and Jul. 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and one hundred and four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. First, the group of patients were analyzed to evaluate the factors affecting the overall survival. The all patients were divided based on tumor size and the number of lymph node metastasis station (single station or multiple station so as to evaluate the role of PORT. The endpoint was overall survival (OS and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the OS, LRFS and Log-rank was used to compare the difference in OS and LRFS between different groups. Results The median duration of follow-up was 2.3 years. 224 patients died. The median survival was 1.5 years and 1, 3, 5-year survival were 78%, 38% and 26%. Univariate analysis showed tumor size, the number of lymph node metastasis station and PORT were correlated with OS. Among patients, 5-year survival rates in PORT and non-PORT were 29% and 24% (P=0.047 respectively. In subgroups, PORT was related with high survival in patients with multiple station N2 compared to non-PORT: 36% vs 20% (P=0.013 and 33% vs 15% (P=0.002 in patients in patients with tumor size > 3 cm. Also, it was related with low local recurrence compared to non-PORT: 65% vs 48% (P=0.006 and 62% vs 48% (P=0.033. Conclusion PORT can improve overall survival for N2 NSCLC, especially the patients with the factors as follows: tumor size > 3 cm and multiple station N2 can benefit from PORT more or less.

  5. Increasing the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of "mildly positive" mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).

  6. The usefulness of attenuation corrected FDG-PET for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Hee Jong; Zo, Jae Ill

    1999-12-01

    Attenuation-corrected image can provide more accurate detection of small lesions and lesions deep in the body. But, the clinical need for attenuation-corrected of PET images is controversial. We undertook the retrospective study to compare the accuracy of attenuation corrected FDG-PET with that of uncorrected FDG-PET for the mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Transmission and emission FDG-PET (TE-PET) scan was performed in 15 patients (Group I)with potentially resectable NSCLC from March, 1999 to November, 1999, and emission PET (E-PET) in 36 (Group II) from September, 1997 to July, 1998. Extensive dissection (418 nodes in Group I, 1101 in Group II) of ipsi- and contralateral mediastinal nodal stations was done at thoracotomy. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic staging results (gold standard). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of TE-PET for mediastinal nodal staging were 43 %, 88 %, 67 %, 75 %, 64 %, and those of E-PET were 88%, 71 %, 75 %, 47 %, 95 % (p>0.05). When analyzed by individual nodal group, the sensitivity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of TE-PET were 25 %, 84 %, 72 %, 81%, and those of E-PET were 60 %, 87%, 82%, 47%, 92 % (p>0.05). In our study, attenuation correction of emission PET scan does not improve mediastinal staging of lung cancer.

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy of histologically proven inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Zimmermann, Frank; Boehm, Eva; Schill, Sabine; Schoenknecht, Christine; Thamm, Reinhard; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten; Geinitz, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report patterns of failure of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in inoperable patients with histologically confirmed stage I NSCLC. Materials and methods: Ninety-two inoperable patients (median age: 75 years) with clinically staged, histologically proven T1 (n = 31) or T2 (n = 61), N0, M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this study. Treatment consisted of 3–5 fractions with 7–15 Gy per fraction prescribed to the 60% isodose. Results: Freedom from local recurrence at 1, 3 and 5 years was 89%, 83% and 83%, respectively. All 10 local failures were observed in patients with T2 tumors. Isolated regional recurrence was observed in 7.6%. The crude rate of distant progression was 20.7%. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 79%, 38% and 17% with a median survival of 29 months. Disease specific survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 93%, 64% and 48%. Karnofsky performance status, T stage, gross tumor volume and tumor location had no significant impact on overall and disease specific survival. SBRT was generally well tolerated and all patients completed therapy as planned. Conclusion: SBRT for stage I lung cancer is very well tolerated in this patient cohort with significant cardiopulmonal comorbidity and results in excellent local control rates, although a considerable portion develops regional and distant metastases.

  8. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: Unsolved questions and frontiers ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingze; Kong, Li; Jiao, Qinghua; Li, Minghuan; Yu, Jingming

    2017-08-10

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has been recognized as a standard alternative treatment to surgery for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Guaranteed local control rates over 90% makes oncologists wonder whether SABR is qualified enough to challenge surgery in operable patients. The role of SABR for centrally located lesions would be another question because of the increased risk of severe toxic effect. Plenty of studies suggest that optimization of dose regimen and appropriate case selection would be helpful. Additionally, the effect of adjuvant therapy following SABR in selected patients is worth looking forward, given that it significantly reduced risk of recurrence after complete resection. A consensus about salvage treatment after SABR also needs, given the current diversity of options. Finally, witnessing the emergence of proton therapy and immunotherapy, we believe that the future of SABR lay behind these novel forms of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  10. National patterns of care and outcomes after combined modality therapy for stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aalok P; Crabtree, Traves D; Bell, Jennifer M; Guthrie, Tracey J; Robinson, Clifford G; Morgensztern, Daniel; Colditz, Graham A; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, A Sasha; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Patterson, G Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F; Puri, Varun

    2014-05-01

    The role of surgery in addition to chemotherapy and radiation for stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. Because there are limited data on the benefit from surgery in this setting, we evaluated the use of combined modality therapy nationally and explored the outcomes with and without the addition of surgery. Patient variables and treatment-related outcomes were abstracted for patients with clinical stage IIIA NSCLC from the National Cancer Database. Patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation were compared with those undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery (CRS) in any sequence. Between 1998 and 2010, 61,339 patients underwent combined modality treatment for clinical stage IIIA NSCLC. Of these, 51,979 (84.7%) received chemotherapy and radiation while 9360 (15.3%) underwent CRS. Patients in the CRS group were younger, more likely female patients and Caucasians, and had smaller tumors and lower Charlson comorbidity scores. The 30-day surgical mortality was 200 of 8993 (2.2%). The median overall survival favored the CRS group in both unmatched (32.4 months versus 15.7 months, p therapy seem to have better long-term survival.

  11. Survival in Operated Early and Local Advanced-Stage (IA-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsuk Taylan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The early and local advanced stages (IA-IIIA of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC warrant the curative treatment approach of surgery. However, despite the surgical approach, survival depends on a number of factors. The aim of the study was to examine the factors that affect survival in operated NSCLC patients with these stages. Methods: A cohort of 231 operated patients with IA, IB, IIA, IIB, and IIIA stages of NSCLC were analyzed. The effects of age, sex, comorbidity, performance status, histopathology of the tumor, T stage, N stage, pleural invasion, surgical resection type and postoperative resection margin invasion on the survival of the patients were examined with Kaplan-Meier and Cox Regression analyses. Results: Advanced age (OR=1.042 for every passing year, CI=1.020-1.064, adenocarcinoma histopathology (OR=1.676 CI=1.178-2.384, N2 invasion (OR=2.389 CI=1.46-4.239, pleural invasion (OR=2.403 CI=1.569-3.678, resection margin invasion (OR=2.401, CI=1.141-5.048 and pneumonectomy as the type of surgical operation (OR=2.313, CI=1.467-3.647 were found to be independent prognostic factors of mortality. Conclusion: Follow-up of the NSCLC cases with advanced age, an adenocarcinoma type, visceral pleural invasion, N2-lymph node invasion, a history of pneumonectomy, and a resection margin invasion should be undertaken more atten­tively during planning of surgical operation and postoperative period. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (2: 125-133

  12. Sarcopenia is a novel poor prognostic factor in male patients with pathological Stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Toda, Michihito; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, and has a risk of adverse outcomes such as disability, poor quality of life and death. As prognosis depends not only on disease aggressiveness, but also on a patient's physical condition, sarcopenia can predict survival in patients with various cancer types. However, its effects on postoperative prognosis in patients with localized non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have never been reported. We retrospectively investigated 215 male patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC. L3 muscle index is defined as the cross-section area of muscle at the third lumbar vertebra level, normalized for height, and is a clinical measurement of sarcopenia. We then investigated the effect of preoperative sarcopenia on their postoperative prognosis. Our 215 subjects included 30 patients with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with body mass index, nutritional condition, serum CYFRA 21-1 level and pathological stage, but not with preoperative respiratory function or performance status. Frequency of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage period or causes of death were not correlated with the presence of sarcopenia. The sarcopenia group had a significantly shorter median overall survival (32 months) than the no-sarcopenia group. Sarcopenia might not affect short-term outcomes in patients with early-stage lung cancer. Sarcopenia was a predictor of poor prognosis in male patients with Stage I NSCLC. As sarcopenic patients with NSCLC patients are at risk for significantly worse outcomes, their treatments require careful planning, even for those with Stage I disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  14. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

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    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a small academic hospital experience

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    Oren B Factor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective(s: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been shown to have increased local control and overall survival relative to conventional external beam radiation therapy in patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Excellent rates of local control have been demonstrated both in clinical trials as well as in single-center studies at large academic institutions. However, there is limited data on the experiences of small academic hospitals with SBRT for Stage I NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to report the local control and overall survival rates in patients treated with SBRT for Stage I NSCLC at Winthrop-University Hospital (WUH, a small academic hospital. Materials/Methods: This is a retrospective review of 78 Stage I central and peripheral NSCLC tumors treated between December 2006 and July 2012 with SBRT at WUH. Treatment was given utilizing fiducials and a respiratory tracking system. If the fiducials were not trackable, a spine tracking system was used for tumor localization. CT-based planning was performed using the ray trace algorithm. Treatment was delivered over 4 consecutive days for central tumors to a dose of 4800 cGy delivered in 4 fractions. Peripheral tumors were treated to a dose of 6000 cGy in 3 consecutive fractions. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate local control and overall survival. Results: The median age was 78.5 years. 54% of the patient population was female. 67% of the tumors were Stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were Stage IB. 53% of the tumors were adenocarcinomas and 29% were squamous cell carcinomas, with the remainder being of unknown histology or NSCLC, not otherwise specified The 2-year local control rate was 87%, and the two-year overall survival was 68%. Conclusions: Our findings support that local control and overall survival at a small academic hospital are comparable to that of larger academic institutions' published experiences with SBRT for

  16. A Quantitative CT Imaging Signature Predicts Survival and Complements Established Prognosticators in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juheon; Li, Bailiang; Cui, Yi; Sun, Xiaoli; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming; Gensheimer, Michael F; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian; Li, Ruijiang

    2018-01-10

    Prognostic biomarkers are needed to guide the management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This work aims to develop an image-based prognostic signature and assess its complementary value to existing biomarkers. We retrospectively analyzed data of stage I NSCLC in 8 cohorts. On the basis of an analysis of 39 computed tomography (CT) features characterizing tumor and its relation to neighboring pleura, we developed a prognostic signature in an institutional cohort (n = 117) and tested it in an external cohort (n = 88). A third cohort of 89 patients with CT and gene expression data was used to create a surrogate genomic signature of the imaging signature. We conducted further validation using data from 5 gene expression cohorts (n = 639) and built a composite signature by integrating with the cell-cycle progression (CCP) score and clinical variables. An imaging signature consisting of a pleural contact index and normalized inverse difference was significantly associated with overall survival in both imaging cohorts (P = .0005 and P = .0009). Functional enrichment analysis revealed that genes highly correlated with the imaging signature were related to immune response, such as lymphocyte activation and chemotaxis (false discovery rate CCP score. A composite signature outperformed the genomic surrogate, CCP score, and clinical model alone (P < .01) regarding concordance index (0.70 vs 0.62-0.63). The proposed CT imaging signature reflects fundamental biological differences in tumors and predicts overall survival in patients with stage I NSCLC. When combined with established prognosticators, the imaging signature improves survival prediction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer: the role of the patient in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, S; Nuyttens, J J M E; de Mol, M; Aerts, J G J V; Maat, A P W M; Birim, Ö; Bogers, A J J C; Takkenberg, J J M

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role and experience of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient in decision making process concerning treatment selection in the current clinical practice. Stage I-II NSCLC patients (surgery 55 patients, SBRT 29 patients, median age 68) were included in this prospective study and completed a questionnaire that explored: (1) perceived patient knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, (2) experience with current clinical decision making, and (3) the information that the patient reported to have received from their treating physician. This was assessed by multiple-choice, 1-5 Likert Scale, and open questions. The Decisional Conflict Scale was used to assess the decisional conflict. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured with SF-36 questionnaire. In 19% of patients, there was self-reported perceived lack of knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options. Seventy-four percent of patients felt that they were sufficiently involved in decision-making by their physician, and 81% found it important to be involved in decision making. Forty percent experienced decisional conflict, and one-in-five patients to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. Subscores with regard to feeling uninformed and on uncertainty, contributed the most to decisional conflict, as 36% felt uninformed and 17% of patients were not satisfied with their decision. HRQoL was not influenced by patient experience with decision-making or patient preferences for shared decision making. Dutch early-stage NSCLC patients find it important to be involved in treatment decision making. Yet a substantial proportion experiences decisional conflict and feels uninformed. Better patient information and/or involvement in treatment-decision-making is needed in order to improve patient knowledge and hopefully reduce decisional conflict.

  18. Radiation therapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 75 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masaya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Katano, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1992, 32 patients aged 75 and older with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were given definitive radiation therapy. These patients did not undergo surgery because of old age, poor cardiac/pulmonary condition, or refusal to give consent. The mean age was 79 years, and 11 patients were over 80 years old. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients and adenocarcinoma in 7. The clinical T and N stage was T1N0 in 4 patients, T2N0 in 9, and T2N0 in 19. The total dose of radiation therapy given to each patient exceeded 60 Gy using 10-MV X-rays. The treatment was completed in all 32 patients without treatment-related complications. The 2- and 5-year overall actuarial survival rates were 40% and 16%, respectively. Eleven intercurrent deaths occurred, including 7 patients who died of heart disease. The 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 57% and 36%, respectively. None of the patients developed severe pneumonitis requiring hospitalization. All but three patients received radiation therapy on an inpatient basis. The mean duration of the hospital stay for initial treatment was 56 days, and mean ratio to total survival period (mean 739 days) was 8%. Although many elderly patients have concurrent medical complications such as heart disease and chronic pulmonary disease, the present study showed that elderly patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC can expert a realistic probability of long-term survival with definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  19. Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubels, Rutger J; Mokhles, Sahar; Andrinopoulou, Eleni R; Braat, Cornelia; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C van der; Aluwini, Shafak; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2–3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months. During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: −0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years. QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment

  20. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  1. Smoking habits of patients with newly diagnosed stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.; Bonner, J.A.; McGinnis, W.L.; Stella, P.; Marks, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to assess the smoking habits and changes in the cigarette smoking habits of patients prior to, at the time of and after the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer who had agreed to enter a phase III North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial comparing twice daily thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) given with chemotherapy to once daily TRT given with chemotherapy were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their past and present cigarette smoking habits. This questionnaire included information regarding the number of years of smoking, number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day and the time frame of smoking history. Subsequently, patients were given questionnaires to assess changes in smoking history at the halfway point of treatment, and during follow-up visits. Results: Of the 140 patients who were entered on the above noted trial, 132 filled out baseline questionnaires and were the subject of this study. Of these 132 patients, 126 (95%) had either smoked cigarettes in the past or smoked at the time of study entry. The median pack years of smoking. (years of smoking x packs per day) was 43 with a range of 3-169 pack years. Of the 126 patients with a smoking history, 124 provided information regarding the status of their smoking at the time of entry on the study: 89 (72%) claimed to have quit smoking and, 35 (28%) reported that they continued to smoke an average of one pack per day. Of the 89 patients who had quit smoking, roughly one third had quit within the month before study entry and 45% had quit during the 8 month period prior to entry on the study. Of the 35 patients who continued to smoke at the time of entry on the study, 21 indicated that they stopped smoking during the period following randomization. Hence 10% of the original 140 patients entered on study continued to smoke an average of one

  2. Prognosis of stage pIIIA non small cell lung cancer after mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misthos, P; Sepsas, E; Kokotsakis, J; Skottis, I; Lioulias, A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the impact of systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLD) and mediastinal lymph node sampling (MLS) on the long-term results of patients suffering from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 disease (pIIIA/N2). From 1999 to 2002, patients with NSCLC in stage pIIIA/N2 were retrospectively classified according to MLD or MLS procedure. Several clinical and pathological factors such as overall survival, disease-free interval, and complications were recorded and analyzed. Ninety-seven (64%) patients were subjected to MLD and 54 (35%) to MLS. Comparison between the two studied groups disclosed more frequent detection of one station pN2 nodes in MLS specimens (p <0.001), while skip metastasis was more often encountered after MLD (p=0.05). Duration of the operation, amount of postoperative bleeding and incidence of prolonged air leak were not significantly different between MLD and MLS groups. Cox regression analysis of all cases disclosed squamous histology as the only favorable factor of survival. The disease-free interval was significantly longer after MLD (p <0.001). Although radical lymphadenectomy did not offer significant prolongation of survival, the disease-free interval was significantly longer after MLD compared with MLS.

  3. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viteri Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93% patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients.

  4. Definitive radiation therapy for medically inoperable patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, K.; Mitsuhashi, N.; Saito, Y.; Nakayama, Y.; Katano, S.; Furuta, M.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, T.; Niibe, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment for medically inoperable patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: From 1976 through 1989, 84 patients with clinical stage I and II NSCLC were treated with definitive RT alone at Gunma University hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV X-rays using antero-posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 90 Gy (35 pts; 60-69 Gy, 39 pts; 70-74 Gy, 10 pts; ≥ 80 Gy) with once-daily standard fractionation. Results: The two and five-year survival rates were 74% and 31% for 28 patients with stage I disease, as compared with 40% and 19% for 56 patients with stage II respectively (p<0.05). Although there was no significant difference of survival rates by the histologic subtypes, in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma there were more long-term survivors. Fifty-three patients with tumors less than 5 cm in diameter had an infield progression rate of 14% at two years, in comparison with 38% of 31 patients with tumors greater than 5 cm (p<0.05). Overall distant failure occurred in 57% of the patients with smaller tumors and in 80% of the patients with larger tumors (p<0.05). The difference of survival rates for these two groups was statistically significant (p<0.005). Ten patients given a total dose of 80Gy or over had only 17% local progression at the time of last follow-up, however they had not been alive beyond three years because they developed pulmonary insufficiency due to severe stenosis of the proximal bronchus. For age and sex, there were no significant differences in survival, however, patients with performance status of 0-1 lived longer than those with a status of 2 or more (MST 24 versus 13 months; p=0.06). Conclusion: The tumor size was the most important factor not only for local control but also for distant failure. It was also suggested that the optimal radiation dose for medically inoperable stage I

  5. Nodal Stage of Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Its Effect on Recurrence Patterns and Overall Survival

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    Varlotto, John M., E-mail: john.varlotto@umassmemorial.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Yao, Aaron N. [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); DeCamp, Malcolm M. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ramakrishna, Satvik [Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Recht, Abe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Flickinger, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Andrei, Adin [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Reed, Michael F. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Heart and Vascular Institute, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Toth, Jennifer W. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Fizgerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zheng, Xiao [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Shelkey, Julie [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 involvement. We investigated the relationship between nodal stage and local-regional recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR) and overall survival (OS) for patients having an R0 resection. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional database of consecutive patients undergoing R0 resection for stage I-IIIA NSCLC from 1995 to 2008 was used. Patients receiving any radiation therapy before relapse were excluded. A total of 1241, 202, and 125 patients were identified with N0, N1, and N2 involvement, respectively; 161 patients received chemotherapy. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated for LR and DR as first sites of failure, and Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for OS. Competing risk analysis and proportional hazards models were used to examine LR, DR, and OS. Independent variables included age, sex, surgical procedure, extent of lymph node sampling, histology, lymphatic or vascular invasion, tumor size, tumor grade, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and visceral pleural invasion. Results: The median follow-up time was 28.7 months. Patients with N1 or N2 nodal stage had rates of LR similar to those of patients with N0 disease, but were at significantly increased risk for both DR (N1, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.59; P=.001; N2, HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.55-3.48; P<.001) and death (N1, HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18-1.81; P<.001; N2, HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.78-3.04; P<.001). LR was associated with squamous histology, visceral pleural involvement, tumor size, age, wedge resection, and segmentectomy. The most frequent site of LR was the mediastinum. Conclusions: Our investigation demonstrated that nodal stage is directly associated with DR and OS but not with LR. Thus, even some patients with, N0-N1 disease are at relatively high risk of local recurrence. Prospective

  6. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  7. Absence of toxicity with hypofractionated 3-dimensional radiation therapy for inoperable, early stage non-small cell lung cancer

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    Vuong Te

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated radiotherapy may overcome repopulation in rapidly proliferating tumors such as lung cancer. It is more convenient for the patients and reduces health care costs. This study reports our results on patients with medically inoperable, early stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with hypofractionation. Materials and methods Stage T1-2N0 NSCLC patients were treated with hypofractionation alone, 52.5 Gy/15 fractions, in 3 weeks, with 3-dimensional conformal planning. T1-2N1 patients with the hilar lymphnode close to the primary tumor were also eligible for this treatment. We did not use any approach to reduce respiratory motion, but it was monitored in all patients. Elective nodal radiotherapy was not performed. Routine follow up included assessment for acute and late toxicity and radiological tumor response. Median follow up time was 29 months for the surviving patients. Results Thirty-two patients with a median age of 76 years, T1 = 15 and T2 = 17, were treated. Median planning target volume (PTV volume was 150cc and median V16 of both lungs was 13%. The most important finding of this study is that toxicity was minimal. Two patients had grade ≤ 2 acute pneumonitis and 3 had mild (grade 1 acute esophagitis. There was no late toxicity. Actuarial 1 and 2-year overall survival rates are 78% and 56%, cancer specific survival rates (CSS are 90% and 74%, and local relapse free survival rates are 93% and 76% respectively. Conclusion 3-D planning, involved field hypofractionation at a dose of 52.5 Gy in 15 daily fractions is safe, well tolerated and easy radiation treatment for medically inoperable lung cancer patients. It shortens by half the traditional treatment. Results compare favorably with previously published studies. Further studies are needed to compare similar technique with other treatments such as surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy.

  8. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  9. Percutaneous microwave ablation for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the elderly: a promising outlook

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    Acksteiner, Christian; Steinke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a relatively new minimally invasive treatment option for lung cancer with substantially lower morbidity and mortality than surgery. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and follow-up imaging of MWA in the elderly aged 75 years and above. Eleven percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were performed in 10 patients aged 75 years and older. All but one patient were treated with a high-powered MWA system delivering maximally 140 W. Follow-up with CT and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was carried out over a maximum period of 30 months and a median period of 12 months. There were no peri-procedural deaths or major complications. Seven patients were disease free at the time of manuscript submission. Three patients showed growth of the treated lesions, one patient aged 90 years deceased due to unknown cause after approximately 18 months. One patient presented with local progression and disseminated metastatic disease at 12 months; he is still alive. One patient showed increasing soft tissue at the ablation site 15 months post-treatment. Three consecutive core biopsies over 2 months failed to confirm tumour recurrence. MWA therapy is a promising option of treating early-stage NSCLC in the elderly with good treatment outcome and negligible morbidity. Determining successful treatment outcome may be challenging at times as local tissue increase and PET-CT positivity do not seem to necessarily correlate with recurrence of malignancy.

  10. THROMBOCYTOSIS AS PROGNOSTIC FACTOR FOR SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER TREATED WITH FIRST- LINE CHEMOTHERAPY.

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    Deyan Davidov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate elevated platelet count as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with advanced (stage IIIB/ IV non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC receiving first- line chemotherapy. Methods: From 2005 to 2009 three hundreds forty seven consecutive patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, treated in Department of Medical Oncology, UMHAT "Dr Georgi Stranski" entered the study. The therapeutic regimens included intravenous administration of platinum- based doublets. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. The influence of pretreatment thrombocytosis as prognostic factor for survival was analyzed using multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. Results: Elevated platelet counts were found in 78 patients. The overall survival for patients without elevated platelet counts was 9,6 months versus 6,9 months for these with thrombocytosis. In multivariate analysis as independent poor prognostic factors were identified: stage, performance status and elevated platelet counts. Conclusions: These results indicated that platelet counts as well as some clinical pathologic characteristics could be useful prognostic factors in patients with unresectable NSCLC.

  11. Percutaneous thermal ablation for stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: long-term follow-up.

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    Narsule, Chaitan K; Sridhar, Praveen; Nair, Divya; Gupta, Avneesh; Oommen, Roy G; Ebright, Michael I; Litle, Virginia R; Fernando, Hiran C

    2017-10-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective curative therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many patients are unable to tolerate resection secondary to poor reserve or comorbid disease. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are methods of percutaneous thermal ablation that can be used to treat medically inoperable patients with NSCLC. We present long-term outcomes following thermal ablation of stage IA NSCLC from a single center. Patients with stage IA NSCLC and factors precluding resection who underwent RFA or MWA from July 2005 to September 2009 were studied. CT and PET-CT scans were performed at 3 and 6 month intervals, respectively, for first 24 months of follow-up. Factors associated with local progression (LP) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent 21 RFA and 4 MWA for a total of 25 ablations. Fifteen patients had T1a and six patients had T1b tumors. Mean follow-up was 42 months, median survival was 39 months, and OS at three years was 52%. There was no significant difference in median survival between T1a nodules and T1b nodules (36 vs . 39 months, P=0.29) or for RFA and MWA (36 vs . 50 months, P=0.80). Ten patients had LP (47.6%), at a median time of 35 months. There was no significant difference in LP between T1a and T1b tumors (22 vs . 35 months, P=0.94) or RFA and MWA (35 vs . 17 months, P=0.18). Median OS with LP was 32 months compared to 39 months without LP (P=0.68). Three patients underwent repeat ablations. Mean time to LP following repeat ablation was 14.75 months. One patient had two repeat ablations and was disease free at 40-month follow-up. Thermal ablation effectively treated or controlled stage IA NSCLC in medically inoperable patients. Three-year OS exceeded 50%, and LP did not affect OS. Therefore, thermal ablation is a viable option for medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC.

  12. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Osti, Mattia Falchetto [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Agolli, Linda, E-mail: lindaagolli@yahoo.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  13. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  14. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  15. Complete resection of the primary lesion improves survival of certain patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Shinohara, Shinji; Kuwata, Taiji; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Soichi; Hirai, Ayako; Yoneda, Kazue; Kuroda, Kouji; Imanishi, Naoko; Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2017-12-01

    The standard treatment for patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is systemic chemotherapy. However, certain patients, such as those with oligometastasis or M1a disease undergo resection of the primary lesion. We conducted a retrospective review of the records of 1,471 consecutive patients with NSCLC who underwent resection of the primary lesion for between June 2005 and May 2016. The present study included 38 patients with stage IV NSCLC who underwent complete resection of the primary lesion as first-line treatment. The median follow-up duration for the 38 patients (27 men) was 17.7 months (range, 1-82.3 months). The T factors were T1/T2/T3/T4 in 4/16/12/6 patients, respectively. The N factors were N0/N1/N2/N3 in 16/8/12/2 patients, respectively. The M factors were M1a/M1b/M1c in 19/13/6 patients, respectively. Of the 19 M1a patients, 11 were classified as cM0. We introduced the novel classification M-better/M-worse. M-better includes cM0 patients and M1b and M1c patients in whom all lesions have been locally controlled. M-worse includes cM1a patients and M1b and M1c patients in whom lesions cannot be locally controlled. The new M-better/M-worse statuses were 24/14 patients, respectively. The histology of NSCLC was adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma/others in 30/5/3 patients, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate was 29%, and the median survival time was 725 days. Squamous cell carcinoma and M-worse were significant factors predicting poor outcomes (P=0.0017, P=0.0007, respectively). Even for stage IV NSCLC patients, resection of the primary lesion may be beneficial, especially for those with M-better status and those not diagnosed with squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC).

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy using tomotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung carcinoma: analysis of intrafaction tumour motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, Drexell Hunter; Feigenberg, Steven; Walter, Robert; Wissing, Dennis; Patel, Bijal; Wu, Terry; Rosen, Lane

    2014-01-01

    Intrafraction tumour motion in helical tomotherapy was investigated by comparing pre- and mid-fraction CT scans in patients with early non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to assess the efficacy of a 7-mm margin around gross tumour volumes (GTVs) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirty patients with early-stage NSCLC received SBRT in four or five fractions for a total of 141 treatments. A slow positron emission tomography/CT scan was fused with the simulation CT to determine the GTV. A planning target volume was created by placing an isotropic margin of 7mm around the GTV. Data were retrospectively analyzed to assess translational tumour positional changes along the x, y and z axes and vector changes in millimeters from the pretreatment megavoltage (MV)-CT to the mid-fraction MV-CT. Average movements for all 141 treatment days along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±2.3, −0.3±3.0 and 0.9±3.0mm, respectively. Average movements for each patient along the x, y and z axes were 0.5±1.5, −0.2±2.0 and 0.9±1.9mm, respectively. Average vector displacement was 4.3±2.4mm for all treatment days and 4.2±1.7mm for each patient. Of 141 treatments, 137 (97.2%) fell within 7.0mm in all axes. The addition of a 7-mm margin to the GTV for patients receiving SBRT for NSCLC using tomotherapy is adequate to account for tumour movement. Mid-fraction CT scans proved to be valuable in assessing intrafraction tumour motion.

  17. Risk factors of brain metastases in completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer

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    Ding Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM is one of the most common failures of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC after combined-modality therapy. The outcome of trials on prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has prompted us to identify the highest-risk subset most likely to benefit from PCI. Focusing on patients with completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 (pIIIA-N2 NSCLC, we aimed to assess risk factors of BM and to define the highest-risk subset. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, the records of 217 consecutive patients with pIIIA-N2 NSCLC in our institution were reviewed. The cumulative incidence of BM was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and differences between the groups were analyzed using log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied to assess risk factors of BM. Results Fifty-three (24.4 % patients developed BM at some point during their clinical course. On multivariate analysis, non-squamous cell cancer (relative risk [RR]: 4.13, 95 % CI: 1.86–9.19; P = 0.001 and the ratio of metastatic to examined nodes or lymph node ratio (LNR ≥ 30 % (RR: 3.33, 95 % CI: 1.79–6.18; P = 0.000 were found to be associated with an increased risk of BM. In patients with non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 %, the 5-year actuarial risk of BM was 57.3 %. Conclusions In NSCLC, patients with completely resected pIIIA-N2 non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 % are at the highest risk for BM, and are most likely to benefit from PCI. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of PCI on this subset of patients.

  18. The role of radiation therapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Impact of clinical nodal stage on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Furuta, Masaya; Saito, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 46 patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without malignant effusion were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV x-rays using antero posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose; 66 Gy) with once daily standard fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 22% and 10% respectively with a median survival time (MST) of 10 months. The survival of 18 patients with stage N0-2 disease was significantly better than the 28 patients with stage N3 disease (MST 21 versus 9 months; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival based on age and sex. However, there was a borderline difference in survival rates between patients with a performance status of 0-1 and those with status of 2-3 (p=0.06). Three patients with squamous cell carcinoma were alive after 5 years and were without disease progression. No patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma were free of disease after 5 years. These results provide support for the use of definitive RT to manage those patients with limited stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma not extending to N3 stage. (author)

  19. Nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study

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    Babu KG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available K Govind Babu,1 Kumar Prabhash,2 Ashok K Vaid,3 Bhawna Sirohi,3 Ravi B Diwakar,4 Raghunadha Rao,5 Madhuchanda Kar,6 Hemant Malhotra,7 Shona Nag,8 Chanchal Goswami,9 Vinod Raina,10 Ravi Mohan111Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 2Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, 3Artemis Health Institute, Delhi, 4Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 5Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 6B R Singh Hospital, Kolkata, 7Birla Cancer Centre, Jaipur, 8Jehangir Hospital, Pune, 9B P Poddar Hospital and Medical Research Ltd, Kolkata, 10Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, 11King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel and carboplatin versus chemotherapy alone in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.Methods: This multicenter, open-label, Phase II study randomized 110 patients to receive nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy (nimotuzumab group or chemotherapy alone (control group, and comprised concomitant, maintenance, and follow-up phases. Nimotuzumab 200 mg was administered once weekly for 13 weeks during the first two phases with four cycles of chemotherapy and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and carboplatin (area under the curve 5 mg/mL*min every 3 weeks for a maximum of four cycles during the concomitant phase. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (sum of complete response and partial response. Secondary endpoints, ie, overall survival and progression-free survival, were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Efficacy was evaluated on the intent-to-treat and efficacy-evaluable sets. Safety was assessed from adverse event and serious adverse event data.Results: The objective response rate was significantly higher in the nimotuzumab group than in the control group in the intent-to-treat population (54% versus 34.5%; P=0.04. A complete response and partial response were achieved in 3

  20. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  1. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

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    Karam SD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,1 Robert L Hong,1,2 Nimrah Baig,1 Gregory J Gagnon,4 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr1,21Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Frederick Memorial Hospital, Frederick, MD, USAIntroduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT.Methods: A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED was 105.6 (range 37.50–180, and the median age was 73 (65–90 years. No patient received concurrent chemotherapy.Results: With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02, while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04. Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05. Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006. There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached

  2. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Fried, David V. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Division of Quantitative Sciences, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  3. Impact of Examined Lymph Node Count on Precise Staging and Long-Term Survival of Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Wenhua; He, Jiaxi; Shen, Yaxing

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the correlation between the number of examined lymph nodes (ELNs) and correct staging and long-term survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by using large databases and determined the minimal threshold for the ELN count. Methods Data from a Chinese multi-institution...

  4. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  5. Randomized controlled trial of resection versus radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy in stage IIIA-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerbeeck, J.P. van; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Schil, P.E. van; Legrand, C.; Smit, E.F.; Schramel, F.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Biesma, B.; Debruyne, C.; Zandwijk, N. van; Splinter, T.A.; Giaccone, G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Induction chemotherapy before surgical resection increases survival compared with surgical resection alone in patients with stage IIIA-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We hypothesized that, following a response to induction chemotherapy, surgical resection would be superior to

  6. Randomized controlled trial of resection versus radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy in stage IIIA-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan); G.W.P.M. Kramer (Gijs); P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); C. Legrand; E.F. Smit (Egbert); F.M.N.H. Schramel (Franz); V.C.G. Tjan-Heijnen (Vivianne); B. Biesma (Bonne); C. Debruyne (Channa); N. van Zandwijk (Nico); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Induction chemotherapy before surgical resection increases survival compared with surgical resection alone in patients with stage IIIA-N2 non - small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We hypothesized that, following a response to induction chemotherapy, surgical resection would be

  7. Impact of staging with 18F-FDG-PET on outcome of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer: PET identifies potential survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, S.M.; Reimold, M.; Bares, R.; Friedel, G.; Paulsen, F.; Hehr, T.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Budach, W.; Kotzerke, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of FDG-PET staging on treatment results of neo-adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We compared prospectively the outcome of two patient groups with stage III NSCLC undergoing the same neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy (NARCT). In one group, FDG-PET was part of the pretherapeutic staging, whereas in the other group, no PET scans were performed. One hundred and eighty-eight patients with advanced stage III NSCLC were selected for a phase II trial of NARCT. The first 115 patients underwent conventional workup (CWU) and FDG-PET before inclusion (group I); the remaining 73 patients underwent CWU only (group II). All patients were followed up according to a standardised protocol for at least 11 months (up to 64 months). Overall survival and disease-free survival were used as parameters of therapeutic success and analysed statistically. After staging, 157/188 patients were included in the clinical trial. Thirty-one were excluded owing to the results of FDG-PET, in most cases because of the detection of previously unknown distant metastases. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were significantly longer in patients of group I stratified by FDG-PET than in group II (p=0.006 and 0.02 respectively). Another significant factor for survival was complete tumour resection (p=0.02). Gender, histological tumour type, tumour grade and UICC stage had no significant influence. Pretherapeutic staging by FDG-PET significantly influences the results of NARCT and subsequent surgery by identifying patients not eligible for curative treatment. (orig.)

  8. Platinum based doublet cross over therapy for advanced stage non small cell lung cancer? A better survival option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum based doublet chemotherapy namely the cisplatin/carboplatin based etopiside or gemcitabine therapy forms the therapy of choice, for patients with advanced non small cell carcinoma of the lung. Here we report two cases were unusual cross over was done from gemcitabine-to cisplatin-doublet chemotherapy resulting in unexpectedly better clinical and radiological response.

  9. Correlation among genetic variations of c-MET in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jianchun; Yang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Jun; Zhuo, Minglei; Wang, Zhijie; An, Tongtong; Bai, Hua; Wang, Jie

    2018-01-05

    The purpose of our research was to determine the correlation of amplification, protein expression and somatic mutation of c-MET in IIIb-IV stage NSCLC (Non-small cell lung cancer). We also explored correlation of c-MET variation with clinical outcome. c-MET expression was observed in 28.6% (56/196) cases, and among those 13.8% (27/196) were shown to be FISH positive. Only 2.67% patients in this study carried the c-MET mutation. Cases with c-MET FISH positive were all IHC positive ,but in IHC positive cases, only half were FISH positive. Among patients with IHC 2+ staining, 35.5% was FISH positive, while cases with IHC 3+ staining,64% was FISH positive. Both protein expression and copy number of c-MET did not significantly correlate with clinical prognosis in these patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. IHC could be used as a preliminary screening method for c-MET copy number amplification and should be confirmed by FISH only in IHC positive case which facilitate selection of ALK or MET inhibitor therapy. c-MET gene copy number, protein expression and somatic mutation for exon 14 were detected by fluorescent- In-Situ -Hybridization (FISH), Immunohistochemistry (IHC), and Denaturing-High-Performance-Liquid-Chromatography (DHPLC), respectively, in 196 NSCLC patients. The relationship between c-MET abnormalities and clinical outcome of targeted therapy was analyzed by McNemar's test.

  10. UFT plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Its application to outpatient practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Tokujiro; Koga, Tadashi; Nomiyama, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT) and cisplatin is active and less toxic for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This treatment is likely to be applied to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, especially in the outpatient setting. Ten patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received the UFT plus cisplatin treatment combined with concurrent radiotherapy. The chemotherapeutic regimen consisted of oral administration of UFT 400 mg/m 2 daily and venous infusion of cisplatin 20-25 mg/m 2 on days 8-10. The administration of cisplatin was repeated every 3-4 weeks. Thoracic radiation started on day 8, and was completed to a total dose of 60-70 Gy. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4) occurred in 2 patients (esophagitis 2, leukopenia/neutropenia 1) with no treatment-related death. There were 7 partial responses (response rate 70.0%; 95% confidence interval (C.I.), 41.6-98.4%). The median survival time was 18.7 months with a 1-year survival rate of 77.8%. Two patients uneventfully received the treatment in an outpatient setting. With regard to the quality of life of patients, UFT plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy might be the treatment of choice for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer. (author)

  11. The role of positron emission tomography in mediastinal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Amico, Andrea; Turska-d'Amico, Maria; Jarzab, Barbara; Zielinski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    To examine the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in evaluating the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to histopathology results. The prospective study was conducted at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of the Pulmonary Hospital in Zakopane, Poland, from September 2008 to August 2012 and comprised patients with radiologically-suspected lung cancer. All patients underwent histological verification by either mediastinoscopy alone or thoracotomy with mediastinal lymphanedectomy. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography data sets were compared with the results of the histopathology examinations. There were 80 patients in the study. In the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes, computed tomography was able to detect 9(11.25%) true-positive, 17(21.25%) false-positive, 40(50%) true-negative and 14(17.5%) false-negative cases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the method were found to be 39%, 70% and 61% respectively, while the positive and negative predictive values were 35% and 74%. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography yielded 15(18.75%) true-positive, 12(15%) false-positive, 46(57.5%) true-negative and 7(8.75%) false-negative cases. Sensitivity was 68% while specificity was 79%. The accuracy was 96%, and the positive and negative predictive values were 55% and 87% respectively. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography had higher diagnostic accuracy than computed tomography in assessing mediastinal lymph nodes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. However, a positive test requires histopathology confirmation.

  12. Control of Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis with Efalizumab: 24-Week, Open-Label, Phase IIIb/IV Latin American Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Fernando M; Petri, Valeria; Campbell, Gladys Am; Dorantes, Gladys Leon; López, Magdalina; Galimberti, Ricardo L; Valdez, Raúl P; de Arruda, Lucia F; Guerra, Mario Amaya; Chouela, Edgardo N; Licu, Daiana

    2009-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a debilitating, chronic inflammatory systemic disease affecting around 2% of the South American population. Biological therapies offer the possibility of long-term therapy with improved safety and efficacy. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, open-label, single-arm, Phase IIIb/IV study of adult patients (18-75 years) with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who were candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy. Patients received efalizumab subcutaneously (1.0 mg/kg/wk). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving a Physician Global Assessment (PGA) rating of "excellent" or "cleared" at Week 24. Safety outcomes were adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and abnormalities on laboratory tests. RESULTS: Of 189 patients included in the intent-to-treat and safety populations, 104 (55.0%) were of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. At Week 24, 92/189 (48.7%) patients achieved or maintained a PGA rating of "excellent" or "cleared". AEs were reported by 161/189 (85.2%) patients, SAEs by 21/189 (11.1%). One patient died during the study (meningoencephalitis). Laboratory findings were consistent with previous experience. CONCLUSIONS: Efalizumab demonstrated sustained control of psoriasis up to 24 weeks in patients from Latin America, confirming results seen in Phase III studies conducted in North America and Europe.

  13. Satellite pulmonary nodule in the same lobe (T4N0) should not be staged as IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Pereira, Sara J; Miller, Daniel L; Cerfolio, Robert James

    2006-11-01

    Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer depends on stage. Patients with T4 lesions represent a heterogeneous group. A case-control study of patients with pathologically proven, node-negative T4 lesions (T4 N0 M0) was conducted. Patients with T4 disease were stratified as T4 from a satellite nodule (T4-satellite) or T4 from local invasion (T4-invasion). T4-satellite patients were matched 1:4 for sex and histology with resected control patients with stage IA, IB, and IIA non-small cell lung cancer and matched 1:3 with stage II non-small cell lung cancer. Survival and the maximal standardized uptake value on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans were compared. There were 337 patients, 26 patients with T4-satellite lesions, 25 with T4-invasion lesions, and 286 controls (104 patients with T1 N0 M0, 104 with T2 N0 M0, and 78 with T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0 lesions). The two T4 groups were similar for age, race, sex, and neoadjuvant therapy rates. The 5-year survival was 80% for the T1 N0 M0 patients, 68% for T2 N0 M0, 57% for T4-satellite N0 M0, 45% for T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0, and 30% for the T4-invasion N0 M0 patients (p = 0.016). Multivariate analysis showed that only the type of T4 impacted survival (p = 0.011). The median maximal standardized uptake values of the cancers were 4.2 for T1 N0 M0, 4.8 for T4-satellite, 5.4 for T2 N0 M0, 7.8 for T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0, and 8.8 for the T4-invasion patients. Larger studies are needed; however, patients with T4-satellite non-small cell lung cancer who undergo complete resection have survival and maximal standardized uptake values similar to patients with stage IB and stage IIA lesions. Their survival is significantly better than those with T4-invasion. Patients with T4-satellite N0 M0 lesions should not be classified as stage IIIB and should not be grouped with patients with T4-invasion, and resection should be considered.

  14. Myeloid clusters are associated with a pro-metastatic environment and poor prognosis in smoking-related early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhang

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the role of myeloid cell clusters in uninvolved regional lymph nodes from early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.Uninvolved regional lymph node sections from 67 patients with stage I-III resected non-small cell lung cancer were immunostained to detect myeloid clusters, STAT3 activity and occult metastasis. Anthracosis intensity, myeloid cluster infiltration associated with anthracosis and pSTAT3 level were scored and correlated with patient survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with prognostic variables. Human macrophages were used for in vitro nicotine treatment.CD68+ myeloid clusters associated with anthracosis and with an immunosuppressive and metastasis-promoting phenotype and elevated overall STAT3 activity were observed in uninvolved lymph nodes. In patients with a smoking history, myeloid cluster score significantly correlated with anthracosis intensity and pSTAT3 level (P<0.01. Nicotine activated STAT3 in macrophages in long-term culture. CD68+ myeloid clusters correlated and colocalized with occult metastasis. Myeloid cluster score was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.049 and was associated with survival by Kaplan-Maier estimate in patients with a history of smoking (P = 0.055. The combination of myeloid cluster score with either lymph node stage or pSTAT3 level defined two populations with a significant difference in survival (P = 0.024 and P = 0.004, respectively.Myeloid clusters facilitate a pro-metastatic microenvironment in uninvolved regional lymph nodes and associate with occult metastasis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Myeloid cluster score is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with a history of smoking, and may present a novel method to inform therapy choices in the adjuvant setting. Further validation studies are warranted.

  15. Radiation induced chemotherapy sensitization in trimodality therapy of stage 3 non small cell lung cancer. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takita, H. [Millard Fillmore Hospital, Buffalo (United States); Shin, K. H. [CCS Oncology Center, Kenmore, NY, (United States)

    2000-12-01

    The overall cure rate of locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remains poor. Although there have been encouraging reports of preoperative use of chemotherapy, more recent trend is the trimodal approach of radiation, chemo, and surgical-therapies. With the trimodal therapy, increased tumor response and resectability are reported, however, there are increased treatment related side effects. It was observed that a relatively small dose of radiation given prior to induction chemotherapy greatly enhanced the tumor response to the chemotherapy without increased toxicity. A total of 18 patients (8 3. A and 10 3.B) were initially given 20 Gy of radiation therapy in 10 fractions and then received 2 courses of Taxol combination chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 83% (15/18) and 13 out of 18 patients underwent surgery. There was one postoperative death (not therapy related). It is speculated that the small dose of radiation therapy may have sensitized the tumor to subsequent chemotherapy, and it was suggested a new hypothesis of radiation therapy induced chemotherapy sensitization.

