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Sample records for stage iiib disease

  1. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

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    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  2. HIGH-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY IN CARCINOMA CERVIX STAGE IIIB

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    Sathya Maruthavanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced (IIB-IVA and early inoperable cases. The current standard of practice with curable intent is concurrent chemoradiation in which intracavitary brachytherapy is an integral component of radiotherapy. This study aims at assessing the efficacy of HDR ICBT (High-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy in terms local response, normal tissue reactions, and feasibility. METHODS AND MATERIALS A total of 20 patients of stage IIIB cancer of the uterine cervix were enrolled in the study and were planned to receive concurrent chemotherapy weekly along with EBRT (external beam radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 Fr. Suitability for ICBT was assessed at 40 Gy/20 Fr. 6/20 patients were suitable at 40 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 5.5 Gy to point A in 4 sessions (5.5 Gy/4 Fr. The remaining 14/20 patients completed 50 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 6 Gy to point A in 3 sessions (6 Gy/3 Fr. RESULTS A total of 66 intracavitary applications were done and only one application required dose modification due to high bladder dose, the pelvic control rate was 85% (17/20. 10% (2/20 had stable disease and 5% (1/20 had progressive disease at one year of follow up. When toxicity was considered only 15% developed grade I and grade II rectal complications. Patient compliance and acceptability was 100%. Patients were very comfortable with the short treatment time as compared with patients on LDR ICBT (low-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment interviewed during the same period. CONCLUSION This study proves that HDR brachytherapy is efficacious and feasible in carcinoma of cervix stage IIIB. It also proves that good dose distribution can be achieved with HDR intracavitary facility by the use of dose optimization. The short treatment time in HDR ICBT makes it possible to maintain this optimised dose distribution throughout the treatment providing a gain in the therapeutic ratio and

  3. Comparing treatment outcomes of stage IIIB cervical cancer patients between those with and without lower third of vaginal invasion.

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    Katanyoo, Kanyarat

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes between stage IIIB cervical cancer with and without lower third of vaginal invasion (LTI) in terms of response to treatment and overall survival (OS). Matching one patient with LTI for 2 patients without LTI who had completed treatment between 1995 and 2012 were conducted by using treatment modalities (radiation therapy [RT] alone vs. concurrent chemoradiation therapy [CCRT]) and tumor histology (squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] vs. adenocarcinoma [ADC]). Treatment outcomes including complete response (CR) rate of RT/CCRT, patterns of treatment failure and survival outcomes were analyzed. Of 216 stage IIIB cervical cancer patients, 114 of them had no LTI and 72 had LTI. Most of the patients (83.8%) had tumor histology as SCC. The CR rates between stage IIIB without LTI and with LTI were 93.8% and 81.9% (p=0.009), and corresponding with disease progression at pelvis accounted for 18.2% and 34.4% (p=0.017), respectively. Distant metastasis was comparable between 2 groups of patients, 28.9% in patients without LTI and 29.5% in patients with LTI (p=0.988). The 2-year and 5-year OS of stage IIIB without LTI were 66.5% and 46.8% compared to stage IIIB with LTI which were 43.1% and 28.9% (p=0.004), respectively. For multivariable analysis, stage IIIB with LTI was only the influential factor on OS with hazard ratio (HR) of 1.63 (p=0.012). Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients with LTI have poorer treatment outcomes including response to treatment and survival outcomes than patients in the same stage without LTI. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  4. Nivolumab and Plinabulin in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV, Recurrent, or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    2017-08-29

    ALK Gene Translocation; EGFR Activating Mutation; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; ROS1 Gene Translocation; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease, triggers a pathogenic CNS autoimmune response

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    Popovich Phillip G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, using a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB, a lysosomal storage disease with severe neurological deterioration, we showed that MPS IIIB neuropathology is accompanied by a robust neuroinflammatory response of unknown consequence. This study was to assess whether MPS IIIB lymphocytes are pathogenic. Methods Lymphocytes from MPS IIIB mice were adoptively transferred to naïve wild-type mice. The recipient animals were then evaluated for signs of disease and inflammation in the central nervous system. Results Our results show for the first time, that lymphocytes isolated from MPS IIIB mice caused a mild paralytic disease when they were injected systemically into naïve wild-type mice. This disease is characterized by mild tail and lower trunk weakness with delayed weight gain. The MPS IIIB lymphocytes also trigger neuroinflammation within the CNS of recipient mice characterized by an increase in transcripts of IL2, IL4, IL5, IL17, TNFα, IFNα and Ifi30, and intraparenchymal lymphocyte infiltration. Conclusions Our data suggest that an autoimmune response directed at CNS components contributes to MPS IIIB neuropathology independent of lysosomal storage pathology. Adoptive transfer of purified T-cells will be needed in future studies to identify specific effector T-cells in MPS IIIB neuroimmune pathogenesis.

  6. The role of radiation therapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Impact of clinical nodal stage on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Furuta, Masaya; Saito, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 46 patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without malignant effusion were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV x-rays using antero posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose; 66 Gy) with once daily standard fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 22% and 10% respectively with a median survival time (MST) of 10 months. The survival of 18 patients with stage N0-2 disease was significantly better than the 28 patients with stage N3 disease (MST 21 versus 9 months; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival based on age and sex. However, there was a borderline difference in survival rates between patients with a performance status of 0-1 and those with status of 2-3 (p=0.06). Three patients with squamous cell carcinoma were alive after 5 years and were without disease progression. No patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma were free of disease after 5 years. These results provide support for the use of definitive RT to manage those patients with limited stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma not extending to N3 stage. (author)

  7. Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

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    2018-03-02

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Margin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  8. Treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer with Californium-252 fast-neutron brachytherapy and external photon therapy.

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    Gallion, H H; Maruyama, Y; van Nagell, J R; Donaldson, E S; Rowley, K C; Yoneda, J; Beach, J L; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J

    1987-05-15

    From January 1977 to July 1984, 32 patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy and external pelvic radiation. These patients received 4500 to 5000 rad external photon therapy and two or three outpatient Californium-252 (252Cf) implants, plus sidewall boost irradiation. Treatment results were compared retrospectively to those obtained in a historical control group of patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with external radiation and conventional photon brachytherapy from 1972 to 1976. Local or regional tumor recurrence developed in 53% of patients treated with neutron therapy and an additional 9% experienced distant metastases. Thirty-eight percent of patients remain free of disease 12 to 96 months (mean, 51 months) after therapy. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates of patients treated with neutron therapy were 53% and 36%, which were not significantly different than those obtained with photon brachytherapy (2-year survival, 61%; 5-year survival, 34%). Complications of neutron therapy were minimal and included proctitis (19%) and vaginal stenosis (9%). There were no cases of enteric fistulae. Outpatient neutron brachytherapy was cost effective and was well tolerated by patients.

  9. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  10. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: natural history, treatment results, and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifel, Patricia J.; Logsdon, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To define patient, tumor, and treatment factors that influence the outcome of patients with FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix. Materials and Methods: The hospital and radiotherapy records of 1007 consecutive patients treated between 1960 and 1989 for FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT) either with curative intent (903 patients) or to palliate symptoms (104 patients). Patients who were selected for palliative treatment usually had a combination of adverse characteristics including massive tumor with bilateral pelvic wall fixation, hydronephrosis, bulky adenopathy, pathologic evidence of extrapelvic disease, and poor performance status. 64 (7%) of 903 patients failed to complete planned curative RT either because of progressive disease, complications, or poor compliance. Of 903 patients treated with curative intent, 319 (35%) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone and 586 (65%) were treated with a combination of EBRT and intracavitary irradiation (ICRT). EBRT was usually delivered using 18-25 MV photons and ICRT was administered with Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators. Treatment philosophies evolved during the study period with greater emphasis placed on EBRT between 1966 and 1979 (52% treated with EBRT alone) compared with the other study years (15% treated with EBRT alone). 206 patients received investigational treatments including neutrons (69 pts), hyperbaric oxygen (66 pts), concurrent chemotherapy (29 pts), or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (42 pts). 875 patients have been followed until death. Median follow up for surviving patients is 171 months with only 9 surviving patients followed for 10%, or hgb < 10 gm% before treatment or at any time during radiotherapy. DSS was significantly better for patients whose treatment included ICRT (43% vs 21%; P< 0.0001). Also, patients who received