  16. Comparison of clinical and surgical-pathological staging in IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd; Wehrmann, Caren; Oberhuber, Alexander; Schelzig, Hubert; Barth, Thomas; Orend, Karl Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneous group of IIIA NSCLC patients requires careful preoperative clinical staging as tumor size and lymph node involvement guide treatment. The purpose of our study was to analyze the correctness of clinical staging in IIIA patients. Retrospective analysis of all patients resected due to lung cancer that had been staged IIIA either clinically using invasive and noninvasive techniques or surgical-pathologically after surgical resection. Correctness, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of clinical staging were calculated. From our tumor database, 49 patients who met the inclusion criteria were identified. The histology of the primary tumor included adenocarcinoma (53%), squamous cell carcinoma (41%), and other (6%). Preoperative clinical staging consisted of computed tomography (CT), integrated positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT), bronchoscopy, and mediastinoscopy. The predominant surgical procedures performed were lobectomies (57%) and pneumonectomies (29%). Clinical staging for UICC, T and N stage was correct in 36.7, 38.7, and 40.8%, respectively. In terms of T4 stage, sensitivity was 28.5%, specificity was 80.9%, positive predictive value was 20%, and negative predictive value was 87.1%. As for N2 involvement, we found a sensitivity of 66.6% and a specificity of 35.7%. Positive and negative predictive values for N2 involvement were 43.7 and 58.8% in that order. Despite multimodal preoperative invasive and noninvasive staging techniques, the correctness of clinical staging in IIIA NSCLC patients is low. Hence, in doubt more invasive staging or probatory thoracotomy should be performed not to deny potentially curative surgery in those patients.

  17. Risk Factors Associated With Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shiming; Zeng, Zhaochong; Ye, Luxi; Huang, Yan; He, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is the most frequent acute pulmonary toxicity following stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer. Here, we investigate clinical and dosimetric factors associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A total of 67 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who received stereotactic body radiation therapy at our institution were enrolled, and their clinicopathological parameters and dosimetric parameters were recorded and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 26.4 months (range: 7-48 months). In univariate analysis, tumor size ( P = .041), mean lung dose ( P = .028), V2.5 ( P = .024), V5 ( P = .014), V10 ( P = .004), V20 ( P = .024), V30 ( P = .020), V40 ( P = .040), and V50 ( P = 0.040) were associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, V10 ( P = .049) was significantly associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. In conclusion, this study found that tumor size, mean lung dose, and V2.5 to V50 were risk factors markedly associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. Our data suggested that lung V10 was the most significant factor, and optimizing lung V10 may reduce the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. For both central and peripheral stage I lung cancer, rate of radiation pneumonitis ≥grade 2 was low after stereotactic body radiation therapy with appropriate fraction dose.

  18. First-line systemic treatment of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer in Asia: consensus statement from the Asian Oncology Summit 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Ross A; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cho, Byoung Chul; Yang, Chih-Hsin; Liao, Meilin; Lim, Wan-Teck; Goldstraw, Peter; Mok, Tony S

    2009-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an increasing global challenge, especially in low-income countries. Most guidelines for the management of advanced-stage NSCLC have limited effect in countries with resource constraints. Following a systematic literature search, we present an overview of the management of advanced-stage NSCLC in the first-line setting, discuss resources required for systemic therapy, and provide treatment recommendations stratified to four resources levels. Treatment guidelines appropriate for different resource levels offer a realistic approach to management of advanced-stage NSCLC, by recognising the limitations of a particular health-care system. Although there are many barriers to cancer control in low-resource countries, these can be overcome by using measures that are culturally appropriate, economically feasible, and evidence-based. Initiatives include strategic planning, tobacco control, training of health-care workers, access to therapeutic agents, acquisition of information, public education, and alliances with established institutions and international organisations.

  19. Increasing Rates of No Treatment in Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: A Propensity Matched Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Daly, Megan E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Chiu, Chi-Lu; Cooke, David T; Brown, Lisa M; Melnikow, Joy; Kelly, Karen; Canter, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Variation in treatment and survival outcomes for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is high among patients with stage III or IV, but untreated NSCLC patients have not been critically analyzed to evaluate for improvable outcomes. We evaluated treatment trends and their association with oncologic outcomes for NSCLC, hypothesizing that there are a substantial number of untreated patients who are similar to patients who undergo treatment. Methods Linear regression was used to calculate trends in utilization of treatment. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression modeling were used to determine predictors of receiving treatment. Propensity-matching was used to compare survival among subsets of treated versus untreated patients. Results Patients with primary NSCLC were identified from the National Cancer Data base from 1998–2012 and 21% (190,539) of patients received no treatment. For stage IIIA and IV, the proportion of untreated patients increased over the study period by 0.21% and 0.4% respectively (p= 0.003, <0.0001). Regardless of stage, untreated patients had significantly shorter OS (p<0.0001). Propensity-matched analyses of 6,144 stage IIIA patient pairs treated with chemoradiation vs no treatment confirmed shorter OS for untreated patients (Median, 16.5 vs 6.1 months, p <0.0001). For 19,046 stage IV patient pairs treated with chemotherapy vs no treatment, similar results were obtained (Median OS, 9.3 vs 2.0 months, p<0.0001). Conclusions The proportion of untreated stage IIIA and IV patients is increasing. Survival outcomes among advanced stage patients are superior with treatment, independent of selection bias. The benefits and risks of treatment should be carefully assessed prior to choosing to forego treatment. PMID:28109804

  20. Results of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z0050 trial: the utility of positron emission tomography in staging potentially operable non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Carolyn E; Harpole, David H; Posther, Katherine E; Woolson, Sandra L; Downey, Robert J; Meyers, Bryan F; Heelan, Robert T; MacApinlac, Homer A; Jung, Sin-Ho; Silvestri, Gerard A; Siegel, Barry A; Rusch, Valerie W

    2003-12-01

    The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group undertook a trial to ascertain whether positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose could detect lesions that would preclude pulmonary resection in a group of patients with documented or suspected non-small cell lung cancer found to be surgical candidates by routine staging procedures. A total of 303 eligible patients registered from 22 institutions underwent positron emission tomography after routine staging (computed tomography of chest and upper abdomen, bone scintigraphy, and brain imaging) had deemed their tumors resectable. Positive findings required confirmatory procedures. Positron emission tomography was significantly better than computed tomography for the detection of N1 and N2/N3 disease (42% vs 13%, P =.0177, and 58% vs 32%, P =.0041, respectively). The negative predictive value of positron emission tomography for mediastinal node disease was 87%. Unsuspected metastatic disease or second primary malignancy was identified in 18 of 287 patients (6.3%). Distant metastatic disease indicated in 19 of 287 patients (6.6%) was subsequently shown to be benign. By correctly identifying advanced disease (stages IIIA, IIIB, and IV) or benign lesions, positron emission tomography potentially avoided unnecessary thoracotomy in 1 of 5 patients. In patients with suspected or proven non-small cell lung cancer considered resectable by standard staging procedures, positron emission tomography can prevent nontherapeutic thoracotomy in a significant number of cases. Use of positron emission tomography for mediastinal staging should not be relied on as a sole staging modality, and positive findings should be confirmed by mediastinoscopy. Metastatic disease, especially a single site, identified by positron emission tomography requires further confirmatory evaluation.

  1. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT for N staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Hadžihasanović, Besima

    2017-08-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities of non-invasive diagnostic imaging methods, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and CT, in clinical N staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Retrospective clinical study included 50 patients with diagnosed NSCLC who have undergone PET/CT for the purpose of disease staging. The International association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) nodal mapping system was used for analysis of nodal disease. Data regarding CT N-staging and PET/CT Nstaging were recorded. Two methods were compared using χ2 test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Statistical analysis showed that although there were some differences in determining the N stage between CT and PET/CT, these methods were in significant correlation. CT and PET/CT findings established the same N stage in 74% of the patients. In five patients based on PET/CT findings the staging was changed from operable to inoperable, while in four patients staging was changed from inoperable to operable. Conclusion PET/CT and CT are noninvasive methods that can be reliably used for N staging of NSCLC. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  2. Interpreting survival data from clinical trials of surgery versus stereotactic body radiation therapy in operable Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Pamela; Keogan, Kathleen; Crabtree, Traves; Colditz, Graham; Broderick, Stephen; Puri, Varun; Meyers, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    To identify the variability of short- and long-term survival outcomes among closed Phase III randomized controlled trials with small sample sizes comparing SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) and surgical resection in operable clinical Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent surgery at our institution meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria for STARS (Randomized Study to Compare CyberKnife to Surgical Resection in Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), ROSEL (Trial of Either Surgery or Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Early Stage (IA) Lung Cancer), or both were identified. Bootstrapping analysis provided 10,000 iterations to depict 30-day mortality and three-year overall survival (OS) in cohorts of 16 patients (to simulate the STARS surgical arm), 27 patients (to simulate the pooled surgical arms of STARS and ROSEL), and 515 (to simulate the goal accrual for the surgical arm of STARS). From 2000 to 2012, 749/873 (86%) of clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent resection were eligible for STARS only, ROSEL only, or both studies. When patients eligible for STARS only were repeatedly sampled with a cohort size of 16, the 3-year OS rates ranged from 27 to 100%, and 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 25%. When patients eligible for ROSEL or for both STARS and ROSEL underwent bootstrapping with n=27, the 3-year OS ranged from 46 to 100%, while 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 15%. Finally, when patients eligible for STARS were repeatedly sampled in groups of 515, 3-year OS narrowed to 70-85%, with 30-day mortality varying from 0 to 4%. Short- and long-term survival outcomes from trials with small sample sizes are extremely variable and unreliable for extrapolation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sublobar resection versus lobectomy in patients aged ≤35 years with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: a SEER database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chang; Wang, Rui; Pan, Xufeng; Huang, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yangyang; Yang, Jun; Shi, Jianxin

    2017-11-01

    Sublobar resection has been increasingly adopted in elderly patients with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the equivalency of sublobar resection versus lobectomy among young patients with stage IA NSCLC is unknown. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry, we identified patients aged ≤35 years who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2013 with pathological stage IA NSCLC and treated with sublobar resection or lobectomy. We used propensity-score matching to minimize the effect of potential confounders that existed in the baseline characteristics of patients in different treatment groups. The overall survival (OS) and lung cancer-specific survival (LCSS) rates of patients who underwent sublobar resection or lobectomy were compared in stratification analysis. Overall, we identified 188 patients who had stage IA disease, 32 (17%) of whom underwent sublobar resection. We did not identify any difference in OS/LCSS between patients who received sublobar resection versus lobectomy before (log-rank p = 0.6354) or after (log-rank p = 0.5305) adjusting for propensity scores. Similarly, we still could not recognize different OS/LCSS rates among stratified T stage groups or stratified lymph node-removed groups before or after adjusting for propensity scores. Sublobar resection is not inferior to lobectomy for young patients with stage IA NSCLC. Considering sublobar resection better preserves lung function and has reduced overall morbidity, sublobar resection may be preferable for the treatment of young patients with stage IA NSCLC.

  4. A case of small cell cancer of the breast in a male with synchronous stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Matt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC are extremely rare. Most reports indicate success with therapy directed at the tumor as if it was pulmonary small cell carcinoma Primary small cell carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon form of EPSCC. Differentiating between a primary small cell carcinoma of the breast from metastatic disease to the breast is very important. According to the literature, there have been approximately 70 cases reported worldwide. Of these cases, only two cases are documented in men. Prognosis is varied and depends on stage of disease at presentation. A combination of surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation is required to adequately treat patients with small cell carcinoma of the breast. We present a case of a male patient diagnosed with stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma first and then subsequently diagnosed with a concurrent small cell carcinoma of the breast responding to treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiation.

  5. Does the Method of Radiologic Surveillance Impact Survival Following Resection of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Traves D.; Puri, Varun; Chen, Simon B.; Gierada, David S.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Broderick, Stephen; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Kreisel, Daniel; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Controversy persists regarding appropriate radiographic surveillance strategies following lung cancer resection. We compared the impact of surveillance CT scan (CT) vs. chest radiograph (CXR) in patients who underwent resection for stage I lung cancer. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients undergoing resection for pathologic stage I lung cancer from January 2000–April 2013. After resection, follow-up included routine history and physical exam in conjunction with CXR or CT at the discretion of the treating physician. Identification of successive lung malignancy (i.e. recurrence at any new site or new primary) and survival were recorded. Results There were 554 evaluable patients with 232 undergoing routine postoperative CT and 322 receiving routine CXR. Postoperative five-year survival was 67.8% in the CT group vs. 74.8% in the CXR group (p = 0.603). Successive lung malignancy was found in 27% (63/232) of patients undergoing CT vs. 22% (72/322) receiving CXR (p = 0.19). The mean time from surgery to diagnosis of successive malignancy was 1.93 years for CT vs. 2.56 years for CXR (p = 0.046). For the CT group, 41% (26/63) of successive malignancies were treated with curative intent vs. 40% (29/72) in the CXR group (p = 0.639). Cox-proportional hazard analysis indicated imaging modality (CT vs. CXR) was not associated with survival (p = 0.958). Conclusion Surveillance CT may result in earlier diagnosis of successive malignancy vs. CXR in stage I lung cancer, although no difference in survival was demonstrated. A randomized trial would help determine the impact of postoperative surveillance strategies on survival. PMID:25218540

  6. Non-small cell lung cancer in young adults: presentation and survival in the English National Lung Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A L; Khakwani, A; Free, C M; Tata, L J; Stanley, R A; Peake, M D; Hubbard, R B; Baldwin, D R

    2015-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in young adults is a rare but devastating illness with significant socioeconomic implications, and studies of this patient subgroup are limited. This study employed the National Lung Cancer Audit to compare the clinical features and survival of young adults with NSCLC with the older age groups. A retrospective cohort review using a validated national audit dataset. Data were analysed for the period between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2011. Young adults were defined as between 18 and 39 years, and all others were divided into decade age groups, up to the 80 years and above group. We performed logistic and Cox regression analyses to assess clinical outcomes. Of a total of 1 46 422 patients, 651 (0.5%) were young adults, of whom a higher proportion had adenocarcinoma (48%) than in any other age group. Stage distribution of NSCLC was similar across the age groups and 71% of young patients had stage IIIb/IV. Performance status (PS) was 0-1 for 85%. Young adults were more likely to have surgery and chemotherapy compared with the older age groups and had better overall and post-operative survival. The proportion with adenocarcinoma, better PS and that receiving surgery or chemotherapy diminished progressively with advancing decade age groups. In our cohort of young adults with NSCLC, the majority had good PS despite the same late-stage disease as older patients. They were more likely to have treatment and survive longer than older patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a 14-gene risk score assay to target adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua A; Billings, Paul; Ramsey, Scott D; Dumanois, Robert; Carlson, Josh J

    2014-05-01

    Life Technologies has developed a 14-gene molecular assay that provides information about the risk of death in early stage non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer patients after surgery. The assay can be used to identify patients at highest risk of mortality, informing subsequent treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this novel assay. Patients and Methods. We developed a Markov model to estimate life expectancy, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs for testing versus standard care. Risk-group classification was based on assay-validation studies, and chemotherapy uptake was based on pre- and post-testing recommendations from a study of 58 physicians. We evaluated three chemotherapy-benefit scenarios: moderately predictive (base case), nonpredictive (i.e., the same benefit for each risk group), and strongly predictive. We calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and performed one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results. In the base case, testing and standard-care strategies resulted in 6.81 and 6.66 life years, 3.76 and 3.68 QALYs, and $122,400 and $118,800 in costs, respectively. The ICER was $23,200 per QALY (stage I: $29,200 per QALY; stage II: $12,200 per QALY). The ICER ranged from "dominant" to $92,100 per QALY in the strongly predictive and nonpredictive scenarios. The model was most sensitive to the proportion of high-risk patients receiving chemotherapy and the high-risk hazard ratio. The 14-gene risk score assay strategy was cost-effective in 68% of simulations. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the 14-gene risk score assay may be a cost-effective alternative to standard guideline-based adjuvant chemotherapy decision making in early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

  8. Bevacizumab for the treatment of nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Portugal: a retrospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevinho F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Estevinho1, Marta Soares2, Isabel Azevedo2, Henrique Queiroga3, Bárbara Parente4, Ulisses Brito5, Encarnação Teixeira6, Renato Sotto-Mayor7, António Araújo81Medical Oncology Resident, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 2Medical Oncology Assistant, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 3Coordinator of the Oncological Pneumology Consultation, Pneumology Departament of Hospital S João, Oporto, Portugal; 4Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Vila Nova de Gaia-Espinho Medical Center, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 5Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Faro Hospital, Faro, Portugal; 6Pneumology assistant, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 7Head of Service of Pneumology, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 8Coordinator of Lung Pathology Clinic, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, PortugalIntroduction: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. In patients with nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC stage IIIB/IV treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab led to significant improvements in progression-free and median overall survival (OS.Aim: To report the experience of five Portuguese centers in treating patients with nonsquamous NSCLC in stage IIIB or IV with bevacizumab and chemotherapy regarding survival and toxicity outcomes.Materials and methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter study on patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and chemotherapy from November 2007 to August 2010 through special use permits. We reviewed the medical records, registry of demographic characteristics, treatments provided, treatment responses, adverse

  9. Thoracic staging of non-small-cell lung cancer using integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging: diagnostic value of different MR sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian; Rubbert, Christian; Hild, Florian; Antoch, Gerald; Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Koehler, Jens [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Reis, Henning [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences in simultaneous PET/MR imaging for T staging in non-small-cell lung cancer in relation to histopathology. The study included 28 patients who underwent dedicated thoracic PET/MR imaging before tumour resection. Local tumour staging was performed separately by three readers with each of the following MR sequences together with PET: transverse T2 BLADE, transverse non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, coronal T2 HASTE, and coronal TrueFISP. The staging results were compared with histopathology after resection as the reference standard. Differences in the accuracy of T staging among the MR sequences were evaluated using McNemar's test. Due to multiple testing, Bonferroni correction was applied to prevent accumulation of α errors; p < 0.0024 was considered statistically significant. Compared with histopathology, T-staging accuracy was 69 % with T2 BLADE, 68 % with T2 HASTE, 59 % with contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, 57 % with TrueFISP, 50 % with non-enhanced T1 FLASH, and 45 % and 48 % with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, respectively. Staging accuracy with T2 BLADE was significantly higher than with non-enhanced T1 FLASH and with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientations (p < 0.0024). T2 HASTE had a significantly higher T-staging accuracy than transverse T1 3D-Dixon-VIBE (p < 0.0024). Transverse T2 BLADE images provide the highest accuracy for local tumour staging and should therefore be included in dedicated thoracic PET/MR protocols. As T1 3D Dixon VIBE images acquired for attenuation correction performed significantly worse, this sequence cannot be considered sufficiently accurate for local tumour staging in the thorax. (orig.)

  10. Dual time point FDG PET/CT:Is it useful for lymph node staging in patients with non small cell lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Chang Guhn [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Dual time point (DTP)FDG PET/CT has been shown to be useful for lymph node (LN)staging in patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the LN staging ability of DTP FDG PET/CT in the predominant area of pulmonary tuberculosis. Sixty nine NSCLC patients underwent DTP PET/CT. Regions of interest were placed on each LN of each station, and the maximum SUVs were measured. Three variables were obtained: (1)the SUV on the early scan (SUV{sup early}), (2)the SUV on the delayed scan (SUV{sup delayed}), and (3)the retention index of the SUV (RI). Each patient had one final LN stage and three other LN stages according to the cutoff values of SUV{sup early}, SUV{sup delayed}, and RI. In the LN based analysis, the area under the ROC curve of SUV{sup delayed} (0.884)was significantly larger (p<0.01)than those of SUV{sup early} (0.868)and RI (0.717). Among the three variables, SUV{sup delayed} was more accurate (P<0.01)for detecting the mediastinal LN metastasis than SUV{sup early} and RI. In the patient based analysis, SUV{sup delayed} had correctly determined LN stages in 55 of 69 patients (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy=88.7%, 50.0%, and 79.7%), whereas SUV{sup early} and RI correctly determined LN stages in 53 and 52 patients, respectively. In this study, comparing the diagnostic efficacy of SUV{sup early}, SUV{sup delayed}, and RI for LN staging in patients with NSCLC, SUV{sup delayed} was the most accurate variable for LN staging. DTP PET/CT could provide improved diagnostic accuracy for the LN staging of NSCLC.

  11. Prognostic factors and long term results of neo adjuvant therapy followed by surgery in stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prognosis of stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains poor despite the changes in therapeutic strategies. Objectives: To assess long term results of neo adjuvant therapy followed by surgery for patients with stage IIIA N2 NSCLC and to analyze factors influencing survival. Materials and Methods: The methods adopted include: Retrospective review of medical records of 91 patients with stage IIIA N2 NSCLC, who received neo adjuvant therapy followed by surgery; collection of information on demographic information, staging procedure, preoperative therapy, clinical response, type of resection, pathologic response of tumor, status of lymph nodes and adjuvant chemotherapy; survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier and calculation of prognostic factors using log-rank and Cox regression model. Results: All patients received a platinum-based chemotherapy and 23 (29.1% had an associated radiotherapy. Eighty four patients underwent thoracotomy. Median survival was 26 months (95%CI, 22.6-30.8 months with three and five year survival rates of 31.6 and 20.9%, respectively. Prognostic factors for survival on univariate analysis was clinical response (P = 0.032, complete resection (P = 0.002, pathologic tumor response ( P < 0.001, and lymph nodal down staging (P = 0.001. Multivariate analyses identified complete resection, pathologic tumor response and lymph nodal down staging as independent prognostic factors. Conclusion: Survival of patients with stage IIIA N2 NSCLC who received neo adjuvant therapy is significantly influenced by clinical response, complete resection, pathologic tumor response, and lymph nodal down staging. These results can be helpful in guiding standard clinical practice and evaluating the outcome of neo adjuvant therapy followed by surgery in patients with stage IIIA N2 NSCLC.

  12. Treatment-Related Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Trimodality Approach in Stage IIIA/N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Jeremić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While there are no established pretreatment predictive and prognostic factors in patients with stage IIIA/pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC indicating a benefit to surgery as a part of trimodality approach, little is known about treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors in this setting. A literature search was conducted to identify possible treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors for patients for whom trimodality approach was reported on. Overall survival was the primary endpoint of this study. Of 30 identified studies, there were two phase II studies, 5 “prospective” studies, and 23 retrospective studies. No study was found which specifically looked at treatment-related predictive factors of improved outcomes in trimodality treatment. Of potential treatment-related prognostic factors, the least frequently analyzed factors among 30 available studies were overall pathologic stage after preoperative treatment and UICC downstaging. Evaluation of treatment response before surgery and by pathologic tumor stage after induction therapy were analyzed in slightly more than 40% of studies and found not to influence survival. More frequently studied factors—resection status, degree of tumor regression, and pathologic nodal stage after induction therapy as well as the most frequently studied factor, the treatment (in almost 75% studies—showed no discernible impact on survival, due to conflicting results. Currently, it is impossible to identify any treatment-related predictive or prognostic factors for selecting surgery in the treatment of patients with stage IIIA/pN2 NSCLC.

  13. Study of percutaneous 125I seeds implantation guided by CT in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Mingyao; Yong Yazhi; Luo Bingqing; Wu Xuemei; Chen Lingling; Xie Hongqi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy, feasibility and safety of CT guided percutaneous 125 I seeds implantation in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Clinical data of 16 elderly peripheral stage I NSCLC patients (10 squamous carcinoma and 6 adenocarcinoma; 13 stage I A and 3 stage I B ) who received radioactive 125 I seeds implantation because of refusal or being unsuited to operation or external radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Prescribed dose was 140 - 160 Gy. Under CT guidance, 125 I seeds were implanted percutaneously into tumors for interstitial radiotherapy according to treatment plan system. Results: Mean number of 125 I seeds each patient received was 21.1. 12 complete response (CR) and 4 partial response (PR) were achieved. Total response rate (CR + PR) was 100%. 100% patients completed 10 to 56 months of follow-up, 15, 13, 8 and 6 patients completed 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-years' follow-up, respectively. The median local progression free time was 14 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-year overall survival rate were 60%, 54%, 50% and 33%, respectively (median : 14 months). 7 cases died of non-tumor disease and 5 died of metastasis. No severe complications were observed. Conclusions: CT guided 125 I seeds implantation is a safe, reliable and effective radical treatment method for elderly stage I peripheral NSCLC patients, who refuse to or are unsuitable to operation or external radiotherapy. (authors)

  14. The impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients: the key to improve patient treatment strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretas, Gustavo Oliveira; Guedes, Juliana Barroso; Carvalho, Fernanda Monteiro Castro; Viana, Marcelo; Amaral, Nilson; Lewer, Marcelo Mamede; Elcordis Centro de Diagnosticos Ltda., Contagem, MG; Fundacao Hospitalar do Estado de Minas Gerais; Hospital Julia Kubistchek, Cirurgia Toracica, Belo Horizonte, MG; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer leads the cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women around the world. The most common is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for NSCLC. The positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) can provide molecular and metabolic information, which acquired simultaneously with computed tomography (CT), has proved to be a very useful tool in the cancer diagnosis and staging. Identifying the stage of lung cancer is important to avoid unnecessary surgeries, reducing morbidity and treatment costs. This study aims to examine the impact of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation of patients with NSCLC in the Brazilian reality. Twenty-six patients with histopathologic diagnosis of NSCLC were included. They underwent staging in two separated moments: first with morphological images (x-ray and computed tomography scan) and after with 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The performance of 18 F-FDG PET/CT changed lymph node staging in around 30% of the patients initially classified as potentially operable, with high sensitivity and negative predictive values. Regarding the stage of metastasis, 18 F-FDG PET/CT increased by 11.5% the detection of metastasis not previously detected. About the clinical staging, using the 1 '8F-FDG PET/CT significantly reduced the number of patients classified as potentially operable in the early stages, avoiding the use of unnecessary thoracotomies in 19.2% of patients. The metabolic information obtained by 18 F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated better accuracy when compared to anatomic methods in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. Thus, having important impact on therapeutic strategy and treatment cost related. (author)

  15. Pretreatment prognostic factors in patients with early-stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Milicic, Biljana; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Acimovic, Ljubisa; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate influence of various pretreatment prognostic factors in patients with early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy alone. Patients and Methods: One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with tumor doses of 69.6 Gy, 1.2-Gy, twice-daily fractionation. There were 49 patients with Stage I and 67 patients with Stage II. Eighty patients had Karnofsky performance status (KPS) 90-100 and 95 patients had <5% weight loss. Peripheral tumors were observed in 57 patients. Squamous histology was observed in 70 patients and the majority of patients had concomitant disease (n = 72). Results: The median survival time for all patients was 29 months; 5-year survival was 29%. The median time to local progression and the distant metastasis were not achieved, whereas 5-year local progression-free and distant metastasis-free survivals were 50% and 72%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified KPS, weight loss, location, histology, and the reason for not undergoing surgery as prognostic factors for survival. KPS, location, and histology influenced local progression-free survival, whereas only KPS and weight loss influenced distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis identified KPS and weight loss as the most important prognostic factors of outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with hyperfractionation radiation therapy

  16. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  17. Effectiveness of surgery and individualized high-dose hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy on survival in clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A propensity score matched analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Marcelo F.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Novoa, Nuria M.; Varela, Gonzalo; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with poor pulmonary function or other comorbidities are treated with radiotherapy. The objective of this investigation is to compare the 3-year survival of two early-stage NSCLC populations treated in two different hospitals, either by surgical resection (lobectomy) or by individualized high-dose accelerated radiotherapy, after matching patients by propensity scoring analysis. Methods: A retrospective comparative study has been performed on two series of consecutive patients with cytohistological diagnosis of NSCLC, clinically staged IA by means of PET-scan (radiotherapy group) and pathologically staged IA (surgery group). Results: A total of 157 cases were initially selected for the analysis (110 operated and 47 treated by radiotherapy). Patients in the radiotherapy group were older, with higher comorbidity and lower FEV1% with 3-years probability of survival for operated patients higher than that found for patients treated by radiotherapy. After matching by propensity scoring (using age and FEV1%), differences disappear and 3-years probability of survival had no statistical differences. Conclusions: Although this is a non-randomized retrospective analysis, we have not found 3-years survival differences after matching cases between surgery and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, data presented here support the continuous investigation for non-surgical alternatives in this disease.

  18. Mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer among Australasian thoracic physicians: clinical practice and constraints on minimally invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabscheck, E J; Steinfort, D P; Irving, L B; Hew, M

    2012-06-01

    We determined current practice among Australasian thoracic physicians in the mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We focused on the availability of endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and constraints to its use, as there has been no systematic analysis regarding the availability and uptake of this new technology among thoracic physicians. Physician members of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand were emailed a survey seeking their current approach to three scenarios requiring mediastinal staging of NSCLC. Respondents were also asked for their preferred investigation for each scenario if any current constraints were removed. Relevant demographic information was sought. We received 164 responses from 512 Australasian physicians (34%). Without constraints, EBUS-TBNA was the preferred investigation for all three clinical scenarios, but only 33% of respondents had access to EBUS-TBNA. Constraints included lack of availability and lack of expertise. Reduced EBUS-TBNA access was associated with a number of clinician factors. Australasian thoracic physicians prefer EBUS-TBNA for the mediastinal staging of NSCLC, but access to EBUS-TBNA services is limited. We recommend targeted measures to improve access to EBUS-TBNA use and optimise mediastinal staging of NSCLC. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Preoperative Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index: A predictive and prognostic factor in patients with pathological stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Matsubara, Taichi; Kozuma, Yuka; Haratake, Naoki; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Toyokawa, Gouji; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-01

    Surgical outcomes of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poor. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) is a useful parameter for evaluating nutritional status. We aimed to investigate if preoperative GNRI could be a predictive factor for pathological stage I NSCLC patients. We retrospectively selected 141 consecutive pathological stage I NSCLC patients treated from August 2005 to August 2010. We analyzed their preoperative GNRI in univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses for postoperative recurrence-free survival (RFS). A preoperative abnormal GNRI was significantly associated with postoperative recurrence (P = 0.0107). Univariate analyses showed that serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels (P = 0.0013), preoperative serum albumin level (P preoperative GNRI (P = 0.0009), pleural invasion (P preoperative GNRI (P = 0.0084), CEA level (P = 0.0031), preoperative serum albumin level (P = 0.0041) and pleural invasion (P = 0.0018) were independent prognostic factors. In Kaplan-Meier analysis of RFS, cancer-specific survival (CS), and overall survival (OS) by preoperative GNRI, the abnormal GNRI group had significantly shorter RFS, CS, and OS (5-year RFS, CS, and OS: 52.81% vs. 89.15%; P Preoperative GNRI is a novel prognostic factor for pathological stage I NSCLC patients, which can identify high-risk patients for postoperative recurrence and cancer-related death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, WD; Berlind, CG; Gee, JC; Simone, CB

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  1. Prognostic and predictive role of FOXP3 positive tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs in curatively resected non small cell lung cancer other than stage IA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kose

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality and responsible for 1.6 million deaths per year through world-wide. Surgical resection with negative margin combined with the adjuvant therapy [except for stage IA and IB (<4 cm] is the Standard treatment for early-stage Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Early-stage NSCLC, however, has relapse rate over 40% mostly at distant sites. Therefore, high relapse rate necessitates urgent novel biomarker for these patients. In this study, we aim to evaluate the predictive and prognostic role of FOXP3+ Treg cells along with well defined Clinicohistopathological factors in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. FOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL was examined by immunohistochemical staining from resected early-stage 48 NSCLC patients. Data of patients and FOXP3 expression status along with common clinicohistopathological prognostic factors were evaluated retrospectively. Median age of patients was 62 years-old (range 43–78. Mean follow-up, median overall survival (OS, and disease-free survival (DFS were 49, 49 and 30 months, respectively. FOXP3 expression was positive in 23 (47.9% patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy (4 cycles of cisplatin-vinorelbine was given to 16 patients (33.3% at physician discretion. Patients with a FOXP3 expression of 25% or higher significantly lower OS and DFS when compared with patients with a FOXP3 staining lower than 25% with p-value of 0.016 and 0.032, respectively. In the patients with high FOXP3 expression, platin-based adjuvant chemotherapy had showed a detrimental effect on DFS and OS. These results suggest that FOXP3 expression may be used as useful prognostic biomarker in resected NSCLC. Our findings also suggest that resected NSCLC patients with FOXP3 expression of 25% or higher staining intensity may not get any benefit even disfavor from adjuvant platin chemotherapy.

  2. A phase II study of cisplatin, oral administration of etoposide, OK-432 and radiation therapy for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yoshinao [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Takahashi, Jutaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi [and others

    1998-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of giving cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432 concurrently with conventional radiotherapy (RTx) for patient`s with inoperable stage III, based on the TNM classification according to the International Union against Cancer staging system for lung cancer (1987) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 1992 to December 1994, 31 patients with cytologically or histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC were treated with RTx, to a total dose of 56-64 Gy, with concurrent daily oral administration of etoposide (25 mg) and cisplatin (20 mg) for 5 days during the third or fourth week from the start of RTx. The subcutaneous injection of 1 or 2 KE of OK-432, three times a week, for the duration of radiotherapy also started from the beginning of RTx. The number of eligible patients was 29 (26 men and 3 women). Their mean age was 66 years (range, 55-77 years). Six patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) of 0; 15, 1; 8; 2. Three were stage IIIA, and 26, stage IIIB. Histologically, 2 had adenocarcinoma, 23, squamous cell carcinoma, and 4, large cell carcinoma. In 27 of the 29 patients, the RTx schedule was completed. There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 4 toxicity (according to World Health Organisation criteria) leukopenia (700/{mu}l) was observed in 1 patient. The response rate was 79% and the median survival was 17 months. Survival rates at 1, 2 and 3 years were 62%, 31%, and 21%, respectively. The local failure rate was 51%. The combination of cisplatin, etoposide, and OK-432, given concurrently with conventional RTx is feasible and effective for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (author)

  3. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle in clinical practice: implications for prognosis in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grutsch James F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent manifestation of advanced lung cancer is malnutrition, timely identification and treatment of which can lead to improved patient outcomes. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is an easy-to-use and non-invasive technique to evaluate changes in body composition and nutritional status. We investigated the prognostic role of BIA-derived phase angle in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A case series of 165 stages IIIB and IV NSCLC patients treated at our center. The Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle, independent of stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history. Results 93 were males and 72 females. 61 had stage IIIB disease at diagnosis while 104 had stage IV. The median phase angle was 5.3 degrees (range = 2.9 – 8. Patients with phase angle 5.3 had 12.4 months (95% CI: 10.5 to 18.7; n = 84; (p = 0.02. After adjusting for age, stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history we found that every one degree increase in phase angle was associated with a relative risk of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64 to 0.97, P = 0.02. Conclusion We found BIA-derived phase angle to be an independent prognostic indicator in patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. Nutritional interventions targeted at improving phase angle could potentially lead to an improved survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  4. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Masaharu; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade ≥3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC

  5. Genetic variations in the regulator of G-protein signaling genes are associated with survival in late-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

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    Jingyao Dai

    Full Text Available The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS pathway plays an important role in signaling transduction, cellular activities, and carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variations in RGS gene family may be associated with the response of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients to chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. We selected 95 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 17 RGS genes and genotyped them in 598 late-stage NSCLC patients. Thirteen SNPs were significantly associated with overall survival. Among them, rs2749786 of RGS12 was most significant. Stratified analysis by chemotherapy or chemoradiation further identified SNPs that were associated with overall survival in subgroups. Rs2816312 of RGS1 and rs6689169 of RGS7 were most significant in chemotherapy group and chemoradiotherapy group, respectively. A significant cumulative effect was observed when these SNPs were combined. Survival tree analyses identified potential interactions between rs944343, rs2816312, and rs1122794 in affecting survival time in patients treated with chemotherapy, while the genotype of rs6429264 affected survival in chemoradiation-treated patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the importance of RGS gene family in the survival of late-stage NSCLC patients.

  6. "It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be": a qualitative study of early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sara E; Thomas, Charles R; Deffebach, Mark E; Sukumar, Mithran S; Schipper, Paul H; Tieu, Brandon H; Kee, Andrew Y; Tsen, Andrew C; Slatore, Christopher G

    2017-11-29

    While surgical resection is recommended for most patients with early stage lung cancer, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly utilized. Provider-patient communication regarding risks/benefits of each approach may be a modifiable factor leading to improved patient-centered outcomes. Our objective was to determine a framework and recommended strategies on how to best communicate with patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the post-treatment setting. We qualitatively evaluated the experiences of 11 patients with early clinical stage NSCLC after treatment, with a focus on treatment experience, knowledge obtained, communication, and recommendations. We used conventional content analysis and a patient-centered communication theoretical model to guide our understanding. Five patients received surgery and six received SBRT. Both treatments were generally well-tolerated. Few participants reported communication deficits around receiving follow-up information, although several had remaining questions about their treatment outcome (mainly those who underwent SBRT). They described feeling anxious regarding their first surveillance CT scan and clinician visit. Overall, participants remained satisfied with care because of implicit trust in their clinicians rather than explicit communication. Communication gaps remain but may be addressed by a trusting relationship with the clinician. Patients recommend clinicians give thorough explanations and personalize when possible.

  7. Cost and effectiveness of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Huang, Hsu-Chih; Lin, Yu-Sen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Shieh, Shwn-Huey; Chen, Pin-Ru; Chen, Chein-Kuang; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2014-12-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is a minimally invasive alternative to conventional surgery (CS). We aimed to estimate the short-term cost-effectiveness of VATS vs. CS for clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC-c-stage-I) patients from the payer's perspective (National Health Insurance). We identified NSCLC-c-stage-I patients diagnosed and received surgery within 2007-2009 through a comprehensive population-based database containing cancer and death registries, and reimbursement data. The duration of interest was 1 year. We included potential confounding covariables through literature searching and our own experience, and used a propensity score to construct a 1:1 population for adjustment. Our study population constituted 966 patients. The mean hospital stay [days, standard deviation (SD)] were 14.4 [7] and 16.1 (7.7) for VATS and CS respectively (P=0.002). The mean cost (2013 USD) and survival (year) was $22,316 vs. $21,976 and 0.98 vs. 0.974 for VATS vs. CS. The probability for VATS to be cost-effective (i.e., positive net benefit) was 0.49 & 0.56 at willingness-to-pay (WTP) 50,000 & 100,000 USD/life-year, respectively. We provide the first empirical evidence that when compared to CS, VATS was potentially cost-effective in the short term (1 year) within the common WTP levels in Taiwan.

  8. Radiological differential diagnosis between fibrosis and recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Palombarini, Marcella; Akshija, Ilir; Cammelli, Silvia; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Zompatori, Maurizio; Frezza, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Parenchymal changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) make differential diagnosis between treatment outcomes and disease recurrence often difficult. The purpose of our study was to identify the radiographic features detectable at computed tomography (CT) scan [high-risk features (HRFs)] that allow enough specificity and sensitivity for early detection of recurrence. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent SBRT for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The median delivered dose performed was 50 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to 80% isodose. All patients underwent chest CT scan before SBRT and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months after, and then annually. Each CT scan was evaluated and benign and HRFs were recorded. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-CT was not used routinely. Forty-five patients were included (34 males, 11 females; median age: 77 years; stage IA: 77.8%, stage IB: 22.2%; median follow-up: 21.7 months). Two year and actuarial local control was 77%. HRFs were identified in 20 patients. The most significant predictor of relapse was an enlarging opacity at 12 months (P2 HRFs.

  9. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, Marco; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H; Marrinucci, Dena; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL −1 (range 0–515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL −1 . No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0–178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0–515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0–442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and

  10. Influence of conformal radiotherapy technique on survival after chemoradiotherapy for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, David J; Koshy, Matthew; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-07-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy is a core treatment modality for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although radiotherapy (RT) technologies have advanced dramatically, to the authors' knowledge relatively little is known regarding the importance of irradiation technique on outcome, particularly given the competing risk of distant metastasis. The National Cancer Data Base was used to determine predictors of overall survival (OS) in patients with AJCC stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy, focusing on the importance of conformal RT (CRT). Patients with stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy between 2003 and 2005 in the National Cancer Data Base were included. RT technique was defined as conventional, 3-dimensional-conformal, or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), the latter 2 combined as CRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed for univariable and multivariable analyses of OS. The median, 3-year, and 5-year survival outcomes for the 13,292 patients were 12.9 months, 19%, and 11%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year survival probabilities of patients receiving CRT versus no CRT were 22% versus 19% and 14% versus 11%, respectively (P < .0001). On multivariable analysis, CRT was found to be significantly associated with improved OS (hazards ratio, 0.89). This effect was confirmed on sensitivity analyses, including restricting the cohort to minimum 6-month survivors, young patients with stage IIIA disease, and propensity score-matching. Institutional academic status and patient volume were not found to be associated with OS. CRT was found to be independently associated with a survival advantage. These results reflect the importance of optimal locoregional therapy in patients with stage III NSCLC and provide motivation for further study of advanced RT technologies in patients with NSCLC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  11. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  12. Anxiety After Diagnosis Predicts Lung Cancer-Specific and Overall Survival in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodermaier, Andrea; Lucas, Sarah; Linden, Wolfgang; Olson, Robert

    2017-06-01

    The question as to whether anxiety and depression are related to mortality in patients with lung cancer is inconclusive. Therefore, the present study is examining associations of anxiety and depression in a large representative sample of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Patients (n = 684) were routinely assessed for anxiety and depression with the PsychoSocial Screen for Cancer questionnaire after diagnosis of lung cancer and before treatment initiation between 2004 and 2010. Survival data were retrieved in May 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses had been used as statistical procedures allowing adjustment for demographic, biomedical, and treatment variables. In analyses controlling for demographic, biomedical, and treatment prognosticators, anxiety but not depression was associated with increased lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.07; P = 0.035) and all-cause (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.07; P = 0.005) mortality. Secondary analyses revealed a confounder effect of performance status on the association between depression and mortality, such that the removal of performance status identified a significant relationship of depression on lung cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. In a large population-based sample of patients with non-small cell lung cancer analyses demonstrated associations of anxiety with mortality, adding to the evidence that psychosocial factors might play a role in disease progression in this patient group. Because emotional distress is associated with continued smoking and lack of success of smoking cessation attempts, psychological interventions potentially could influence length of survival in lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Panels of tumor-derived RNA markers in peripheral blood of patients with non-small cell lung cancer: their dependence on age, gender and clinical stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Chih-Feng; Hwang, Yi-Ting; Terng, Harn-Jing; Lee, Shih-Chun; Chao, Tsui-Yi; Chang, Hung; Ho, Ching-Liang; Wu, Yi-Ying; Perng, Wann-Cherng

    2016-08-02

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived gene signatures were investigated for their potential use in the early detection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, 187 patients with NSCLC and 310 age- and gender-matched controls, and an independent set containing 29 patients for validation were included. Eight significant NSCLC-associated genes were identified, including DUSP6, EIF2S3, GRB2, MDM2, NF1, POLDIP2, RNF4, and WEE1. The logistic model containing these significant markers was able to distinguish subjects with NSCLC from controls with an excellent performance, 80.7% sensitivity, 90.6% specificity, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.924. Repeated random sub-sampling for 100 times was used to validate the performance of classification training models with an average AUC of 0.92. Additional cross-validation using the independent set resulted in the sensitivity 75.86%. Furthermore, six age/gender-dependent genes: CPEB4, EIF2S3, GRB2, MCM4, RNF4, and STAT2 were identified using age and gender stratification approach. STAT2 and WEE1 were explored as stage-dependent using stage-stratified subpopulation. We conclude that these logistic models using different signatures for total and stratified samples are potential complementary tools for assessing the risk of NSCLC.