  12. Hyperfractionated external radiation therapy in stage IIIB carcinoma of uterine cervix: a prospective pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Ferrigno, Robson

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Brazil has one of the highest incidence of carcinoma of the cervix in the world. Half of the patients have advanced stages at the diagnosis. Due to this large number of patients we decided to conduct a prospective pilot study to investigate the tolerance to and survival rate with hyperfractionated external radiotherapy only in patients with Stage IIIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: Between January 1991 and December 1993, 23 patients underwent hyperfractionated external beam radiotherapy without brachytherapy. All cases were biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of cervix clinically Staged as IIIB (FIGO). Hyperfractionation (HFX) was given with 1.2 Gy doses, twice daily at 6-h interval, 5 days/week, to the whole pelvis up to 72 Gy within 30 working days. Complications were evaluated by an adaptation of the RTOG Radiation Morbidity Scoring Table graded as 1 = none/mild; 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe. Results: Follow-up ranged from 27 to 50 months (median 40 months) on the 9 to 23 living patients at the time of the analysis in December 1995. There was no severe acute toxicity, but moderate acute reaction was high: 74%. The commonest site of complication was the intestine where severe late toxicity occurred in 2 of 23 (9%). Overall survival rate at 27 months was 48% and at 40 months was 43%. Discussion: There is little information in literature about HFX in carcinoma of the cervix. This is the third published study about it and the one that gave the highest total dose with external HFX of 60 x 1.2 Gy = 72 Gy. Theoretically, through the linear quadratic formula this schedule of HFX would be equivalent to 30 x 2 Gy = 60 Gy of standard fractionation, both treatments given in 30 working days. HFX schedules must be tested to establish their safety. Present results suggest being possible to further increase the total dose in the pelvis with hyperfractionated irradiation

  13. Brachytherapy for stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: survival and toxicity

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    Zuliani, Antonio Carlos; Cunha, Maercio de Oliveira, E-mail: aczo.rt@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Esteves, Sergio C.B. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Secao de Radioterapia; Teixeira, Julio Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Tocoginecologia

    2010-07-01

    Objective: to compare survival and toxicity of three different treatments for stage IIIB cervix cancer: low-dose-rate (LDR), high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and association of HDR and chemotherapy. Methods: between 1985 and 2005, 230 patients with FIGO stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix received 4-field pelvic teletherapy at doses between 40 and 50.4 Gy, with a different complementation in each group. The LDRB group, with 42 patients, received one or two insertions of LDR, with Cesium-137, in a total dose of 80 to 100Gy at point A. The HDR group, 155 patients received HDR in 4 weekly 7 Gy fractions and 9 Gy to 14.4 Gy applied to the involved parametria. The CHT group, 33 patients, were given the same treatment as the HDR group and received 5 or 6 weekly cycles of cisplatin, 40 mg per m2. Results: the five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 60% for the HDR group and 45% for the LDR group, and the two-year PFS for the CHT group was 65% (p = 0.02). The five-year Overall Survival (OS) was 65% for the HDR group and 49% for the LDR group. The two-year OS was 86% for the CHT group (p 0.02). Rectum toxicity grade II was 7% for the LDR group, 4% for the HDR group and 7% for the CHT group that had one case of rectum toxicity grade IV. Conclusion: patients that received HDR had better OS and PFS. The Chemotherapy-HDR association showed no benefit when compared to HDR only. Toxicity rates showed no difference between the three groups. (author)

  14. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle in clinical practice: implications for prognosis in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer

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    Grutsch James F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent manifestation of advanced lung cancer is malnutrition, timely identification and treatment of which can lead to improved patient outcomes. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is an easy-to-use and non-invasive technique to evaluate changes in body composition and nutritional status. We investigated the prognostic role of BIA-derived phase angle in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A case series of 165 stages IIIB and IV NSCLC patients treated at our center. The Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle, independent of stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history. Results 93 were males and 72 females. 61 had stage IIIB disease at diagnosis while 104 had stage IV. The median phase angle was 5.3 degrees (range = 2.9 – 8. Patients with phase angle 5.3 had 12.4 months (95% CI: 10.5 to 18.7; n = 84; (p = 0.02. After adjusting for age, stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history we found that every one degree increase in phase angle was associated with a relative risk of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64 to 0.97, P = 0.02. Conclusion We found BIA-derived phase angle to be an independent prognostic indicator in patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. Nutritional interventions targeted at improving phase angle could potentially lead to an improved survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  15. Primary radiotherapy of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. A comparison of continuous versus sequential regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.; Nemeskeri, C.; Petnehazi, C.; Varga, S.; Naszaly, A.; Borgulya, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: comprehensive literature on cervical cancer demonstrates, even today, the need for optimization of the timing of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in the treatment of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. Patients and methods: 210 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were treated in the Municipal Center of Oncoradiology between January 1991 and December 1996 (FIGO IIA: n = 10, FIGO IIB: n = 113, and FIGO IIIB: n = 87). Two regimens were compared: sequential radiation therapy (SRT) with 4 x 8 Gy HDR-BT to point A followed by EBRT, and continuous radiation therapy (CRT) in which 5 x 6 Gy HDR-BT to point A, one session per week, was integrated into the EBRT. A total dose of 68-70 Gy to point A and 52-54 Gy to point B was given in EBRT with SRT, five fractions per week were applied. Four fractions per week were applied in CRT, i.e., no EBRT was performed on the day of HDR-BT. Total doses to points A and B were identical in both regimens. Overall treatment time (OTT) amounted to 56 days for SRT and 35 days for CRT. Median follow-up time was 3.4 (2.5-4.2) years. Results: progression-free 5-year-survival (PFS) was 71% in the CRT and 56% in the SRT group. Nevertheless, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 1.00), and the same was found in a subgroup analysis of the different tumor stages, showing, however, an unequivocal trend. Late bladder and rectal injuries occurred in 13% and 25%, respectively. Late rectal injuries were significantly more frequent with SRT than CRT (35 patients in the SRT and 18 patients in the CRT group; p = 0.037). This was due to the higher doses per fraction of HDR-BT in the SRT group. No difference was found regarding late bladder injuries (p = 0.837). Conclusion: for the patients included in this study, no advantage has been found so far in using CRT, i.e., shortening the OTT by weekly integration of HDR-BT into EBRT. Nevertheless, an obvious trend exists. The dose of 8 Gy per

  16. Primary radiotherapy of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. A comparison of continuous versus sequential regimens

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    Mayer, A.; Nemeskeri, C.; Petnehazi, C.; Varga, S.; Naszaly, A. [Center of Oncoradiology, Uzsoki Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Borgulya, G. [National Pediatric Cancer Registry of the Hungarian Pediatric Oncology Working Group, 2nd Dept. of Pediatrics, Semmelweis Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-04-01

    Background: comprehensive literature on cervical cancer demonstrates, even today, the need for optimization of the timing of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in the treatment of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. Patients and methods: 210 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were treated in the Municipal Center of Oncoradiology between January 1991 and December 1996 (FIGO IIA: n = 10, FIGO IIB: n = 113, and FIGO IIIB: n = 87). Two regimens were compared: sequential radiation therapy (SRT) with 4 x 8 Gy HDR-BT to point A followed by EBRT, and continuous radiation therapy (CRT) in which 5 x 6 Gy HDR-BT to point A, one session per week, was integrated into the EBRT. A total dose of 68-70 Gy to point A and 52-54 Gy to point B was given in EBRT with SRT, five fractions per week were applied. Four fractions per week were applied in CRT, i.e., no EBRT was performed on the day of HDR-BT. Total doses to points A and B were identical in both regimens. Overall treatment time (OTT) amounted to 56 days for SRT and 35 days for CRT. Median follow-up time was 3.4 (2.5-4.2) years. Results: progression-free 5-year-survival (PFS) was 71% in the CRT and 56% in the SRT group. Nevertheless, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 1.00), and the same was found in a subgroup analysis of the different tumor stages, showing, however, an unequivocal trend. Late bladder and rectal injuries occurred in 13% and 25%, respectively. Late rectal injuries were significantly more frequent with SRT than CRT (35 patients in the SRT and 18 patients in the CRT group; p = 0.037). This was due to the higher doses per fraction of HDR-BT in the SRT group. No difference was found regarding late bladder injuries (p = 0.837). Conclusion: for the patients included in this study, no advantage has been found so far in using CRT, i.e., shortening the OTT by weekly integration of HDR-BT into EBRT. Nevertheless, an obvious trend exists. The dose of 8 Gy per

  17. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus.