  14. [Intraoperative methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotope tracing for sentinel node mapping in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Shen, Xueyuan; Chen, Jiangyong

    2014-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of intaoperative methylene blue alone and in combination with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotopic tracing for detection of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixty-one patients with operable NSCLC who did not receive previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy were enrolled. Methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid were injected into the subserosal layer adjacent to the tumor, and SLNs were defined as those with blue staining or those containing 3 times more radioactivity than the surrounding tissue detected with a gamma probe. The SLN were removed with systematic lymph node dissection. All the removed lymph nodes were examined histopathologically with HE staining and immunohistochemistry. Methylene blue alone showed a low detection rate (60.0%) and sensitivity (58.33%) for SLNs compared with the combination of methylene blue and isotope tracing (96.15% and 92.86%, respectively). The combination of methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotopic tracing allows accurate detection of the SLNs in early-stage NSCLC.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of strategies introducing FDG-PET into the mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer from the French healthcare system perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzahouri, K.; Lejeune, C.; Woronoff-Lemsi, M.-C.; Arveux, P.; Guillemin, F.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the most cost-effective strategy using PET for mediastinal staging of potentially operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Four decision strategies based on French NSCLC work-up practices for the selection of potential surgical candidates were compared, comprising CT only, PET for negative CT, PET for all with anatomical CT, and CT and PET for all cases. The medical literature was surveyed to obtain values for all variables of interest. Costs were assessed with reimbursements from the French healthcare insurance for the year 1999. Expected cost and life expectancy were calculated for all possible outcomes of each strategy. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of changing variables on the expected cost and life expectancy. RESULTS: Compared with the CT only strategy, CT and PET for all resulted in a relative reduction of 70% of surgery for persons with mediastinal lymph node metastasis. PET for all with anatomical CT was shown to be a cost-effective alternative to the CT only, with life expectancy increased by 0.10 years and expected cost savings of 61 euros. This strategy was more favourable than PET for negative CT. Overall, sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of the results. CONCLUSION: The introduction of thoracic PET for NSCLC staging is potentially cost-effective in France. Further clinical investigation might help to validate this result

  16. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Nan; Shedden, Kerby; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-08-01

    To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Survival prognostic value of morphological and metabolic variables in patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domachevsky, L. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva (Israel); Groshar, D.; Bernstine, H. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Galili, R. [Lady Davis-Carmel Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Haifa (Israel); Saute, M. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important, as patients with resectable disease and poor prognostic variables might benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate SUVmax, SUVmax ratio, CT volume (CTvol), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolisis (TLG) as survival prognostic markers. In addition, we defined two variables; MTV x SUVmax (MTVmax) and CTvol x SUVmax (CTvolmax) and assessed whether they can be used as prognostic markers. Patients with stage I-II NSCLC who underwent 18 F FDG PET/CT and surgery were evaluated. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the association between variables and survival. Similar analysis was performed in cases with no lymph node (LN) involvement. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included (at the end of the study, 140 patients were alive). SUVmax with a cut-off value of 8.2 was significant survival prognostic factor regardless of LN involvement (P = 0.012). In cases with no LN involvement, SUVmax and CTvol (≥7.1 ml) were significant survival prognostic factors with P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively. SUVmax may be a useful prognostic variable in stage I-II NSCLC while morphologic tumour volume might be useful in cases with no lymph node involvement. (orig.)

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of strategies introducing FDG-PET into the mediastinal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer from the French healthcare system perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alzahouri, K. [CEC-Inserm, Service d' Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, C.H.U. de Nancy, Nancy (France); Lejeune, C. [Inserm EMI 01 06, Faculte de Medecine, BP 87900, Dijon (France); Woronoff-Lemsi, M.-C. [Service Pharmacie, Unite Evaluation Medico-economique, Besancon (France); Arveux, P. [Departement d' Information Medicale, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Guillemin, F. [CEC-Inserm, Service d' Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, C.H.U. de Nancy, Nancy (France)]. E-mail: f.guillemin@chu-nancy.fr

    2005-04-01

    AIM: To determine the most cost-effective strategy using PET for mediastinal staging of potentially operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Four decision strategies based on French NSCLC work-up practices for the selection of potential surgical candidates were compared, comprising CT only, PET for negative CT, PET for all with anatomical CT, and CT and PET for all cases. The medical literature was surveyed to obtain values for all variables of interest. Costs were assessed with reimbursements from the French healthcare insurance for the year 1999. Expected cost and life expectancy were calculated for all possible outcomes of each strategy. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of changing variables on the expected cost and life expectancy. RESULTS: Compared with the CT only strategy, CT and PET for all resulted in a relative reduction of 70% of surgery for persons with mediastinal lymph node metastasis. PET for all with anatomical CT was shown to be a cost-effective alternative to the CT only, with life expectancy increased by 0.10 years and expected cost savings of 61 euros. This strategy was more favourable than PET for negative CT. Overall, sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of the results. CONCLUSION: The introduction of thoracic PET for NSCLC staging is potentially cost-effective in France. Further clinical investigation might help to validate this result.

  19. Synergistic effect of Bcl-2 and cyclin A2 on adverse recurrence-free survival in stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Jungho; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2013-03-01

    The prognostic significance of cyclin A2 overexpression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. To understand the effect of cyclin A2 on recurrence in NSCLC, we retrospectively analyzed the expression of Bcl-2, cyclin A2, E-cadherin, Ki-67, and p53 using immunohistochemistry in 635 NSCLCs. Overexpression of cyclin A2 was found in 466 (73%) of 635 NSCLCs, and recurrence occurred in 291 (46%) of 635 NSCLCs with a median follow-up of 5.4 years. The relationship between recurrence and cyclin A2 overexpression was not homogenous by pathologic stage (Breslow-Day test for homogeneity, P = 0.007). Overexpression of cyclin A2 was associated with poor recurrence-free survival (RFS) in 374 stage I NSCLCs (P = 0.02), and RFS was worse in patient with negative expression of Bcl-2 than those with positive expression of Bcl-2. Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that stage I NSCLC patients with overexpression of cyclin A2 and negative expression of Bcl-2 had poorer RFS (hazard ratio = 3.86, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-15.77; P = 0.03) than those with normal expression of cyclin A2 and Bcl-2, after adjusting for age, adjuvant radiotherapy, and histology. Neural network and generalized linear model including cyclin A2 and Bcl-2 showed best performance in the prediction of recurrence; error rates for neural network and generalized linear model were 15% and 12%, respectively. Negative effect of cyclin A2 on RFS in stage I NSCLC was aggravated by negative expression of Bcl-2.

  20. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  1. The Frequency and Clinical Implication of ROS1 and RET Rearrangements in Resected Stage IIIA-N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Fu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the frequency and clinicopathological features of ROS1 and RET rearrangements in N2 node positive stage IIIA (IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, we retrospectively screened 204 cases with a tissue microarray (TMA panel by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and confirmed by direct sequencing and immunohistochemistry (IHC. The relationship between ROS1 or RET rearrangements, clinicopathological features, and prognostic factors were analyzed in resected stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC. Of the 204 cases, 4 cases were confirmed with ROS1 rearrangement, but no RET rearrangement was detected. All 4 ROS1-rearranged cases were adenocarcinomas. The predominant pathological type was acinar pattern in ROS1-rearranged tumors, except for 1 case harboring a mixture acinar and mucous tumor cells. Variants of ROS1 rearrangement were SDC4-ROS1 (E2:E32, SDC4-ROS1 (E4:E32 and SDC4-ROS1 (E4:E34. There was no significant association between ROS1 rearrangement and clinicopathological characteristics. In this cohort, multivariate analysis for overall survival (OS indicated that squamous cell carcinoma and lobectomy were independent predictors of poor prognosis; R0 surgical resection and non-pleural invasion were independent predictors of good prognosis. In resected stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC patients, ROS1-rearranged cases tended to occur in younger patients with adenocarcinomas. The prognosis of resected stage IIIA-N2 is generally considered poor, but patients with ROS1 rearrangement will benefit from the targeted therapy.

  2. Reliable and valid assessment of competence in endoscopic ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konge, L; Vilmann, P; Clementsen, P; Annema, J T; Ringsted, C

    2012-10-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is important in mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Training standards and implementation strategies of this technique are currently under discussion. The aim of this study was to explore the reliability and validity of a newly developed EUS Assessment Tool (EUSAT) designed to measure competence in EUS - FNA for mediastinal staging of NSCLC. A total of 30 patients with proven or suspected NSCLC underwent EUS - FNA for mediastinal staging by three trainees and three experienced physicians. Their performances were assessed prospectively by three experts in EUS under direct observation and again 2 months later in a blinded fashion using digital video-recordings. Based on the assessments, intra-rater reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity were explored. The intra-rater reliability was good (Cronbach's α = 0.80), but comparison of results based on direct observations and blinded video-recordings indicated a significant bias favoring consultants (P = 0.022). Inter-rater reliability was very good (Cronbach's α = 0.93). However, one rater assessing five procedures or two raters each assessing four procedures were necessary to secure a generalizability coefficient of 0.80. The assessment tool demonstrated construct validity by discriminating between trainees and experienced physicians (P = 0.034). Competency in mediastinal staging of NSCLC using EUS and EUS - FNA can be assessed in a reliable and valid way using the EUSAT assessment tool. Measuring and defining competency and training requirements could improve EUS quality and benefit patient care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Detection of Occult Micrometastases in Patients With Clinical Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Analysis of Mature Results of CALGB 9761 (Alliance).

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    Martin, Linda W; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaofei; Herzan, Debra; Gu, Lin; Abraham, Naif; Demmy, Todd L; Detterbeck, Frank C; Groth, Shawn S; Harpole, David H; Krasna, Mark J; Kernstine, Kemp; Kohman, Leslie J; Patterson, G Alexander; Sugarbaker, David J; Vollmer, Robin T; Maddaus, Michael A; Kratzke, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after resection of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are variable, potentially due to undetected occult micrometastases (OM). Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9761 was a prospectively designed study aimed at determining the prognostic significance of OM. Between 1997 and 2002, 502 patients with suspected clinical stage I (T1-2N0M0) NSCLC were prospectively enrolled at 11 institutions. Primary tumor and lymph nodes (LNs) were collected and sent to a central site for molecular analysis. Both were assayed for OM using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for carcinoembryonic antigen. Four hundred eighty-nine of the 502 enrolled patients underwent complete surgical staging. Three hundred four patients (61%) had pathologic stage I NSCLC (T1, 58%; T2, 42%) and were included in the final analysis. Fifty-six percent had adenocarcinomas, 34% had squamous cell carcinomas, and 10% had another histology. LNs from 298 patients were analyzed by IHC; 41 (14%) were IHC-positive (42% in N1 position, 58% in N2 position). Neither overall survival (OS) nor disease-free survival was associated with IHC positivity; however, patients who had IHC-positive N2 LNs had statistically significantly worse survival rates (hazard ratio, 2.04, P = .017). LNs from 256 patients were analyzed by RT-PCR; 176 (69%) were PCR-positive (52% in N1 position, 48% in N2 position). Neither OS nor disease-free survival was associated with PCR positivity. NSCLC tumor markers can be detected in histologically negative LNs by AE1/AE3 IHC and carcinoembryonic antigen RT-PCR. In this prospective, multi-institutional trial, the presence of OM by IHC staining in N2 LNs of patients with NSCLC correlated with decreased OS. The clinical significance of this warrants further investigation. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  5. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  6. The Preoperative Controlling Nutritional Status Score Predicts Survival After Curative Surgery in Patients with Pathological Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Haratake, Naoki; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Takada, Kazuki; Toyokawa, Gouji; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-02-01

    The prognostic Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score is used to evaluate immuno-nutritional conditions and is a predictive factor of postoperative survival in patients with digestive tract cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological features of patients with pathological stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify predictors or prognostic factors of postoperative survival and to investigate the role of preoperative CONUT score in predicting survival. We selected 138 consecutive patients with pathological stage I NSCLC treated from August 2005 to August 2010. We measured their preoperative CONUT score in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses of postoperative survival. A high CONUT score was positively associated with preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level (p=0.0100) and postoperative recurrence (p=0.0767). In multivariate analysis, the preoperative CONUT score [relative risk (RR)=6.058; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.068-113.941; p=0.0407), increasing age (RR=7.858; 95% CI=2.034-36.185; p=0.0029), and pleural invasion (RR=36.615; 95% CI=5.900-362.620; pcancer-specific survival (CS), and overall survival (OS), the group with high CONUT score had a significantly shorter RFS, CS, and OS than did the low-CONUT score group by log-rank test (p=0.0458, p=0.0104 and p=0.0096, respectively). The preoperative CONUT score is both a predictive and prognostic factor in patients with pathological stage I NSCLC. This immuno-nutritional score can indicate patients at high risk of postoperative recurrence and death. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship Between Preoperative Sarcopenia Status and Immuno-nutritional Parameters in Patients with Early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Matsubara, Taichi; Kozuma, Yuka; Haratake, Naoki; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Toyokawa, Gouji; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-01

    Although the skeletal muscle in the region of the third lumbar vertebra (L3) is generally assessed in order to judge sarcopenia, not every patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoes computed tomography including the L3 region. We hypothesized that immuno-nutritional parameters could predict the existence of sarcopenia in patients with NSCLC. The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the correlation between preoperative sarcopenia and immuno-nutritional parameters in patients with early-stage NSCLC. We selected 147 of patients with pathological stage I NSCLC who underwent preoperative measurement of immuno-nutritional parameters and CT including the L3 region. Preoperative sarcopenia was significantly associated with female gender (p=0.0003) and poor prognosis (p=0.0322). In Kaplan-Meier analysis of overall survival (OS) by preoperative sarcopenia status, the sarcopenic group had significantly shorter OS than the non-sarcopenic group (5-year OS: 87.27% vs. 77.37%, p=0.0131, log-rank test). In multivariate analysis, the preoperative sarcopenia status (hazard ratio=5.138; 95% confidence interval=2.305-11.676; pnutritional status score (p=0.0071) and Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) (p<0.0001). Spearman's correlation test showed good significant correlation between preoperative sarcopenia status and GNRI (r=0.348, p<0.0001). The preoperative GNRI is a simple and useful predictor for existence of preoperative sarcopenia which was associated with poor outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Has 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) improved the local tumour control for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Senan, Suresh; Meerbeeck, Jan P. van; Graveland, Wilfried J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims and background: The high local failure rates observed after radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be improved by the use of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Materials and methods: The case-records of 113 patients who were treated with curative 3D CRT between 1991 and 1999 were analysed. No elective nodal irradiation was performed, and doses of 60 Gy or more, in once-daily fractions of between 2 and 3 Gy, were prescribed. Results: The median actuarial survival of patients was 20 months, with 1-, 3- and 5-year survival of 71, 25 and 12%, respectively. Local disease progression was the cause of death in 30% of patients, and 22% patients died from distant metastases. Grade 2-3 acute radiation pneumonitis (SWOG) was observed in 6.2% of patients. The median actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 27 months, with 85 and 43% of patients free from local progression at 1 and 3 years, respectively. Endobronchial tumour extension significantly influenced LPFS, both on univariate (P=0.023) and multivariate analysis (P=0.023). The median actuarial cause-specific survival (CSS) was 19 months, and the respective 1- and 3-year rates were 72 and 30%. Multivariate analysis showed T2 classification (P=0.017) and the presence of endobronchial tumour extension (P=0.029) to be adverse prognostic factors for CSS. On multivariate analysis, T-stage significantly correlated with distant failure (P=0.005). Conclusions: Local failure rates remain substantial despite the use of 3D CRT for stage I NSCLC. Additional improvements in local control can come about with the use of radiation dose escalation and approaches to address the problem of tumour mobility

  9. Sublobar resection versus lobectomy in Surgical Treatment of Elderly Patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (STEPS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Sui, Xizhao; Chen, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Lixue; Wang, Xun; Wang, Shaodong; Wang, Jun

    2016-04-07

    The appropriateness of lobectomy for all elderly patients is controversial. Meanwhile, sublobar resection is associated with reduced operative risk, better preservation of pulmonary function, and a better quality of life, constituting a potential alternative to standard lobectomy for elderly patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To date, no randomized trial comparing sublobar resection and lobectomy focusing on elderly patients has been reported. We hypothesized that for patients at least 70 years old with clinical stage T1N0M0 NSCLC, sublobar resection is non-inferior to lobectomy for 3-year disease-free survival (DFS). This is a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter non-inferiority trial with two study arms: sublobar resection and lobectomy groups. Comprehensive geriatric assessments will be acquired for each patient. A total of 339 subjects will be enrolled on the basis of power calculations, and participants followed up every 6 months post-operation for 3 years. In case of relapse, survival follow-up will be continued until 5 years or death. Pulmonary function testing will be performed at 6, 12, and 36 months post-operation. The primary outcome is 3-year DFS; secondary endpoints include peri-operative complications and mortality, hospitalization time, post-operative ventilator time, overall survival, 3-year recurrence rates, post-operative pulmonary function, quality of life, geriatric assessment data, and 4-year mortality index. The present study is the only prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing sublobar resection and lobectomy for elderly patients. The therapeutic outcomes of sublobar resection will be evaluated in comparison with lobectomy for elderly patients (≥70 years) with early-stage NSCLC. NCT02360761 : 01/24/2015 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  10. [Resected non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma stage pIIIA-N2. Which patients will benefit most from adjuvant therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana M; Jarabo, José Ramón; Fernandez, Cristina; Calatayud, Joaquín; Fernández, Elena; Torres, Antonio J; Balibrea, José L; Hernando, Florentino

    2014-04-01

    Controversy persists as regards the indications and results of surgery in the treatment of patients with stage pIIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study was to analyze the overall survival of a multicentre series of these patients and the role of adjuvant treatment, looking for factors that may define subgroups of patients with an increased benefit from this treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on 287 patients, with stage pIIIA-N2 NSCLC subjected to complete resection, taken from a multi-institutional database of 2.994 prospectively collected consecutive patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. Adjuvant treatment was administered in 238 cases (82.9%). Analyses were made of the age, gender, histological type, administration of induction and adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy treatments. The 5-year survival was 24%, with a median survival of 22 months. Survival was 26.5% among patients receiving with adjuvant treatment, versus 10.7% for those without it (P=.069). Age modified the effect of adjuvant treatment on survival (interaction P=.049). In patients under 70 years of age with squamous cell carcinoma, adjuvant treatment reduced the mortality rate by 37% (hazard ratio: 0,63; 95% CI; 0,42-0,95; P=.036). Completely resected patients with stage pIIIA-N2 NSCLC receiving adjuvant treatment reached higher survival rates than those who did not. Maximum benefit was achieved by the subgroup of patients under 70 years of age with squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Using SPECT-guidance to protect functional lung with optimizing intensity modulated radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongtang; Li Baosheng; Sun Hongfu; Fang Yongcun; Chen Jinhu; Yan Jing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to protect functional lung with optimizing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan in patients with stage m non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Twenty-four patients with stage III NSCLC who were candidated for radiotherapy were enrolled. All patients had PET-CT scans and SPECT scans. The two sets of images were accurately co-registered in the planning system. SPECT images were used to define a volume of functional lung (FL) and non-functional lung (NFL). The region of ≥30% maximum radioactive counts was FL and the other region was NFL. Then SPECT images were classified by comparing lung perfusion deficit with area of radiological abnormality. Grade O: no lung perfusion deficit. Grade 1: the size of radiological abnormality was similar to the area of lung perfusion deficit. Grade 2: the area of lung perfusion was bigger than that of radiological abnormality, and extended to 1 pulmonary lobe. Grade 3: the area of lung perfusion deficit exceed 1 pulmonary lobe. The optimized IMRT objective was to minimize the dose to FL. the difference between the two sets of IMRT plans was studied. Results: All patients had lung perfusion deficits, 8 patients with grade 1 damage, 6 patients with grade 2 damage, and 10 patient with grade 3 damage. After IMRT plan optimized, both the percentage of whole lung volume received dose (WLV) and the percentage of functional lung volume received dose (FLV) were decreased. However, the FLVs was decreased more significantly. There was significant difference in WLV 10 , WLV 15 , WLV 20 , WLV 25 , WLV 30 and FLV 10 , FLV 15 , FLV 20 , FLV 25 , FLV 30 between the two sets of IMRT plans (P<0.05). Conclusions: It is convenient to SPECT-guidance to protect functional lung with optimizing IMRT in stage III NSCLC patients, potentially reducing lung toxicity. (authors)

  12. Patient outcomes of monotherapy with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for stage T2 or T3 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Fukushima, Shoko; Abe, Osamu; Saito, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a treatment option for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are medically unable to tolerate surgery and who are not amenable to treatment with stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of 3D-CRT as a monotherapy in patients with localized stage T2 or T3 NSCLC. This retrospective study consisted of 29 patients (20 males) aged 56–89 years (median, 76 years) with histologically confirmed NSCLC who underwent 3D-CRT between 2005 and 2014. The median duration of patient observation was 17.0 months (range, 1.0–64.0 months). Complete and partial responses occurred in 13.8 and 44.8 % of patients, respectively, and the overall response rate was 58.2 %. Meanwhile, the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 65.8 and 33.8 %, respectively. In T2 NSCLC, the median survival time (MST) was 12 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 62.4 and 21.4 %, respectively. In T3 NSCLC, the MST was 17 months, and the 1- and 3-year survival rates were 72.9 and 48.6 %, respectively. Severe toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3) were not observed. The mean biologically effective dose required to improve local control exceeded 80 Gy (range, 67.2–96.0 Gy). These findings support a role for 3D-CRT as a treatment option for patients who refuse or could not tolerate surgical therapy with early-stage NSCLC. Although this was a small, retrospective study, it may form the basis for future, larger controlled studies on 3D-CRT as a monotherapy for NSCLC

  13. [Classification and Risk-factor Analysis of Postoperative Cardio-pulmonary 
Complications after Lobectomy in Patients with Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yutian; Su, Jianhua; Wang, Mingming; Zhou, Kun; Du, Heng; Huang, Jian; Che, Guowei

    2016-05-20

    There are incresing lung cancer patients detected and diagnosed at the intermediate stage when the pre-malignant or early lesions are amenable to resection and cure, owing to the progress of medical technology, the renewal of detection methods, the popularity of medical screening and the improvement of social health consciousness. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, based on routine laboratory tests, basic characteristics, and intraoperative variables in hospital. The 421 patients after lobectomy in patients with stage I NSCLC at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2013 were included into the study and stratified into complication group and non-complication group, according to whether to occur postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications after lobectomy in 30 days. Of them, 64 (15.2%) patients were finally identified and selected into the complication group, compared with 357 (84.8%) in non-complication group: pneumonia (8.8%, 37/421) was the primary complication, and other main complications included atelectasis (5.9%, 25/421), pleural effusion (≥middle) (5.0%, 21/421), persistent air leak (3.6%, 15/421); The operation time (P=0.007), amount of blood loss (P=0.034), preoperative chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (P=0.027), white blood cell (WBC) count (Pcardio-pulmonary complications. Among an array of clinical variables in hospital, operation time, preoperative white blood cell count, preoperative COPD, may be the independent risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications.

  14. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis

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    Bi, Nan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, Xiangpeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fskong@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Results: Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P<.001). These differences remained significant after correcting for stage IA and age (P<.001 at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years; P=.04 at 5 years). The effect of RFA was not different from that of SBRT on OS (P>.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Conclusions: Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings.

  15. The Effect of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy on Overall Survival in 237 Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Zhao Lujun; Hayman, James; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and their interaction in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 237 consecutive Stage III NSCLC patients were evaluated. Median follow-up was 69.0 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone (n = 106), sequential chemoradiation (n = 69), or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Radiation dose ranged from 30 to 102.9 Gy (median 60 Gy), corresponding to a bioequivalent dose (BED) of 39 to 124.5 Gy (median 72 Gy). Results: The median OS of the entire cohort was 12.6 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rates were 22.4% and 10.0%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression model demonstrated that Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.020), weight loss < 5% (p = 0.017), chemotherapy (yes vs. no), sequence of chemoradiation (sequential vs. concurrent; p < 0.001), and BED (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of OS. For patients treated with RT alone, sequential chemoradiation, and concurrent chemoradiation, median survival was 7.4, 14.9, and 15.8 months, and 5-year OS was 3.3%, 7.5%, and 19.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). The effect of higher radiation doses on survival was independent of whether chemotherapy was given. Conclusion: Radiation dose and use of chemotherapy are independent predictors of OS in Stage III NSCLC, and concurrent chemoradiation is associated with the best survival. There is no interaction between RT dose and chemotherapy.

  16. 7-year follow-up after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Results of a phase 2 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Brooks, Eric D; Komaki, Ritsuko U; Liao, Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda D; McAleer, Mary F; Allen, Pamela K; Balter, Peter A; Welsh, James D; O'Reilly, Michael S; Gomez, Daniel; Hahn, Stephen M; Roth, Jack A; Mehran, Reza J; Heymach, John V; Chang, Joe Y

    2017-08-15

    The authors evaluated the efficacy, patterns of failure, and toxicity of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for patients with medically inoperable, clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a prospective clinical trial with 7 years of follow-up. Clinical staging was performed according to the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system. Eligible patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC of clinical stage I as determined using positron emission tomography staging were treated with SABR (50 grays in 4 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Patients were followed with computed tomography and/or positron emission tomography/computed tomography every 3 months for the first 2 years, every 6 months for the next 3 years, and then annually thereafter. A total of 65 patients were eligible for analysis. The median age of the patients was 71 years, and the median follow-up was 7.2 years. A total of 18 patients (27.7%) developed disease recurrence at a median of 14.5 months (range, 4.3-71.5 months) after SABR. Estimated incidences of local, regional, and distant disease recurrence using competing risk analysis were 8.1%, 10.9%, and 11.0%, respectively, at 5 years and 8.1%, 13.6%, and 13.8%, respectively, at 7 years. A second primary lung carcinoma developed in 12 patients (18.5%) at a median of 35 months (range, 5-67 months) after SABR. Estimated 5-year and 7-year progression-free survival rates were 49.5% and 38.2%, respectively; the corresponding overall survival rates were 55.7% and 47.5%, respectively. Three patients (4.6%) experienced grade 3 treatment-related adverse events. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 adverse events (toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 3.0]). With long-term follow-up, the results of the current prospective study demonstrated outstanding local control and low toxicity after SABR in

  17. Long-term results of CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of inoperable patients with stage Ia non-small cell lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Yang; Li, Xin-Min; Song, Xiao-Yong; Zhou, Jun-Jun; Shao, Zhuang; Yu, Zhi-Qi; Lin, Yi; Guo, Xin-Yu; Liu, Da-Jiang; Li, Lu

    2018-03-16

    This study was performed to retrospectively evaluate the 10-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates of patients with inoperable stage Ia non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in a single center. Fifty patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA between 2004 and 2016. Thoracic surgeons evaluated the patients and performed RFA under CT guidance. Follow-up CT and positron emission tomography/CT scans were obtained. Local control rates and recurrence patterns were analyzed. Seventy-three lesions in 50 patients (M:F = 22:28; median age: 73 years; range: 52-82 years) were treated with CT-guided RFA. The mean lesion size was 2.2 cm (range: 1-3 cm). No procedure-related deaths occurred. Low-grade fever was the most common post-ablation complication, with an incidence rate of 36%. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS rates of patients with Ia NSCLC were 96.0%, 86.5%, 67.1%, 36.3%, and 1%, respectively, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year PFS rates were 94.0%, 77.5%, 43.5%, and 10.8%, respectively. The most common pattern of recurrence was local, and 15 patients with recurrence were treated with repeat RFA. Tumor size Ia NSCLC. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy versus cisplatin alone with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lei; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Jianyu; Yang, Chaoyang; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation (SCCR) over cisplatin alone plus concurrent thoracic radiation (CCR) for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2009 and November 2011, 40 eligible patients with NSCLC were included and divided randomly into two groups. Twenty patients received SCCR with S-1 (orally at 40 mg/m 2 per dose, b.i.d.) on days 1 through 14, cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) every 4 weeks for two cycles, and radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions over 6 weeks) beginning on day 1. Twenty subjects received CCR (cisplatin and radiotherapy, the same as for SCCR). The 3-year overall response rate was 59.3% and 52.4% for the SCCR and CCR groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant, while the median overall survival was 33 months (range, 4–41 months) and 24 months (range, 2–37 months), respectively (P = 0.048). The median progression-free survival was 31 months for SCCR (range, 5–39 months), whereas it was 20 months (range, 2–37 months) for CCR (P = 0.037). The toxicity profile was similar in both groups. In summary, we demonstrated that S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation was more effective than cisplatin plus radiotherapy in NSCLC patients with acceptable toxicity

  19. Neoadjuvant Oncogene-Targeted Therapy in Early Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer as a Strategy to Improve Clinical Outcome and Identify Early Mechanisms of Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoach, Caroline E; Bivona, Trever G; Blakely, Collin M; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Evaluations of resistance mechanisms to targeted treatments in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are necessary for development of improved treatment after disease progression and to help delay progression of disease. Populations of cells that survive after initial treatment form the basis of resistance via outgrowth of resistant clones or activation of alternative signaling pathways. In this report we describe a clinical trial approach in which patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), C-ros-1 proto-oncogene (ROS1), and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET) exon 14 alterations and early stage (IA-IIIA) NSCLC will be treated with induction EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) or crizotinib, a TKI that inhibits ALK, ROS1, and MET. We will evaluate resected tumor samples for pathologic response to induction therapy, overall response rate, and disease-free survival. Additionally, we will assess patients for early evidence of resistance to targeted therapy in terms of activation of alternative signaling pathways and for identification of resistance clones in remnant cell populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR): an alternative to surgery in stage I-II non-small-cell cancer of the lung?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirimanoff, René-Olivier

    2015-12-01

    For decades, surgery was considered to be the only standard therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been used in a growing number of patients and institutions since the early 2000's. Initially this technique was intended mainly for patients who were deemed to be medically inoperable due to co-morbidities or who refused surgery, but more recently it has been applied to operable patients as well. Strict criteria for treatment planning, the use of high-technology equipment and the appropriate selection of dose based on tumor size and location are of paramount importance for a proper application of SABR. Under these conditions, SABR offers high control rates with a moderate risk of severe toxicity, quite comparable to those of modern surgery. This article reviews the basic principles of SABR, its practical aspects, the definition of biologically equivalent doses, the results in terms of tumor control, survival and toxicity and an attempt will be made to compare the results of SABR with those of surgery.

  1. The prognostic impact of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Tomoyoshi; Furuya, Kiyomi; Yamazaki, Koji; Miura, Naoko; Tsutsui, Kana; Takeo, Sadanori

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcomes of clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) who underwent lobectomy. We reviewed the chest computed tomography (CT) findings and divided the patients into normal, fibrosis, emphysema and CPFE groups. We evaluated the relationships among the CT findings, the clinicopathological findings and postoperative survival. The patients were classified into the following groups based on the preoperative chest CT findings: normal lung, n = 187; emphysema, n = 62; fibrosis, n = 8; and CPFE, n = 17. The patients with CPFE were significantly older, more likely to be men and smokers, had a higher KL-6 level and lower FEV 1.0% value and had a higher rate of squamous cell carcinoma. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates were as follows: normal group, 82.5 and 76.8%; emphysema group, 80.0 and 74.9%; fibrosis group, 46.9 and 50%; and CPFE group, 36.9 and 27.9%, respectively (p lung function.

  2. Single-Fraction Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Patients 80 Years of Age and Older With StageNon-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, Masataka, E-mail: mstk117@gmail.com [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujisawa, Takehiko [Chiba Foundation for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: In an aging society, many senior citizens want less invasive treatment because of potential medical complications. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has started to treat stage I lung cancer with single-fraction carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) as a dose escalation prospective phase 1/2 trial. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of CIRT for patients 80 years of age and older, undergoing single-fraction CIRT. Methods and Materials: Peripheral non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with single-fraction CIRT were prospectively followed. We analyzed the data from among these patients 80 years of age and older. Results: There were 70 patients. Median age was 83 years (range: 80-89) and median follow-up period was 42.7 months (range: 12-128 months). Three-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 88.0%, 81.6%, and 72.4%, respectively. Five-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 85.8%, 64.9%, and 39.7%, respectively. There were no adverse effects higher than grade 2 either in the acute or late phase in terms of skin and lung. Analgesic agents were necessary for only 5 patients (7.1%), to relieve muscular or rib fracture pain caused by irradiation. Conclusions: Single-fraction CIRT was low-risk and effective, even for the elderly.

  3. Oral nutritional supplements containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the nutritional status of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer during multimodality treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Smit, Egbert F; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Paul, Marinus A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2010-10-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil, have immune-modulating effects and may improve nutritional status in cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids on nutritional status and inflammatory markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing multimodality treatment. In a double-blind experiment, 40 patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive 2 cans/d of a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids (2.0 g EPA + 0.9 g DHA/d) or an isocaloric control supplement. EPA in plasma phospholipids, energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE), body weight, fat free mass (FFM), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), and inflammatory markers were assessed. Effects of intervention were analyzed by generalized estimating equations and expressed as regression coefficients (B). The intervention group (I) had a better weight maintenance than the control (C) group after 2 and 4 wk (B = 1.3 and 1.7 kg, respectively; P oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids beneficially affects nutritional status during multimodality treatment in patients with NSCLC.

  4. Clinical Staging of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Netherlands-Need for Improvement in an Era With Expanding Nonsurgical Treatment Options: Data From the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, David Jonathan; Ten Berge, Martijn Geert; Daniels, Johannes Marlene; Versteegh, Michaël Ignatius; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla Jacqueline; Wouters, Michael Wilhelmus; Schreurs, Wilhelmina Hendrika

    2016-11-01

    The clinical stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) determines the initial treatment, whereas the pathologic stage best determines prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. In an era in which stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become an alternative modality to surgical intervention, clinical staging is even more important, because pathologic staging is omitted in the case of SABR. The objective of this study was to determine the concordance between clinical and pathologic stage in routine clinical practice for patients with early-stage NSCLC. Prospective data were derived from the Dutch Lung Surgery Audit (DLSA) in 2013 and 2014. Patients with clinical stage I NSCLC who underwent surgical resection and had a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan in their clinical workup were selected. Clinical and pathologic TNM (cTNM and pTNM) stages were compared. From a total of 1,790 patients with clinical stage I, 1,555 (87%) patients were included in this analysis. Concordance between cTNM and pTNM was 59.9%. Of the patients with clinical stage I, 22.6% were upstaged to pathologic stage II or higher. In total, 14.9% of all patients with clinical stage I had nodal metastases, and 5.5% of all patients had unforeseen N2 disease. In patients with clinical stage T2a tumors, 21.3% had nodal metastases, 14.5% being N1 and 6.7% being N2 disease. Concordance between clinical and pathologic stage is 59.9%. In patients with clinical stage I NSCLC, 22.6% were upstaged to pathologic stage II or higher, which is an indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvement in accuracy of staging is thus needed, particularly for these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preserving Functional Lung Using Perfusion Imaging and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Jang, Si Young; Liu, H. Helen; Guerrero, Thomas; Wang, Xuanmin; Gayed, Isis W.; Erwin, William D.; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Yaremko, Brian P.; Borghero, Yerko O.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess quantitatively the impact of incorporating functional lung imaging into intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced-stage NSCLC who underwent radiotherapy were included in this study. Before radiotherapy, each patient underwent lung perfusion imaging with single-photon-emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT). The SPECT-CT was registered with simulation CT and was used to segment the 50- and 90-percentile hyperperfusion lung (F50 lung and F90 lung). Two IMRT plans were designed and compared in each patient: an anatomic plan using simulation CT alone and a functional plan using SPECT-CT in addition to the simulation CT. Dosimetric parameters of the two types of plans were compared in terms of tumor coverage and avoidance of normal tissues. Results: In incorporating perfusion information in IMRT planning, the median reductions in the mean doses to the F50 and F90 lung in the functional plan were 2.2 and 4.2 Gy, respectively, compared with those in the anatomic plans. The median reductions in the percentage of volume irradiated with >5 Gy, >10 Gy, and >20 Gy in the functional plans were 7.1%, 6.0%, and 5.1%, respectively, for F50 lung, and 11.7%, 12.0%, and 6.8%, respectively, for F90 lung. A greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved for patients with large perfusion defects compared with those with relatively uniform perfusion distribution. Conclusion: Function-guided IMRT planning appears to be effective in preserving functional lung in locally advanced-stage NSCLC patients

  6. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com [Carle Cancer Center and University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, Robert B. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  7. Globo H expression is associated with driver mutations and PD-L1 expressions in stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Yao; Lin, Mong-Wei; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu

    2017-12-12

    Globo H is a tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen exclusively expressed in cancer cells rather than normal tissue. Globo H has been found on many cancers of epithelial origins, and become an attractive target for cancer vaccine. We aimed to study the expression of Globo H in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and correlated its expression with common driver mutations, clinical outcomes, and status of immune checkpoint, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). The study enrolled 228 patients with surgically resected stage I NSCLC, including 139 patients with adenocarcinoma (ADC) and 89 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). Using immunohistochemistry, tumors with moderate to strong membranous staining in ⩾ 1% tumor cells per section were scored as positive Globo H expression. Driver mutations including EGFR, KRAS, BRAF were detected by direct sequencing, while ALK, PI3KCA, FGFR1 and PD-L1 expression was detected by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Positive Globo H expression was detected in 88 of the 228 (38.6%) patients. These included 51 of 139 (36.7%) patients with ADC and 37 of 89 (41.6%) patients with SqCC. Positive Globo H expression was significantly associated with EGFR mutation and PD-L1 expression in the ADC group, and PI3KCA overexpression in the SqCC group. The survival analysis showed that Globo H expression was not an independent prognostic factor in stage I NSCLC. Globo H expression was correlated with specific driver mutations in ADC and SqCC NSCLC tumors, as well as PD-L1 status. Immunotherapy targeting Globo H may have potential application in lung cancer treatment.

  8. Positron emission tomography with selected mediastinoscopy compared to routine mediastinoscopy offers cost and clinical outcome benefits for pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Kelvin K.; Yap, Kenneth S.K.; Byrne, Amanda J.; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Poon, Aurora; Harris, Anthony; Tauro, Andrew; Mitchell, Paul; Knight, Simon R.; Clarke, Peter C.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is an important staging procedure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to demonstrate, through a decision tree model and the incorporation of real costs of each component, that routine FDG-PET imaging as a prelude to curative surgery will reduce requirements for routine mediastinoscopy and overall hospital costs. A decision tree model comparing routine whole-body FDG-PET imaging to routine staging mediastinoscopy was used, with baseline variables of sensitivity, specificity and prevalence of non-operable and metastatic disease obtained from institutional data and a literature review. Costings for hospital admissions for mediastinoscopy and thoracotomy of actual patients with NSCLC were determined. The overall and average cost of managing patients was then calculated over a range of FDG-PET costs to derive projected cost savings to the community. The prevalence of histologically proven mediastinal involvement in patients with NSCLC presenting for surgical assessment at our institution is 20%, and the prevalence of distant metastatic disease is 6%. Based on literature review, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for detection of mediastinal spread are 84% and 89% respectively, and for mediastinoscopy, 81% and 100%. The average cost of mediastinoscopy for NSCLC in our institution is AUD$4,160, while that of thoracotomy is AUD$15,642. The cost of an FDG-PET scan is estimated to be AUD$1,500. Using these figures and the decision tree model, the average cost saving is AUD$2,128 per patient. Routine FDG-PET scanning with selective mediastinoscopy will save AUD$2,128 per patient and will potentially reduce inappropriate surgery. These cost savings remain robust over a wide range of disease prevalence and FDG-PET costs. (orig.)

  9. Is FDG PET/CT cost-effective for pre-operation staging of potentially operative non-small cell lung cancer? – From Chinese healthcare system perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu-ting; Huang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The remarkable morbidity and mortality of lung cancer in the large population address major economic challenges to Chinese healthcare system. This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT for staging patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Management of potentially operative NSCLC was modeled on decision analysis employing data in China. The strategies compared were conventional CT staging (strategy A), additional PET/CT in all patients (strategy B) or only in patients with normal-sized lymph nodes on CT (strategy C). Published medical data for Chinese patients was extracted. The costs corresponded to reimbursement by Chinese public health provider in 2010. Uncertainly of employed parameters was calculated in sensitivity analysis. Results: Taking strategy A as baseline, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of strategy B was 23,800 RMB ($3500) per life year saved, which was acceptable in views of a developing country as China; while strategy C exhibited some loss of life years. Sensitivity analysis suggested the ICER (B–A) was raised more remarkably by a deterioration of PET specificity than by that of its sensitivity. The ICER was turned negative by PET specificity lower than 0.79. Economically, PET cost was proportional to the ICER (B–A), and decrease of palliative therapy cost could reduce both the ICER and overall cost. Conclusions: The PET/CT strategy is potentially cost-effective for management of NSCLC in China. Patients with nodal-positive CT results are not suggested to be excluded from further PET/CT. Furthermore, maintaining high specificity of PET in clinical scenarios is crucial. Prospective trials are warranted to transfer these results into policy making.

  10. A Panel of Genetic Polymorphism for the Prediction of Prognosis in Patients with Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer after Surgical Resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yup Lee

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate whether a panel of eight genetic polymorphisms can predict the prognosis of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after surgical resection.We selected eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which have been associated with the prognosis of lung cancer patients after surgery in our previous studies. A total of 814 patients with early stage NSCLC who underwent curative surgical resection were enrolled. The association of the eight SNPs with overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS was analyzed.The eight SNPs (CD3EAP rs967591, TNFRSF10B rs1047266, AKT1 rs3803300, C3 rs2287845, HOMER2 rs1256428, GNB2L1 rs3756585, ADAMTSL3 rs11259927, and CD3D rs3181259 were significantly associated with OS and/or DFS. Combining those eight SNPs, we designed a prognostic index to predict the prognosis of patients. According to relative risk of death, a score value was assigned to each genotype of the SNPs. A worse prognosis corresponded to a higher score value, and the sum of score values of eight SNPs defined the prognostic index of a patient. When we categorized the patients into two groups based on the prognostic index, high risk group was significantly associated with worse OS and DFS compared to low risk group (aHR for OS = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.69-2.88, P = 8.0 x 10-9, and aHR for DFS = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.29-1.94, P = 1.0 x 10-5.Prognostic index using eight genetic polymorphisms may be useful for the prognostication of patients with surgically resected NSCLC.

  11. Definitive radiotherapy alone over 60 Gy for patients unfit for combined treatment to stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Su Ssan; Jeong, Yuri; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Wonsik; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are frequently treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone, due to poor performance status or underlying disease. We investigated the effectiveness of RT over 60 Gy administered alone to NSCLC patients who were unfit or rejecting for combination treatment. From April 2002 to July 2010, 83 patients with stage II-III NSCLC, aged over 60 years, treated by RT alone with a curative aim were analyzed. Radiation was targeted to the primary tumor and clinically involved lymph nodes. A total dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions (2.2 Gy/fraction) was delivered once daily (5 fractions weekly). One month after completing RT, initial tumor responses were evaluated. Median age of patients was 73 years (range, 60 – 82 years). The median survival time was 18.6 months (range, 2–135). The actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 3 years were 39 % and 23 %, and cause-specific survival rate at 2 and 3 years were 57 % and 47 %, respectively. When primary tumor was controlled, the 2- and 3-year CSS were 56 % and 45 %, but 32 % and 23 % in those patients with local failure, respectively (P = 0.017). Additionally, the local control rate was associated with the initial tumor response (P = 0.01). No patient experienced grade 4+ toxicity. For stage II-III NSCLC patients aged over 60 years and unfit or rejecting for combination treatment, RT alone showed promising result. Long-term disease control can be expected if an early tumor response to radiation is achieved, which could result in improved overall survival rates

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Mahmood, Usama; Husain, Zain; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  13. Parenchymal and Functional Lung Changes after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer—Experiences from a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Hörner-Rieber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate parenchymal and functional lung changes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to correlate radiological and functional findings with patient and treatment characteristics as well as survival.Materials and methodsSeventy patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT from 2004 to 2015 with more than 1 year of CT follow-up scans were analyzed. Incidence, morphology, severity of acute and late lung abnormalities as well as pulmonary function changes were evaluated and correlated with outcome.ResultsMedian follow-up time was 32.2 months with 2-year overall survival (OS of 83% and local progression-free survival of 88%, respectively. Regarding parenchymal changes, most patients only developed mild to moderate CT abnormalities. Mean ipsilateral lung dose (MLD in biological effective dose and planning target volume size were significantly associated with maximum severity score of parenchymal changes (p = 0.014, p < 0.001. Furthermore, both maximum severity score and MLD were significantly connected with OS in univariate analysis (p = 0.043, p = 0.025. For functional lung changes, we detected significantly reduced total lung capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and forced vital capacity (FVC parameters after SBRT (p ≤ 0.001. Multivariate analyses revealed SBRT with an MLD ≥ 9.72 Gy and FVC reduction ≥0.54 L as independent prognostic factors for inferior OS (p = 0.029, p = 0.004.ConclusionSBRT was generally tolerated well with only mild toxicity. For evaluating the possible prognostic impact of MLD and FVC reduction on survival detected in this analysis, larger prospective studies are truly needed.

  14. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  15. Role of FDG-PET scans in staging, response assessment, and follow-up care for non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eCuaron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role PET in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is well established. Evidence is emerging for the role of PET in response assessment to neoadjuvant therapy, combined-modality therapy, and early detection of recurrence. Here, we review the current literature on these aspects of PET in the management of NSCLC. FDG-PET, particularly integrated 18F-FDG-PET/CT, scans have become a standard test in the staging of local tumor extent, mediastinal lymph node involvement, and distant metastatic disease in NSCLC. FDG-PET sensitivity is generally superior to computed tomography (CT scans alone. Local tumor extent and T stage can be more accurately determined with FDG-PET in certain cases. FDG-PET sensitivity is decreased in tumors <1 cm, at least in part due to respiratory motion. False-negative results can occur in areas of low tumor burden. FDG-PET-CT nodal staging is more accurate than CT alone. FDG-PET scans have widely replaced bone scintography for assessing distant metastases, except for the brain, which still warrants dedicated brain imaging. FDG uptake has also been shown to vary between histologies, with adenocarcinomas generally being less FDG avid than squamous cell carcinomas. FDG-PET scans are useful to detect recurrences, but are currently not recommended for routine follow-up. Typically, patients are followed with chest CT scans every 3-6 months, using FDG-PET to evaluate equivocal CT findings. As high FDG uptake can occur in infectious, inflammatory, and other non-neoplastic conditions, PET-positive findings require pathological confirmation. There is increased interest in the prognostic and predictive role of FDG-PET scans. Studies show that absence of metabolic response to neoadjuvant therapy correlates with poor pathologic response, and a favorable FDG-PET response appears to be associated with improved survival. Further work is underway to identify subsets of patients that might benefit individualized management based

  16. Optimization of beam weights in conformal radiotherapy planning of stage III non-small cell lung cancer: effects on therapeutic ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Derycke, Sylvie; Wagter, Carlos de; Neve, Wilfried C.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of beam weight optimization for 3D conformal radiotherapy plans, with or without beam intensity modulation, in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Ten patients with Stage III NSCLC were planned using a conventional 3D technique and a technique involving noncoplanar beam intensity modulation (BIM). Two planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined: PTV1 included macroscopic tumor volume and PTV2 included macroscopic and microscopic tumor volume. Virtual simulation defined the beam shapes and incidences as well as the wedge orientations (3D) and segment outlines (BIM). Weights of wedged beams, unwedged beams, and segments were determined by human trial and error for the 3D-plans (3D-manual), by a standard weight table (SWT) for the BIM-plans (BIM-SWT) and by optimization (3D-optimized and BIM-optimized) using an objective function with a biological and a physical component. The resulting non-optimized and optimized dose distributions were compared, using physical endpoints, after normalizing the median dose of PTV1 to 80 Gy. Results: Optimization improved dose homogeneity at the target for 3D- and BIM-plans and the minimum dose at PTV1. The minimum dose at PTV2 was decreased by optimization especially in 3D-plans. After optimization, the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of lung and heart were shifted to lower doses for 80-90% of the organ volume. Since lung is the dose-limiting organ in Stage III NSCLC, an increased minimum dose at PTV1 together with a decreased dose at the main lung volume suggests an improved therapeutic ratio. Optimization allows 10% dose escalation for 3D-plans and 20% for BIM-plans at isotoxicity levels of lung and spinal cord. Upon dose escalation, esophagus may become the dose-limiting structure when PTV1 extends close to the esophagus. Conclusions: Optimization using a biophysical objective function allowed an increase of the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy planning for Stage III

  17. Update on nodal staging in non-small cell lung cancer with integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography: a meta-analysis.

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    Pak, Kyoungjune; Park, Sohyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, In-Joo; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, E Edmund; Chung, June-Key

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, the number of primary studies on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has been increasing rapidly. Thus, we updated meta-analysis to evaluate the test performance of FDG PET/CT for nodal staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) including the most recent studies. We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE for English publications using keywords "positron emission tomography", "lung cancer", and "lymph node". All searches were limited to human studies. Inclusion criteria were studies of the initial nodal staging of NSCLC with PET/CT. The reasons for exclusion are as follows: (1) studies with PET, (2) previous therapy before PET/CT, (3) nodal staging not confirmed by histology, and (4) reviews, abstracts, and editorial materials. 786 articles were identified through database searching. 28 studies including 3,255 patients and 11,887 lymph nodes (LN) were eligible for this study. The pooled sensitivity was 0.62 (95% CI 0.54-0.70), widely ranging from 0.13 to 0.98. The specificity ranged between 0.72 and 0.98 with an overall estimated specificity of 0.92 (0.88-0.95) for node-based data. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio were 0.67 (0.54-0.79), 0.87 (0.82-0.91), 5.20 (3.59-7.54), and 0.37 (0.25-0.55) for patient-based data. Studies from tuberculosis (Tb) endemic countries showed lower sensitivity (0.56 vs 0.68, p = 0.03) for node-based data and lower specificity (0.83 vs 0.89, p < 0.01) for patient-based ones. PET/CT has a high specificity, but low sensitivity for detecting LN metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Tb might be one of the main reasons for lower sensitivity of PET/CT in several countries. The primary clinicians of lung cancer should be aware of the possibility of hidden metastatic LNs in bilateral FDG uptake of mediastinal and hilar LNs, especially in the Tb endemic countries.

  18. Therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy with gamma knife on early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and life quality of patients

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    Ren Zhengting; Cui Di; Ren Ye; Dai Zhuojie; Su Xiaoming; Fan Jingjing; Shen Yulong; Ma Huizhen; Wang Zongye

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with gamma knife on stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)and the quality of life of the patients undergoing this therapy. Methods: Twenty NSCLC patients with the median age of 76, 10 at stage Ⅰ and 10 at stage Ⅱ who were unable or unwilling to undergo surgery were given SBRT with gamma knife at the doses of 3-6 Gy in 8-15 fractions,finished within 2 to 3 weeks. The prescription isodose line was 50%,the marginal dose was 39-56 Gy, the central dose was 78-112 Gy, and the total biologically effective dose was 51-83 Gy. The patients were observed after admission and followed up by chest CT 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment until progressive disease or death. EORTC QLQ-LC43 questionnaire was used to investigate the changes in quality of life. Results: The 20 patients were followed up for 24 (12-46) months. At six months after the treatment,the overall response rate was 80%, and the complete response rate was 35%. The 1, 2 and 3-year local control rates were 100%, 95% and 95%, respectively. The 1, 2 and 3-year overall survival rates were 95%, 80% and 50% respectively; The 1, 2, and 3-year progression free survival rates were 85%, 64% and 33%, respectively. The failure rate was 20% and the rate of progress within the planning target volume was 5%. No acute toxicity at grade 3 and over occurred in any patient during the treatment. 15% of the patients developed grade 1-2 radiation pneumonia. Age, gender, pathologic index or not were weakly correlated with the overall survival. The emotional function was improved significantly after treatment (P<0.05), dyspnea and cough were improved at different degrees, however, not significantly. There were no significant changes in the physical function and symptoms, such as fatigue,lack of appetite, insomnia, etc. Conclusions: Significantly improving the motional function and maintaining the quality of life, SBRT with gamma knife

  19. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma.

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    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-10-08

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC. Tumor biopsies from normal lung tissue and from a large cohort (n = 169) of NSCLC patients were examined for GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of these antigens was further matched to clinical and pathological features using univariate cox regression analysis. GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens were not expressed in normal lung tissue, while SP17 was expressed in ciliated lung epithelia. The frequency of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 expression in NSCLC tumors were 26.0% (44/169), 11.8% (20/169) and 4.7% (8/169), respectively, and 33.1% (56/169) of the tumors expressed at least one of these antigens. In general, the expression of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was not significantly associated with a specific histotype (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), but high-level GAGE expression (>50%) was more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the frequency of GAGE expression was demonstrated to be significantly higher in stage II-IIIa than stage I NSCLC (17.0% vs. 35.8%; p = 0.02). Analysis of the relation between tumor expression of GAGE and NY-ESO-1 and survival endpoints revealed no significant associations. Our study demonstrates that GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigens are candidate targets for immunotherapy of NSCLC and further suggest that multi-antigen vaccines may be beneficial.

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early-stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: CEPO Review and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boily, Gino; Filion, Édith; Rakovich, George; Kopek, Neil; Tremblay, Lise; Samson, Benoit; Goulet, Stéphanie; Roy, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Canada. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, 20% to 30% of them are deemed medically inoperable and may be offered radiation therapy. Standard external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is associated with high rates of local recurrence and poor long-term survival. Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly being proposed for inoperable patients, and the use of this treatment modality for operable patients is also being contemplated. The objective of this guideline is to review the efficacy and safety of SABR in these two clinical situations and to develop evidence-based recommendations. A review of the scientific literature published up to December 2013 was performed. A total of 44 publications were included. Considering the evidence available to date, the Comité de l'évolution des pratiques en oncologie recommends the following: (1) for medically operable patients with stage T1-2N0M0 NSCLC, surgery remains the standard treatment because comparative data regarding the efficacy of SABR and surgery are currently insufficient for SABR to be considered an equivalent alternative to surgery for these patients; (2) for medically inoperable patients with stage T1-2N0M0 NSCLC or medically operable patients who refuse surgery, SABR should be preferred to standard EBRT (grade B recommendation); (3) the biological equivalent dose (BED(10)) used for SABR treatment should be at least 100 Gy (grade B recommendation); (4) for patients with a central tumor, a large-volume tumor (large planning target volume) or severe pulmonary comorbidity, a risk-adaptive schedule should be used (dose reduction or increase in the number of fractions; grade B recommendation); (5) the choice of using SABR to treat NSCLC should be discussed within tumor boards; treatment with SABR (or with standard EBRT

  1. Radical cyberknife radiosurgery with tumor tracking: an effective treatment for inoperable small peripheral stage I non-small cell lung cancer

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    Esposito Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Curative surgery is not an option for many patients with clinical stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, but radical radiosurgery may be effective. Methods Inoperable patients with small peripheral clinical stage I NSCLC were enrolled in this study. Three-to-five fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors under CT guidance. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows. The GTV margin was expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. A dose of 42–60 Gy was delivered to the PTV in 3 equal fractions in less than 2 weeks using the CyberKnife radiosurgery system. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1 cm from the GTV. Physical examination, CT imaging and pulmonary function testing were completed at 6 months intervals for three years following treatment. Results Twenty patients with an average maximum tumor diameter of 2.2 cm (range, 1.1 – 3.5 cm and a mean FEV1 of 1.08 liters (range, 0.53 – 1.71 L were treated. Pneumothorax requiring tube thoracostomy occurred following CT-guided fiducial placement in 25% of the patients. All patients completed treatment with few acute side effects and no procedure-related mortality. Transient chest wall discomfort developed in 8 of the 12 patients with lesions within 5 mm of the pleura. The mean percentage of the total lung volume receiving a minimum of 15 Gy was 7.3% (range, 2.4% to 11.3%. One patient who received concurrent gefitinib developed short-lived, grade III radiation pneumonitis. The mean percent predicted DLCO decreased by 9% and 11% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. There were no local failures, regional lymph node recurrences or distant metastases. With a median follow-up of 25 months for the surviving patients, Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimate at 2 years was 87%, with deaths due to COPD progression. Conclusion Radical CyberKnife radiosurgery is a well-tolerated treatment option for inoperable patients with small

  2. Classification and Risk-factor Analysis of Postoperative Cardio-pulmonary 
Complications after Lobectomy in Patients with Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yutian LAI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are incresing lung cancer patients detected and diagnosed at the intermediate stage when the pre-malignant or early lesions are amenable to resection and cure, owing to the progress of medical technology, the renewal of detection methods, the popularity of medical screening and the improvement of social health consciousness. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, based on routine laboratory tests, basic characteristics, and intraoperative variables in hospital. Methods The 421 patients after lobectomy in patients with stage I NSCLC at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2013 were included into the study and stratified into complication group and non-complication group, according to whether to occur postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications after lobectomy in 30 days. Results Of them, 64 (15.2% patients were finally identified and selected into the complication group, compared with 357 (84.8% in non-complication group: pneumonia (8.8%, 37/421 was the primary complication, and other main complications included atelectasis (5.9%, 25/421, pleural effusion (≥middle (5.0%, 21/421, persistent air leak (3.6%, 15/421; The operation time (P=0.007, amount of blood loss (P=0.034, preoperative chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (P=0.027, white blood cell (WBC count (P<0.001, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR (P<0.001 were significantly different between the two groups. According to the binary logistics regression analysis, preoperative COPD (OR=0.031, 95%CI: 0.012-0.078, P<0.001 and WBC count (OR=1.451, 95%CI: 1.212-1.736, P<0.001 were independent risk factors for postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications. Conclusion Among an array of clinical variables in hospital, operation time, preoperative white blood cell count, preoperative COPD

  3. Systemic immune-inflammation index predicting chemoradiation resistance and poor outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Yu-Suo Tong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that the existence of systemic inflammation response is correlated with poor prognosis in several solid tumors. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the association between systemic immune-inflammation index (SII and therapy response and overall survival in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The prognostic values of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR, and prognostic nutritional index (PNI were also evaluated. Methods In total, 332 patients with new diagnosis of stage III NSCLC were included in this retrospective analysis. SII was defined as platelet counts × neutrophil counts/lymphocyte counts. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the optimal cut-off value for SII, NLR, PLR and PNI. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis were performed to identify the factors correlated with overall survival. Results Applying cut-offs of ≥ 660 (SII, ≥ 3.57 (NLR, ≥ 147 (PLR, ≤ 52.95 (PNI, SII ≥ 660 was significantly correlated with worse ECOG PS (< 0.001, higher T stage (< 0.001, advanced clinical stage (p = 0.019, and lower response rate (p = 0.018. In univariate analysis, SII ≥ 660, NLR ≥ 3.57, PLR ≥ 147, and PNI ≤ 52.95 were significantly associated with worse overall survival (p all < 0.001. Patients with SII ≥ 660 had a median overall survival of 10 months, and patients with SII < 660 showed a median overall survival of 30 months. In multivariate analysis only ECOG PS (HR, 1.744; 95% CI 1.158–2.626; p = 0.008, T stage (HR, 1.332; 95% CI 1.032–1.718; p = 0.028, N stage (HR, 1.848; 95% CI 1.113–3.068; p = 0.018, SII (HR, 2.105; 95% CI 1.481–2.741; p < 0.001 and NLR ≥ 3.57 (HR, 1.934; 95% CI 1.448–2.585; p < 0.001 were independently correlated with overall survival. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the SII is an

  4. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III chemoprevention trial of selenium supplementation in patients with resected stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: ECOG 5597.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Daniel D; Lee, Sandra J; Keller, Steven M; Wright, Gail Shaw; Aisner, Seena; Belinsky, Steven Alan; Johnson, David H; Johnston, Michael R; Goodman, Gary; Clamon, Gerald; Okawara, Gordon; Marks, Randolph; Frechette, Eric; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Lippman, Scott M; Ruckdeschel, John; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-11-20

    Selenium has been reported to have chemopreventive benefits in lung cancer. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving selenium supplementation. Patients with completely resected stage I NSCLC were randomly assigned to take selenized yeast 200 μg versus placebo daily for 48 months. Participation was 6 to 36 months postoperatively and required a negative mediastinal node biopsy, no excessive vitamin intake, normal liver function, negative chest x-ray, and no other evidence of recurrence. The first interim analysis in October 2009, with 46% of the projected end points accumulated, showed a trend in favor of the placebo group with a low likelihood that the trial would become positive; thus, the study was stopped. One thousand seven hundred seventy-two participants were enrolled, with 1,561 patients randomly assigned. Analysis was updated in June 2011 with the maturation of 54% of the planned end points. Two hundred fifty-two SPTs (from 224 patients) developed, of which 98 (from 97 patients) were lung cancer (38.9%). Lung and overall SPT incidence were 1.62 and 3.54 per 100 person-years, respectively, for selenium versus 1.30 and 3.39 per 100 person-years, respectively, for placebo (P = .294). Five-year disease-free survival was 74.4% for selenium recipients versus 79.6% for placebo recipients. Grade 1 to 2 toxicity occurred in 31% of selenium recipients and 26% of placebo recipients, and grade ≥ 3 toxicity occurred in less than 2% of selenium recipients versus 3% of placebo recipients. Compliance was excellent. No increase in diabetes mellitus or skin cancer was detected. Selenium was safe but conferred no benefit over placebo in the prevention of SPT in patients with resected NSCLC.

  5. Cisplatin and etoposide versus carboplatin and paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: an analysis of Veterans Health Administration data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Davila, Rafael; Devisetty, Kiran; Szabo, Aniko; Sparapani, Rodney; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Gore, Elizabeth M; Moran, Amy; Williams, Christina D; Kelley, Michael J; Whittle, Jeffrey

    2015-02-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen to use with radiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer is unknown. Here, we compare the outcome of patents treated within the Veterans Health Administration with either etoposide-cisplatin (EP) or carboplatin-paclitaxel (CP). We identified patients treated with EP and CP with concurrent radiotherapy from 2001 to 2010. Survival rates were compared using Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustments for confounding provided by propensity score methods and an instrumental variables analysis. Comorbidities and treatment complications were identified through administrative data. A total of 1,842 patients were included; EP was used in 27% (n = 499). Treatment with EP was not associated with a survival advantage in a Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10), a propensity score matched cohort (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.24), or a propensity score adjusted model (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10). In an instrumental variables analysis, there was no survival advantage for patients treated in centers where EP was used more than 50% of the time as compared with centers where EP was used in less than 10% of the patients (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.26). Patients treated with EP, compared with patients treated with CP, had more hospitalizations (2.4 v 1.7 hospitalizations, respectively; P kidney disease/dehydration (30.5% v 21.2%, respectively; P patients treated with EP versus CP had similar overall survival, but EP was associated with increased morbidity. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. [Mortality in early-stage, surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer less than 3 cm of size: Competing risk analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordá Aragón, Carlos; Peñalver Cuesta, Juan Carlos; Mancheño Franch, Nuria; de Aguiar Quevedo, Karol; Vera Sempere, Francisco; Padilla Alarcón, José

    2015-09-07

    Survival studies of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are usually based on the Kaplan-Meier method. However, other factors not covered by this method may modify the observation of the event of interest. There are models of cumulative incidence (CI), that take into account these competing risks, enabling more accurate survival estimates and evaluation of the risk of death from other causes. We aimed to evaluate these models in resected early-stage NSCLC patients. This study included 263 patients with resected NSCLC whose diameter was ≤ 3 cm without node involvement (N0). Demographic, clinical, morphopathological and surgical variables, TNM classification and long-term evolution were analysed. To analyse CI, death by another cause was considered to be competitive event. For the univariate analysis, Gray's method was used, while Fine and Gray's method was employed for the multivariate analysis. Mortality by NSCLC was 19.4% at 5 years and 14.3% by another cause. Both curves crossed at 6.3 years, and probability of death by another cause became greater from this point. In multivariate analysis, cancer mortality was conditioned by visceral pleural invasion (VPI) (P=.001) and vascular invasion (P=.020), with age>50 years (P=.034), smoking (P=.009) and the Charlson index ≥ 2 (P=.000) being by no cancer. By the method of CI, VPI and vascular invasion conditioned cancer death in NSCLC >3 cm, while non-tumor causes of long-term death were determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Moderately Escalated Hypofractionated (ChemoRadiotherapy Delivered with Helical Intensity-Modulated Technique in Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Vittorio eDonato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To assess clinical outcomes and toxicities in patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with a moderately escalated hypofractionated radiotherapy delivered with Helical Intensity-Modulated Technique in combination with sequential or concurrent chemotherapy.Methods and Materials Sixty-one consecutive patients considered non-progressive after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy were treated with a moderately escalated hypofractionated radiation course of 30 daily fractions of 2.25-2.28 Gy each administered in 6 weeks up to a total dose of 67.5 Gy–68.4 Gy (range, 64.5 Gy–71.3 Gy. Thirty-two received sequential RT after 2 more cycles (total= 4 cycles of chemotherapy, while twenty-nine were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation. The target was considered the gross tumour volume and the clinically proven nodal regions, without elective nodal irradiation. Results With a median follow up of 27 months (range 6 to 40, one-year and 2-year OS rate for all patients was 77% and 53% respectively, with a median survival duration of 18.6 months in the sequential group and 24.1 months in the concomitant group. No Grade ≥ 4 acute and late toxicity was reported. Acute Grade 3 treatment-related pneumonitis was detected in 10% of patients. Two patients, both receiving the concurrent schedule, developed a Grade 3 acute esophagitis. The overall incidence of late Grade 3 lung toxicity was 5%. No patients experienced a Grade 3 late esophageal toxicity.Conclusions A moderately hypofractionated radiation course delivered with a Helical Intensity-Modulated Technique is a feasible treatment option for patients with unresectable locally advanced NSCLC receiving chemotherapy (sequentially or concurrently. Hypofractionated radiotherapy with a dedicated technique allows safely dose escalation, minimizing the effect of tumor repopulation that may occur with prolonged treatment time.

  8. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

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    Jeremic, Branislav, E-mail: nebareje@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia); Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Kragujevac (Serbia)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  9. Malignant pleural disease is highly associated with subsequent peritoneal metastasis in patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer independent of oncogene status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Tejas; Aisner, Dara L; Noonan, Sinead A; Bunn, Paul A; Purcell, William T; Carr, Laurie L; Camidge, D Ross; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis from lung cancer is an uncommon clinical event and there are limited data on what factors predict peritoneal progression. This study retrospectively investigated whether patterns of metastatic spread and oncogene status in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with peritoneal metastasis. Patients with metastatic non-squamous NSCLC (n=410) were identified at the University of Colorado Cancer Center. Sites of metastatic disease and baseline oncogene status (EGFR, ALK, KRAS, or triple negative) were documented via a retrospective chart review. In patients with EGFR mutations who developed peritoneal disease, we documented the presence of known resistance mechanisms. Median time to peritoneal metastasis, time from peritoneal disease to death, and overall survival were collected. Eight percent (33/410) patients in this study developed peritoneal metastasis. Malignant pleural disease at baseline was significantly associated with subsequent peritoneal spread. There was no association between oncogene status and peritoneal metastasis. Three patients with EGFR mutations who developed peritoneal metastasis had documented resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the ascitic fluid. Median time from stage IV disease to peritoneal metastasis was 16.5 months (range 0.6-108 months). There were no differences in overall survival between patients who developed peritoneal metastasis and those who did not. Malignant pleural disease is highly associated with peritoneal metastasis in patients with advanced NSCLC. The underlying mechanism is not clear. The presence of resistance mutations in ascitic fluid implies that poor drug penetration is unlikely to be the dominant mechanism. Despite being a late clinical finding, there were no differences in overall survival between patients who developed peritoneal metastasis and those who did not. Additional studies exploring treatment related factors in patients with malignant

  10. Imaging characteristics of stage I non-small cell lung cancer on CT and FDG-PER; Relationship with epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression status and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youkyung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, Doo Hyun; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2013-01-01

    To identify CT and FDG-PET features associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein overexpression, and to evaluate whether imaging features and EGFR-overexpression can help predict clinical outcome. In 214 patients (M : F = 129 : 85; mean age, 63.2) who underwent curative resection of stage I non-small cell lung cancer, EGFR protein expression status was determined through immunohistochemical analysis. Imaging characteristics on CT and FDG-PET was assessed in relation to EGFR-overexpression. Imaging features and EGFR-overexpression were also evaluated for clinical outcome by using the Cox proportional hazards model. EGFR-overexpression was found in 51 patients (23.8%). It was significantly more frequent in tumors with an SUVmax > 5.0 (p 2.43 cm (p 5.0 (OR, 3.113; 95% CI, 1.375-7.049; p = 0.006) and diameter > 2.43 cm (OR, 2.799; 95% CI, 1.285-6.095; p = 0.010) were independent predictors of EGFR overexpression. Multivariate analysis showed that SUVmax > 4.0 (hazard ratio, 10.660; 95% CI, 1.370-82.966; p = 0.024), and the presence of cavitation within a tumor (hazard ratio, 3.122; 95% CI, 1.143-8.532; p = 0.026) were factors associated with poor prognosis. EGFR-overexpression is associated with high SUVmax, large tumor diameter, and small GGO proportion. CT and FDG-PET findings, which are closely related to EGFR overexpression, can be valuable in the prediction of clinical outcome.

  11. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allibhai, Zishan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Taremi, Mojgan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Newmarket (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Cho, B.C. John, E-mail: john.cho@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  12. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  13. Validation of High-Risk Computed Tomography Features for Detection of Local Recurrence After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulen, Heike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mantel, Frederick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Belderbos, José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hope, Andrew; Giuliani, Meredith [Department of Radiation Oncology University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grills, Inga [Department of Radiation Oncology Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Fibrotic changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are difficult to distinguish from local recurrences (LR), hampering proper patient selection for salvage therapy. This study validates previously reported high-risk computed tomography (CT) features (HRFs) for detection of LR in an independent patient cohort. Methods and Materials: From a multicenter database, 13 patients with biopsy-proven LR were matched 1:2 to 26 non-LR control patients based on dose, planning target volume (PTV), follow-up time, and lung lobe. Tested HRFs were enlarging opacity, sequential enlarging opacity, enlarging opacity after 12 months, bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, loss of air bronchogram, and craniocaudal growth. Additionally, 2 new features were analyzed: the occurrence of new unilateral pleural effusion, and growth based on relative volume, assessed by manual delineation. Results: All HRFs were significantly associated with LR except for loss of air bronchogram. The best performing HRFs were bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, and craniocaudal growth. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the number of HRFs to detect LR had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.0), which was identical to the performance described in the original report. The best compromise (closest to 100% sensitivity and specificity) was found at ≥4 HRFs, with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 85%. A model consisting of only 2 HRFs, bulging margin and craniocaudal growth, resulted in a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%, with an AUC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.9-1.0) (HRFs ≥2). Pleural effusion and relative growth did not significantly improve the model. Conclusion: We successfully validated CT-based HRFs for detection of LR after SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. As an alternative to number of HRFs, we propose a simplified model with the combination of the 2 best HRFs

  14. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  15. Non-small cell lung cancer in stages I-IIIB. Long-term results of definitive radiotherapy with doses {>=} 80 Gy in standard fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Weise, Hannes; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Merz, Florian; Sedlmayer, Felix [Univ. Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology and radART - Inst. for research and development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Studnicka, Michael [Univ. Clinic of Pneumology, Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate therapeutic outcome of dose escalation {>=} 80 Gy in nonresected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: 124 consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Tumor stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was diagnosed in 30, eight, 39, and 47 patients, respectively. 38 patients (31%) had weight loss > 5% during the 3 months before diagnosis. A median dose of 88.2 Gy (range 80.0-96.0 Gy), 69.3 Gy (63.0-88.0 Gy) and 56.7 Gy was applied to primary lesions, involved lymph nodes, and elective nodes (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved nodes), respectively. Daily fractional ICRU doses of 2.0-2.2 Gy were delivered by the conformal target-splitting technique. 58 patients (47%) received induction chemotherapy, in median two cycles prior to radiotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time of all patients was 19 months, of patients alive 72.4 months (69-121 months). The cumulative actual overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years amounts to 39% and 11.3%, respectively, resulting in a median overall survival time of 19.6 months. According to stages I, II, IIIA, and IIIB, the median overall survival times are 31.8, 31.4, 19.0, and 14.5 months, respectively. The locoregional tumor control rate at 2 years is 49%. Apart from one treatment-related death (pneumonitis), acute toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG scores was moderate: lung grade 2 (n = 7), grade 3 (n = 3); esophagus grade 1 (n = 11); heart grade 3 (n = 1, pericarditis). No late toxicity grade > 1 has been observed. Conclusion: Sequential, conventionally fractionated high-dose radiotherapy by conformal target splitting is well tolerated. The results for survival and locoregional tumor control seem to at least equalize the outcome of simultaneous chemoradiation approaches, which, at present, are considered ''state of the art'' for patients with nonresected NSCLC. A higher potential of radiation therapy might be reached

  16. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  17. Multicentric evaluation of the impact of central tumour location when comparing rates of N1 upstaging in patients undergoing video-assisted and open surgery for clinical Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decaluwé, Herbert; Petersen, René Horsleben; Brunelli, Alex

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Large retrospective series have indicated lower rates of cN0 to pN1 nodal upstaging after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) compared with open resections for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of our multicentre study was to investigate whether the presumed...

  18. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  19. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED ISO ) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED ISO and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED ISO , age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP modeling are

  20. Phase III study comparing cisplatin plus gemcitabine with cisplatin plus pemetrexed in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, G.V.; Parikh, P.; Pawel, J. von

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cisplatin plus gemcitabine is a standard regimen for first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II studies of pemetrexed plus platinum compounds have also shown activity in this setting. Patients and Methods This noninferiority, phase III, randomized study ...... neutropenia (P = .002); and alopecia (P

  1. Broncho-pulmonary toxicity in stage III non small cell lung cancer patients treated with taxol containing chemotherapy and concurrent preoperative or definitive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M. Maddie; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Recine, Diane C.; Faber, L. Penfield; Warren, William H.; LaFollette, Suzanne; Lincoln, Sarah T.; Bonomi, Philip D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The objective of this trial was to test the feasibility of taxol containing combination chemotherapy and concurrent radiation as preoperative or definitive treatment for stage III non small cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients were treated on this trial. The initial regimen was (Group 1 pts.): paraplatin (P) (AUC of 4) on day 2, etoposide (E) 50 mg po days 1-5 and 8-12, cisplatin (C) 50 mg/m2 on day 21 and taxol (T) 35 mg/m2 escalated to 45 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, 24 hr. infusion. After treatment of 10 pts., the regimen was modified as follows (Group 2 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1, E 40 mg/m2 IV daily and days 2-5, and T 80 mg/m2 escalated to 120 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. After the next 16 pts., the regimen was modified again as follows (Group 3 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1 and T 120 mg/m2 escalated to 140 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. Seven patients were treated on the latest version of the regimen for a total of 33 pts. The radiation given was uniform throughout the 3 groups. A dose of 4000 cGy in 20 fxs was given in the surgical arm and 6000 cGy in 30 fxs in the non surgical arm. Treatments were given at 200 cGy/fx. once a day, on a 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off basis. The RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria was used to grade pneumonitis. Post-operative complications were defined as occurring early (less than or equal to 30 days) or late (greater than 30 days) following surgery. Results: Sixteen of the 33 patients went to surgery. Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis developed in 4 of the 33 patients (12%). There were no episodes of Grade 4 pneumonitis. Grade 3 pneumonitis occured in: One patient in Group 1, (RT dose 5800 cGy), 2 pts in Group 2 (RT dose 4000 cGy and 6000 cGy, respectively), and 1 pt in Group 3 (RT dose 6000 cGy). Major post-operative complications occurred in 6 of the 16 patients (37.5%) who went to surgery. In Group 1, 1 pt. required oxygen supplementation secondary to a significant

  2. Alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy for inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: long-term results of two phase II GOTHA trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier; Moro, Denis; Bolla, Michel; Michel, Genevieve; Brambilla, Christian; Mermillod, Bernadette; Miralbell, Raymond; Alberto, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report on two consecutive Phase II cooperative trials in which we evaluated the combination of alternating hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy in inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Between February 1986 and September 1989, 65 patients were entered in the first trial (GOTHA I), and between December 1989 and October 1992 67 were enrolled in the second trial (GOTHA II). In both protocols, radiotherapy (RT) was administered twice daily, at 6 h intervals, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 63 Gy in 42 fractions of 1.5 Gy. RT was given during weeks 2, 3, 6, and 7, over an elapsed time of 6 weeks. In GOTHA I, three cycles of cisplatin, 60 mg/m 2 day 1, mitomycin, 8 mg/m 2 day 1, and vindesin 3 mg/m 2 day 1 and the first day of the following week, were given during weeks 1, 5, and 9; in GOTHA II, cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 day 1 and vinblastin 5 mg/m 2 day 1 and the first day of the following week were given during weeks 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, and 21. Results: With a minimum follow-up of 3 years, the 1-, 2-, 5-, and 8-year overall survival probability was 56% (95% CI 47-64%), 27% (20-35%), 12% (7-18%) and 9% (3-16%), respectively, with a median survival of 13.6 months (11.4-16.8). Median follow-up for survivors was 6 years (3.3-9.9). There were no survival differences between Stages IIIA and IIIB (p = 0.84), performance status 0, 1, 2 (p = 0.87), sex (p = 0.45) or between the two treatment protocols. At this time, 14 patients are alive, and 118 have died: 102 from NSCLC, 4 from acute toxicity, 2 from secondary surgery, 4 from other medical causes, and 6 from unknown causes. Correlation between response and long-term survival was poor, since of the 24 patients who survived 3 years or more, only 6 (25%) were classified as having a complete response; the remainder having either a partial response (11, 46%), no change (6, 25%), or 'progressive disease' (1, 4%). First site of relapse was

  3. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  4. Immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) for stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer treated with surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Rui; Tiselius, Eva; Roudi, Raheleh; Teghararian, Olivia; Suo, Chen; Song, Huan

    2017-12-16

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung cancer, accounting for approximately 80% to 85% of all cases. For patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III), it has been speculated that immunotherapy may be helpful for reducing postoperative recurrence rates, or improving the clinical outcomes of current treatment for unresectable tumours. While several new agents have now entered phase III clinical trials, we felt a systematic review was needed to address the question of the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy in patients with stages I to III NSCLC. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) in patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III) who received surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent. We searched the following databases (from inception to 20 January 2017): CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL, and five trial registers. We also manually checked abstracts or reports from relevant conference proceedings and the reference lists of included trials. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults (≥ 18 years) with histologically-confirmed early-stage (stages I to III) NSCLC after surgical resection, and those with unresectable locally advanced stage III NSCLC who had received radiotherapy with curative intent. For patients who had received primary surgical treatment, postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy was allowed if it was used for both experimental and control groups. Two review authors independently selected eligible trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We used survival analysis to pool time-to-event data, expressing the intervention effect as a hazard ratio (HR). We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data, and mean differences for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Due to clinical heterogeneity (immunotherapeutic agents with different underlying mechanisms), we used random-effects models for our meta-analyses. We

  5. Randomized phase II study of gefitinib compared with placebo in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and poor performance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A

    2009-05-01

    To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors.

  6. Prognostic implications of survivin and lung resistance protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, WENFENG; MAO, YAN; ZHAN, YONGZI; HUANG, JIANFENG; WANG, XIANGPING; LUO, PENGHUI; LI, LI; MO, DUNCHANG; LIU, QIONG; XU, HUIMIN; HUANG, CHANGJIE

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the chemotherapy often results in the development of chemoresistance. The present study aimed to explore the prognostic implications of survivin and lung resistance protein (LRP) in advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Tumor samples were collected from 61 hospitalized patients with stage IIIB-IV NSCLC that underwent platinum-based chemotherapy. All patient samples were collected in the Oncology Department of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2006 and January 2011. Cytoplasmic survivin and LRP expression were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The expression of LRP and survivin reached 77% (47/61) and 76% (45/61), respectively. Positive expression of survivin was associated with a lower median progression-free survival (PFS) time (4 vs. 9 months; P=0.038) and a lower median overall survival (OS) time compared with the absence of survivin expression (9 vs. 16 months; P=0.039). Patients with LRP and survivin expression (n=41) demonstrated a median PFS time of 4 months. However, patients with either LRP or survivin expression (n=10) demonstrated a median PFS time of 8 months, which is similar to the median PFS time of the 10 patients with no expression of LRP and survivin (9 months; P=0.022). Either the expression of survivin or the combined expression of LRP and survivin is associated with a poor prognosis in advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26870274

  7. High plasma exposure to pemetrexed leads to severe hyponatremia in patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gota, Vikram; Kavathiya, Krunal; Doshi, Kartik; Gurjar, Murari; Damodaran, Solai E; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pemetrexed-platinum doublet therapy is a standard treatment for stage IIIb/IV nonsquamous non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While the regimen is associated with several grade ≥3 toxicities, hyponatremia is not a commonly reported adverse effect. Here we report an unusually high incidence of grade ≥3 hyponatremia in Indian patients receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet, and the pharmacological basis for this phenomenon. Forty-six patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled for a bioequivalence study of two pemetrexed formulations. All patients received the pemetrexed-platinum doublet for six cycles followed by single-agent pemetrexed maintenance until progression. Pharmacokinetic blood samples were collected at predefined time points during the first cycle and the concentration-time profile of pemetrexed was investigated by noncompartmental analysis. Hyponatremic episodes were investigated with serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urinary sodium, and urine osmolality. Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) had at least one episode of grade ≥3 hyponatremia. Twenty-four episodes of grade ≥3 hyponatremia were observed in 200 cycles of doublet chemotherapy. Plasma exposure to pemetrexed was significantly higher in patients with high-grade hyponatremia than in those with low-grade or no hyponatremia (P=0.063 and P=0.001, respectively). Pemetrexed clearance in high-grade hyponatremia was quite low compared with normal and low-grade hyponatremia (P=0.001 and P=0.055, respectively). Median pemetrexed exposure in this cohort was much higher than that reported in the literature from Western studies. Higher exposure to pemetrexed is associated with grade ≥3 hyponatremia. The pharmacogenetic basis for higher exposure to pemetrexed in Indian patients needs further investigation

  8. Phase I Study of Oral Vinorelbine in Combination with Erlotinib in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC Using Two Different Schedules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Sutiman

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the combination of oral vinorelbine with erlotinib using the conventional (CSV and metronomic (MSV dosing schedules in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.This was an open-label, multiple dose-escalation phase I study. An alternating 3+3 phase I design was employed to allow each schedule to enroll three patients sequentially at each dose level. Thirty patients with Stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were treated with escalating doses of oral vinorelbine starting at 40 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 in the CSV group (N = 16 and at 100 mg/week in the MSV group (N = 14. Erlotinib was administered orally daily.The maximum tolerated dose was vinorelbine 80 mg/m2 with erlotinib 100 mg in the CSV group and vinorelbine 120 mg/week with erlotinib 100 mg in the MSV group. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (N = 2; 13% and hyponatremia (N = 1; 6% in the CSV group, and neutropenia (N = 5; 36% in the MSV group. Objective response was achieved in 38% and 29% in the CSV and MSV groups respectively. Vinorelbine co-administration did not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of erlotinib and OSI-420 after initial dose. However, at steady-state, significantly higher Cmax, higher Cmin and lower CL/F of erlotinib were observed with increasing dose levels of vinorelbine in the CSV group. Significantly higher steady-state Cmin, Cavg and AUCss of erlotinib were observed with increasing dose levels of vinorelbine in the MSV group.Combination of oral vinorelbine with erlotinib is feasible and tolerable in both the CSV and MSV groups.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00702182.

  9. Gemcitabine plus docetaxel as first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a lung cancer Galician group phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Joaquín; Amenedo, Margarita; Mel, José Ramón; Antón, Luis Miguel; Rodríguez-López, Rubén; López-López, Rafael; González-Ageitos, Ana; Castellanos, Javier; Constenla, Manuel; Tisaire, José L

    2007-10-01

    Numerous phase II and III clinical trials have demonstrated a higher activity of combined gemcitabine plus docetaxel schedules against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than that of both agents in monotherapy. This phase II study evaluated a 3-week based schedule of docetaxel 85 mg/m(2) (1-h i.v. infusion, d8) combined with gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) (30-min i.v. infusion; d1,8) as first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC. Forty-one patients with non-resectable, stage IIIB/IV, and bidimensionally measurable disease were enrolled. A total of 182 chemotherapy cycles (median 6, range 1-6) was administered to 40 patients during the study; one patient did not receive chemotherapy due to a protocol deviation. Two patients were not evaluable for treatment efficacy. The overall response rate found was 44% (95% CI, 29-59%): three patients (7%) had a complete response and 15 patients (37%) had a partial response (median duration of response = 4.0 months). With a median follow-up of 8.7 months, the median time to disease progression was 4.4 months and the median overall survival was 7.3 months. The combined gemcitabine plus docetaxel chemotherapy was well tolerated except for pulmonary toxicity. The main grade 3-4 hematological toxicity was neutropenia (28% of patients, 9% of cycles). Two cases of febrile neutropenia were reported. The main grade 3-4 non-hematological toxicity was pulmonary toxicity (23% of patients, 6% of cycles). Gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 in combination with docetaxel 85 mg/m(2) on day 8 given in 3-week cycles is an active and well-tolerated first-line chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced NSCLC.

  10. Hope for progress after 40 years of futility? Novel approaches in the treatment of advanced stage III and IV non-small-cell-lung cancer: Stereotactic body radiation therapy, mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and novel systemic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Simon Fung Fee; Warren, Graham W.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of patients present with advanced (stage III-IV) disease. Such patients are treated with a variety of therapies including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite decades of work, however, overall survival in this group has been resistant to any substantial improvement. This review briefly details the evolution to the current standard of care for advanced NSCLC, advances in systemic therapy, and ...

  11. Cost comparison of second-line treatment options for late stage non-small-cell lung cancer: cost analysis for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwander B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bjoern Schwander,1 Simona Ravera,2 Giovanni Giuliani,2 Mark Nuijten,3 Stefan Walzer11Assessment-in-Medicine (AiM GmbH, Loerrach, Germany; 2Roche SpA, Monza, Italy; 3Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam (Jisp, NetherlandsBackground: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide (1.38 million cancer deaths, 18.2% of the total and of cancer morbidity (1.61 million new cases, 12.7% of all new cancers. Currently only three second-line non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC pharmacotherapies are licensed in the European Union: the chemotherapies pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. These therapy alternatives have shown a comparable efficacy (survival benefit. In the past, cost comparisons showed that erlotinib was less costly compared to docetaxel, which in turn is cheaper than pemetrexed. Nowadays erlotinib (and docetaxel are still less expensive than pemetrexed; but docetaxel lost patent protection (basic compound patent at the end of 2010, so docetaxel drug costs have decreased rapidly and the question remains whether erlotinib is still the least costly therapy alternative in second-line NSCLC.Material and methods: Italy was selected for base case analysis to compare the total therapy costs, estimated by combining country-specific drug costs, administration costs, and adverse event costs of erlotinib and generic docetaxel in second-line NSCLC therapy. Sensitivity analyses on central input parameters have been performed.Results: The total costs of treating one patient with erlotinib therapy of €5121 are lower than the docetaxel costs of €6699 for the Italian health care setting. Although the drug costs of erlotinib are higher than generic docetaxel (incremental €3770: the costs of intravenous chemotherapy administration (incremental -€4510, and the costs of adverse event therapy (incremental -€837 lead to higher total therapy costs for docetaxel compared to the epidermal

  12. Results From the Phase III Randomized Trial of Onartuzumab Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib in Previously Treated Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: METLung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Edelman, Martin J; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Paz-Ares, Luis; Mocci, Simonetta; Phan, See; Shames, David S; Smith, Dustin; Yu, Wei; Paton, Virginia E; Mok, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The phase III OAM4971g study (METLung) examined the efficacy and safety of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer selected by MET immunohistochemistry whose disease had progressed after treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive onartuzumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg or intravenous placebo plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) in the intent-to-treat population. Secondary end points included median progression-free survival, overall response rate, biomarker analysis, and safety. Results A total of 499 patients were enrolled (onartuzumab, n = 250; placebo, n = 249). Median OS was 6.8 versus 9.1 months for onartuzumab versus placebo (stratified hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.65; P = .067), with a greater number of deaths in the onartuzumab arm (130 [52%] v 114 [46%]). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 versus 2.6 months (stratified HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.20; P = .92), and overall response rate was 8.4% and 9.6% for onartuzumab versus placebo, respectively. Exploratory analyses using MET fluorescence in situ hybridization status and gene expression showed no benefit for onartuzumab; patients with EGFR mutations showed a trend toward shorter OS with onartuzumab treatment (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 0.97 to 22.63). Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were reported by 56.0% and 51.2% of patients, with serious AEs in 33.9% and 30.7%, for experimental versus control arms, respectively. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib did not improve clinical outcomes, with shorter OS in the onartuzumab arm, compared with erlotinib in patients with MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

  13. The prognostic significance of accumulation of p53 protein in stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, J.A.; Thunnissen, F.B.J.M.; Lamers, R.J.S.; Jong, J.M.A. de; Velde, G.P.M. ten; Wouters, E.F.M.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study the prognostic significance of accumulation of nuclear p53 protein on survival and freedom from local progression was investigated. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections obtained by bronchoscopy or mediastinoscopy were used to examine the expression of nuclear p53 protein using immunohistochemistry. In 37 cases (57%), overexpression of the p53 protein was detected. No relation was found between p53 expression and other pretreatment variables. Response to radiotherapy was found in 11 p53-negative cases (65%) versus 10 p53-positive cases (42%). Freedom from local progression was significantly better in the p53-negative cases as compared with the p53-positive cases. The p53-negative cases who responded to radiotherapy showed an excellent freedom from local progression rate after 2 years of 100%, whereas all p53-positive cases without response to radiotherapy showed local progression within 24 months. Overall survival between p53-negative and -positive cases did not differ, however the disease-specific survival was found to be worse in the p53-positive cases as compared to the negative cases (median survival 8.4 vs. 14.4 months (P < 0.05)). No correlation was found between p53 expression and the frequency of distant metastases. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that p53 protein expression may be of prognostic value on freedom from local progression in non-small cell lung carcinoma

  14. Is immediate chest radiotherapy obligatory for any or all patients with limited-stage non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Yes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.D.; Komaki, R.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    External irradiation with the greatest technical sophistication available is indicated in all patients with inoperable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung confined to the primary site and to regional lymph nodes including the ipsilateral supraclavicular nodes. Irradiation with moderately high doses results in responses in 40%-65% of all patients. With irradiation to a level of at least 6000 rad in 30 fractions in 6 weeks, greater than 60% of patients never fail in the chest. Some of these patients become long-term, disease-free survivors. Until it is possible clearly to predict those patients who do not respond and thereby to justify an approach other than thoracic irradiation, it is necessary to offer radiation therapy to all of these patients. Since local control is far from satisfactory, one can certainly justify investigating new approaches, including further increases of the total dose, altered fractionation schemes, addition of radiosensitizers, and high linear energy transfer radiations. Since distant metastases frequently appear in spite of thorough pretreatment evaluations, one can also justify investigating the addition of systemic agents, both cytotoxic drugs and biologic response modifiers. Benefit from these systemic approaches may be completely masked, even in patients with disseminated disease, by failure to prevent complications and death due to the intrathoracic tumor

  15. Genomic Profiles in Stage I Primary Non Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of cDNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the genomic aberrations that are involved in lung tumorigenesis and therefore may be developed as biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis, we characterized the genomic copy number changes associated with individual genes in 14 tumors from patients with primary non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Six squamous cell carcinomas (SQCAs and eight adenocarcinomas (ADCAs were examined by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis of cDNA microarray. The SQCAs and ADCAs shared common frequency distributions of recurrent genomic gains of 63 genes and losses of 72 genes. Cluster analysis using 57 genes defined the genomic differences between these two major histologic types of NSCLC. Genomic aberrations from a set of 18 genes showed distinct difference of primary ADCAs from their paired normal lung tissues. The genomic copy number of four genes was validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization of 32 primary NSCLC tumors, including those used for cDNA microarray CGH analysis; a strong correlation with cDNA microarray CGH data emerged. The identified genomic aberrations may be involved in the initiation and progression of lung tumorigenesis and, most importantly, may be developed as new biomarkers for the early detection and classification of lung cancer.

  16. Concurrent high-dose thoracic irradiation plus daily low-dose cisplatin and vindesine in locally advanced unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Hada, Yosihiro; Nakamura, Kenji [National Hospital of Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer were treated to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of high-dose thoracic irradiation (RT) combined with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus vindesine. Twenty five evaluable patients were treated with continuous-course RT (70 Gy in 35 fractions of 2.0 Gy once daily) and concurrent daily intravenous cisplatin (6 mg/m{sup 2}) plus vindesine (3 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1 and day 8). Leukopenia (48%) was the most severe sign of toxicity, but there were no episodes of discontinuation of treatment. Two patients (8%) had a grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis, but there was no severe late radiation esophagitis. Ten patients experienced late radiation pneumonitis and 9 of those were grade 1 or 2. There was only one life-threatening toxicity (grade 5 pneumonitis). The objective response rate was 72%, and one patient achieved a radiographic complete response. The median survival duration for all patients was 14 months, and the 3- and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 27.2% and 27.2%, respectively. We concluded that the regimen of high-dose thoracic RT combined with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus vindesine was a well-tolerated regimen. The survival results were encouraging. (author)

  17. Patterns of metastatic progression after definitive radiation therapy for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Garrett L; Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth R; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R

    2017-06-01

    Current preclinical models of metastatic disease (particularly oligometastases) suggest that metastases appear in a hierarchical order. We attempted to identify systematic patterns of metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after radiation therapy (XRT). We analyzed 1074 patients treated from 12/21/1998 through 8/20/2012 with ≥60 Gy definitive radiation for initially non-metastatic NSCLC. Location and time of metastases were recorded. Regional nodal failure was noted, as was subsequent distal failure. For further analysis, we considered only the five most common sites of metastasis (bone, brain, liver, adrenal, and lung). Metastatic progression over time was defined and patterns elucidated with Chi square tests. Histologic findings were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests. A significant multistep linear progression was not apparent. Having a first metastasis in lung or bone was associated with respective 16% (median 2.4 months) and 15% likelihoods (median 7.9 months) of secondary brain metastasis. Initial metastasis in the brain led to metastasis in another organ 29.3% of the time, most often in the lung, bone, and liver (medians 3.6, 7.9, and 3.1 months). Adenocarcinoma was more likely than squamous to metastasize to the brain (18 vs. 9%) and any of the five major sites (41 vs. 27%). We did not appreciate dominant patterns suggesting a multi-step hierarchical order of metastasis. Rather, our findings suggest that certain subgroups may develop different patterns of spread depending on a variety of factors.

  18. Maximum standardized uptake value from staging FDG-PET/CT does not predict treatment outcome for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Michael J; Stephans, Kevin L; Reddy, Chandana A; Djemil, Toufik; Srinivas, Shyam M; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2010-11-15

    To perform a retrospective review to determine whether maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)) from staging 2-deoxy-2- [(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies are associated with outcomes for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventy-two medically inoperable patients were treated between October 17, 2003 and August 17, 2007 with SBRT for T1-2N0M0 NSCLC. SBRT was administered as 60 Gy in 3 fractions, 50 Gy in 5 fractions, or 50 Gy in 10 fractions using abdominal compression and image-guided SBRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine whether PET SUV(max) and other variables influenced outcomes: mediastinal failure (MF), distant metastases (DM), and overall survival (OS). Biopsy was feasible in 49 patients (68.1%). Forty-nine patients had T1N0 disease, and 23 had T2N0 disease. Median SUV(max) was 6.55 (range, 1.5-21). Median follow-up was 16.9 months (range, 0.1-37.9 months). There were 3 local failures, 8 MF, 19 DM, and 30 deaths. Two-year local control, MF, DM, and OS rates were 94.0%, 10.4%, 30.1%, and 61.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, PET/CT SUV(max), defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, did not predict for MF, DM, or OS. On multivariable analysis, the only predictors for overall survival were T1 stage (hazard ratio = 0.331 [95% confidence interval, 0.156-0.701], p = 0.0039) and smoking pack-year history (hazard ratio = 1.015 [95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.026], p = 0.0084). Pretreatment PET SUV(max) did not predict for MF, DM, or OS in patients treated with SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Meta-analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy versus surgery alone in T2aN0 stage IB non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery was beneficial to the patients with Stage IB disease in terms of OS and progression-free survival. Therefore, we recommend clinicians to take this treatment strategy into account for the patients with Stage IB NSCLC.

  20. Definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for clinical stage T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong Yun; Kim, Sang We; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To determine failure patterns and survival outcomes of T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy. Ninety-five patients with T4N0-1 NSCLC who received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy from May 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The standard radiotherapy scheme was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. The main concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 weekly paclitaxel combined with 20 mg/m2 cisplatin or AUC 2 carboplatin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were failure patterns and toxicities. The median age was 64 years (range, 34 to 90 years). Eighty-eight percent of patients (n = 84) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, and 42% (n = 40) experienced pretreatment weight loss. Sixty percent of patients (n = 57) had no metastatic regional lymph nodes. The median radiation dose was EQD2 67.1 Gy (range, 56.9 to 83.3 Gy). Seventy-one patients (75%) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy; of these, 13 were also administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 1 to 102 months), 3-year OS was 44%. The 3-year cumulative incidences of local recurrence and distant recurrence were 48.8% and 36.3%, respectively. Pretreatment weight loss and combined chemotherapy were significant factors for OS. Acute esophagitis over grade 3 occurred in three patients and grade 3 chronic esophagitis occurred in one patient. There was no grade 3-4 radiation pneumonitis. Definitive radiotherapy for T4N0-1 NSCLC results in favorable survival with acceptable toxicity rates. Local recurrence is the major recurrence pattern. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and radio-sensitizing agents would be needed to improve local tumor control.

  1. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  2. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels for patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) levels have been reported to be useful as prognostic factors, indicators of clinical response, and predictors for recurrence in patients with lung cancer treated by surgery or chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were useful as independent prognostic factors in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy alone. The serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured in 158 and 47 patients, respectively, before radiation therapy. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured by sandwich radioimmunoassay using the CEA-RIA (radioimmunoassay) kit and the SCC-RIA kit. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were above reference values in 19% and 30% of the patients, respectively. The 5-year survival rates were significantly better for patients with a negative SCC Ag result than for those with positive SCC Ag levels (p=0.0001), though no significant difference in survival rates was seen by CEA positivity (p=0.25). SCC Ag positivity (p=0.0006) and stage (p=0.04) were the important prognostic factors, as determined by multivariate analyses. Pretreatment serum SCC Ag level may be useful as an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who are treated with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  3. Phase II Trial of Combined Modality Therapy With Concurrent Topotecan Plus Radiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III and Selected Stage IV Non-Small-Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung, Steven K.; Ross, Helen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and the role of consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Topotecan is active against NSCLC, can safely be combined with RT at effective systemic doses, and can be given by continuous infusion, making it an attractive study agent against locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In this pilot study, 20 patients were treated with infusion topotecan 0.4 mg/m 2 /d with three-dimensional conformal RT to 63 Gy both delivered Monday through Friday for 7 weeks. Patients without progression underwent consolidation chemotherapy with etoposide and a platinum agent for one cycle followed by two cycles of docetaxel. The study endpoints were treatment response, time to progression, survival, and toxicity. Results: Of the 20 patients, 19 completed induction chemoradiotherapy and 13 completed consolidation. Of the 20 patients, 18 had a partial response and 1 had stable disease after induction chemoradiotherapy. The 3-year overall survival rate was 32% (median, 18 months). The local and distant progression-free survival rate was 30% (median, 21 months) and 58% (median, not reached), respectively. Three patients developed central nervous system metastases, 1 within 228 days, 1 within 252 days, and 1 within 588 days. Three patients had pulmonary emboli. Therapy was well tolerated with 1 of 20 developing Grade 4 lymphopenia. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was seen in 17 of 20 patients but was not clinically significant. Other Grade 3 toxicities included esophagitis in 3, esophageal stricture in 2, fatigue in 8, and weight loss in 1. Grade 3 pneumonitis occurred in 6 of 20 patients. Conclusion: Continuous infusion topotecan with RT was well tolerated and active in the treatment of poor-risk patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC

  4. Keratin 34betaE12/keratin7 expression is a prognostic factor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, Rene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carcinomas and their metastases often retain the keratin patterns of their epithelial origin, and are therefore useful as lineage-specific markers in diagnostic pathology. Recently, it has become clear that intermediate filaments composed by keratins play a role in modulation of cell...... proliferation, migration, and possibly cancer invasion, factors impacting prognosis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor tissue from a retrospective Danish cohort of 177 patients with completely resected NSCLC, stage I-IIIA tumors, were analyzed for keratin 7 (K7......) and keratin 34βE12 expression by immunohistochemistry and validated in a comparable independent Norwegian cohort of 276 stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients. RESULTS: Based on keratin 34βE12/K7 expression, three subgroups with significantly different median cancer-specific survival rates were identified (34βE12+/K7...

  5. Increasing Rates of No Treatment in Advanced-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: A Propensity-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Daly, Megan E; Li, Chin-Shang; Chiu, Chi-Lu; Cooke, David T; Brown, Lisa M; Melnikow, Joy; Kelly, Karen; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Variation in treatment and survival outcomes for NSCLC is high among patients with stage III or IV disease, but patients with untreated NSCLC have not been critically analyzed to evaluate for improvable outcomes. We evaluated treatment trends and their association with oncologic outcomes for NSCLC, hypothesizing that there are a substantial number of untreated patients who are similar to patients who undergo treatment. Linear regression was used to calculate trends in utilization of treatment. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression modeling were used to determine predictors of receiving treatment. Propensity matching was used to compare survival among subsets of treated versus untreated patients. Patients with primary NSCLC were identified from the National Cancer Data base from 1998 to 2012, and 21% of patients (190,539) received no treatment. For stage IIIA and IV, the proportion of untreated patients increased over the study period by 0.21% and 0.4%, respectively (p = 0.003 and p < 0.0001). Regardless of stage, untreated patients had significantly shorter overall survival (OS) (p < 0.0001). Propensity-matched analyses of 6144 stage IIIA patient pairs treated with chemoradiation versus no treatment confirmed shorter OS for untreated patients (median 16.5 versus 6.1 months, p < 0.0001). For 19,046 stage IV patient pairs treated with chemotherapy versus no treatment, similar results were obtained (median OS 9.3 versus 2.0 months, p < 0.0001). The proportion of untreated patients with stage IIIA and IV disease is increasing. Survival outcomes among patients with advanced-stage disease are superior with treatment, independent of selection bias. The benefits and risks of treatment should be carefully assessed before choosing to forego treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Adjuvant Systemic Therapy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Stage I to IIIA Completely Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris, Mark G; Gaspar, Laurie E; Chaft, Jamie E; Kennedy, Erin B; Azzoli, Christopher G; Ellis, Peter M; Lin, Steven H; Pass, Harvey I; Seth, Rahul; Shepherd, Frances A; Spigel, David R; Strawn, John R; Ung, Yee C; Weyant, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Purpose The panel updated the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) adjuvant therapy guideline for resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods ASCO convened an update panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature, investigating adjuvant therapy in resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Results The updated evidence base covered questions related to adjuvant systemic therapy and included a systematic review conducted by Cancer Care Ontario current to January 2016. A recent American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline and systematic review, previously endorsed by ASCO, was used as the basis for recommendations for adjuvant radiation therapy. An update of these systematic reviews and a search for studies related to radiation therapy found no additional randomized controlled trials. Recommendations Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for routine use in patients with stage IIA, IIB, or IIIA disease who have undergone complete surgical resections. For individuals with stage IB, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a medical oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant chemotherapy for each patient. The guideline provides information on factors other than stage to consider when making a recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy, including tumor size, histopathologic features, and genetic alterations. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended for patients with stage IA disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for patients with resected stage I or II disease. In patients with stage IIIA N2 disease, adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a radiation oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant radiation therapy for each patient with N2 disease. Additional

  7. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC....

  8. Nivolumab Versus Docetaxel in Previously Treated Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Two-Year Outcomes From Two Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trials (CheckMate 017 and CheckMate 057).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Leora; Spigel, David R; Vokes, Everett E; Holgado, Esther; Ready, Neal; Steins, Martin; Poddubskaya, Elena; Borghaei, Hossein; Felip, Enriqueta; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pluzanski, Adam; Reckamp, Karen L; Burgio, Marco A; Kohlhäeufl, Martin; Waterhouse, David; Barlesi, Fabrice; Antonia, Scott; Arrieta, Oscar; Fayette, Jérôme; Crinò, Lucio; Rizvi, Naiyer; Reck, Martin; Hellmann, Matthew D; Geese, William J; Li, Ang; Blackwood-Chirchir, Anne; Healey, Diane; Brahmer, Julie; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E

    2017-12-10

    Purpose Nivolumab, a programmed death-1 inhibitor, prolonged overall survival compared with docetaxel in two independent phase III studies in previously treated patients with advanced squamous (CheckMate 017; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01642004) or nonsquamous (CheckMate 057; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01673867) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report updated results, including a pooled analysis of the two studies. Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV squamous (N = 272) or nonsquamous (N = 582) NSCLC and disease progression during or after prior platinum-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 1:1 to nivolumab (3 mg/kg every 2 weeks) or docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks). Minimum follow-up for survival was 24.2 months. Results Two-year overall survival rates with nivolumab versus docetaxel were 23% (95% CI, 16% to 30%) versus 8% (95% CI, 4% to 13%) in squamous NSCLC and 29% (95% CI, 24% to 34%) versus 16% (95% CI, 12% to 20%) in nonsquamous NSCLC; relative reductions in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel remained similar to those reported in the primary analyses. Durable responses were observed with nivolumab; 10 (37%) of 27 confirmed responders with squamous NSCLC and 19 (34%) of 56 with nonsquamous NSCLC had ongoing responses after 2 years' minimum follow-up. No patient in either docetaxel group had an ongoing response. In the pooled analysis, the relative reduction in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel was 28% (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.84), and rates of treatment-related adverse events were lower with nivolumab than with docetaxel (any grade, 68% v 88%; grade 3 to 4, 10% v 55%). Conclusion Nivolumab provides long-term clinical benefit and a favorable tolerability profile compared with docetaxel in previously treated patients with advanced NSCLC.

  9. A potential new enriching trial design for selecting non-small-cell lung cancer patients with no predictive biomarker for trials based on both histology and early tumor response: further analysis of a thalidomide trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siow Ming; Hackshaw, Allan

    2013-06-01

    There are few predictive biomarkers for antiangiogenic trials in lung cancer. We examine a potential treatment strategy in which a patient group is enriched using both histology and an early assessment of response during standard chemotherapy, and where a new agent is given for the remainder of chemotherapy and as maintenance. We performed a retrospective analysis of 722 stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer patients from a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of thalidomide or placebo 100-200 mg/day, combined with gemcitabine/carboplatin (for up to four cycles), then given as single agent maintenance therapy. There was a significant statistical interaction between treatment and histology, with a possible benefit among squamous cell cancer (SCC) patients. We examined 150 SCC patients who were "nonprogressors" (stable disease or complete/partial response) after completing the second chemotherapy cycle. Endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among the 150 patients nonprogressors after cycle 2 (thalidomide, n = 72; placebo, n = 78; baseline characteristics were similar), the hazard ratios (HRs) were: OS = 0.76 (95% CI: 0.54-1.07) and PFS = 0.69 (95% CI: 0.50-0.97). In 57 patients who had a complete/partial response, the HRs were: OS = 0.63 (95% CI: 0.34-1.15) and PFS = 0.50 (95% CI: 0.28-0.88). SCC patients who were nonprogressors after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy showed evidence of a benefit from thalidomide when taken for the remainder of chemotherapy and as maintenance. This strategy based on histology and, importantly, early assessment of tumor response, as a means of patient enrichment, could be examined in other lung cancer studies. Such an approach might be suitable for trials where there are no predictive biomarkers.

  10. 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron-emission tomography is cost-effective in the initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerci, Juliano Julio, E-mail: cercijuliano@hotmail.com [PET-CT Center, Quanta - Diagnostico e Terapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, Teresa Yae [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Trindade, Evelinda; Morgado, Roberta; Morabito, Fausto; Musolino, Rafael Silva; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares Junior, Jose [Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of metabolic staging (MS) with FDG-PET as compared with the conventional staging (CS) strategy in the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials And Methods: A total of 95 patients with initial diagnosis of NSCLC were staged before undergoing treatment. The MS and CS results were compared with regard to treatment definition and incidence of futile thoracotomies with both strategies. Results: Metabolic staging with FDG-PET upstaged 48.4% and down staged 5.3% of the patients, and would lead to change in the treatment of 41% of cases. Thoracotomy was considered as futile in 47% of the patients with CS, and in 19% of the patients with MS. The cost of futile thoracotomies in eight patients with MS was R$ 79,720, while in 31 patients with CS it would be R$ 308,915. Just such saving in costs would be more than enough to cover the costs of all FDG-PETs (R$ 126,350) or FDG-PET/CTs (R$ 193,515) for the 95 patients. Conclusion: The metabolic staging with FDG-PET is more accurate than CS in patients with NSCLC. Both FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT are cost-effective methods and their utilization is economically justifiable in the Brazilian public health system. (author)

  11. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  12. Hope for progress after 40 years of futility? Novel approaches in the treatment of advanced stage III and IV non-small-cell-lung cancer: Stereotactic body radiation therapy, mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and novel systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Simon Fung Fee; Warren, Graham W; Singh, Anurag K

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of patients present with advanced (stage III-IV) disease. Such patients are treated with a variety of therapies including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite decades of work, however, overall survival in this group has been resistant to any substantial improvement. This review briefly details the evolution to the current standard of care for advanced NSCLC, advances in systemic therapy, and novel techniques (stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT], and transcervical extended mediastinal lymphadenectomy [TEMLA] or video-assisted mediastinal lymphadenectomy [VAMLA]) that have been used in localized NSCLC. The utility of these techniques in advanced stage therapy and potential methods of combining these novel techniques with systemic therapy to improve survival are discussed.

  13. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  14. FDG PET/CT and Mediastinal Nodal Metastasis Detection in Stage T1 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Prognostic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Min; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhin Gook; Kim, Byung Tae; Kwon, O Jung; Park, Keun Chil

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to compare the prognoses of patients with pathologically true negative (P-TN) N2 and PET/CT false negative (FN) results in stage T1 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our institutional review board approved this retrospective study with a waiver of informed consent. The study included 184 patients (124 men and 60 women; mean age, 59 years) with stage T1 NSCLC who underwent an integrated PET/CT and surgery. After estimating the efficacy of PET/CT for detecting N2 disease, we determined and compared disease-free survival (DFS) rates in three groups (P-TN [n = 161], PET/CT FN [n = 12], and PET/CT true positive [TP, n = 11]) using the Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test. Pathologic N2 disease was observed in 23 (12%) patients. PET/CT had an N2 disease detection sensitivity of 48% (11 of 23 patients), a specificity of 95% (153 of 161), and an accuracy of 89% (164 of 184). The 3-year DFS rate in the PET/CT FN group (31%, 95% confidence interval [CI]; 13.6-48.0%) was similar to that of the TP group (16%, 95% CI; 1.7-29.5%) (p = 0.649), but both groups had significantly shorter DFS rates than the P-TN group (77%, 95% CI; 72.0- 81.2%) (p < 0.001). The PET/CT shows a high specificity, but low sensitivity for detecting N2 disease in stage T1 NSCLC. Patients with PET/CT FN N2 disease have survival rates similar to PET/CT TP N2 disease patients, which are both substantially shorter than the survival rate of P-TN patients

  15. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection

  16. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  17. Thoracic staging with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR in non-small cell lung cancer - does it change therapeutic decisions in comparison to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Umutlu, Lale [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metzenmacher, Martin [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, Essen (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Gauler, Thomas [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Radiation and Tumour Clinic, Essen (Germany); Roesel, Christian [University Duisburg-Essen, Ruhrlandklinik, Thoracic Surgery and Endoscopy, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald; Buchbender, Christian [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate whether differences in thoracic tumour staging between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging lead to different therapeutic decisions in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Seventy-seven NSCLC patients that underwent whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT from the base of skull to the upper thighs and thoracic PET/MR were enrolled in this retrospective study. Thoracic PET/CT and PET/MR images were staged according to the 7th edition of the AJCC staging manual. Staging results of both modalities were discussed separately in a simulated interdisciplinary tumour board and therapeutic decisions based on both imaging modalities were recorded. Descriptive statistics were used to compare the results and reasons for changes in the therapeutic decision were investigated. Staging results differed in 35 % of patients (27 patients) between thoracic PET/CT and PET/MR. Differences were detected when assessing the T-stage in 18 % (n = 14), the N-stage in 23 % (n = 18), and the M-stage in 1 % (n = 1). However, patient therapy management was changed in only six patients (8 %). Despite the variability of thoracic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR in TNM-staging, both modalities lead to comparable therapeutic decisions in patients suffering from NSCLC. Hence, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR can be considered an possible alternative to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for clinical NSCLC staging. (orig.)

  18. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Merete; Hansen, Anders Traberg; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2006-01-01

    the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea...... was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions.Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any...... consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary...

  19. Alternating radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC): long-term results of two phase II cooperative trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirimanoff, R.O.; Alberto, P.; Bolla, M.; Mermillod, B.; Michel, G.; Mirabell, R.; Moro, D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The treatment of inoperable Stage III NSCLC with conventional RT alone results in a high incidence of local and distant failures and in very limited long-term survival rates. In two consecutive phase II cooperative trials, we evaluated the combination of alternating hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: A total of one hundred and thirty two patients were enrolled. Between 2/86 and 9/89, 65 patients were entered in the first trial (G.I) and between 12/89 and 10/92 67 were enrolled in the second trial (G.II). In both protocols, RT was administered twice daily, with 6 hours interval, 5 days a week, to a total dose of 63 Gy in 42 fractions of 1.5 Gy. RT was given during weeks 2, 3 and 6, 7, over an elapsed time of 6 weeks. In G.I, 3 cycles of cisplatin, 60 mg/m2 d.1, mitomycin, 8 mg/m2 d.1 and vindesin 3 mg/m2 d.1 and 8, were given during weeks 1, 5 and 9, whereas in G.II, cisplatin 70 mg/m2 d.1 and vinblastin 5 mg/m2 d.1 and 8 were given during weeks 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21. Patients' characteristics included the following : median age was 55.5 years (28-70), male to female ratio was 7.3 : 1, tumor Stage were III A in 44% and III B in 56%, performance status (P.S.) were 0 in 36%, 1 in 52% and 2 in 12%. Histologic type consisted in squamous cell carcinoma in 60%, adenocarcinoma in 22%, large cell carcinoma in 14% and undifferentiated NSCLC in 4%. Results: With a minimum follow-up of 3 years, the 1, 2, 5 and 8 year overall survival probability was 56% (95% C.I. 47% - 64%), 27% (20% - 35%), 12% (7% - 18%) and 9% (3% - 16%) respectively, with a median survival of 13.6 months (11.4 - 16.8). Median follow-up for survivors was 6 years (3.3 - 9.9). There were no survival differences between Stage III A and III B (p = .84), PS 0, ,, 2 (p = .87), sex (p = .45) or between the two treatment protocols. At this time, 14 patients are alive, and 118 have died : 102 from NSCLC, 4 from acute toxicity, 2

  20. Stromal CD8+ T-cell Density—A Promising Supplement to TNM Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donnem, Tom; Hald, Sigurd M; Paulsen, Erna-Elise

    2015-01-01

    immunology is recognized as highly important. We have previously evaluated the prognostic impact of several immunological markers in NSCLC, yielding the density of stromal CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) as the most promising candidate. Hence, we validate the impact of stromal CD8(+) TIL density...... as an immunoscore in NSCLC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The prognostic impact of stromal CD8(+) TILs was evaluated in four different cohorts from Norway and Denmark consisting of 797 stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients. The Tromso cohort (n = 155) was used as training set, and the results were further validated in the cohorts...... from Bodo (n = 169), Oslo (n = 295), and Denmark (n = 178). Tissue microarrays and clinical routine CD8 staining were used for all cohorts. RESULTS: Stromal CD8(+) TIL density was an independent prognostic factor in the total material (n = 797) regardless of the endpoint: disease-free survival (P

  1. Expression and copy number gains of the RET gene in 631 early and mid stage non-small cell lung cancer cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ling; Hu, Yerong; Tao, Yongguang; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Jun; Tang, Zhenjie; Lu, Ting; Tang, Hao

    2018-02-23

    To identify whether RET is a potential target for NSCLC treatment, we examined the status of the RET gene in 631 early and mid stage NSCLC cases from south central China. RET expression was identified by Western blot. RET-positive expression samples were verified by immunohistochemistry. RET gene mutation, copy number variation, and rearrangement were analyzed by DNA Sanger sequencing, TaqMan copy number assays, and reverse transcription-PCR. ALK and ROS1 expression levels were tested by Western blot and EGFR mutation using Sanger sequencing. The RET-positive rate was 2.5% (16/631). RET-positive expression was related to poorer tumor differentiation (P < 0.05). In the 16 RET-positive samples, only two samples of moderately and poorly differentiated lung adenocarcinomas displayed RET rearrangement, both in RET-KIF5B fusion partners. Neither ALK nor ROS1 translocation was found. The EGFR mutation rate in RET-positive samples was significantly lower than in RET-negative samples (P < 0.05). RET-positive expression in early and mid stage NSCLC cases from south central China is relatively low and is related to poorer tumor differentiation. RET gene alterations (copy number gain and rearrangement) exist in all RET-positive samples. RET-positive expression is a relatively independent factor in NSCLC patients, which indicates that the RET gene may be a novel target site for personalized treatment of NSCLC. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolaro, T.; Ardizzoni, A.; Giudici, S.; Grossi, F.; Cosso, M.; Pennucci, M.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Rosso, R.; Vitale, V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m 2 daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12.3-41.9). Actuarial

  3. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage - non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paludan, Merete; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Joergen

    2006-01-01

    In SBRT for NSCLC, highly potent radiation doses are delivered to patients with frequent pre-irradiatory compromise of pulmonary function. For the risk of pulmonary toxicity to be minimized during SBRT planning, data on its dose-volume dependency is needed. In the present study, we analyse the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions. Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary toxicity should not be prohibitive for future studies targeting limitations to dose and volume

  4. Aggravation of dyspnea in stage - non-small cell lung cancer patients following stereotactic body radiotherapy: Is there a dose-volume dependency?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paludan, Merete; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2006-09-15

    In SBRT for NSCLC, highly potent radiation doses are delivered to patients with frequent pre-irradiatory compromise of pulmonary function. For the risk of pulmonary toxicity to be minimized during SBRT planning, data on its dose-volume dependency is needed. In the present study, we analyse the association of dose-volume histogram parameters with changes in dyspnea. The study concerns 28 medically inoperable stage I NSCLC patients that received SBRT at our department between 2000 and 2003. A central dose of 45 Gy/3 fractions was delivered in 5-8 days. WHO toxicity scoring of dyspnea was prospectively performed at baseline and during a 6-month follow-up post-SBRT. DVH parameters for pulmonary tissue were retrieved from the 3-D dose distributions. Aggravated dyspnea was registered in 11 patients (40%). We found no association between DVH parameters and changes in dyspnea. Nor did we find any consistent temporal variations of dyspnea after SBRT. We identified COPD as the factor showing the closest association with aggravation of dyspnea. The observed aggravation of dyspnea following SBRT reflects habitual exacerbations of COPD rather than treatment-related toxicity. Concern about pulmonary toxicity should not be prohibitive for future studies targeting limitations to dose and volume.

  5. To SABR or not to SABR? Indications and contraindications for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in the treatment of early-stage, oligometastatic, or oligoprogressive non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a highly effective treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Although direct comparisons from randomized trials are not available, rates of both primary tumor control and distant metastasis are similar between SABR and surgery. Overall survival is lower after SABR compared with surgery, largely reflecting that a primary selection criterion for SABR has been medical inoperability because of decreased cardiopulmonary function and other comorbidities that lead to decreased survival independent of non-small cell lung cancer. Survival outcomes between SABR and surgery are much more similar in propensity-matched cohorts. Newer potential indications for SABR include treatment of operable patients; of oligometastatic lung cancer, in which SABR has emerged as an alternative to metastasectomy; and of oligoprogressive lung cancer, an attractive concept especially as improved personalized systemic therapies emerge, and prospective trials are currently being conducted in these settings. Although toxicity in modern series is low, SABR is clearly capable of producing fatal complications, and understanding the risk factors and approaches for mitigating them has been emerging in recent years. Thus, appropriate patient selection is a vital, evolving, and controversial topic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A phase I study of concurrent chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy with oral epigallocatechin-3-gallate protection in patients with locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Xie, Peng; Li, Huiqin; Zhang, Xiqin; Sun, Xiaorong; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy often develop esophagitis that may lead to unplanned treatment interruptions, which may severely reduce rates of locoregional tumor control and survival. No effective treatment that would reduce the incidence and severity of this complication has been identified up to now. Although acceleration of normal tissue protection using epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been reported, its actual clinical practicability remains obscure. Methods and materials: This is a phase I study of EGCG in combination with standard chemoradiation in surgically unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide) was given concurrently with radiation. EGCG solution was swallowed three times a day after the occurrence of grade 2 esophagitis at six concentration levels and dose escalation followed a standard phase I design. Esophageal toxicity and patient-reported pain was recorded weekly. Results: Twenty-four patients with AJCC stage IIIA (six) and IIIB (eighteen) completed the course of therapy. Twelve had squamous histology, ten adenocarcinoma, and two not specified. Patients were treated in six cohorts at six dose levels of EGCG. RT was not interrupted with a median dose of 64 Gy. There were no dose-limiting toxicities reported in all EGCG dosing tiers. Dramatic regression of esophagitis to grade 0/1 was observed in 22 of 24 patients, whereas grade 2 esophagitis persisted in 2 of 24 patients at the end of radiotherapy. The pain score was also reduced from a mean of 4.58 (N = 24), 1.29 (N = 24), 1.42 (N = 24), 0.96 (N = 23) to 1.13 (N = 16) every week in turn. Conclusion: We conclude that the oral administration of EGCG is feasible, safe and effective. The phase II recommended concentration is 440 μmol/L

  7. EGFR mutation testing in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive evaluation of real-world practice in an East Asian tertiary hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-La Choi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Guidelines for management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC strongly recommend EGFR mutation testing. These recommendations are particularly relevant in Asians that have higher EGFR mutation prevalence. This study aims to explore current testing practices, logistics of testing, types of EGFR mutation, and prevalence of EGFR mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC in a large comprehensive cancer center in Korea. METHODS: Our retrospective cohort included 1,503 NSCLC patients aged ≥18 years, with stage IIIB/IV disease, who attended the Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from January 2007 through July 2010. Trained oncology nurses reviewed and abstracted data from electronic medical records. RESULTS: This cohort had a mean age (SD of 59.6 (11.1 years, 62.7% were males, and 52.9% never-smokers. The most common NSCLC histological types were adenocarcinoma (70.5% and squamous cell carcinoma (18.0%. Overall, 39.5% of patients were tested for EGFR mutations. The proportion of patients undergoing EGFR testing during January 2007 through July 2008, August 2008 through September 2009, and October 2009 through July 2010 were 23.3%, 38.3%, and 63.5%, respectively (P<0.001. The median time elapsed between cancer diagnoses and receiving EGFR testing results was 21 days. EGFR testing was most frequently ordered by oncologists (57.7%, pulmonologists (31.9%, and thoracic surgeons (6.6%. EGFR testing was more commonly requested for women, younger patients, stage IV disease, non-smokers, and adenocarcinoma histology. Of 586 cases successfully tested for EGFR mutations, 209 (35.7% were positive, including 118 cases with exon 19 deletions and 62 with L858R mutations. EGFR mutation positive patients were more likely to be female, never-smokers, never-drinkers and to have adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cancer center in Korea, the proportion of EGFR testing increased from 2007 through 2010. The high frequency of EGFR mutation positive

  8. Meta-analysis study of lymph node staging by 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan in non-small cell lung cancer: Comparison of TB and non-TB endemic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chih-Ying, E-mail: jine871@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Taichung Hospital, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jin-Hua, E-mail: chenjh12@gmail.com [Biostatistics Center and Graduate Institute of Biostatistics, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An, E-mail: hope.jal@msa.hinet.net [Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Jun-Jun, E-mail: anvin.funlan@msa.hinet.net [Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Research, PingTung Christian Hospital and Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Hung, E-mail: d10040@mail.cmuh.org.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    Lymph node staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is challenging and important for deciding treatment policy. The role of PET/CT scans in lymph node staging of NSCLC remains controversial when comparing TB and non-TB endemic regions. This study systematically reviews the literature regarding the diagnostic performance of PET/CT in lymph node staging of patients with NSCLC, and determines its pooled sensitivity and specificity. Methods: The databases of PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane library were searched for relevant studies. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of each study. A meta-analysis of the reported sensitivity and specificity of each study was performed. Results: Seven of 86 studies were included. These studies had moderate to good methodological quality. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio for patient-based analyses (five studies) were 66%, 92.7%, 5.86%, and 0.41%, respectively, and those for lesion-based analyses (six studies) were 59.4%, 96.5%, 9.37%, and 0.31%, respectively. Subanalysis of endemic regions of tuberculosis (TB) showed that these regions had lower sensitivity and similar specificity to non-TB endemic regions. Conclusion: PET/CT showed high specificity in the lymph node staging of NSCLC and lower sensitivity in TB endemic regions.

  9. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  10. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  11. Off-Label Use of Crizotinib as a Neoadjuvant Treatment for a Young Patient When Conventional Chemotherapy Gave No Benefits in Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Delphine; Dô, Pascal; Lerouge, Delphine; Planchard, Gaëtane; Riffet, Marc; Dubos-Arvis, Catherine; Danhier, Serge; Gervais, Radj

    2017-08-15

    BACKGROUND The treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer involves a combination of chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy. Each case is discussed and the best strategy is chosen individually, following international guidelines. CASE REPORT A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with locally advanced broncho-pulmonary adenocarcinoma (stage IIIA). The disease was stable after 2 cycles of cisplatin plus Navelbine used as neoadjuvant therapy. FISH analysis revealed an ALK rearrangement. The patient then received unlicensed crizotinib as second-line neoadjuvant treatment, which led to an almost complete radiological and metabolic response. A left upper lobectomy was performed, followed by post-operative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At 18 months post-surgery, the patient is still disease-free according to the last CT scan. CONCLUSIONS Targeted therapy was an alternative solution when chemotherapy was not helping. Randomized studies are needed to define its precise role in the neoadjuvant scheme.

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET for the lymph node staging of non-small cell lung cancer in a tuberculosis-endemic country: Is dual time point imaging worth the effort?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Wu, Yen-Wen [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Chen, Ke-Cheng; Lee, Jang-Ming; Lee, Yung-Chie [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Thoracic Section, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wang, Jane [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China)

    2008-07-15

    This study was to compare {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) with thoracic contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in the ability of lymph node (LN) staging non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a tuberculosis-prevalent country. The usefulness of dual time point PET imaging (DTPI) in NSCLC nodal staging was also evaluated. We reviewed 96 NSCLC patients (mean age, 65.3 {+-} 11.7 years) who had received PET studies before their surgery. DTPI were performed on 37 patients (mean age, 64.8 {+-} 12.2 years) who received an additional scan of thorax 3 h after tracer injection. The accuracies of nodal staging by CECT and PET were evaluated according to final histopathology of hilar and mediastinal LN resected by surgery. The accuracy for nodal staging by CECT was 65.6% and that by PET was 82.3% (p < 0.05). Six patients were over-staged and 11 were under-staged by PET. Tuberculosis (n = 3, 50%) were mostly responsible for false-positive, while small tumor foci (n = 7, 63.6%) were mostly accountable for false-negative. For the 37 patients with DTPI, 45 min standardized uptake value (SUV) and 3 h SUV for negative LNs are significantly lower than those for positive LNs (p < 0.0001). Nevertheless, the retention index (RI) showed no significant difference between these two groups. Our study demonstrates that PET is more accurate than CECT in LN staging NSCLC patients in Taiwan where TB is still prevalent. Semi-quantitative SUV method or DTPI with RI does not result in better diagnostic accuracy than visual analysis of PET images. (orig.)

  13. New PET/CT criterion for nodal staging in non-small cell lung cancer: measurement of the ratio of section area of standard uptake values ≥2.5/lymph node section area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaro; Imai, Kazuhiro; Ishiyama, Koichi; Saito, Hajime; Motoyama, Satoru; Sato, Yusuke; Konno, Hayato; Fujishima, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Manabu; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to use surgical and histological results to develop a simple noninvasive technique for improving nodal staging using preoperative PET/CT in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Preoperative PET/CT findings (163 patients) and pathological diagnoses after surgical resection were evaluated. Using PET/CT images, lymph node section area (SA), the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), SA of SUV ≥2.5 and ≥3.0 were drawn freehand and measured using caliper software. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were then used to analyze those data. Based on ROC analyses, the cut-off values for SA of SUV ≥2.5, SA of SUV ≥3.0, SUV ≥2.5 SA/node SA and SUV ≥3.0 SA/node SA for diagnosis of lymph node metastasis were 200 mm 2 , 30 mm 2 , 1.0 and 0.4. SUV ≥2.5 SA/node SA ≥1.0 had the highest negative predictive value, and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of nodal staging were 61.1, 73.4, 36.7, 88.2 and 70.9%. When diagnosing nodal staging based a lymph node SUV ≥2.5 SA/node SA ratio of ≥1.0, it can be an effective criterion for use to determine surgical indications.

  14. Gemcitabine, cisplatin and vinorelbine as induction chemotherapy followed by radical therapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicentre study of galician-lung-cancer-group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Luis; Cueva-Banuelos, Juan F; Huidobro, G; Fírvida, J L; Amenedo, M; Lázaro, M; Romero, C; Estévez, S V; Barón, F J; Grande, C; García Mata, J; González, A; Castellanos, J; Gómez, A; Caeiro, M; Rodríguez, M R; Casal, J

    2003-05-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a gemcitabine-cisplatin-vinorelbine combination in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients (n=46) with stage III NSCLC and naive of therapy were recruited into the trial to receive gemcitabine (G, 1000 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 8, cisplatin (C, 100 mg/m(2)) on day 1 and vinorelbine (V, 25 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 8 every 21 days for three cycles. Two patients achieved complete response (CR) and 23 partial response (PR), overall response 52%. Subsequent radical surgery included nine patients of whom four were non-resectable and five were resected and with 1 CR. Radiotherapy was administered to 31 patients, and two achieved CR. The median time to progression and overall survival were 37 and 50 weeks, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 35% of cycles, with two toxic deaths. Severe non-haematological toxicity was uncommon. This GCV combination is effective in patients with stage III NSCLC, and with an acceptable toxicity.

  15. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  16. Docetaxel-carboplatin in combination with erlotinib and/or bevacizumab in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutsikou E

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Eftimia Boutsikou,1 Theodoros Kontakiotis,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,1 Kaid Darwiche,2 Ellada Eleptheriadou,1 Konstantinos Porpodis,1 Grammati Galaktidou,3 Leonidas Sakkas,4 Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,5 Kosmas Tsakiridis,6 Theodoros Karaiskos,7 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis11Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece; 2University Pulmonary Department-Interventional Unit, Ruhrland Klinic, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Theagenio Anticancer Institute Research Laboratory, 4Department of Pathology, G Papanikolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 5II Medical Clinic, Hospital Coburg, University of Wuerzburg, Coburg, Germany; 6Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Saint Luke Private Hospital, Panorama, 7Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, GreeceBackground: Bevacizumab and erlotinib have been demonstrated to prolong overall survival in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We designed a four-arm Phase III trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of docetaxel, carboplatin, bevacizumab, and erlotinib in the first-line treatment of patients with NSCLC.Methods: A total of 229 patients with stage IIIb/IV non-squamous NSCLC were treated with two cycles of carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve 5.5 and docetaxel 100 mg/m2 as chemotherapy. After completion of two treatment cycles, patients were evaluated for response and divided into four groups: 61/229 continued with four more cycles of chemotherapy (control group, 52/229 received chemotherapy plus erlotinib 150 mg daily, 56/229 received chemotherapy plus bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, and 60/229 were treated with the combination of chemotherapy, erlotinib, and bevacizumab until disease progression. The primary endpoint was overall survival.Results: Over 4 years of follow-up, there was no statistically

  17. The association between COX-2 polymorphisms and hematologic toxicity in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Overexpression of COX-2 is proved to contribute to tumor promotion and carcinogenesis through stimulating cell proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing the invasiveness of cancer cells. Apoptosis-related molecules are potential predictive markers for survival and toxicity in platinum treatment. This study aimed at investigating the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and the occurrence of grade 3 or 4 toxicity in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and twelve patients with inoperable stage IIIB-IV NSCLC received first-line chemotherapy between 2007 and 2009 were recruited in this study. Four functional COX-2 polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods. RESULTS: The incidence of grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity was significantly higher in G allele carriers of the COX-2 rs689466 (-1195G/A polymorphism compared with wild-type homozygotes AA (P value = 0.008; odds ratio, 2.47; 95% confidence internal, 1.26-4.84 and the significance still existed after the Bonferroni correction. Statistically significant difference was also found in grade 3 or 4 leukopenia (P value = 0.010; OR = 2.82; 95%CI = 1.28-6.20. No other significant association was observed between genotype and toxicity in the study. The haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype AGG was associated with a reduced risk of grade 3 or 4 hematologic and leukopenia toxicity (P value = 0.009; OR = 0.59; 95%CI = 0.39-0.88 and P value = 0.025; OR = 0.61; 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, respectively while the haplotype GGG was associated with an increased risk of grade 3 or 4 hematologic and leukopenia toxicity (P value = 0.009; OR = 1.71; 95%CI = 1.14-2.56 and P value = 0.025; OR = 1.65; 95%CI  = 1.06-2.57, respectively. CONCLUSION: This investigation for the first time

  18. Comparing docetaxel with gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A single institute randomized phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the backbone of treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC however second-line treatment options are controversial particularly in patients with borderline performance status (PS of 2. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy and toxicity of weekly docetaxel versus gemcitabine in this clinical setting. Patients and methods: A total of 70 patients with advanced (stage IIIB, IV NSCLC entered this single institute study. Cases of this study had experienced disease progression after the first-line platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, with PS 0- 2 in “Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group” scale. They were randomly assigned by stratified blocks to receive docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (Arm A, n=34 or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 (Arm B, n=36 days 1, 8 and 15, every three weeks, for up to six cycles. Primary end point was progression free survival (PFS and secondary end points were objective response rate, disease control rate, median overall survival (OS and toxicity. Dose modification was permitted upon clinician’s discretion for each individual patient. Results: Median of PFS was 2.02 months in arm A and 2.63 months in arm B (HR= 1.279; 95% CI: 0.710-2.304, P= 0.551. Although median OS for arm A was numerically greater (9.2 months than arm B (8.3 months it was statistically non-significant (HR= 1.384; 95% CI: 0.632 to 2.809, P= 0.59. Objective response was higher in Arm B than that in Arm A (P= 0.20 but disease control rates were statistically different in both arms (P= 0.034. Statistically significant differences in term of leukopenia was seen in arm B (P= 0.013. Conclusion: This study, with limited number of cases, indicates that in advanced NSCLC, weekly docetaxel and gemcitabine are reasonable second-line treatment options with statistically similar effectiveness in terms of PFS and median OS with manageable toxicities in patients with PS 0-2.

  19. Comparisons of dose-volume histograms for proton-beam versus 3-D conformal X-ray therapy in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changlu; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Sakae, Takeji; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were reviewed to determine if there is an advantage of the two modalities when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 24 stage I NSCLC patients who underwent proton-beam therapy (PBT) from June 2003 to May 2007 were included in this study. Based on the same clinical target volumes (CTVs), treatment planning was made to cover CTV within 90% isodose lines. Each patient was evaluated by two sets of DVHs, one for PBT and the other for three-dimensional conformal X-ray therapy (3D-CRT). For all patients, the 95% isodose line covered 86.4% of the CTV for PBT, and 43.2% for 3D-CRT. PBT was associated with significantly lower mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, total lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord than 3D-CRT. PBT offered reduced radiation doses to the lung when evaluated in terms of percentage lung volumes receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V 5 ), ≥ 10 Gy (V 10 ), and ≥ 20 Gy (V 20 ) when compared to 3D-CRT. PBT is advantageous over 3D-CRT in reducing doses to the lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord in treating stage I NSCLC. (orig.)

  20. Impact of Examined Lymph Node Count on Precise Staging and Long-Term Survival of Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Population Study of the US SEER Database and a Chinese Multi-Institutional Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenhua; He, Jiaxi; Shen, Yaxing; Shen, Jianfei; He, Qihua; Zhang, Jianrong; Jiang, Gening; Wang, Qun; Liu, Lunxu; Gao, Shugeng; Liu, Deruo; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Zhihua; Ng, Calvin S H; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Horsleben Petersen, René; Rocco, Gaetano; D'Amico, Thomas; Brunelli, Alessandro; Chen, Haiquan; Zhi, Xiuyi; Liu, Bo; Yang, Yixin; Chen, Wensen; Zhou, Qian; He, Jianxing

    2017-04-10

    Purpose We investigated the correlation between the number of examined lymph nodes (ELNs) and correct staging and long-term survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by using large databases and determined the minimal threshold for the ELN count. Methods Data from a Chinese multi-institutional registry and the US SEER database on stage I to IIIA resected NSCLC (2001 to 2008) were analyzed for the relationship between the ELN count and stage migration and overall survival (OS) by using multivariable models. The series of the mean positive LNs, odds ratios (ORs), and hazard ratios (HRs) were fitted with a LOWESS smoother, and the structural break points were determined by Chow test. The selected cut point was validated with the SEER 2009 cohort. Results Although the distribution of ELN count differed between the Chinese registry (n = 5,706) and the SEER database (n = 38,806; median, 15 versus seven, respectively), both cohorts exhibited significantly proportional increases from N0 to N1 and N2 disease (SEER OR, 1.038; China OR, 1.012; both P HR, 0.986; China HR, 0.981; both P HR, 0.989; China HR, 0.984; both P controlling for confounders. Cut point analysis showed a threshold ELN count of 16 in patients with declared node-negative disease, which were examined in the derivation cohorts (SEER 2001 to 2008 HR, 0.830; China HR, 0.738) and validated in the SEER 2009 cohort (HR, 0.837). Conclusion A greater number of ELNs is associated with more-accurate node staging and better long-term survival of resected NSCLC. We recommend 16 ELNs as the cut point for evaluating the quality of LN examination or prognostic stratification postoperatively for patients with declared node-negative disease.

  1. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in mediastinal lymph node staging of non-small-cell lung cancer in a tuberculosis-endemic country: consideration of lymph node calcification and distribution pattern to improve specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Soonhag [Seoul National University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Bom Sahn [Ewha Woman' s University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in mediastinal lymph node staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a region with a high prevalence of granulomatous disease. Between March 2004 and February 2006, all patients with NSCLC underwent FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced thoracic CT, and subsequent surgical resection. PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT images of 182 patients (126 men and 56 women; mean age 60.7 years) with NSCLC were acquired. Mediastinal node staging was determined using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Surgical and histological findings served as the reference standard. A total of 182 patients with 778 mediastinal node stations were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced CT were 36% and 80% on a per-patient basis and 23% and 92% on a per-node station basis. Sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were 81% and 73% on a per-patient basis and 75% and 85% on a per-node station basis. After lymph nodes with calcification and bilateral hilar distribution were considered benign, sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were 75% and 89% on a per-patient basis and 66% and 96% on a per-node station basis. This prospective study suggests that FDG PET/CT can more accurately stage mediastinal lymph nodes than CT. Considering lymph node calcification and distribution pattern could improve specificity at the cost of a decrease in sensitivity. (orig.)

  2. 18F-FDG PET/CT in mediastinal lymph node staging of non-small-cell lung cancer in a tuberculosis-endemic country: consideration of lymph node calcification and distribution pattern to improve specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Soonhag; Kang, Won Jun

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in mediastinal lymph node staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a region with a high prevalence of granulomatous disease. Between March 2004 and February 2006, all patients with NSCLC underwent FDG PET/CT and contrast-enhanced thoracic CT, and subsequent surgical resection. PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT images of 182 patients (126 men and 56 women; mean age 60.7 years) with NSCLC were acquired. Mediastinal node staging was determined using the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Surgical and histological findings served as the reference standard. A total of 182 patients with 778 mediastinal node stations were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced CT were 36% and 80% on a per-patient basis and 23% and 92% on a per-node station basis. Sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were 81% and 73% on a per-patient basis and 75% and 85% on a per-node station basis. After lymph nodes with calcification and bilateral hilar distribution were considered benign, sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were 75% and 89% on a per-patient basis and 66% and 96% on a per-node station basis. This prospective study suggests that FDG PET/CT can more accurately stage mediastinal lymph nodes than CT. Considering lymph node calcification and distribution pattern could improve specificity at the cost of a decrease in sensitivity.

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion Area-Detector CT: Preliminary Comparison of Diagnostic Performance for N Stage Assessment With FDG PET/CT in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sugihara, Naoki; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The objective of our study was to directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and FDG PET/CT for differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Seventy-seven consecutive patients, 45 men (mean age ± SD, 70.4 ± 5.9 years) and 32 women (71.2 ± 7.7 years), underwent dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT at two or three different positions for covering the entire thorax, FDG PET/CT, surgical treatment, and pathologic examination. From all ADCT data for each of the subjects, a whole-chest perfusion map was computationally generated using the dual- and single-input maximum slope and Patlak plot methods. For quantitative N stage assessment, perfusion parameters and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) for each lymph node were determined by measuring the relevant ROI. ROC curve analyses were performed for comparing the diagnostic capability of each of the methods on a per-node basis. N stages evaluated by each of the indexes were then statistically compared with the final pathologic diagnosis by means of chi-square and kappa statistics. The area under the ROC curve (A z ) values of systemic arterial perfusion (A z = 0.89), permeability surface (A z = 0.78), and SUV max (A z = 0.85) were significantly larger than the A z values of total perfusion (A z = 0.70, p perfusion calculated using the dual-input maximum slope model was substantial (κ = 0.70, p perfusion ADCT is as useful as FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with NSCLC.

  4. Pooled Analysis of Individual Patient Data on Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Elderly Patients Compared With Younger Patients Who Participated in US National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Zhang, Ying; Vokes, Everett E; Schiller, Joan H; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Karen; Curran, Walter J; Schild, Steven E; Movsas, Benjamin; Clamon, Gerald; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Blumenschein, George R; Socinski, Mark A; Ready, Neal E; Akerley, Wallace L; Cohen, Harvey J; Pang, Herbert H; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Elderly patients may experience increased rates of adverse events (AEs) or less benefit from concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods Individual patient data were collected from 16 phase II or III trials conducted by US National Cancer Institute-supported cooperative groups of concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone or with consolidation or induction chemotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer from 1990 to 2012. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and AEs were compared between patients age ≥ 70 (elderly) and those younger than 70 years (younger). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for survival time and CIs were estimated by single-predictor and multivariable frailty Cox models. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio (ORs) for AEs and CIs were obtained from single-predictor and multivariable generalized linear mixed-effect models. Results A total of 2,768 patients were classified as younger and 832 as elderly. In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly patients had worse OS (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.31 and HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.29, respectively). In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly and younger patients had similar progression-free survival (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.10 and HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.09, respectively). Elderly patients had a higher rate of grade ≥ 3 AEs in unadjusted and multivariable models (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.70 and OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.74, respectively). Grade 5 AEs were significantly higher in elderly compared with younger patients (9% v 4%; P < .01). Fewer elderly compared with younger patients completed treatment (47% v 57%; P < .01), and more discontinued treatment because of AEs (20% v 13%; P < .01), died during treatment (7.8% v 2.9%; P < .01), and refused further treatment (5.8% v 3.9%; P = .02). Conclusion Elderly patients in concurrent

  5. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. The management impact of clinically significant incidental lesions detected on staging FDG PET-CT in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): an analysis of 649 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michael; Ambati, Chaitanya

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate FDG PET-CT in the detection of unexpected pre-malignancy or second malignancy at the initial staging of patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on management. Staging FDG PET-CT scans acquired between February 2006 and July 2010 in 649 patients (M=389; F=260) with NSCLC were reviewed for the presence of unexpected pre-malignancy or second primary. A "True-Positive" lesion represented a second primary or pre-malignant lesion. A "False-Positive" lesion was due to benign causes or an atypical site of metastasis from NSCLC. 77 (12%) patients were identified on PET-CT as having a potential pre-malignancy or second primary. 39 out of 77 (51%) patients had diagnostic verification where histopathology served as reference standard in 33 patients (85%) and the rest had endoscopy and progress PET-CT scans. 20 patients (3.1%) had a second primary (n=11) or pre-malignant lesions comprising dysplastic colorectal polyps (n=9), and additional therapy and/or management change for the index tumour was instigated in 17 patients (85%). In patients with a second primary, 3 (27%) patients had a high impact change in management from an initial curative intent to palliative. Staging FDG PET-CT is highly valuable in identifying second primary cancers or pre-malignant lesions in patients with NSCLC. When a second primary is detected on PET-CT, there is a high impact change in management in 27% of patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [de

  8. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily: high local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd; Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2015-03-01

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70%) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88%, while regional control was 100%. There were 10 patients (19%) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33%) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20%) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28%) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts.

  9. The diagnostic ability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for mediastinal lymph node staging using {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and volumetric CT histogram analysis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Joon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Jun; Yun, Mijin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Doo [Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical implications of lymph node (LN) density on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for mediastinal LN characterization in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One hundred and fifty-two patients with 271 mediastinal LNs who underwent PET/CT and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for staging were enrolled. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), short axis diameter, LN-to-primary cancer ratio of SUVmax, and median Hounsfield unit (HU) based on CT histogram were correlated to histopathology. Of 271 nodes, 162 (59.8 %) were malignant. SUVmax, short axis diameter, and LPR of malignant LNs were higher than those of benign nodes. Among malignant LNs, 71.0 % had median HU between 25 and 45, while 78.9 % of benign LNs had values <25 HU or >45 HU. Using a cutoff value of 4.0, SUVmax showed the highest diagnostic ability for detecting malignant LNs with a specificity of 94.5 %, but showing a sensitivity of 70.4 %. Using additional density criteria (median HU 25-45) in LNs with 2.0< SUVmax ≤4.0, the sensitivity increased to 88.3 % with the specificity of 82.6 %. LN density is useful for the characterization of LNs with mild {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. The risk of mediastinal LN metastasis in NSCLC patients could be further stratified using both {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and LN density. (orig.)

  10. Regional nodal staging with 18F-FDG PET–CT in non-small cell lung cancer: Additional diagnostic value of CT attenuation and dual-time-point imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Wu, Ning; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Rong; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhao, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background: [Fluorine-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET–CT) is widely performed in the regional nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the uptake of 18 F-FDG by tubercular granulomatous tissues may lead to false-positive diagnosis. This is of special concern in China, where tubercular granulomatous disease is epidemic. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of an additional CT attenuation and a dual-time-point scan in determining the status of lymph nodes. Methods: Eighty NSCLC patients underwent curative surgical resection after 18 F-FDG PET–CT and separate breath-hold CT examinations. The initial images were analyzed by two methods. In method 1, nodal status was determined by 18 F-FDG uptake only. In Method 2, nodal status was determined by 18 F-FDG uptake associated with CT attenuation. For dual-time-point imaging, the retention index (RI) of benign and malignant nodal groups with positive uptake in the initial scan was examined. Results: A total of 265 nodal groups were documented. On a per-nodal-group basis, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Method 1 were 66.7%, 89.7%, and 85.3%, respectively, whereas those of Method 2 were 64.7%, 96.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. The improvement in diagnostic specificity and accuracy associated with the addition of CT attenuation in Method 2 as compared to Method 1 was statistically significant (p 0.05). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET–CT has high diagnostic value for preoperative lymph-node (N) staging of NSCLC patients. We show that 18 F-FDG uptake combined with CT attenuation improves the diagnostic specificity and accuracy of nodal diagnosis in NSCLC. For the lymph nodes with positive uptake in the initial scan, dual-time-point imaging has limited effect in differentiation.

  11. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheek, Gregory [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with

  12. Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography for evaluation of mediastinal lymph node staging of non-small-cell lung cancer in a tuberculosis-endemic area: A 5-year prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jane A; Irusen, Elvis M; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Warwick, James M; Jeremic, Branislav; du Toit, Rudolf; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N

    2015-01-09

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) is a well-validated modality for assessing mediastinal lymph node metastasis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which determines management and predicts survival. Tuberculosis (TB) is known to lead to false-positive PET-CT findings. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of PET-CT in identifying mediastinal lymph node involvement of NSCLC in a high TB-endemic area. Patients who underwent both PET-CT and lymph node tissue sampling for the investigation of suspected NSCLC were prospectively included in this observational study. Results were analysed per patient and per lymph node stage. A post-hoc analysis was performed to test the validity of a maximum standardised uptake value (SUV-max) cut-off for lymph node positivity. PET-CT had a sensitivity of 92.6%, specificity of 48.6%, positive predictive value of 56.8% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 90.0% in the per-patient analysis. Diagnostic accuracy was 67.2%. Similar values were obtained in the per-lymph node stage analysis. TB was responsible for 21.1% of false-positive results. A SUVmax cut-off of 4.5 yielded an improvement in diagnostic accuracy from 64.0% to 84.7% compared with a cut-off of 2.5, but at the cost of decreasing the NPV from 90.6% to 83.5%. In a high TB-endemic area, PET-CT remains a valuable method for excluding mediastinal lymph node involvement in NSCLC. Patients with a negative PET-CT may proceed to definitive management without further invasive procedures. However, PET-CT-positive lymph nodes require pathological confirmation, and the possibility of TB must be considered.

  13. High-dose hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy is safe and effective for central and peripheral early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: results of a 12-year experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, David A; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D

    2013-08-01

    We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. A phase II trial of erlotinib as maintenance treatment after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Rubio, J; Fírvida-Pérez, J L; Lázaro-Quintela, M; Barón-Duarte, F J; Alonso-Jáudenes, G; Santomé, L; Afonso-Afonso, F J; Amenedo, M; Huidobro, G; Campos-Balea, B; López-Vázquez, M D; Vázquez, S

    2014-03-01

    This single arm, phase II study aims to evaluate the role of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance therapy following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) in unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with unresectable stage IIIA o dry IIIB NSCLC with no evidence of tumor progression after receiving a standard cCRT regimen with curative intent were included. Oral erlotinib 150 mg/day was administered within 4-6 weeks after the end of the cCRT for a maximum of 6 months if no disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Primary end point was the progression-free rate (PFR) at 6 months. Secondary end points included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Sixty-six patients were enrolled and received maintenance treatment with erlotinib [average: 4.5 months (95 % CI 4.0-5.0)]. PFR at 6 months was 63.5 % (41/66). With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (95 % CI 13.5-37.1), the median TTP was 9.9 months (95 % CI 6.2-12.1), and the median OS was 24.0 months (95 % CI 17.3-48.6). Most common adverse events (AEs) related to erlotinib were rash (78.8 %; 16.7 % grade 3), diarrhea (28.8 %; 1.5 % grade 3), fatigue (15.2 %; 1.5 % grade 3), anorexia (7.6 %; 1.5 % grade 3) and vomiting (4.6 %; none grade 3). Five patients (7.6 %) were withdrawn due to AEs. Erlotinib as maintenance therapy is an active treatment after cCRT in unselected patients with stage III NSCLC, reaching a 6-month PFR of 63.5 % and a median OS of 24 months. The safety profile of maintenance erlotinib was as expected and manageable.

  15. Impact ofin vitrochemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients with p-stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that underwent complete resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuki; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Nishino, Kazumi; Uchida, Jyunji; Kumagai, Toru; Inoue, Takako; Fujiwara, Ayako; Tokunaga, Toshiteru; Okami, Jiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kodama, Ken; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2017-09-01

    The impact of in vitro chemosensitivity test-guided platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the surgical outcomes of patients undergoing complete resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy based on the collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) in patients with p (pathology)-stage IIIA NSCLC was retrospectively analyzed. A series of 39 patients that had received platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy following complete resection between 2007 and 2012 were enrolled. Their surgical specimens were subjected to the CD-DST. The patients were subsequently classified into two groups on the basis of in vitro anti-cancer drug sensitivity data obtained using the CD-DST: The sensitive group (25 patients) were treated with regimens including one or two of the anti-cancer drug(s) that were indicated to be effective by the CD-DST, whereas the non-sensitive group (14 patients) were treated with chemotherapy regimens that did not include any CD-DST-selected anti-cancer drugs. There were no significant differences in the background characteristics of the two groups [including in respect of the pathological TN (tumor-lymph node) stage, tumor histology, epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status, the frequency of each chemotherapy regimen, and the number of administered cycles]. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of the sensitive group was 32.3%, whereas that of the non-sensitive group was 14.3% (P=0.037). In contrast, no difference in overall survival (OS) was observed (P=0.76). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant chemotherapy based on the CD-DST had a significant favorable effect on the DFS (P=0.01). Therefore, the present study has demonstrated that CD-DST data obtained from surgical specimens aid the selection of effective platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for patients undergoing complete resection for p-stage IIIA

  16. Accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3 Gy/fraction) combined with concurrent chemotherapy for patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: preliminary results of an early terminated phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Cang; Wang, Quan-Yu; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Xue-Ji; Wang, Na; Liu, Yue-E; Zong, Jie; Guo, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Dong-Ying; Lin, Qiang

    2016-04-23

    Increasing the biological effective dose (BED) of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can increase local control rates and improve overall survival. Compared with conventional fractionated radiotherapy, accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can yield higher BED, shorten the total treatment time, and theoretically obtain better efficacy. However, currently, there is no optimal hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen. Based on phase I trial results, we performed this phase II trial to further evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3-DCRT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy for patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC. Patients with previously untreated unresectable stage III NSCLC received 3-DCRT with a total dose of 69 Gy, delivered at 3 Gy per fraction, once daily, five fractions per week, completed within 4.6 weeks. At the same time, platinum doublet chemotherapy was applied. After 12 patients were enrolled in the group, the trial was terminated early. There were five cases of grade III radiation esophagitis, of which four cases completed the radiation doses of 51 Gy, 51 Gy, 54 Gy, and 66 Gy, and one case had 16 days of radiation interruption. The incidence of grade III acute esophagitis in patients receiving an irradiation dose per fraction ≥2.7 Gy on the esophagus was 83.3% (5/6). The incidence of symptomatic grade III radiation pneumonitis among the seven patients who completed 69 Gy according to the plan was 28.6% (2/7). The median local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were not achieved; the 1-year LC rate was 59.3%, and the 1-year OS rate was 78.6%. For unresectable stage III NSCLC, the accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 69 Gy (3 Gy/f) combined with concurrent chemotherapy might result in severe radiation esophagitis and pneumonitis to severely affect the completion of the radiotherapy. Therefore, we considered that

  17. Clinical significance of expression of cancer/testis antigen and down-regulation of HLA class-I in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagiri, Takeshi; Shigematsu, Yoshiki; Shinohara, Shinji; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Sohich; Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yoshika; Baba, Tetsuro; Uramoto, Hidetaka; So, Tomoko; Yamada, Sohsuke

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of expression of cancer/testis (CT) antigen and down-regulation of HLA class-I in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which underwent complete surgical resection. The expression of HLA class-I molecules was evaluated in 136 resected NSCLC specimens by immunohistochemistry. The results were scored as the percentage of stained tumor cells and categorized into two groups: 0-79%, reduced expression; and >80%, normal expression. The expression of CT antigen was performed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of HLA class-I was normal in 49 tumors (36%), and there was reduced expression in 87 tumors (64%). The expression of Melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A3, MAGE-A4, and Kita-Kyushu lung cancer antigen-1 (KK-LC-1) was positive in 34 (25.0%), 22 (16.2%), and 42 (30.9%) patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in the proportion of HLA class-I expression associated with the expression of any of the CT antigens. Among the patients with positive expression of at least one of the CT antigens, the 5-year survival rate of the patients with the normal expression of HLA class-I was 87.5%; however, it was 63.4% in patients with the reduced expression of HLA class-I (p=0.0477). Reduced expression of HLA class-I was an unfavorable prognostic factor in patients with positive expression of CT antigen, and represents an important hurdle to antigen-based cancer immunotherapy.

  18. CHAMP: A Phase II Study of Panitumumab With Pemetrexed and Cisplatin Versus Pemetrexed and Cisplatin in the Treatment of Patients With Advanced-Stage Primary Nonsquamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer With Particular Regard to the KRAS Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, Wolfgang; Behringer, Dirk; Stoehlmacher, Jan; Kollmeier, Jens; Schmager, Sibylle; Fischer von Weikersthal, Ludwig; Schumann, Christian; Buchmann, Joerg

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of panitumumab, a fully human antiepidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, in combination with pemetrexed/cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB to IV primary nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer and wild type V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS). Results were compared with those obtained in a control group of patients who received a pemetrexed/cisplatin regimen only. This was a phase II, randomized, open-label study with 2 treatment arms. In total, 96 patients received panitumumab at a dose of 9 mg/kg in combination with pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) (n = 49) or pemetrexed/cisplatin alone (n = 47). The primary outcome measure was progression-free survival at 6 months. Secondary end points of the study included overall survival, tumor response, quality of life, and safety outcomes. The CHAMP study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01088620. Progression-free survival at 6 months did not indicate a benefit of panitumumab as a supplement to the standard therapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin whereas the overall survival showed a clear difference between the treatment groups in favor of the standard therapy. Results might be affected by the higher rates of serious adverse events and higher death rates within the panitumumab arm. Results from the present study indicate that combination of cisplatin/pemetrexed with panitumumab should not be recommended for patients with adenocarcinoma and KRAS wild type because of lack of efficacy, lack of improvement of quality of life, and because of the increase in toxicity rates compared with patients in the control arm, who received standard chemotherapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Individual isotoxic radiation dose escalation based on V20 and advanced technologies benefits unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy: long term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Zhongtang; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Antang; Zhao, Qian; Li, Hongsheng; Sun, Hongfu; Huang, Wei; Li, BaoSheng

    2017-08-01

    Under the assumption that the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing the total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, the phase I trial was conducted in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, to determine the feasibility and effects of individual isotoxic radiation dose escalation based on bilateral lung V20 and advanced technologies. Consecutive eligible patients were assigned to cohorts of eight. V20 of each cohort was increased from 27% to 30%, 33%, 35%, 37%, and so on. The criterion for cessation of dose escalation was defined as ≥ 2 patients in each cohort experienced dose limiting toxicity. Isotoxic dose escalation was based on V20, functional imaging was used to improve the accuracy of radiotherapy. To test the power of escalation dose, patients with TTD over 66 Gy were assigned to the higher dose group (HD), while the others to the standard dose one (SD). In result, the recommended value of V20 was 35%. For all patients, follow-up ranged from 1 to 112 months, median overall and progression free survivals were 25.0 and 13.0 months, respectively. The 1-, 3-, 5- and 8-year overall survival (OS) rates were 72.5%, 22.5%, 17.5%, and 10.0%, respectively. Especially, the OS and local recurrence-free survival of patients in HD group were significantly longer than those in SD one ( P =0.035, P=0.007, respectively) without increasing severe toxicity. Thus, individual isotoxic dose escalation based on V20 with advanced technologies was feasible and effective.

  20. Regional nodal staging with {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer: Additional diagnostic value of CT attenuation and dual-time-point imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meng, E-mail: caseylimeng@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Wu, Ning, E-mail: cjr.wuning@vip.163.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Liu, Ying, E-mail: liuyinggqw@sina.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong_2004@yahoo.com.cn [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Liang, Ying, E-mail: liangy_2000@sina.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhang, Wenjie, E-mail: winjiezh@163.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhao, Ping, E-mail: dr.zhaoping@263.net [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Background: [Fluorine-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) is widely performed in the regional nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG by tubercular granulomatous tissues may lead to false-positive diagnosis. This is of special concern in China, where tubercular granulomatous disease is epidemic. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of an additional CT attenuation and a dual-time-point scan in determining the status of lymph nodes. Methods: Eighty NSCLC patients underwent curative surgical resection after {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT and separate breath-hold CT examinations. The initial images were analyzed by two methods. In method 1, nodal status was determined by {sup 18}F-FDG uptake only. In Method 2, nodal status was determined by {sup 18}F-FDG uptake associated with CT attenuation. For dual-time-point imaging, the retention index (RI) of benign and malignant nodal groups with positive uptake in the initial scan was examined. Results: A total of 265 nodal groups were documented. On a per-nodal-group basis, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Method 1 were 66.7%, 89.7%, and 85.3%, respectively, whereas those of Method 2 were 64.7%, 96.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. The improvement in diagnostic specificity and accuracy associated with the addition of CT attenuation in Method 2 as compared to Method 1 was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Thirty-nine nodal groups with positive uptake in the initial scan underwent dual-time-point imaging and the difference in the RI between benign and malignant groups showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT has high diagnostic value for preoperative lymph-node (N) staging of NSCLC patients. We show that {sup 18}F-FDG uptake combined with CT attenuation improves the diagnostic specificity and accuracy of nodal diagnosis in NSCLC. For the lymph nodes with positive uptake in

  1. Ratio of mediastinal lymph node SUV to primary tumor SUV in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for nodal staging in non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Cho, Jae Hyuk; Choe, Jae Gol; Pahk, Kisoo; Choi, Sun Ju; Kwon, Hye Ryeong; Kim, Sun Geun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Jae Seon; Seo, Hyo Jung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Han [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Following determination of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the mediastinal lymph nodes (SUV-LN) and of the primary tumor (SUV-T) on 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the aim of the study was to determine the value of the SUV-LN/SUV-T ratio in lymph node staging in comparison with that of SUV-LN. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 289 mediastinal lymph node stations from 98 patients with NSCLC who were examined preoperatively for staging and subsequently underwent pathologic studies of the mediastinal lymph nodes. We determined SUV-LN and SUV-R for each lymph node station on 18F-FDG PET/CT and then classified each station into one of three groups based on SUV-T (low, medium and high SUV-T groups). Diagnostic performance was assessed based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and the optimal cut-off values that would best discriminate metastatic from benign lymph nodes were determined for each method. The average of SUV-R of malignant lymph nodes was significantly higher than that of benign lymph nodes (0.79 ± 0.45 vs. 0.36 ± 0.23, P < 0.0001). In the ROC curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of SUV-R was significantly higher than that of SUV-LN in the low SUV-T group (0.885 vs. 0.810, P = 0.019). There were no significant differences between the AUCs of SUV-LN and of SUV-R in the medium and high SUV-T groups. The optimal cut-off value for SUV-R in the low SUV-T group was 0.71 (sensitivity 87.5 %, specificity 85.9 %). The SUV-R performed well in distinguishing between metastatic and benign lymph nodes. In particular, SUV-R was found to have a better diagnostic performance than SUV-LN in the low SUV-T group.

  2. Three-Dimensional Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Phase 2 Study From PPRA-RTOG, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, ShengFa; Li, Tao; Lu, Bing; Wang, XiaoHu; Li, JianCheng; Chen, Ming; Lu, You; Bai, YuJu; Hu, YinXiang; Ouyang, WeiWei; Ma, Zhu; Li, QingSong; Li, HuiQin; Wang, Yu

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this prospective multi-institutional phase 2 study was to investigate disease control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after thoracic three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT) with concurrent chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eligible patients were 18 to 80 years of age, had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score ≥70%, and newly diagnosed stage IV NSCLC with limited metastatic disease (defined as involving ≤3 organs). Patients received platinum-doublet chemotherapy with concurrent irradiation to the primary tumor. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and acute toxicity. From May 2008 to May 2012, 198 eligible patients were enrolled from 7 cancer centers. Most patients died with distant metastasis; only 10% died with isolated primary recurrence. Median OS time was 13.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.7-14.3); OS rates were 53.5% at 1 year, 15.8% at 2 years, and 9.2% at 3 years. Median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 9.0 months (95% CI: 7.7-10.3); corresponding PFS rates were 30.8%, 8.2%, and 6.1%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year local (primary tumor) control rates were 78.8%, 57.7%, and 55.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that delivery of ≥63 Gy to the primary tumor (P=.014), having a primary tumor volume acute toxicities were hematologic: leukopenia (37.9%), thrombocytopenia (10.1%), and anemia (6.9%). No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 radiation-related toxicity; 2.5% had acute grade 3 pneumonitis, and 6.6% had acute grade 3 radiation esophagitis. Thoracic 3D-RT to the primary tumor with concurrent chemotherapy led to satisfactory survival outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Radiation dose, primary tumor volume, and PFS after treatment all predicted survival in these patients with limited-metastasis NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-Dimensional Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Phase 2 Study From PPRA-RTOG, China

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    Su, ShengFa [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, and Guizhou Cancer Hospital, Guiyang (China); Teaching and Research Section of Oncology, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang (China); Li, Tao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lu, Bing, E-mail: lbgymaaaa@163.com [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, and Guizhou Cancer Hospital, Guiyang (China); Teaching and Research Section of Oncology, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang (China); Wang, XiaoHu, E-mail: xhwanggansu@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gansu Cancer Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Li, JianCheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Lu, You [Department of Thoracic Oncology and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Bai, YuJu [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi (China); Hu, YinXiang; Ouyang, WeiWei; Ma, Zhu; Li, QingSong; Li, HuiQin; Wang, Yu [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, and Guizhou Cancer Hospital, Guiyang (China); Teaching and Research Section of Oncology, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang (China)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this prospective multi-institutional phase 2 study was to investigate disease control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after thoracic three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT) with concurrent chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 18 to 80 years of age, had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score ≥70%, and newly diagnosed stage IV NSCLC with limited metastatic disease (defined as involving ≤3 organs). Patients received platinum-doublet chemotherapy with concurrent irradiation to the primary tumor. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and acute toxicity. Results: From May 2008 to May 2012, 198 eligible patients were enrolled from 7 cancer centers. Most patients died with distant metastasis; only 10% died with isolated primary recurrence. Median OS time was 13.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.7-14.3); OS rates were 53.5% at 1 year, 15.8% at 2 years, and 9.2% at 3 years. Median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 9.0 months (95% CI: 7.7-10.3); corresponding PFS rates were 30.8%, 8.2%, and 6.1%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year local (primary tumor) control rates were 78.8%, 57.7%, and 55.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that delivery of ≥63 Gy to the primary tumor (P=.014), having a primary tumor volume <134 cm{sup 3} (P=.008), and having a stable or higher KPS score after treatment (P=.01) were independent predictors of better OS. The most common severe (grades 3-4) acute toxicities were hematologic: leukopenia (37.9%), thrombocytopenia (10.1%), and anemia (6.9%). No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 radiation-related toxicity; 2.5% had acute grade 3 pneumonitis, and 6.6% had acute grade 3 radiation esophagitis. Conclusions: Thoracic 3D-RT to the primary tumor with concurrent chemotherapy led to satisfactory survival outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Radiation dose, primary tumor volume, and PFS after treatment all

  4. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  5. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located Early Stage or Isolated Parenchymal Recurrences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: How to Fly in a “No Fly Zone”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Xu, Qing-Yong; Allen, Pamela K.; Rebueno, Neal; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mehran, Reza; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack A. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We extended our previous experience with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR; 50 Gy in 4 fractions) for centrally located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); explored the use of 70 Gy in 10 fractions for cases in which dose-volume constraints could not be met with the previous regimen; and suggested modified dose-volume constraints. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based volumetric image-guided SABR was used for 100 patients with biopsy-proven, central T1-T2N0M0 (n=81) or isolated parenchymal recurrence of NSCLC (n=19). All disease was staged with positron emission tomography/CT; all tumors were within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, trachea, major vessels, esophagus, heart, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body. Endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), local and regional control, and distant metastasis. Results: At a median follow-up time of 30.6 months, median OS time was 55.6 months, and the 3-year OS rate was 70.5%. Three-year cumulative actuarial local, regional, and distant control rates were 96.5%, 87.9%, and 77.2%, respectively. The most common toxicities were chest-wall pain (18% grade 1, 13% grade 2) and radiation pneumonitis (11% grade 2 and 1% grade 3). No patient experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Among the 82 patients receiving 50 Gy in 4 fractions, multivariate analyses showed mean total lung dose >6 Gy, V{sub 20} >12%, or ipsilateral lung V{sub 30} >15% to independently predict radiation pneumonitis; and 3 of 9 patients with brachial plexus D{sub max} >35 Gy experienced brachial neuropathy versus none of 73 patients with brachial D{sub max} <35 Gy (P=.001). Other toxicities were analyzed and new dose-volume constraints are proposed. Conclusions: SABR for centrally located lesions produces clinical outcomes similar to those for peripheral lesions when normal tissue constraints are respected.

  6. An Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Phase II Study of Paclitaxel-Carboplatin Chemotherapy With Necitumumab Versus Paclitaxel-Carboplatin Alone in First-Line Treatment of Patients With Stage IV Squamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Luft, Alexander; Depenbrock, Henrik; Ramlau, Rodryg; Khalil, Mazen; Kim, Joo-Hang; Mayo, Carlos; Chao, Grace Yi; Obasaju, Coleman; Natale, Ronald

    2017-09-01

    The combination of necitumumab with gemcitabine-cisplatin significantly improved overall survival (OS) in patients with stage IV squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in the phase III SQUamous NSCLC treatment with the Inhibitor of EGF REceptor (SQUIRE) trial. Paclitaxel-carboplatin was selected as an alternative standard of care in the current phase II study. Patients were randomized (stratified according to Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status and sex) 2:1 to ≤ six 3-week cycles (Q3W) of paclitaxel and carboplatin with or without necitumumab. Chemotherapy was paclitaxel 200 mg/m 2 on day 1 Q3W and carboplatin area under the curve 6 on day 1 Q3W. Necitumumab 800 mg, on days 1 and 8, was continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was objective response rate (ORR) on the basis of Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors version 1.1. One hundred sixty-seven patients were randomized to the necitumumab-containing arm (n = 110) or the chemotherapy-only arm (n = 57). The combination of necitumumab with chemotherapy resulted in an ORR of 48.9% versus 40.0%. Median progression-free survival and OS were 5.4 versus 5.6 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.0) and 13.2 versus 11.2 months (HR, 0.83; P = .379) in each treatment arm, respectively. Disease control rate was 87.2% versus 84.0%. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events typically associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies showing a > 2% increase were hypomagnesemia (5.7% vs. 0) and rash (2.8% vs. 0). Any Grade thromboembolic events occurred in < 4% of patients in either arm. The results of our study support previously reported results that the combination of necitumumab with chemotherapy improves survival in patients with advanced squamous NSCLC and shows a safety profile consistent with that of EGFR monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [18F]FDG PET/CT-based response assessment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer treated with paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Evelyn E.C. de; Elmpt, Wouter van; Leijenaar, Ralph T.H.; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groen, Harry J.M. [University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Noort, Vincent van der [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G.C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is a vasodilating drug, which increases tumor blood flow and consequently decreases hypoxia. Therefore, changes in [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) uptake pattern may occur. In this analysis, we investigated the feasibility of [18F]FDG PET for response assessment to paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab (PCB) treatment with and without NTG patches. And we compared the [18F]FDG PET response assessment to RECIST response assessment and survival. A total of 223 stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in a phase II study (NCT01171170) randomizing between PCB treatment with or without NTG patches. For 60 participating patients, a baseline and a second [18F]FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, performed between day 22 and 24 after the start of treatment, were available. Tumor response was defined as a 30 % decrease in CT and PET parameters, and was compared to RECIST response at week 6. The predictive value of these assessments for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed with and without NTG. A 30 % decrease in SUVpeak assessment identified more patients as responders compared to a 30 % decrease in CT diameter assessment (73 % vs. 18 %), however, this was not correlated to OS (SUVpeak30 p = 0.833; CTdiameter30 p = 0.557). Changes in PET parameters between the baseline and the second scan were not significantly different for the NTG group compared to the control group (p value range 0.159-0.634). The CT-based (part of the [18F]FDG PET/CT) parameters showed a significant difference between the baseline and the second scan for the NTG group compared to the control group (CT diameter decrease of 7 ± 23 % vs. 19 ± 14 %, p = 0.016, respectively). The decrease in tumoral FDG uptake in advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy with and without NTG did not differ between both treatment arms. Early PET-based response assessment showed more tumor responders

  8. Computed Tomography-Based Anatomic Assessment Overestimates Local Tumor Recurrence in Patients With Mass-like Consolidation After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, Neal E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Yang Wensha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McIntosh, Alyson [Department of Radiation Oncology, John and Dorothy Morgan Cancer Center, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA (United States); Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Larner, James M., E-mail: jml2p@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET) CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade {>=}2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Conclusion: Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will

  9. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Phase II Study of Pazopanib in Combination with Pemetrexed in First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Felip, Enriqueta; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer....

  10. DART-bid: dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily. High local control in early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehentmayr, Franz; Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Institute for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Dagn, Karin; Fastner, Gerd [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Studnicka, Michael [Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Univ.-Klinik fuer Pneumologie, Univ.-Klinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-09-23

    While surgery is considered standard of care for early stage (I/II), non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiotherapy is a widely accepted alternative for medically unfit patients or those who refuse surgery. International guidelines recommend several treatment options, comprising stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small tumors, conventional radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy for larger sized especially centrally located lesions or continuous hyperfractionated accelerated RT (CHART). This study presents clinical outcome and toxicity for patients treated with a dose-differentiated accelerated schedule using 1.8 Gy bid (DART-bid). Between April 2002 and December 2010, 54 patients (median age 71 years, median Karnofsky performance score 70 %) were treated for early stage NSCLC. Total doses were applied according to tumor diameter: 73.8 Gy for < 2.5 cm, 79.2 Gy for 2.5-4.5 cm, 84.6 Gy for 4.5-6 cm, 90 Gy for > 6 cm. The median follow-up was 28.5 months (range 2-108 months); actuarial local control (LC) at 2 and 3 years was 88 %, while regional control was 100 %. There were 10 patients (19 %) who died of the tumor, and 18 patients (33 %) died due to cardiovascular or pulmonary causes. A total of 11 patients (20 %) died intercurrently without evidence of progression or treatment-related toxicity at the last follow-up, while 15 patients (28 %) are alive. Acute esophagitis ≤ grade 2 occurred in 7 cases, 2 patients developed grade 2 chronic pulmonary fibrosis. DART-bid yields high LC without significant toxicity. For centrally located and/or large (> 5 cm) early stage tumors, where SBRT is not feasible, this method might serve as radiotherapeutic alternative to present treatment recommendations, with the need of confirmation in larger cohorts. (orig.) [German] Die Standardbehandlung fuer nichtkleinzellige Bronchialkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I/II ist die Operation, wobei Radiotherapie fuer Patienten, die nicht operabel sind oder die Operation ablehnen, als Alternative

  11. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  12. Afatinib versus gefitinib in patients with EGFR mutation-positive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: overall survival data from the phase IIb LUX-Lung 7 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ares, L; Tan, E-H; O'Byrne, K; Zhang, L; Hirsh, V; Boyer, M; Yang, J C-H; Mok, T; Lee, K H; Lu, S; Shi, Y; Lee, D H; Laskin, J; Kim, D-W; Laurie, S A; Kölbeck, K; Fan, J; Dodd, N; Märten, A; Park, K

    2017-02-01

    In LUX-Lung 7, the irreversible ErbB family blocker, afatinib, significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and objective response rate (ORR) versus gefitinib in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we present primary analysis of mature overall survival (OS) data. LUX-Lung 7 assessed afatinib 40 mg/day versus gefitinib 250 mg/day in treatment-naïve patients with stage IIIb/IV NSCLC and a common EGFR mutation (exon 19 deletion/L858R). Primary OS analysis was planned after ∼213 OS events and ≥32-month follow-up. OS was analysed by a Cox proportional hazards model, stratified by EGFR mutation type and baseline brain metastases. Two-hundred and twenty-six OS events had occurred at the data cut-off (8 April 2016). After a median follow-up of 42.6 months, median OS (afatinib versus gefitinib) was 27.9 versus 24.5 months [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66‒1.12, P = 0.2580]. Prespecified subgroup analyses showed similar OS trends (afatinib versus gefitinib) in patients with exon 19 deletion (30.7 versus 26.4 months; HR, 0.83, 95% CI 0.58‒1.17, P = 0.2841) and L858R (25.0 versus 21.2 months; HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.62‒1.36, P = 0.6585) mutations. Most patients (afatinib, 72.6%; gefitinib, 76.8%) had at least one subsequent systemic anti-cancer treatment following discontinuation of afatinib/gefitinib; 20 (13.7%) and 23 (15.2%) patients received a third-generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Updated PFS (independent review), TTF and ORR data were significantly improved with afatinib. In LUX-Lung 7, there was no significant difference in OS with afatinib versus gefitinib. Updated PFS (independent review), TTF and ORR data were significantly improved with afatinib. NCT01466660. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology.

  13. GILT - A randomised phase III study of oral vinorelbine and cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy followed by either consolidation therapy with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin or best supportive care alone in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Wuerzburg (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [University Hospital Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M), Munich (Germany); Engel-Riedel, Walburga [University Hospital Merheim, Dept. of Pneumonology, Cologne (Germany); Andreas, Stefan [Dept. of Pneumonology, Immenhausen (Germany); Kollmeier, Jens [Helios Emil-von-Behring Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Municipal Hospital Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Dickgreber, Nicolas [University Hospital Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Vaissiere, Nathalie; Almeida, Cecilia de [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Edlich, Birgit [Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered standard for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consolidation chemotherapy (CC) following CRT is intended to further improve outcomes, yet studies have shown discordant results. This phase III study assessed CRT followed by best supportive care (BSC) or consolidation with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin. Patients received two cycles of oral vinorelbine (50 mg/m{sup 2} days 1, 8 and 15) + cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-4) q4w + radiotherapy (RT; 66 Gy). Patients with at least stable disease (SD) were randomised to either two cycles oral vinorelbine (60-80 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 and 8) + cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) q3w + BSC or BSC alone. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 279 patients were enrolled for CRT and 201 patients were randomised to CC or BSC. Both CRT and CC were well tolerated, with limited radiation-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC/BSC: oesophagitis-related events 12.9 %/3.1 %/0 %; grade 3 pneumonitis 0 %/0 %/2 %) and chemotherapy-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC: neutropenia 11.2 %/22.1 %; leukopenia 18.3 %/26.7 %; grade 3 nausea 5.0 %/2.3 %, grade 3 vomiting 3.2 %/3.5 %). Median PFS from randomisation was 6.4 (5.0-8.7) and 5.5 (3.8-7.4) months in the CC and BSC arms (hazard ratio, HR = 0.93 [0.69-1.26]; p = 0.63), respectively; median overall survival (OS) 20.8 (13.5-25.3) and 18.5 (13.6-24.7) months, respectively. Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT did not prolong PFS or OS. Concurrent RT with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin demonstrated a favourable safety profile and represents a suitable treatment regimen for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Simultane Radiochemotherapie (CRT) wird als Standardtherapie beim inoperablen Stadium III des nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) angesehen. Konsolidierende Chemotherapie (CC) nach der CRT zielt darauf ab, das Therapieergebnis zu verbessern, allerdings zeigen Studien

  14. Biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine as second-line chemotherapy for patients with stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer: a phase II study of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP 013-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Sergio; Huidobro, Gerardo; Amenedo, Margarita; Fírvida, José Luis; León, Luis; Lázaro, Martín; Grande, Carlos; Mel, José Ramón; Ramos, Manuel; Salgado, Mercedes; Casal, Joaquín

    2007-11-01

    The current report aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of a biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine to patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, who had previously been treated for this disease. In a prospective, multicenter, open-label, phase II trial, patients received 40 mg/m of docetaxel and 20 mg/m of vinorelbine on days 1 and 15, every 28 days. Treatment continued for up to a maximum of six cycles, unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred, or consent was withdrawn. Fifty patients were enrolled in the study and they received 174 cycles of chemotherapy, with a median of three cycles per patient. All patients were evaluated for efficacy and toxicity in an intention-to-treat analysis. The overall response rate was 10% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1-19], including one complete response (2%) and four partial responses (8%). Previous chemotherapy of 80% of the responders included paclitaxel. Median time to disease progression was 2.7 months (95% CI: 2.2-4.3) and median overall survival was 6.5 months (95% CI: 2.5-9.2). The survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 18% (95% CI: 7-29) and 4% (95% CI: 0-10), respectively. The most frequent severe toxicities were neutropenia (20% of patients) and leukopenia (8% of patients). Other toxicities appeared in 4% or fewer of the patients. Biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine is feasible as a second-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer patients, but its level of activity and toxicity does not suggest any advantage compared with the results obtained with single-agent docetaxel in the same setting.

  15. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  16. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  17. IDEAL-CRT: A Phase 1/2 Trial of Isotoxic Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage II/III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, David B., E-mail: david.landau@kcl.ac.uk [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, Laura [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Baker, Angela [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Bates, Andrew T. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bayne, Michael C. [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Counsell, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alonso, Angel [North Wales Cancer Centre, Rhyl (United Kingdom); Harden, Susan V. [Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hicks, Jonathan D. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hughes, Simon R. [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Illsley, Marianne C. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guilford (United Kingdom); Khan, Iftekhar [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Laurence, Virginia [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar; Mayles, Helen; Mayles, William Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Nazia [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ngai, Yenting [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Parsons, Emma [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and early survival data for IDEAL-CRT, a trial of dose-escalated concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients received tumor doses of 63 to 73 Gy in 30 once-daily fractions over 6 weeks with 2 concurrent cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine. They were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to esophageal dose. In group 1, tumor doses were determined by an experimental constraint on maximum esophageal dose, which was escalated following a 6 + 6 design from 65 Gy through 68 Gy to 71 Gy, allowing an esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be determined from early and late toxicities. Tumor doses for group 2 patients were determined by other tissue constraints, often lung. Overall survival, progression-free survival, tumor response, and toxicity were evaluated for both groups combined. Results: Eight centers recruited 84 patients: 13, 12, and 10, respectively, in the 65-Gy, 68-Gy, and 71-Gy cohorts of group 1; and 49 in group 2. The mean prescribed tumor dose was 67.7 Gy. Five grade 3 esophagitis and 3 grade 3 pneumonitis events were observed across both groups. After 1 fatal esophageal perforation in the 71-Gy cohort, 68 Gy was declared the esophageal maximum tolerated dose. With a median follow-up of 35 months, median overall survival was 36.9 months, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 87.8% and 72.0%, respectively, at 1 year and 68.0% and 48.5% at 2 years. Conclusions: IDEAL-CRT achieved significant treatment intensification with acceptable toxicity and promising survival. The isotoxic design allowed the esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be identified from relatively few patients.

  18. Multinational Randomized Phase III Trial With or Without Consolidation Chemotherapy Using Docetaxel and Cisplatin After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Inoperable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: KCSG-LU05-04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Joo-Hang; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chen, Ming; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Hoon-Kyo; Min, Young Joo; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Choi, Jin-Hyuck; Kim, Sang-We; Zhu, Guangying; Wu, Yi-Long; Kim, Sung Rok; Lee, Kyung Hee; Song, Hong Suk; Choi, Yoon-La; Sun, Jong-Mu; Jung, Sin-Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil

    2015-08-20

    To determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy (CC) with docetaxel and cisplatin (DP) after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with the same agents in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients were randomly assigned to either CCRT alone (observation arm) or CCRT followed by CC (consolidation arm). CCRT with docetaxel (20 mg/m(2)) and cisplatin (20 mg/m(2)) was administered every week for 6 weeks with a total dose of 66 Gy of thoracic radiotherapy in 33 fractions. In the consolidation arm, patients were further treated with three cycles of DP (35 mg/m(2) each on days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks). The primary end point was 40% improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) compared with observation. From October 2005 to April 2011, 437 patients were randomly assigned. Seventeen patients did not start CCRT as a result of consent withdrawal or ineligibility reasons after random assignment, leaving 420 patients for this analysis (n = 211 for observation; n = 209 for consolidation). Patient characteristics were similar in both arms. In the consolidation arm, 143 patients (68%) received CC, of whom 88 (62%) completed three planned cycles. The median PFS was 8.1 months in the observation arm and 9.1 months in the consolidation arm (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.12; P = .36). Median overall survival times were 20.6 and 21.8 months in the observation and consolidation arms, respectively (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.25; P = .44). CC with DP after CCRT with weekly DP in LA-NSCLC failed to further prolong PFS. CCRT alone should remain the standard of care. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Inter-scan and inter-observer tumour volume delineation variability on cone beam computed tomography in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Lee, Stephanie; Agrawal, Vishesh; Romano, John; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Chen, Aileen B; Kozono, David E; Killoran, Joseph H; Wagar, Matthew; Hacker, Fred L; Aerts, Hugo Jwl; Lewis, John H; Mak, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of volume changes on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and for adaptive treatment planning. This study quantifies inter-scan and inter-observer variability in tumour volume delineation on CBCT. Three clinicians independently contoured the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) manually on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (post) for 19 NSCLC patients. Relative volume differences (RVD) were calculated between the pre- and post-CBCTs for a given treatment and between any two of three observers for a given CBCT. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to quantitatively measure and compare the extent of variability. Inter-observer variability had a significantly higher CV of 0.15 ± 0.13 compared to inter-scan CV of 0.03 ± 0.04 with P < 0.0001. The greatest variability was observed with tumours (<2 cm in diameter) versus larger tumours with 95% limit of agreement (LOA) (Mean ± Standard Deviation) of 1.90% ± 19.55% vs. -0.97% ± 12.26% for inter-scan RVD and 29.99% ± 73.84% vs. 9.37% ± 29.95% for inter-observer RVD respectively. Inter-observer variability was greater than inter-scan variability for tumour volume delineation on CBCT with greatest variability for small tumours (<2 cm in diameter). LOA for inter-scan variability (~12%) helps defines a threshold for clinically meaningful tumour volume change during SBRT treatment for tumours with diameter greater than 2 cm, with larger thresholds needed for smaller tumours. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Oncological outcomes from trimodality therapy receiving definitive doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (≥60 Gy and factors influencing consideration for surgery in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.L. Vyfhuis, MD PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Trimodality treatment significantly improves survival and FFR in patients with LA-NSCLC when definitive doses of radiation with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are employed. We identified important demographic features that predict the use of surgical intervention in patients with stage III NSCLC.

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer - A first report of toxicity related to COPD/CVD in a non-randomized prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Hoyer, Morten; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Lax, Ingmar; Wennberg, Berit; Drugge, Ninni; Ekberg, Lars; Friesland, Signe; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Lund, Jo-Asmund; Morhed, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Kristina; Levin, Nina; Paludan, Merete; Sederholm, Christer; Traberg, Anders; Wittgren, Lena; Lewensohn, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims: In a retrospective study using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically inoperable patients with stage I NSCLC we previously reported a local control rate of 88% utilizing a median dose of 15 Gy x 3. This report records the toxicity encountered in a prospective phase II trial, and its relation to coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardio vascular disease (CVD). Material and methods: Sixty patients were entered in the study between August 2003 and September 2005. Fifty-seven patients (T1 65%, T2 35%) with a median age of 75 years (59-87 years) were evaluable. The baseline mean FEV1% was 64% and median Karnofsky index was 80. A total dose of 45 Gy was delivered in three fractions at the 67% isodose of the PTV. Clinical, pulmonary and radiological evaluations were made at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 36 months post-SBRT. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v2.0 and performance status was graded according to the Karnofsky scale. Results: At a median follow-up of 23 months, 2 patients had relapsed locally. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was reported. Grade 3 toxicity was seen in 12 patients (21%). There was no significant decline of FEV1% during follow-up. Low grade pneumonitis developed to the same extent in the CVD 3/17 (18%) and COPD 7/40 (18%) groups. The incidence of fibrosis was 9/17 (53%) and pleural effusions was 8/17 (47%) in the CVD group compared with 13/40 (33%) and 5/40 (13%) in the COPD group. Conclusion: SBRT for stage I NSCLC patients who are medically inoperable because of COPD and CVD results in a favourable local control rate with a low incidence of grade 3 and no grade 4 or 5 toxicity

  2. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  3. The impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients: the key to improve patient treatment strategy; Impacto do {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT no estadiamento de pacientes com cancer de pulmao: chave para melhorar o tratamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretas, Gustavo Oliveira; Guedes, Juliana Barroso; Carvalho, Fernanda Monteiro Castro; Viana, Marcelo; Amaral, Nilson; Lewer, Marcelo Mamede, E-mail: golbretas@gmail.com [Prefeitura Municipal de Belo Horizonte, Posto de Saude, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Elcordis Centro de Diagnosticos Ltda., Contagem, MG (Brazil); Fundacao Hospitalar do Estado de Minas Gerais (FHEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Hospital Julia Kubistchek, Cirurgia Toracica, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer leads the cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women around the world. The most common is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for NSCLC. The positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) can provide molecular and metabolic information, which acquired simultaneously with computed tomography (CT), has proved to be a very useful tool in the cancer diagnosis and staging. Identifying the stage of lung cancer is important to avoid unnecessary surgeries, reducing morbidity and treatment costs. This study aims to examine the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation of patients with NSCLC in the Brazilian reality. Twenty-six patients with histopathologic diagnosis of NSCLC were included. They underwent staging in two separated moments: first with morphological images (x-ray and computed tomography scan) and after with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The performance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT changed lymph node staging in around 30% of the patients initially classified as potentially operable, with high sensitivity and negative predictive values. Regarding the stage of metastasis, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT increased by 11.5% the detection of metastasis not previously detected. About the clinical staging, using the {sup 1}'8F-FDG PET/CT significantly reduced the number of patients classified as potentially operable in the early stages, avoiding the use of unnecessary thoracotomies in 19.2% of patients. The metabolic information obtained by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated better accuracy when compared to anatomic methods in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. Thus, having important impact on therapeutic strategy and treatment cost related. (author)

  4. A Randomized Phase 2 Study Comparing 2 Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Schedules for Medically Inoperable Patients With Stage I Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: NRG Oncology RTOG 0915 (NCCTG N0927)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videtic, Gregory M.M., E-mail: videtig@ccf.org [The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hu, Chen [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Singh, Anurag K. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Chang, Joe Y. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Parker, William [McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Urbanic, James J. [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Choy, Hak [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To compare 2 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules for medically inoperable early-stage lung cancer to determine which produces the lowest rate of grade ≥3 protocol-specified adverse events (psAEs) at 1 year. Methods and Materials: Patients with biopsy-proven peripheral (≥2 cm from the central bronchial tree) T1 or T2, N0 (clinically node negative by positron emission tomography), M0 tumors were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive either 34 Gy in 1 fraction (arm 1) or 48 Gy in 4 consecutive daily fractions (arm 2). Rigorous central accreditation and quality assurance confirmed treatment per protocol guidelines. This study was designed to detect a psAEs rate >17% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 90% power. Secondary endpoints included rates of primary tumor control (PC), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 year. Designating the better of the 2 regimens was based on prespecified rules of psAEs and PC for each arm. Results: Ninety-four patients were accrued between September 2009 and March 2011. The median follow-up time was 30.2 months. Of 84 analyzable patients, 39 were in arm 1 and 45 in arm 2. Patient and tumor characteristics were balanced between arms. Four (10.3%) patients on arm 1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9%-24.2%) and 6 (13.3%) patients on arm 2 (95% CI 5.1%-26.8%) experienced psAEs. The 2-year OS rate was 61.3% (95% CI 44.2%-74.6%) for arm 1 patients and 77.7% (95% CI 62.5%-87.3%) for arm 2. The 2-year DFS was 56.4% (95% CI 39.6%-70.2%) for arm 1 and 71.1% (95% CI 55.5%-82.1%) for arm 2. The 1-year PC rate was 97.0% (95% CI 84.2%-99.9%) for arm 1 and 92.7% (95% CI 80.1%-98.5%) for arm 2. Conclusions: 34 Gy in 1 fraction met the prespecified criteria and, of the 2 schedules, warrants further clinical research.

  5. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  6. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  7. TU-D-207B-02: Delta-Radiomics: The Prognostic Value of Therapy-Induced Changes in Radiomics Features for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fave, X; Court, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Health Science Center, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, L; Yang, J; Mackin, D; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Balter, P; Jones, A; Gomez, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine how radiomics features change during radiation therapy and whether those changes (delta-radiomics features) can improve prognostic models built with clinical factors. Methods: 62 radiomics features, including histogram, co-occurrence, run-length, gray-tone difference, and shape features, were calculated from pretreatment and weekly intra-treatment CTs for 107 stage III NSCLC patients (5–9 images per patient). Image preprocessing for each feature was determined using the set of pretreatment images: bit-depth resample and/or a smoothing filter were tested for their impact on volume-correlation and significance of each feature in univariate cox regression models to maximize their information content. Next, the optimized features were calculated from the intratreatment images and tested in linear mixed-effects models to determine which features changed significantly with dose-fraction. The slopes in these significant features were defined as delta-radiomics features. To test their prognostic potential multivariate cox regression models were fitted, first using only clinical features and then clinical+delta-radiomics features for overall-survival, local-recurrence, and distant-metastases. Leave-one-out cross validation was used for model-fitting and patient predictions. Concordance indices(c-index) and p-values for the log-rank test with patients stratified at the median were calculated. Results: Approximately one-half of the 62 optimized features required no preprocessing, one-fourth required smoothing, and one-fourth required smoothing and resampling. From these, 54 changed significantly during treatment. For overall-survival, the c-index improved from 0.52 for clinical factors alone to 0.62 for clinical+delta-radiomics features. For distant-metastases, the c-index improved from 0.53 to 0.58, while for local-recurrence it did not improve. Patient stratification significantly improved (p-value<0.05) for overallsurvival and distant

  8. TU-D-207B-02: Delta-Radiomics: The Prognostic Value of Therapy-Induced Changes in Radiomics Features for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fave, X; Court, L; Zhang, L; Yang, J; Mackin, D; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Balter, P; Jones, A; Gomez, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how radiomics features change during radiation therapy and whether those changes (delta-radiomics features) can improve prognostic models built with clinical factors. Methods: 62 radiomics features, including histogram, co-occurrence, run-length, gray-tone difference, and shape features, were calculated from pretreatment and weekly intra-treatment CTs for 107 stage III NSCLC patients (5–9 images per patient). Image preprocessing for each feature was determined using the set of pretreatment images: bit-depth resample and/or a smoothing filter were tested for their impact on volume-correlation and significance of each feature in univariate cox regression models to maximize their information content. Next, the optimized features were calculated from the intratreatment images and tested in linear mixed-effects models to determine which features changed significantly with dose-fraction. The slopes in these significant features were defined as delta-radiomics features. To test their prognostic potential multivariate cox regression models were fitted, first using only clinical features and then clinical+delta-radiomics features for overall-survival, local-recurrence, and distant-metastases. Leave-one-out cross validation was used for model-fitting and patient predictions. Concordance indices(c-index) and p-values for the log-rank test with patients stratified at the median were calculated. Results: Approximately one-half of the 62 optimized features required no preprocessing, one-fourth required smoothing, and one-fourth required smoothing and resampling. From these, 54 changed significantly during treatment. For overall-survival, the c-index improved from 0.52 for clinical factors alone to 0.62 for clinical+delta-radiomics features. For distant-metastases, the c-index improved from 0.53 to 0.58, while for local-recurrence it did not improve. Patient stratification significantly improved (p-value<0.05) for overallsurvival and distant

  9. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  11. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  12. Management of non-small cell lung cancer with oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Kubicek, Gregory J; Socinski, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) present a potential opportunity for curative therapy; however, the challenge remains the definitive treatment of their localized disease and ablation of their limited overt metastatic sites of disease. In selecting patients with oligometastatic NSCLC for definitive therapy, proper staging through radiographic studies, including PET and brain MRI, and the pathologic staging of the mediastinal lymph nodes and potential sites of metastatic disease, are critical. With that in mind, the available literature suggests that in highly selected patients with solitary metastases to the brain, adrenals and other organs, long term survival may be achieved with combined definitive therapy of both the primary lung tumor and the solitary metastatic site.

  13. Gefitinib in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Costanzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gefitinib is an oral, reversible, tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR that plays a key role in the biology of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Phase I studies indicated that the recommended dose of gefitinib was 250 mg/day. Rash, diarrhea, and nausea were the most common adverse events. The positive results obtained in early phase 2 clinical trials with gefitinib were not confirmed in large phase 3 trials in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. The subsequent discovery that the presence of somatic mutations in the kinase domain of EGFR strongly correlates with increased responsiveness to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors prompted phase 2 and 3 trials with gefitinib in the first line-treatment of EGFR-mutated NSCLC. The results of these trials have demonstrated the efficacy of gefitinib that can be now considered as the standard first-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring activating EGFR mutations.

  14. Chemotherapy versus best supportive care in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer, non metastatic to the brain Quimioterapia versus melhor tratamento de suporte em câncer de pulmão estádio clínico IV não metastático para o sistema nervoso central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnaldo Anelli

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer is a fatal disease, with a median survival of 14 months. Systemic chemotherapy is the most common approach. However the impact in overall survival and quality of life still a controversy. OBJECTIVES: To determine differences in overall survival and quality of life among patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer non-metastatic to the brain treated with best supportive care versus systemic chemotherapy. PATIENTS: From February 1990 through December 1995, 78 eligible patients were admitted with the diagnosis of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer . Patients were divided in 2 groups: Group A (n=31 -- treated with best supportive care , and Group B (n=47 -- treated with systemic chemotherapy. RESULTS: The median survival time was 23 weeks (range 5 -- 153 weeks in Group A and 55 weeks (range 7.4 -- 213 weeks in Group B (p=0.0018. In both groups, the incidence of admission for IV antibiotics and need of blood transfusions were similar. Patients receiving systemic chemotherapy were also stratified into those receiving mytomycin, vinblastin, and cisplatinum, n=25 and those receiving other combination regimens (platinum derivatives associated with other drugs, n=22. Patients receiving mytomycin, vinblastin, and cisplatinum, n=25 had a higher incidence of febrile neutropenia and had their cycles delayed for longer periods of time than the other group. These patients also had a shorter median survival time (51 versus 66 weeks, p=0.005. CONCLUSION: In patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer, non-metastatic to the brain, chemotherapy significantly increases survival compared with best supportive care.O câncer de pulmão de células não pequenas em estádio IV é uma doença fatal, com uma sobrevida mediana de seis meses. Quimioterapia é a abordagem mais freqüente, apresentando um impacto na sobrevida controverso e questionável alteração na qualidade de vida. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o impacto na

  15. [Computed tomography imaging of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassagnon, G; Bennani, S; Revel, M P

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) plays a key role in the initial evaluation of non-small cell lung cancer. It allows initial staging and helps targeting lesions for pathological analysis. The aim of initial imaging work-up is to differentiate between localized disease, eligible to a local treatment, and advanced disease requiring medical treatment. CT is very useful for the assessment of local extension but is less accurate than positron emission tomography (PET)-CT for the assessment of lymphatic and metastatic spread. However, initial staging should include CT examination of the brain and upper abdomen, and PET-CT should be only be performed in patients eligible to a local treatment after initial CT assessment. Propositions for the 8th edition of lung cancer TNM bring several changes for T staging. In particular, the weight of lesion size is increased. Similarly, N1 and N2 stages are now divided in subgroups according the number of involved stations. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress in Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yan XU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the five-year survival rate of patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains low despite recent advances in surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Immunotherapy which utilizes the immune system to control and eradicate cancer is a viable treatment approach for malignancy. Immunotherapy in patients with lung cancer has made breakthrough progress recently. Novel immunotherapeutic agents, such as antigen-specific tumour vaccines, checkpoint inhibitors, etc, have all been evaluated in lung cancer, and some have shown prolonged survival time in phase II trials and III trails. The immune-related response criteria for the evaluation of antitumor responses with immunotherapeutic agents have been made. Now, immunotherapy will likely be a fundamentally new concept for the treatment of NSCLC.

  17. Non small cell carcinoma of the lung: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.; Firth, I.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken in 1990 of 188 patients with the diagnosis of non small cell carcinoma of the lung referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology in 1984. Most patients (178 out of 188) received a course of radiotherapy. This was definitive in 23, palliative in 148 (primary site in 113, metastases in 16, primary plus metastases in 19) and postoperative in 7. This report is a 5 year follow-up of the 171 patients treated by radiation alone, to assess factors that influence survival. Palliative intent of treatment and poorer performance status were related significantly to increasing stage of disease. The effects of palliative treatment were recorded in 79 cases: in 71 there was a reduction in symptoms. The median survival from diagnosis was 8 months. Using univariate and multi-variate analyses, significant and independent prognostic factors for improved survival were good performance status, absence of systemic symptoms, lower tumour stage and curative intent of treatment (higher radiation dose). However the 5-year survival was only 2%. Long-term survival was associated predominantly with early stage disease but not with the type or intent of treatment. Age, sex, histology and apical site did not influence survival. These results are comparable to those found in the literature and emphasize the need to select patients carefully for either palliative or aggressive treatment. 29 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  18. Treatment Rationale and Study Design for the JUNIPER Study: A Randomized Phase III Study of Abemaciclib With Best Supportive Care Versus Erlotinib With Best Supportive Care in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer With a Detectable KRAS Mutation Whose Disease Has Progressed After Platinum-Based Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jonathan W; Shi, Peipei; Reck, Martin; Paz-Ares, Luis; Koustenis, Andrew; Hurt, Karla C

    2016-01-01

    This clinical trial summary provides the background and rationale for the JUNIPER study (NCT02152631). JUNIPER is a randomized study of abemaciclib (200 mg orally every 12 hours) with best supportive care (BSC) versus erlotinib (150 mg orally every 24 hours) with BSC in patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have detectable Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) mutations and whose disease has progressed after platinum-based chemotherapy and 1 other previous therapy, or who are not eligible for further chemotherapy. Approximately 550 patients will be randomized in a 3:2 ratio and stratified according to number of previous chemotherapy regimens (1 vs. 2), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. 1), sex (male vs. female), and KRAS mutation (G12C vs. others). Erlotinib was chosen as the control arm, because it is the only agent indicated for second- and third-line therapy in advanced NSCLC. Treatment will continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurs, with assessments every 28 days, followed by short-term and long-term follow-up. The coprimary efficacy objectives of this study are progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS); secondary objectives are overall response rate, changes in patient-reported pain and disease-related symptoms, changes in health status, resource utilization, safety and tolerability, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. This design has 80% power to detect OS hazard ratio (HR) of 0.75 (type I error 0.045) and PFS HR of 0.67 (type I error 0.005). If the coprimary objectives (OS and PFS) are achieved, this study will provide a new alternative third-line treatment option for patients with NSCLC whose tumors have detectable KRAS mutations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Concurrent split-course chemotherapy and radiotherapy for unresectable stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer: results of a preliminary phase 2 study; Chimioradiotherapie en split course dans les carcinomes bronchiques non a petites cellules de stade 3: resultats preliminaires d'une etude de phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchalal, M.; Elgard Maitre, A.M.; Pignol, J.P.; Noirclerc, M.; Prevot, G. [Service d' oncoradiotherapie de Mulhouse, 68 (France); Bourderont, D. [Hopital du Hasenrain, 68 - Mulhouse (France); Salze, P. [Hopital Pasteur, 68 - Colmar (France); Bombaron, P.; Neidhardt, A.C.; Sizaret, O.; Newinger, G.; Zipper, J.M. [Centre Hospitalier de Mulhouse, 68 (France); Lambert, J.; Baumann, J.; Sabountchi, M. [Centre Medical Lalance, 68 - Lutterbach (France)

    1999-12-01

    Purpose: we initiated at Hospital de Mulhouse a prospective phase II study to assess a split-course concurrent radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Materials and methods: from March 1996 to December 1997, 28 patients were included in our study. All patients had a stage III cancer. The chemotherapy scheduled included vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d, d1 and d5), cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d, from d1 to d5), and 5-Fluorouracil (350 mg/m{sup 2}/d, from d1 to d5 by continuous infusion). The planned irradiation dose was 12.5 Gy per week with one daily fraction of 2.5 Gy from d1 to d5. Cycles were repeated every four weeks, for four cycles (50 Gy). Patients with a partial or complete response were proposed a fifth cycle. Results: of the 28 patients of the study, only 27 were analysed; one patient had a metastatic disease at diagnosis. Major hematologic toxicity occurred in 26% of the patients. One to five cycles of chemoradiotherapy were administrated per patient (median: four). Four patients had received fewer than three cycles and their responses were not assessable. Of the 23 patients assessed, 12 responses (52%) were observed, three CR (13%) and nine PR (39%). Median follow-up was 14 months, and median survival 13.5 months. One- and two-year survival rates were respectively 63%, and 14%. Local control rates was 11%, and 44% of the patients had a metastatic evolution. Conclusion: very preliminary results of this phase II study are disappointing, and quite inferior to the published results using chemoradiotherapy with conventional or hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Hematologic toxicity is restrictive. This type of chemoradiotherapy cannot be recommended. (author)

  20. [Non-small cell lung cancer irradiation in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupic, G; Bellière-Calandry, A

    2016-06-01

    People over the age of 65 are often excluded from participation in oncological clinical trials. However, more than half of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer are older than 65 years. Any therapeutic strategy must be discussed in multidisciplinary meetings after adapted geriatric assessment. Patients who benefit from the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) of Balducci and Extermann are those whose G8 screening tool score is less than or equal to 14. Age itself does not contraindicate a curative therapeutic approach. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an alternative to surgery for early stages in elderly patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery, because it significantly increases overall survival. Mostly sequential (rarely concomitant) chemoradiotherapy can be proposed to elderly patients with locally advanced stages in good general state of health. For the others, an exclusive palliative radiotherapy, a single or dual agent of chemotherapy, a targeted drug or best supportive care only may be discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Brain metastasis development and poor survival associated with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Patricia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system is a common site of metastasis in NSCLC and confers worse prognosis and quality of life. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical-pathological factors (CPF, serum CEA levels, and EGFR and HER2 tissue-expression in brain metastasis (BM and overall survival (OS in patients with advanced NSCLC. Methods In a prospective manner, we studied 293 patients with NSCLC in IIIB-IV clinical stage. They received standard chemotherapy. CEA was measured prior to treatment; EGFR and HER2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. BM development was confirmed by MRI in symptomatic patients. Results BM developed in 27, and 32% of patients at 1 and 2 years of diagnosis with adenocarcinoma (RR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.002–29; p = 0.05 and CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 11.4; 95% CI, 1.7–74; p p = 0.048, poor performance status (RR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5–2.3; p = 0.002, advanced clinical stage (RR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02–2; p = 0.04, CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.2; p = 0.014 and EGFR expression (RR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4–1.9; p = 0.012 were independent associated factors to worse OS. Conclusion High CEA serum level is a risk factor for BM development and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC. Surface expression of CEA in tumor cells could be the physiopathological mechanism for invasion to CNS.

  2. [Role of PET/CT in primitive non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumia, Fdil; Leila, Achachi; Mohamed, Raoufi; Laila, Herrak; Mustapha, Elftouh

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary cancer is a real public health problem. Morphological imaging plays a central role in its diagnosis, staging as well as post-therapeutic assessment but it has some limitations. Metabolic imaging is a more recent technique which allows to significantly improve the overall imagery performance. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive and analytical study at the Ibn Sina Hospital and at the Military Hospital of instruction Mohammed V in Rabat over a period of 18 months, between September 2014 and February 2016, in order to evaluate the role of Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in the staging and restaging of non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer. Initial staging showed a vast majority of locally advanced and metastatic stages: stage IV (40%), Stage IIIB (36%), Stage IIIA (16%), Stage II (8%). PET-CT allowed to detect new sites which were not initially seen on CT scan in 24 cases: 15 new ganglion sites, 8 new adrenal sites and 6 sites of bone lesions. PET/CT allowed to modify initial tumor stage in 60% of cases: upstaging in 23 patients (46%) and downstaging in 7 patients(14%). The initial stage remained unchanged in 40% of patients. Our study confirms the data from the literature concerning the superiority of PET-CT in comparison with CT scan, but only in the optimization of the non-small cell bronchopulmonary cancer management, in particular in locoregional and distant staging.

  3. Health state utilities for non small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Shkun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing reports of utility values for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC vary quite widely and are not all suitable for use in submissions in the UK. The aim of this study was to elicit UK societal based utility values for different stages of NSCLC and different grade III-IV toxicities commonly associated with chemotherapy treatments. Toxicities included neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting, rash and hair loss. Methods Existing health state descriptions of metastatic breast cancer were revised to make them suitable as descriptions of metastatic NSCLC patients on second-line treatment. The existing health states were used in cognitive debrief interviews with oncologists (n = 5 and oncology specialist nurses (n = 5. Changes were made as suggested by the clinical experts. The resulting health states (n = 17 were piloted and used in a societal based valuation study (n = 100. Participants rated half of the total health states in a standard gamble interview to derive health state utility scores. Data were analysed using a mixed model analysis. Results Each health state described the symptom burden of disease and impact on different levels of functioning (physical, emotional, sexual, and social. The disutility related to each disease state and toxicity was estimated and were combined to give health state values. All disease states and toxicities were independent significant predictors of utility (p Conclusion This study reflects the value that society place on the avoidance of disease progression and severe toxicities in NSCLC.

  4. Erlotinib in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrdel, U.; Kovac, V.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Erlotinib is a novel biological anti-tumour agent in the treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer. It represents the molecularly-targeted therapy which has been studied extensively. Case report. We present a case of a patient who suffered from advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. After the progress of disease following a prior chemotherapy he was treated with erlotinib with remarkable effect which was shown at chest x ray and symptoms were quite reduced. Conclusions. In selected patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer Erlotinib improves survival and symptom control as it results in presented case. (author)

  5. Surgical management of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo; Jiménez, Marcelo F

    2016-11-01

    The oligometastatic stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers a new surgical opportunity. New reported data is showing that surgery can offer a reasonable benefit, in terms of long-term survival, to some patients. The advantages of surgical treatment rely on a more adequate patient selection and a better understanding of the biology of these tumors. Currently, mediastinal involvement of the primary tumor can be identified as the most important prognostic variable after curative-intent of synchronous or metachronous metastasis. It seems clear that the routine use of combined FDG-PET and CT will help to detect the more favorable cohort of oligometastatic patients. As expected, pathological T staging of the primary tumor and the completeness of its resection are also crucial factors influencing final results. The real benefit of the local treatment over synchronous or metachronous metastasis is controversial with series showing better outcomes for metachronous lesions than for synchronous and others offering equal results. Also non conclusive results appear when analyzing different sites of metastasis. Retrospective series tend to show different outcomes depending on the affected organ while usually no differences are found in prospective ones. Most of the current evidence is based on retrospective studies on patients collected along extended periods of time. That represents a great limitation to the knowledge on this topic. Some prospective analyses have added some insight, but still the quality of the evidence is too low to allow drawing robust conclusions. As frequently concluded, prospective well designed investigation is requested to ascertain the value of surgery in this specific population of patients with extended NSCLC.

  6. Chemotherapy beyond first-line in stage IV metastatic non-small cell lung cancer Quimioterapia em câncer de pulmão não pequenas células metastático estádio IV: além da primeira linha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riad Naim Younes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is considered the standard of care for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, prognosis after recurrent or progressive disease following first-line chemotherapy is usually poor. Maintenance chemotherapy, second line treatment and even third line chemotherapy are available for patients with advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, few patients are candidates for chemotherapy beyond first line. The present study evaluated characteristics of patients with NSCLC and outcomes of the treatment of their metastatic disease, with emphasis on second and third-line chemotherapy. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study of 2,673 patients with metastatic, stage IV, non-small cell lung cancer admitted for treatment in two São Paulo institutions. First-line chemotherapy was defined as the first chemotherapeutic approach administered to the patient. Second and third-line chemotherapy were defined as the systemic treatment administered after discontinuing first-line chemotherapy, either for intolerance or for progressive or recurrent disease. RESULTS: Most patients (57.9% received first-line chemotherapy, and approximately 23.4% received second-line and 8% third-line regimens. Only 2.5% received fourth-line chemotherapy. Median overall survival (OS was 8 months (95% CI: 8-9 months. At univariate analyses, gender (p OBJETIVO: A quimioterapia dupla com base em platina consiste no tratamento padrão para o câncer de pulmão não pequenas células (CPNPC avançado. Contudo, o prognóstico dos pacientes com doença recorrente ou em progressão após a quimioterapia de primeira linha é ruim. Quimioterapia de manutenção, de segunda linha e até de terceira linha são tratamentos válidos para pacientes com CPNPC de estádio avançado. Infelizmente, poucos pacientes são candidatos para o tratamento quimioterápico além daquele de primeira linha. O presente estudo avalia as características de

  7. Protein signature for non-small cell lung cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Libo; Gao, Ling; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Kai; Song, Jena; Wang, Hongxia; Bayer, Thomas A; Glaser, Laurel; Sun, Yezhou; Zhang, Weijia; Cutaia, Michael; Zhang, David Y; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological classification and TNM staging have limited accuracy in predicting survival and stratifying patients for appropriate treatment. The goal of the study is to determine whether the expression pattern of functionally important regulatory proteins can add additional values for more accurate classification and prognostication of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of 108 proteins and phosphoproteins in 30 paired NSCLC samples were assessed using Protein Pathway Array (PPA). The differentially expressed proteins were further confirmed using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 94 NSCLC samples and were correlated with clinical data and survival. Results: Twelve of 108 proteins (p-CREB(Ser133), p-ERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), Cyclin B1, p-PDK1(Ser241), CDK4, CDK2, HSP90, CDC2p34, β-catenin, EGFR, XIAP and PCNA) were selected to build the predictor to classify normal and tumor samples with 97% accuracy. Five proteins (CDC2p34, HSP90, XIAP, CDK4 and CREB) were confirmed to be differentially expressed between NSCLC (n=94) and benign lung tumor (n=19). Over-expression of CDK4 and HSP90 in tumors correlated with a favorable overall survival in all NSCLC patients and the over-expression of p-CREB(Ser133) and CREB in NSCLC correlated with a favorable survival in smokers and those with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Finally, the four proteins (CDK4, HSP90, p-CREB and CREB) were used to calculate the risk score of each individual patient with NSCLC to predict survival. Conclusion: In summary, our data demonstrated a broad disturbance of functionally important regulatory proteins in NSCLC and some of these can be selected as clinically useful biomarkers for diagnosis, classification and prognosis. PMID:24959380

  8. Chemotherapy related toxicity in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For inoperable non-small cell lung cancer combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy plays an important role as a therapeutic modality. The aim of the present study was to analyze neoadjuvant chemotherapy related acute toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer (stage IIIA and IIIB in Indian patients using Cisplatin and Etoposide combination chemotherapy. Material and methods: Forty patients of locally advanced Non small cell lung cancer received three cycles neoadjuvant chemotherapy using Injection Cisplatin and Etoposide. The patients were taken for Radical radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray over 30 fractions in conventional fractionation after completing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was assessed using common toxicity criteria (CTC v2.0 Results: Forty patients were available for final evaluation. Median age of presentation of patients was fifty-six years. Thirteen patients had Non small cell lung cancer stage IIIA while twenty-seven patients had Stage IIIB disease. Anemia was the most common hematological toxicity observed (seen in 81% of patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most common non -hematological toxicity seen. Sensory neuropathy was seen in 38%of patients. 88% patients developed alopecia. Seven patients developed febrile neutropenias. Conclusion: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy using Cisplatin and Etoposide continues to be a basic regimen in the Indian set up despite availability of higher molecules, since it is cost effective, well tolerated and therapeutically effective. Blood transfusions, growth factors and supportive care can be used effectively to over come toxicity associated with this regimen.

  9. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017;123:4672-4679. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

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    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  11. Tracking the Evolution of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; McGranahan, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), data on intratumor heterogeneity and cancer genome evolution have been limited to small retrospective cohorts. We wanted to prospectively investigate intratumor heterogeneity in relation to clinical outcome and to determine the cl...

  12. [Clinic significance of nm23, collage IV and PCNA expression in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Ma, L; Jing, S; Xu, Y; Geng, D

    2001-12-20

    To study the significance of nm23, collagen IV and PCNA expressions in non-small cell lung cancer. Expressions of the nm23, collagen IV and PCNA in 84 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were examined with SP immunohistochemical technique. Of the 84 cases, there were squamous cell carcinoma 42, adenocarcinoma 42, stage I 27, stage II 24, stage III 24, and stage IV 9. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-Square test. Expressions of the nm23, collagen IV and PCNA in 84 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were 60. 7% ( 51/ 84) , 75. 0% ( 63/ 84) and 53. 6% ( 45/ 84) respectively. There was negative correlation between the lymph node metastasis and the expressions of nm23 and collagen IV in squamous cell carcinoma, and the expressions of collagen IV and PCNA were associated with tumor differentiation. No correlation was found between TNM stage and expressions of nm23, collagen IV and PCNA. The results indicate that nm23, collagen IV and PCNA participate the modulation of metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer and that they may be used to evaluate the potential of metastasis.

  13. Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E

    2016-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  14. Approach for oligometastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidemi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring a limited number of distant metastases, referred to as the oligometastatic state, has been indicated for surgery for the past several decades. However, whether the strategy of surgical treatment results in a survival benefit for such patients remains controversial. Experientially, however, thoracic surgeons often encounter long-term survivors among surgically resected oligometastatic NSCLC patients. In this article, the current situation of surgical approach and potential future perspective for oligometastatic NSCLC are reviewed.

  15. Prognostic factors in resected satellite-nodule T4 non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jagan; Sayeed, Rana A; Tomaszek, Sandra; Fischer, Stefan; Keshavjee, Shaf; Darling, Gail E

    2007-09-01

    The 1997 non-small cell lung cancer staging revisions assigned a T4 descriptor to satellite nodules in the primary tumor lobe. We reviewed our experience of satellite-nodule T4 non-small cell lung cancer following these revisions and evaluated prognostic factors for this group. All patients who underwent resection of non-small cell lung cancer between April 1997 and June 2005 with satellite nodule(s) confirmed at pathologic examination were identified from our institutional Lung Tumor Registry. Case notes and pathology reports were reviewed and data collected on possible prognostic factors. Survival was modeled using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival differences between groups were analyzed using the log-rank test. From 1,276 non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent resection, 137 were staged pT4, and 35 were T4-satellite nodules. Median follow-up was 25 months (range, 1 to 102 months). Median main tumor size was 3.0 cm (range, 1 to 9.8 cm). Adenocarcinoma or bronchioloalveolar carcinoma was the predominant histologic diagnosis (n = 28; 80%). One-, 3- and 5-year survival was 86%, 69%, and 57%, respectively; median survival was 68 months. During the same period, 137 patients undergoing resection for all T4 lesions had a 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival of 68%, 53%, and 18%, respectively. Adenocarcinoma or bronchioloalveolar carcinoma histologic diagnosis (adenocarcinoma or bronchioloalveolar carcinoma versus squamous, 75% versus 67% 3-year survival; p = 0.0026), female gender (66% versus 49% for males, 5-year survival; p = 0.041), and absence of vascular invasion (no invasion versus vascular invasion, 74% versus 20% 5-year survival; p = 0.0101) were significant predictors of better survival. Survival for resected T4 non-small cell lung cancer with satellite nodule(s) in the primary lobe is better than for other T4 lesions, and the T4 descriptor may unduly upstage these cases. The current T4 descriptor represents a heterogeneous population.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of First-Line Necitumumab Plus Gemcitabine and Cisplatin Versus Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in East Asian Patients with Stage IV Squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Subgroup Analysis of the Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized SQUIRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunchil; Cho, Eun Kyung; Bello, Maximino; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Song, Eun-Kee; Soldatenkova, Victoria; Depenbrock, Henrik; Puri, Tarun; Orlando, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    The phase 3 randomized SQUIRE study revealed significantly longer overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for necitumumab plus gemcitabine and cisplatin (neci+GC) than for gemcitabine and cisplatin alone (GC) in 1,093 patients with previously untreated advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This post hoc subgroup analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of neci+GC among East Asian (EA) patients enrolled in the study. All patients received up to six 3-week cycles of gemcitabine (days 1 and 8, 1,250 mg/m²) and cisplatin (day 1, 75 mg/m²). Patients in the neci+GC arm also received necitumumab (days 1 and 8, 800 mg) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from stratified Cox proportional hazards models. In EA patients, there were improvements for neci+GC (n=43) versus GC (n=41) in OS (HR, 0.805; 95% CI, 0.484 to 1.341) and PFS (HR, 0.720; 95% CI, 0.439 to 1.180), consistent with the results for non-EA patients observed in the present study. The overall safety data were consistent between EA and non-EA patients. A numerically higher proportion of patients experienced serious adverse events (AEs), grade ≥ 3 AEs, and AEs with an outcome of death for neci+GC versus GC in EA patients and EA patients versus non-EA patients for neci+GC. Although limited by the small sample size and post hoc nature of the analysis, these findings are consistent with those of the overall study and suggest that neci+GC offers a survival advantage and favorable benefit/risk for EA patients with advanced squamous NSCLC.

  17. Radiotherapy of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kumagai, Kazuhiko; Tukamoto, Yuji; Furonaka, Makoto; Hayakawa, Masanobu; Nakamura, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Treatment results of patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) with non-small-cell lung cancer were compared with those of patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). In patients with stage III disease, radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival of 11.5 months in the younger group and 5.5 months in the elderly group. There was a significant difference in survival rate between the two groups (P=0.0008). Moreover, the elderly group patients more frequently died of pneumonia and radiation pneumonitis than the younger group patients. However, results of radiotherapy were similar in the two groups of patients with stage I and II disease. Accordingly, these findings suggested that radiotherapy is an appropriate treatment modality for elderly lung cancer patients, but that individualized radiotherapy is needed for those with locally advanced stage. (author)

  18. Non-small-cell lung cancer resectability: diagnostic value of PET/MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraioli, Francesco; Menezes, Leon; Kayani, Irfan; Syed, Rizwan; O'Meara, Celia; Barnes, Anna; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Punwani, Shonit; Groves, Ashley M.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Janes, Samuel M.; Win, Thida; Zaccagna, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of PET/MR in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Fifty consecutive consenting patients who underwent routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT for potentially radically treatable lung cancer following a staging CT scan were recruited for PET/MR imaging on the same day. Two experienced readers, unaware of the results with the other modalities, interpreted the PET/MR images independently. Discordances were resolved in consensus. PET/MR TNM staging was compared to surgical staging from thoracotomy as the reference standard in 33 patients. In the remaining 17 nonsurgical patients, TNM was determined based on histology from biopsy, imaging results (CT and PET/CT) and follow-up. ROC curve analysis was used to assess accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the PET/MR in assessing the surgical resectability of primary tumour. The kappa statistic was used to assess interobserver agreement in the PET/MR TNM staging. Two different readers, without knowledge of the PET/MR findings, subsequently separately reviewed the PET/CT images for TNM staging. The generalized kappa statistic was used to determine intermodality agreement between PET/CT and PET/MR for TNM staging. ROC curve analysis showed that PET/MR had a specificity of 92.3 % and a sensitivity of 97.3 % in the determination of resectability with an AUC of 0.95. Interobserver agreement in PET/MR reading ranged from substantial to perfect between the two readers (Cohen's kappa 0.646 - 1) for T stage, N stage and M stage. Intermodality agreement between PET/CT and PET/MR ranged from substantial to almost perfect for T stage, N stage and M stage (Cohen's kappa 0.627 - 0.823). In lung cancer patients PET/MR appears to be a robust technique for preoperative staging. (orig.)

  19. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

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    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  20. Outcome following radiotherapy for loco-regionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foo, K.; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, R.; Foroudi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Local and regional recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer is reported to occur in 13-20% of treatment failures after resection. Reported post-recurrent median survival following radiotherapy ranges from 9 to 14 months. This study examines survival following radiotherapy alone for patients with loco-regionally recurring non-small cell lung cancer after initial surgery. Fifty-five patients, receiving radiotherapy at Westmead Hospital between 1979 and 1997, were eligible for study. Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing patient records. The end-point was overall survival. Symptom control was also recorded. Prognostic factors for analysis included age, sex, original presenting stage, disease-free interval (DFI), performance status, site of recurrence, treatment intent and dose. The median overall survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval: 8.1-13.0). Survival following treatment with radical intent was 26 months compared to 10.5 months for patients treated with palliative intent (P = 0.025). There was no significant difference in survival for short (<2 years) or long DFI, performance status, radiation dose, age, sex, site of recurrence or stage. Most patients (55%) had partial or complete resolution of symptoms. Radiotherapy results in overall post-recurrence median survival of nearly 1 year, consistent with previous published data. Radical treatment intent predicts better prognosis as a result of patient selection and higher dose. Radiotherapy is effective at palliating symptoms of this disease Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  1. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

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    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  2. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  3. Does concurrent chemotherapy improve local control and survival over radiotherapy alone or induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)? Results at 3 years in 140 patients (pts) with a minimum follow-up of 24 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Brewer, Y.; Vincent, P.; Chauvet, B.; Faure, C. Felix; Taulelle, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Recent Phase III trials have demonstrated a significant but limited survival benefit of induction chemotherapy over standard radiotherapy alone in Stage III NSCLC. Induction chemotherapy does not significantly improve local control and substantially prolongs overall treatment time in this poor prognosis population. Concurrent chemotherapy has the potential for improving local control through drug-radiation interactions. This study was designed to determine the overall survival after standard fractionation radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin or cisplatin-etoposide, as well as the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Material and Methods: From July 1989 to February 1994, 140 favorable pts according to CALGB criteria with histologically proven medically or technically inoperable stage III NSCLC were treated with radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Median age was 64 years with a majority of males (93%), WHO status 1 (66.4%), and squamous cell histology (72%). Clinical stage was IIIA (65.7%), IIIB (34.3%), N0-1 (20.8%), N2 (57.8%) or N3 (21.4%). Median tumor size was 6 cm. Using once-daily fractionation, pts received thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) up to a median dose of 60 Gy (n=116), or 45 Gy preceding surgery (n=24). No pts received induction chemotherapy before TRT. During TRT, all pts received two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/sqm/d over 5 days). In addition to cisplatin, the last 67 pts received etoposide (50 mg/sqm/d over 5 days). After TRT, 48 of these pts received two additional cycles of cisplatin-etoposide. Results: With a minimum follow-up of 24 months (median 58 months), overall survival was 34.3% and 24.9% at 2 and 3 years respectively. Age, sex, performance status, histologic type or grade, tumor size, and T stage, had no significant predictive value for survival. Three-year survival according to clinical stage (IIIA : 26%, IIIB : 22.7%) was not statistically different. Univariate analysis identified 3 significant factors for

  4. Non-small-cell lung cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggi, Fausto; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    The world population is getting increasingly older. In Western countries, lung cancer in the most frequent cancer and more than 50% of patients who contract non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are close to 70 years old. It is therefore fundamentally important that we identify an overall strategy of screening, diagnosis and therapy designed specifically for elderly patients. NSCLC research still has relatively little material dedicated exclusively to the elderly, but recently interest has been growing, possibly due to the positive results of the most recent trials (Elderly Lung Cancer Vinorelbine Study Group (ELVIS), Southern Italy Cooperative Oncology Group (SICOG), Multicenter Italian Lung Cancer in the Elderly Study (MILES)). In particular, the integration of geriatric and oncological information has led to better recognition of elderly candidates for more aggressive therapy which is usually reserved for younger patients, while recognizing more fragile patients who need only support therapy.

  5. Treatment and outcomes of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with high comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Rios,1 Rahul Gosain,1 Bernardo HL Goulart,2 Bin Huang,3 Margaret N Oechsli,1 Jaclyn K McDowell,4 Quan Chen,4 Thomas Tucker,4 Goetz H Kloecker1 1James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 4Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Background: The life expectancy of untreated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is dismal, while treatment for NSCLC improves survival. The presence of comorbidities is thought to play a significant role in the decision to treat or not treat a given patient. We aim to evaluate the association of comorbidities with the survival of patients treated for NSCLC.Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients aged ≥66 years with invasive NSCLC between the years 2007 and 2011 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Kentucky Cancer Registry. Comorbidity was measured using the Klabunde Comorbidity Index (KCI, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure association between receiving treatment and comorbidity. Kaplan–Meier plots were constructed to estimate time-to-event outcomes.Results: A total of 4014 patients were identified; of this, 94.9% were white and 55.7% were male. The proportion of patients who did not receive any treatment was 8.7%, 3.9%, 19.1%, and 23.5% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.0001. In multivariate analysis, older age, higher stage, and higher comorbidity (KCI ≥3 were associated with a lower likelihood of receiving any treatment. The median overall survival (OS for untreated and KCI=0 was 17.7 months for stages I and II, 2.3 months for stage III, and 1.3 months for stage IV. The median OS for treated and KCI=0 was 58.9 months for stages I and II, 16.8 months for stage III, and 5.8 months for stage

  6. Quality of life assessment as a predictor of survival in non-small cell lung cancer

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    Staren Edgar D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are conflicting and inconsistent results in the literature on the prognostic role of quality of life (QoL in cancer. We investigated whether QoL at admission could predict survival in lung cancer patients. Methods The study population consisted of 1194 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated at our institution between Jan 2001 and Dec 2008. QoL was evaluated using EORTC-QLQ-C30 prior to initiation of treatment. Patient survival was defined as the time interval between the date of first patient visit and the date of death from any cause/date of last contact. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression evaluated the prognostic significance of QoL. Results Mean age at presentation was 58.3 years. There were 605 newly diagnosed and 589 previously treated patients; 601 males and 593 females. Stage of disease at diagnosis was I, 100; II, 63; III, 348; IV, 656; and 27 indeterminate. Upon multivariate analyses, global QoL as well as physical function predicted patient survival in the entire study population. Every 10-point increase in physical function was associated with a 10% increase in survival (95% CI = 6% to 14%, p Conclusions Baseline global QoL and physical function provide useful prognostic information in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

  7. Prognostic factors of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy in treating non-small lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fei; Li Guang; Dang Jun; Cai Feng; Xia Bing; Zhang Shuo; Yao Lei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognosis of patients with non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three -dimension conformal radiation therapy(3DCRT). Methods: From January 2003 to December 2004, 178 patients with NSCLC were treated, including 136 males and 42 females. Their median age was 65. Radiotherapy was delivered at 2 - 3 Gy per fraction, 6 fractions per week with a total dose of 60 -75 Gy. The impact of related prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. The treatment outcome was analyzed by prognostic index model. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 1 - and 2 -year survival rates were 62.4% and 39.7%, respectively. Logrank analysis showed that gender, weight loss, histology, tumor stage, tumor diameter, Gross tumor volume (GTV) and total irradiation dose were prognostic factors for the survival. COX model multivariate analysis showed that weight loss, histology, GTV and total dose were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Weight loss, histology, total dose and gross tumor volume are independent prognostic factors of patients with non-small lung cancer treated with radiation therapy. Prognostic index model is able to predict the prognosis more effectively than single variable. (authors)

  8. Cetuximab and biomarkers in non-small-cell lung carcinoma

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    Patil N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitin Patil, Mohammed Abba, Heike AllgayerDepartment of Experimental Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg and Molecular Oncology of Solid Tumors Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Cancer progression is a highly complex process that is driven by a constellation of deregulated signaling pathways and key molecular events. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as in several other cancer types, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its downstream signaling components represent a key axis that has been found not only to trigger cancer progression but also to support advanced disease leading to metastasis. Two major therapeutic approaches comprising monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have so far been used to target this pathway, with a combination of positive, negative, and inconsequential results, as judged by patient survival indices. Since these drugs are expensive and not all patients derive benefits from taking them, it has become both pertinent and paramount to identify biomarkers that can predict not only beneficial response but also resistance. This review focuses on the chimeric monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, its application in the treatment of NSCLC, and the biomarkers that may guide its use in the clinical setting. A special emphasis is placed on the EGFR, including its structural and mechanistic attributes.Keywords: NSCLC, cetuximab, biomarker, cancer progression

  9. MEDI 4736 (durvalumab) in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanson, Arnaud; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2017-10-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) are now a therapeutic option for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. ICI, such as the PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab and the PD-L1 inhibitor atezolizumab, have already been marketed for the treatment of pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC. Other notable PD-L1 inhibitors under development include avelumab and durvalumab. Areas covered: This article reviews literature on durvalumab development, from the preclinical data to the results of phase III clinical trials, whether published or presented at international scientific conferences. Ongoing clinical trials were also reviewed. Expert opinion: Early phase trials of durvalumab monotherapy (and in combination) have demonstrated activity in advanced NSCLC patients and it has demonstrated a good safety profile. The authors believe that durvalumab will likely play an important role in future treatment strategies for NSCLC. The PACIFIC trial assessing durvalumab after standard chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced NSCLC has already met its primary endpoint and the potential of durvalumab will be reinforced if phase III randomized studies of first-line (MYSTIC trial) and second or subsequent (ARCTIC trial) lines of therapy demonstrate superiority over the current standard of care.

  10. MEK inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Johnson, Gary L

    2014-11-01

    KRAS mutations are the most common mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with adenocarcinoma histology. KRAS mutations result in the activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, and agents that target RAF-MEK-ERK pathways have been investigated in KRAS mutant NSCLC. The two agents furthest in development are selumetinib and trametinib. Trametinib has greater binding for the MEK1/2 allosteric site, and generally has superior pharmacokinetics. A randomized phase II trial of docetaxel with and without selumetinib revealed that the combination resulted numerically superior overall survival, and a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate. However, a concerning rate of hospital admission, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia was observed with the combination. Trials have investigated MEK inhibitors as single agents and in combination with erlotinib, and the data do not support the further development. The activity of MEK inhibitors appears to be similar in patients with KRAS mutant and wild-type NSCLC suggesting KRAS mutation status is not a reliable biomarker for efficacy. It is possible that mutations of genes in addition to KRAS mutations impact the activity of MEK inhibitors, or specific subsets of KRAS mutations may be resistant or susceptible to MEK inhibition. Other potential explanations are gene amplifications, alternative RNA splicing of genes resulting in activation of their protein products, and deregulation of noncoding RNAs and consequent altered protein expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation between Pre-treatment Anemia and Prognosis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

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    Qiuhua DENG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC might contract anemia, however, whether anemia is one of the independent prognostic factors to the patients with NSCLC is still controversial. So the aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between anemia and overall survival (OS in patients with NSCLC. Methods 1 018 patients with operable NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed in our hospital from January 2000 to December 2008. Results The occurrence of anemia before operation was 252/1 018 (24.1%. The OS in NSCLC patients without anemia was (2 425.98±50.03 days, and the OS in patients with anemia was (2 107.15±93.86 days. There was significant difference in the OS between them (P=0.001. The patients with anemia in stage I had shorter survival time than those without anemia (P < 0.001. But there was no difference in other stage patients. TNM stage, gender, tumor size and lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with OS using Cox regression analysis. Conclusion Anemia is correlated with survival in operable NSCLC patients. Moreover, it is an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC patients with stage I.

  12. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). When SPN or mass without calcification is found on chest X-ray or CT, 18 F-FDG PET is an effective modality to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. For initial staging of NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET is useful, and proved to be cost-effective in several countries. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for detecting recurrence, restaging and evaluating residual tumor after curative therapy in NSCLC. For therapy response assessment, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 18 F-FDG PET is useful to predict pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in NSCLC. For radiation therapy planning, 18 F-FDG PET may be helpful, but requires further investigations. PET/CT is better for evaluating NSCLC than conventional PET

  13. The Conceptual Oligometastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Therapeutic Strategies

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    Xiaozheng KANG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC ranks among the most prevalent malignancies and is the major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Nearly 20%-50% will accompany by metastatic disease and the most common extrapulmonary sites of distant metastases are the brain, bone, liver and adrenal gland. The oligometastatic state is a biologically mild tumor stage and a intermediate state in which spread may be limited to specific organs and metastases might be present in limited numbers. Oligometastases are thought to arise from micrometastases, which have been dormant for a period of time. Local control may be an crucial component of a curative therapeutic strategy in the following four clinical schemes: to prohibit metastases; to cure occult metastatic disease; to remedy oligometastases; and to deracinate any residual lesion after systemic therapy. This review aims to outline the concept of the oligometastatic NSCLC and its strategies of treatment.

  14. Progress of Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined with Surgery in Non-small Cell
Lung Cancer

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    Yaqi WANG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading form of cancer in terms of both incidence and cancer-related deaths. For patients with resectable IIIa/N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, guidelines in and abroad recommend multidisciplinary team treatment, including surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy or other comprehensive treatment. Newly published evidences prove that neoadjuvant therapy can improve outcomes of NSCLC patients significantly, with advangtages in tolerability and compliance medication. Neoadjuvant therapy has been adopted mainly in locally advanced NSCLC, especially in stages IIIa/N2 patients, and chemotherapy of 2-4 cycles has become the basic pattern. Neoadjuvant therapy does not increase the concomitant complications of chemotherapy and surgery. However, challenges still exist in determining subsequent surgical timing, approach and extent of resection.

  15. Biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and recurrence monitoring of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yong Tang,1,2,* Guibin Qiao,1,2,* Enwu Xu,2 Yiwen Xuan,2 Ming Liao,2 Guilin Yin1 1Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of PLA, Yuexiu District, Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Despite advances in the management of non-small cell lung cancer, it remains to be the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide primarily because of diagnosis at a late stage with an overall 5-year survival rate of 17%. A reduction in mortality was achieved by low-dose computed tomography screening of high-risk patients. However, the benefit was later challenged by the high false positive rate, resulting in unnecessary follow-ups, thus entailing a burden on both the health care system and the individual. The diagnostic dilemma imposed by imaging modalities has created a need for the development of biomarkers capable of differentiating benign nodules from malignant ones. In the past decade, with the advancements in high-throughput profiling technologies, a huge amount of work has been done to derive biomarkers to supplement clinical diagnosis. However, only a few of them have efficient sensitivity and specificity to be utilized in clinical settings. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of sensitive and specific means to detect and diagnose lung cancers at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Due to the invasiveness of tissue biopsies and inability to capture tumor heterogeneity, nowadays enormous efforts have been invested in the development of technologies and biomarkers that enable sensitive and cost-effective testing using substrates that can be obtained in a noninvasive manner. This review, primarily focusing on liquid biopsy, summarizes all documented potential biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring recurrence treatment response. Keywords

  16. The clinical significance of CXCL5 in non-small cell lung cancer

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    Wu K

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kongju Wu,1,* Shengnan Yu,2,* Qian Liu,2 Xianguang Bai,1 Xinhua Zheng,1 Kongming Wu2 1Medical School of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan, Henan, 2Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: As a CXC-type chemokine, ENA78/CXCL5 is an important attractant for granulocytes by binding to its receptor CXCR2. Recent studies proved that CXCL5/CXCR2 axis plays an oncogenic role in many human cancers. However, the exact clinical significance of CXCL5 in lung cancer has not been well defined. Here, we found that the serum protein expression of CXCL5 was significantly increased in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC compared with that in healthy volunteers. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed that CXCL5 protein was higher in various lung cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. Moreover, CXCL5 expression correlated with histological grade, tumor size, and TNM stage in NSCLC. Elevated CXCL5 protein abundance predicted poor overall survival in adenocarcinoma patients. Further meta-analysis demonstrated that CXCL5 mRNA expression was also positively associated with tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, and worse survival. Kaplan–Meier plot analyses indicated high CXCL5 was associated with short overall survival and progression-free survival. Together, these results indicated that CXCL5 may be a potential biomarker for NSCLC. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, chemokine, CXCL5, migration, prognosis 

  17. Long noncoding nature brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is associated with poor prognosis and functional regulation in non-small cell lung caner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, MingJing; Xu, Zhonghua; Jiang, Kanqiu; Xu, Weihua; Chen, Yongbin; Xu, ZhongHeng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the prognostic potential and functional regulation of human nature antisense, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense, in non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma and adjacent non-carcinoma lung tissues were extracted from 151 patients. Their endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression levels were compared by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical relevance between endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression level and patients' clinicopathological variances or overall survival was analyzed. The potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense being an independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer was also evaluated. In in vitro non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense was upregulated through forced overexpression. The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense upregulation on non-small cell lung cancer in vitro survival, proliferation, and migration were evaluated by viability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, and transwell assays. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is lowly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma tissues and further downregulated in late-stage carcinomas. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense downregulation was closely associated with non-small cell lung cancer patients' advanced tumor, lymph node, metastasis stage, and positive status of lymph node metastasis, and confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for patients' poor overall survival. In non-small cell lung cancer A549 and H226 cell lines, forced overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense did not alter cancer cell viability but had significantly tumor suppressive effect in inhibiting in vitro non-small cell lung cancer proliferation and migration. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense in

  18. Non-Small Cell Carcinoma Biomarker Testing: The Pathologist's Perspective.

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    Elisa eBrega

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker testing has become standard of care for patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer. Although it can be successfully performed in circulating tu-mor cells, at present, the vast majority of investigations are carried out using di-rect tumor sampling, either through aspiration methods, which render most often isolated cells, or tissue sampling, that could range from minute biopsies to large resections. Consequently, pathologists play a central role in this process. Recent evidence suggests that refining NSCLC diagnosis might be clinically signifi-cant, particularly in cases of lung adenocarcinomas (ADC, which in turn, has prompted a new proposal for the histologic classification of such pulmonary neo-plasms. These changes, in conjunction with the mandatory incorporation of biomarker testing in routine NSCLC tissue processing, have directly affected the pathologist’s role in lung cancer work-up. This new role pathologists must play is complex and demanding, and requires a close interaction with surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and molecular pathologists. Pathologists often find themselves as the central figure in the coordination of a process, that involves assuring that the tumor samples are properly fixed, but without disruption of the DNA structure, obtaining the proper diagnosis with a minimum of tissue waste, providing pre-analytical evaluation of tumor samples selected for biomarker testing, which includes assessment of the proportion of tumor to normal tissues, as well as cell viability, and assuring that this entire pro-cess happens in a timely fashion. Therefore, it is part of the pathologist’s respon-sibilities to assure that the samples received in their laboratories, be processed in a manner that allows for optimal biomarker testing. This article goal is to discuss the essential role pathologists must play NSCLC bi-omarker testing, as well as to provide a summarized review of the main NSCLC bi-omarkers of

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected non-small-cell lung cancer: future perspectives for clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonomi Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is a debated issue in clinical oncology. Although it is considered a standard for resected stage II-IIIA patients according to the available guidelines, many questions are still open. Among them, it should be acknowledged that the treatment for stage IB disease has shown so far a limited (if sizable efficacy, the role of modern radiotherapies requires to be evaluated in large prospective randomized trials and the relative impact of age and comorbidities should be weighted to assess the reliability of the trials' evidences in the context of the everyday-practice. In addition, a conclusive evidence of the best partner for cisplatin is currently awaited as well as a deeper investigation of the fading effect of chemotherapy over time. The limited survival benefit since first studies were published and the lack of reliable prognostic and predictive factors beyond pathological stage, strongly call for the identification of bio-molecular markers and classifiers to identify which patients should be treated and which drugs should be used. Given the disappointing results of targeted therapy in this setting have obscured the initial promising perspectives, a biomarker-selection approach may represent the basis of future trials exploring adjuvant treatment for resected NSCLC.

  20. Prognostic factors for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer, limited disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Mastekaasa, A.; Lund, E.

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective controlled clinical trial, 102 patients with inoperable non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), limited disease, stage II and III were treated with combination chemotherapy, cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 i.v. on day one and etoposide 100 mg/m 2 i.v. on day one, and etoposide 200 mg/m 2 orally on days 2 and 3, or radiotherapy given in 15 fractions of 2.8 Gy with two anterior/posterior fields during a period of three weeks. The patients completed a validated self-administered questionnaire before the start of treatment that assessed their psychosocial well-being, disease-related symptoms, personal functioning, and every day activity. These subjective varibles were evaluated together with treatment modality, WHO performance status, weight loss, and stage of disease, with regard to their value in predicting survival. Univariate survival analyses were undertaken for each individual factor, median survival was calculated according to life-table analyses. A step-wise multiple regression analysis was used to measure the prognostic value of the various factors. In the univariate analysis, general symptons (p=0.0006) psychosocial well-being (p=0.0002) and stage of disease (p=0.007) were the best predictive factors. In the multiple regression analyses the subjective variables, general symptons (p<0.01) and psychosocial well-being (p<0.05) were shown to have the best predictive value for the patients' survival. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Combined modality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recine, D.; Rowland, K.; Reddy, S.; Lee, M.S.; Bonomi, P.; Taylor, S.; Faber, L.P.; Warren, W.; Kittle, C.F.; Hendrickson, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    Multi-modality treatment consisting of cisplatin, VP-16, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy given concomitantly with external beam radiation was used to treat 64 patients with locally advanced Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma. This regimen was used in a preoperative fashion for four cycles in patients considered surgically resectable and with curative intent for six cycles in the remainder of patients. The clinical response rate for the entire group was 84% and the overall local control rate was 74%. The median survival was 13 months with a median follow-up for live patients of 19 months. The actuarial 3-year survival and disease-free survival rates were 30% and 23%, respectively. Histologic complete response was 39% and appeared to predict for survival. The 3-year actuarial survival and disease-free survival rates for 23 resected patients were 69% and 45%, respectively, with the complete histologic responders having a disease-free survival of 78%. The pattern of first recurrence did not appear to differ by histology or presence of lymph nodes in this subset of patients. The actuarial 3-year survival and disease-free survival rates for inoperable patients receiving six cycles of treatment were 18% and 23%, respectively. The local control was 67% with the majority of these patients having Stage IIIB disease. The Mountain International staging system appeared to predict for operability, local recurrence, and survival. This concomitant treatment regimen is feasible, with the major toxicities being leukopenia, nausea, and vomiting

  2. The value of positron emission tomography in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Frank [Centre for Public Health, Queen' s University Belfast, Mulhouse Building, Royal Victoria Hospital Site, Grosvenor Road, Belfast BT12 6BJ, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.kee@qub.ac.uk; Erridge, Sara [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, University of Edinburgh, Crewe Road South, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bradbury, Ian [Frontier Science (Scotland) Ltd., Grampian View, Kincraig, Inverness-shire PH21 1NA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cairns, Karen [School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, David Bates Building, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Background: Pre-operative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major application of positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Despite substantial evidence of diagnostic accuracy, relatively little attention has been paid to its effects on patient outcomes. This paper addresses this by extending an existing decision model to include patient-elicited utilities. Patients and methods: A decision-tree model of the effect of FDG-PET on pre-operative staging was converted to a Markov model. Utilities for futile and appropriate thoracotomy were elicited from 75 patients undergoing staging investigation for NSCLC. The decision model was then used to estimate the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) associated with three sources of uncertainty-the accuracy of PET, the accuracy of CT and the patient related utility of a futile thoracotomy. Results: The model confirmed the apparent cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET and indicated that the EVPI associated with the utility of futile thoracotomy considerably exceeds that associated with measures of accuracy. Conclusion: The study highlights the importance of patient related utilities in assessing the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic technologies. In the specific case of PET for pre-operative staging of NSCLC, future research effort should focus on such elicitation, rather than further refinement of accuracy estimates.

  3. Prognosis and Treatment Decision Making in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mokhles (Sahar)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and it is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses (12% of total new cancer cases) and to death from cancer (18% of total cancer deaths). There are two major groups of lung cancer that arise from the cells of the

  4. Phase 0 Trial of Itraconazole for Early Stage Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A-18295) on May 19, 2015. The protocol was activated at UT Southwestern Medical Center and Parkland Health and Hospital System in June 2015...Departments of Radiology, Thoracic Surgery, Pulmonary Medicine, Hematology-Oncology; Texas Tech School of Pharmacy; Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology...Ethnicity Smoking Status Pack Years 7701 63 Male Caucasian Non-Hispanic Former 40 7702 64 Female Caucasian Non-Hispanic Former 47 7706 50 Female

  5. Neuroendocrine differentiation as a survival prognostic factor in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Beckground/Aim. Neuroendrocine lung tumors are histologically heterogenous group of cancers with different clinical progression. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC neuroendocrine differentiation exists in 10-30% of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and influence of neuroendocrine differentiation on survival of treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods. A clinical trial included 158 patients (74% males and 26% females, with the diagnosis of NSCLC, determined by histological verification. The patients were treated by combined chemo - and X-ray therapy in stage III (without pleural effusion or chemotherapy only in stage III (with pleural effusion and stage IV. Chemotherapy was conducted until progression of the disease, but no more than six cycles. When the progression had been noted in stage III (without pleural effusion, the treatment was continued with X-ray therapy. Neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, as well as synapthophysin expression in tissue examples were determined by immunohistochemical analysis with monoclonal mouse anti-human-bodies. Survival was assessed within a year and two years follow-up examination. Results. A total of 53 patients (34% had NSCLC with neuroendocrine differentiation, confirmed rather in large cell lung cancer and lung adenocarcinoma (66.7% and 40%, respectively. Neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A and synapthophysin expression was noted in 45 (28.5%, 34 (21.5% and 33 (20.1% patients, respectively. The one year and two years follow-up survival periods were confirmed in 39% and 17% of patients respectively. The median survival time in the patients with the neuroendocrine expression as compared to those without the expression was 15.6 vs 10.8 months; one year survival time with the expression compared to those without the expression achieved in 62% vs 27% of the patients, (p < 0.001; a two - year survival time noted in 30% of the patients (p = 0

  6. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  7. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry Llyn; Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar; Wong, Ching-yee Oliver; Margolis, Jeffrey Harold; Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  8. Lungscape: resected non-small-cell lung cancer outcome by clinical and pathological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Solange; Weder, Walter; Dafni, Urania; Kerr, Keith M; Bubendorf, Lukas; Meldgaard, Peter; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Wrona, Anna; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Felip, Enriqueta; Marchetti, Antonio; Savic, Spasenija; Lu, Shun; Smit, Egbert; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Blackhall, Fiona H; Baas, Paul; Camps, Carlos; Rosell, Rafael; Stahel, Rolf A

    2014-11-01

    The Lungscape project was designed to address the impact of clinical, pathological, and molecular characteristics on outcome in resected non-small- cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A decentralized biobank with fully annotated tissue samples was established. Selection criteria for participating centers included sufficient number of cases, tissue microarray building capability, and documented ethical approval. Patient selection was based on availability of comprehensive clinical data, radical resection between 2003 and 2009 with adequate follow-up, and adequate quantity and quality of formalin-fixed tissue. Fifteen centers contributed 2449 cases. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 69.6% and 63.6% for stages IA and IB, 51.6% and 47.7% for stages IIA and IIB, and 29.0% and 13.0% for stages IIIA and IIIB, respectively (p < 0.001). Median and 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) were 52.8 months and 47.3%, respectively. Distant relapse was recorded for 44.4%, local for 26.0%, and both for 16.9% of patients. Based on multivariate analysis for the OS, RFS, and time to relapse, the factors significantly associated with all of them are performance status and pathological stage. The aim of this report is to present the results from Lungscape, the first large series reporting on NSCLC surgical outcome measured not only by OS but also by RFS and time to relapse and including multivariate analysis by significant clinical and pathological prognostic parameters. As tissue from all patients is preserved locally and is available for detailed molecular investigations, Lungscape provides an excellent basis to evaluate the influence of molecular parameters on the disease outcome after radical resection, besides providing an overview of the molecular landscape of stage I to III NSCLC.

  9. Expression of transcription factor Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-hong; Wang, Sheng-fa; Yu, Liang; Wang, Ju; Chang, Hao; Yan, Wei-li; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Jian

    2008-03-05

    Transcription factor Pokemon, a central regulation gene of the important tumor suppressor ARF gene, exerted its activity by acting upstream of many tumor-suppressing genes and proto-oncogenes. Its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in NSCLC and to explore its correlation with the clinical pathological characteristics and its influence on patients' prognosis. Fifty-five cases of NSCLC were involved in this study. The expression of Pokemon in the tumor tissue, the corresponding tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue was detected via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, with the aim of investigating the correlation between the expression of Pokemon in tumor tissue of NSCLC and its clinical pathological characteristics. Moreover, a prognostic analysis was carried out based upon the immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of the expression of Pokemon gene in archival tumor specimens (5 years ago) of 62 cases of NSCLC. Statistical significance of the expression of Pokemon mRNA and protein was determined in the tumor tissue, the tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue (PPokemon was determined not to be associated with the patients' sex, age, smoking condition, tumor differentiation degree, histology and lymph node metastasis condition. However, its relationship with TNM staging was established (PPokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression (P=0.004), therefore, the expression of Pokemon is believed to be an independent factor affecting prognosis (P=0.034). Pokemon was over-expressed in NSCLC tissue and the expression of Pokemon might be of clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer prognostic evaluation.

  10. Curative radiotherapy in non-small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talton, B.M.; Constable, W.C.; Kersh, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent reports suggest radiotherapy administered to the 5000-6000 cGy level can result in significant long-term survival in non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. This is particularly true for many cases that are technically operable but for medical or other reasons thoracotomy cannot be performed. Such patients drawn from Southern Appalachia where the principal industry is coal mining are the subject of this report. In this region coal miners pneumoconiosis (black lung) is common as well as other chronic respiratory disorders resulting in poor tolerance for surgery. Three hundred and eleven cases of non-small cell carcinoma were irradiated during the 4 years of 1980 through 1983. This group consisted of 77 patients with clinical Stage T1, T2, T3 all N0, M0 tumors, the majority of which were technically operable but upon whom no thoracotomy was performed because of medical reasons or patient refusal. All are available for 5-year study. Each of these patients was uniformly irradiated to 6000 cGy target dose in 30 fractions over 6 weeks using standard techniques.Comparison with reported surgical series treated for cure show little difference in survival up to 2 years. Thereafter, the survival curves diverge with radiotherapy patients dying at a somewhat higher rate although by 4 years both survival curves slope similarly. A possible explanation for this difference is the advantage thoracotomy offers in early case selection allowing exclusion of advance cases from surgical reports whereas radiotherapy must include patients with occult local metastasis not identifiable on clinical grounds. This experience, among other reports include evidence that radiotherapy can result in long-term survival or cure with minimal morbidity in lung cancer patients in whom surgery carries excessive risk

  11. Potentially Curative Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Norway: A Population-Based Study of Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Trond-Eirik; Brunsvig, Paal Fredrik; Johannessen, Dag Clement; Sundstrom, Stein; Wang, Mari; Hornslien, Kjersti; Bremnes, Roy Martin; Stensvold, Andreas; Garpestad, Oddveig; Norstein, Jarle

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative irradiation in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer patients is considered limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival in a population-based approach. Methods and Materials: Cases of non-small-cell lung cancer diagnosed from 1993 to 2001 were identified in the Cancer Registry of Norway. Electronic linkage with national data from the hospitals' radiotherapy verification systems identified those who received potentially curative doses (≥50 Gy). Hospital records were reviewed for all patients. Results: A total of 497 patients (336 men) were identified with a radiation dose of ≥50 Gy delivered to the lung region. Of these, 41% received 60 Gy or more. The majority (70%) of patients included had advanced stage disease: 24% Stage IIIA and 46% Stage IIIB. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year observed survival rates were 53%, 16%, and 9%, respectively. Multivariable analyses identified stage and chemotherapy, but not radiation dose, as significant independent prognostic variables for survival. However, 68% of patients treated with chemotherapy participated in prospective studies with inclusion criteria that excluded patients with less favorable prognostic factors, leading to a selection bias. The number of fractions and the radiation doses varied widely among different hospitals. Conclusion: The long-term prognosis after radiation therapy is poor. More sophisticated, targeted, and uniform delivery of radiation therapy is needed. The apparent benefit of chemotherapy may in part be due to selection of patients with more favorable prognostic factors for this therapy.

  12. Bmi-1 expression modulates non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dan; Ye, Yunlin; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Jinglong; Kuang, Bohua; Wang, Hongbo; Wang, Xiumin; Zu, Lidong; Xiao, Gang; Hao, Mingang; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the role of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) is responsible for multiple cancer progression. However, Bmi-1 in controlling gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) development is not well explored. Here we report that the Bmi-1 level is highly increased in primary NSCLC tissues compared to matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues and required for lung tumor growth in xenograft model. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that Bmi-1 level is lower in matched involved lymph node cancerous tissues than the respective primary NSCLC tissues. We find that Bmi-1 does not affect cell cycle and apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines as it does not affect the expression of p16/p19, Pten, AKT and P-AKT. Mechanistic analyses note that reduction of Bmi-1 expression inversely regulates invasion and metastasis of NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo, followed by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using genome microarray assays, we find that RNAi-mediated silence of Bmi-1 modulates some important molecular genetics or signaling pathways, potentially associated with NSCLC development. Taken together, our findings disclose for the first time that Bmi-1 level accumulates strongly in early stage and then declines in late stage, which is potentially important for NSCLC cell invasion and metastasis during progression. PMID:25880371

  13. Interpretation of NCCN Guidelines: General Therapies on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (Version 6. 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-en HUANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China and ranks the first of cancer-related death. The major etiological agent of lung cancer is an industry-made and promoted addictive product, so lung cancer is considered to be a unique disease in all cancers. Effective policies for public health are required to prevent the smoking initiation so as to reduce the mortality of lung cancer, so Food and Drug Administration (FDA has introduced a series of measures to monitor the tobacco products. As to patients with strong suspicion of lung cancer in stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ, a preoperative biopsy is needed and intra-operative diagnosis is necessary before pneumonectomy, bilobectomy or lobectomy if the preoperative tissue diagnosis is not obtained. However, lung cancer still cannot be easily diagnosed and cured, so the annual improvement and update of new therapeutic protocols and the development of new agents is of great significance. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for about 80% of all lung cancer, and above 75% NSCLC patients are in middle-advanced stage when diagnosed, so they have lost the optimal therapeutic opportunity and the 5-year survival rate is relatively low. Therefore, this study mainly interpreted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines on the general therapies on NSCLC, hoping to provide references for the treatment of NSCLC patients and prolong their long-term survival.

  14. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC. PMID:27081229

  15. Dyspnea evolution after high-dose radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dehing, Cary; Yu, Shipeng; Wanders, Rinus; Ollers, Michel; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Hochstenbag, Monique; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Boersma, Liesbeth; Borger, Jacques; Dekker, Andre; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what the influence is of dyspnea (CTCAE3.0) before high-dose radiotherapy (RT) on the incidence and severity of subsequent lung toxicity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: In 197 patients with stage I-III NSCLC maximal dyspnea scores (CTCAE3.0) were obtained prospectively at three time periods: before RT, the first 6 months post-RT and 6-9 months post-RT. Only patients who were clinically progression-free 12 months or more after RT were included, thus minimizing dyspnea due to tumor progression. Time-trends of dyspnea as a function of baseline dyspnea were investigated and correlated with gender, age, chemotherapy, mean lung dose (MLD), lung function parameters (FeV1 and DLCO), stage, PTV dose, overall treatment time and smoking habits. Results: The proportion developing less, the same or more dyspnea 6-9 months post-treatment according to their baseline dyspnea scores was: Grade 0: none, 82.9%, 17.1%; Grade 1: 21.2%, 51.9%, 26.9%; Grade 2: 27.3%, 54.5%, 18.2%, respectively. Only age was associated with increased dyspnea after RT. Conclusions: Patients with dyspnea before therapy have a realistic chance to improve after high-dose radiotherapy. Reporting only dyspnea at one time-point post-RT is insufficient to determine radiation-induced dyspnea.

  16. Optimal radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Current progress and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a key role in treating lung cancer. Advances in physics and computer technology have improved radiation delivery systems. With innovations in the radiation therapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), new strategies have emerged, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and particle therapy. Compared with previous methods, these newer technologies can deliver even higher doses precisely to the tumor while minimizing doses to normal tissues, which should lead to better tumor control with less toxicity. In patients with stage I NSCLC, stereotactic body radiation therapy is highly effective and may achieve local control and survival equivalent to that achieved with surgery. In patients with stage III NSCLC, dose escalation has been investigated using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and particle therapy. The results from ongoing randomized trials on both patient populations are awaited. It is important to generate new hypotheses and to explore newer radiotherapy approaches to overcome NSCLC. (author)

  17. Detection of lymphangiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer and its prognostic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Rong-xia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim was to detect lymphatic endothelial marker podoplanin, lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3 and study the prognostic relevance of lymphangiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Materials 82 paraffin-embedded tissues and 40 fresh frozen tissues from patients with NSCLC were studied. Tumor samples were immunostained for the lymphatic endothelial markers. Lymphangiogenesis was assessed by immunohistochemical double stains for Podoplanin and Ki-67. The prognostic relevance of lymphangiogenesis-related clinicopathological parameters in NSCLC was evaluated. Results We found that the number of podoplanin positive vessels was correlated positively with the number of LYVE-1 positive vessels. Most of VEGFR-3 positive, few of LYVE-1 positive and none of podoplanin positive vessels were blood vessels. Peritumoral lymphatic vessel density (ptLVD, pathologic stage, lymph node status, lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C expression and Ki-67 index of the endothelium cells of the micro lymphatic vessels (Ki67% were associated significantly with a higher risk of tumor progress. ptLVD, pathologic stage, lymph-node metastasis and Ki67% were independent prognostic parameters for overall survival. Conclusion Podoplanin positive ptLVD might play important roles in the lymphangiogenesis and progression of NSCLC. Patients with high podoplanin+ ptLVD have a poor prognosis.

  18. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Thymic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1840 Old Spanish Trail, Houston, TX 77054 (United States)

    2012-03-14

    For many thoracic malignancies, surgery, when feasible, is the preferred upfront modality for local control. However, adjuvant radiation plays an important role in minimizing the risk of locoregional recurrence. Tumors in the thoracic category include certain subgroups of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as thymic malignancies. The indications, radiation doses, and treatment fields vary amongst subtypes of thoracic tumors, as does the level of data supporting the use of radiation. For example, in the setting of NSCLC, postoperative radiation is typically reserved for close/positive margins or N2/N3 disease, although such diseases as superior sulcus tumors present unique cases in which the role of neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment is still being elucidated. In contrast, for thymic malignancies, postoperative radiation therapy is often used for initially resected Masaoka stage III or higher disease, with its use for stage II disease remaining controversial. This review provides an overview of postoperative radiation therapy for thoracic tumors, with a separate focus on superior sulcus tumors and thymoma, including a discussion of acceptable radiation approaches and an assessment of the current controversies involved in its use.

  19. Cost and effectiveness studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yalcin-Balcik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer disease diagnosis and treatment is costly. As the numbers of inflicted rise so does the economic burden assumed for this cancer type. When the treatment expenditures are considered for all types of cancer, the lung cancer is thought to occupy a 20% share. The disease examined in two basic groups as small-cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most frequently encountered type of its kind nationally and in the World. This study considers the cost, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of platinum based chemotherapy medications with active ingredients pemetrexed and gemcitabine used for NSCLC. A review of studies relevant to the advanced stage NSCLC where majority of patients are positioned is foreseen to be useful to the decision makers since policy makers, regulating authorities and physicians require more information due to increased overall finance and costs, as well as treatment cost effectiveness. Furthermore, due to the entry attempt of pemetrexed active ingredient to the list of reimbursed medications for the first stage lung cancer treatment, it is assumed that a review of studies containing pemetrexed and gemcitabine will draw the attention of decision makers at the Social Security Instutition. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(1.000: 55-64

  20. Prognostic Factors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Less Than 3 Centimeters: Actuarial Analysis, Accumulative Incidence and Risk Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalver Cuesta, Juan C; Jordá Aragón, Carlos; Mancheño Franch, Nuria; Cerón Navarro, José A; de Aguiar Quevedo, Karol; Arrarás Martínez, Miguel; Vera Sempere, Francisco J; Padilla Alarcón, Jose D

    2015-09-01

    In TNM classification, factors determining the tumor (T) component in non-small cell lung cancer have scarcely changed over time and are still based solely on anatomical features. Our objective was to study the influence of these and other morphopathological factors on survival. A total of 263 patients undergoing lung resection due to stage I non-small cell lung cancer ≤3cm in diameter were studied. A survival analysis and competing-risk estimate study was made on the basis of clinical, surgical and pathological variables using actuarial analysis and accumulative incidence methods, respectively. A risk model was then generated from the results. Survival at 5 and 10 years was 79.8 and 74.3%, respectively. The best prognostic factors were presence of symptoms, smoking habit and FEV1>60%, number of resected nodes>7, squamous histology, absence of vascular invasion, absence of visceral pleural invasion and presence of invasion more proximal than the lobar bronchus. All these were statistically significant according to the actuarial method. The factor "age60%. Pleural invasion and vascular invasion determine survival or risk of death due to non-small cell lung cancer ≤3cm and can be used for generating a predictive risk model. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of Rab25 in non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu ZHOU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the expression of Rab25 protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and explore the correlation of its expression with tumor proliferation and metastasis. Methods Sixty-one cases of NSCLC specimens (31 cases of squamous cell carcinoma, 26 cases of adenocarcinoma, and 4 cases of adenosquamous carcinoma undergone surgical treatment, and 40 specimens of adjacent normal lung tissues were obtained from Jan. 2009 to Jun. 2010 at Xingqiao Hospital of Third Military Medical University. Immunochemistry method of MaxVision was used to detect the expression of Rab25 in the specimens, and then the correlation of the expression with the clinicopathological parameters (patients' sex, age, smoking history, tumor type, differentiation, volume, TNM stage, lymph metastasis, etc. was analyzed using statistical software SPSS 21.0. Results  Rab25 protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm and cell membrane. The positive rate of Rab25 in NSCLC was 93.4%, which was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (27.5%, P<0.01. The expression of Rab25 protein was significantly associated with the TNM stage and tumor size (P<0.05. Conclusions The expression of Rab25 is obviously higher in NSCLC than in the adjacent normal tissues, and the expression is associated with TNM stage and tumor size. Moreover, the later of the NSCLC stage, the larger of tumor size, and the higher of Rab25 expression will be in the NSCLC tissue. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.16

  2. Metagenes Associated with Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgard, Egon; Vooder, Tõnu; Võsa, Urmo; Välk, Kristjan; Liu, Mingming; Luo, Cheng; Hoti, Fabian; Roosipuu, Retlav; Annilo, Tarmo; Laine, Jukka; Frenz, Christopher M.; Zhang, Liqing; Metspalu, Andres

    2011-01-01

    NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) comprises about 80% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. Surgery is most effective treatment for patients with early-stage disease. However, 30%–55% of these patients develop recurrence within 5 years. Therefore, markers that can be used to accurately classify early-stage NSCLC patients into different prognostic groups may be helpful in selecting patients who should receive specific therapies. A previously published dataset was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of different NSCLC subtypes. A moderated two-sample t-test was used to identify differentially expressed genes between all tumor samples and cancer-free control tissue, between SCC samples and AC/BC samples and between stage I tumor samples and all other tumor samples. Gene expression microarray measurements were validated using qRT-PCR. Bayesian regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed to determine metagenes associated with survival. We identified 599 genes which were down-regulated and 402 genes which were up-regulated in NSCLC compared to the normal lung tissue and 112 genes which were up-regulated and 101 genes which were down-regulated in AC/BC compared to the SCC. Further, for stage Ib patients the metagenes potentially associated with survival were identified. Genes that expressed differently between normal lung tissue and cancer showed enrichment in gene ontology terms which were associated with mitosis and proliferation. Bayesian regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that gene-expression patterns and metagene profiles can be applied to predict the probability of different survival outcomes in NSCLC patients. PMID:21695068

  3. Does Lymph Node Count Influence Survival in Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Cooke, David T; Chen, Yingjia; Nijar, Kieranjeet; Canter, Robert J; Cress, Rosemary D

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic significance of the number of lymph nodes sampled (NLNS) during resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The NLNS is influenced by many factors, and some have argued that it should be a surrogate for quality. We sought to determine the influence of the NLNS on overall survival and cancer-specific survival for surgically resected NSCLC. The California Cancer Registry was queried from 2004 to 2011 for cases of stage I to III NSCLC treated with surgical resection, identifying 16,393 patients. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to determine the influence of NLNS on overall survival and cancer-specific survival. In all, 15,195 patients had information regarding nodal sampling. Eighty percent (13,167 of 15,195) were treated with lobectomy. Patients who were younger, male, non-Hispanic white, highest socioeconomic status, higher stage, or larger size tumor had more nodes removed. Sampling fewer than 10 nodes was associated with poorer overall survival when compared with sampling 10 or more nodes after adjustment for demographic and clinical factors for stage I: overall survival hazard ratio 1.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.54 to 2.05, p < 0.0001), hazard ratio 1.43 (95% confidence interval: 1.27 to 1.59, p < 0.0001), and hazard ratio 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.28, p = 0.004), for 0, 1 to 3, and 4 to 10 nodes, respectively. Of patients who underwent sublobar resection, 43.8% had no nodes sampled. For NSCLC, the NLNS influenced both overall survival and cancer-specific survival, but the influence is dependent on stage. Surgeons should perform mediastinal lymphadenectomy to maximize patient survival, but the optimal NLNS remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synchronous Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Isolated Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Timothy K; Louie, Alexander V

    2015-10-27

    A 58-year-old gentleman presenting with a progressive headache, visual disturbance, decreased appetite, and weight loss was found to have a localized clear cell carcinoma of the kidney and synchronous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer with a solitary brain metastasis. This case illustrates the challenges in distinguishing between primary and metastatic disease in a patient with both renal cell carcinoma and lung cancer. We highlight the uncertainties in the diagnosis and management of this unique clinical scenario and the potential implications on prognosis.

  5. Multigene expression profile for predicting efficacy of cisplatin and vinorelbine in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, I. K.; Christensen, I. J.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers to predict efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Presented is a combined cisplatin and vinorelbine marker from a previously validated model system [1] tested in two cohorts. Methods: The profiles consist...... and vinorelbine (ACT) and 62 patients who had no adjuvant treatment (OBS) [2] and 2) 95 stage Ib-IIIb completely resected NSCLC patients who all received adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine [3]. Endpoint is cancer specific survival. Results: The combined cisplatin and vinorelbine profiles scored as a continuous...

  6. Urokinase receptor forms in serum from non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte Elberling; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.......To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients....

  7. Radiation pneumonitis in non.small.cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation pneumonitis in non.small.cell lung cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy. B Yao, YD Wang, QZ Liu. Abstract. Objective: In this study, we investigated the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in non.small.cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing helical tomotherapy (HT) and the clinical and ...

  8. Utilization of genomic testing in advanced non-small cell lung cancer among oncologists in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Jennifer; Helm, Ashley; Crook, Travis; Braun, Ursula K; Chen, G John; Hayes, Teresa G

    2018-02-01

    Current national guidelines recommend genomic testing on all stage