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    Bang, Sun-Hwi; Yoon, Jeung-Won; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Shin, Ji-Eun; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2012-06-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus(HAP) has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC) from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD), and the other three showed progressive disease (PD). The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  18. Complete loss of PTEN protein expression correlates with shorter time to brain metastasis and survival in stage IIIB/C melanoma patients with BRAFV600 mutations.

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    Bucheit, Amanda D; Chen, Guo; Siroy, Alan; Tetzlaff, Michael; Broaddus, Russell; Milton, Denai; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland; Hwu, Patrick; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Lazar, Alexander J; Davies, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Loss of function of PTEN is a frequent event in melanoma, particularly in tumors with BRAF(V600) mutations. The prevalence, pathologic features, and clinical outcomes associated with PTEN loss in patients with stage IIIB/C melanoma were interrogated to improve our understanding of the clinical significance of this molecular event. Archival tissue from lymphadenectomy specimens among patients (n = 136) with stage IIIB or IIIC melanoma was assessed by DNA sequencing for activating BRAF and NRAS mutations, and by immunohistochemistry for the expression of PTEN protein. Associations of these molecular aberrations with demographics, tumor characteristics, and clinical outcomes were determined. The prevalence of BRAF(V600) mutations (40% overall), NRAS mutations (10%), and PTEN loss (25%) did not vary by pathologic substage. BRAF/NRAS mutation status did not correlate with distant disease-free survival (DDFS) or overall survival (OS). Complete loss of PTEN expression correlated with shorter OS but not DDFS. When stratified by specific sites of distant metastasis, PTEN loss was associated with significantly shorter time to melanoma brain metastasis (MBM), but not to liver, lung, or bone metastasis. Analysis of PTEN in mutationally defined subsets showed that PTEN loss was significantly associated with OS and time to MBM in patients with BRAF(V600) mutations. Loss of PTEN protein expression correlates significantly with decreased OS and time to MBM in stage IIIB/C melanoma patients with BRAF(V600) mutations. The findings add to evidence supporting a significant role for PTEN loss and the PI3K-AKT pathway in melanoma. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Prognostic value of the standardized uptake value for {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with stage IIIB melanoma

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    Bastiaannet, E.; Hoekstra, H.J. [University of Groningen, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoekstra, O.S. [VU Amsterdam, Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, J.R. de; Brouwers, A.H. [University of Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Suurmeijer, A.J.H. [University of Groningen, Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    FDG PET/CT is an excellent tool to detect melanoma metastases and also allows quantification of FDG uptake using standardized uptake value (SUV). The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the potential prognostic value of SUV for disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with stage IIIB melanoma. From November 2003 to March 2008, all consecutive patients were included in the present study. Inclusion criteria were: palpable, histology- or cytology-proven lymph node metastases of melanoma, and referred to the University Medical Centre Groningen for FDG PET and CT examination. Patients without distant metastases were evaluated. Multivariable survival analysis was performed to determine whether SUV was associated with DFS and DSS (Cox proportional hazard analysis). In 80 patients (without distant metastases, 65 %) SUV could be measured. Overall 5-year DFS was 41 % (95% CI 26-56 %) and 24 % (95% CI 12-38 %) in patients with a low and high SUVmean (p = 0.02), respectively. Overall 5-year DSS was 48 % (95% CI 31-62 %) and 30 % (95% CI 17-45 %) in patients with a low and high SUVmean (p = 0.04), respectively. In the multivariable analysis, SUVmean was associated with DFS (hazard ratio 1.7; p = 0.048), but was not associated with DSS (hazard ratio 1.6; p = 0.1). The number of positive nodes, extranodal growth and gender were also associated with survival. FDG uptake in clinically overt nodal melanoma metastases is inversely associated with DFS. Univariate analysis showed an association with DSS. However, after adjustment for potential confounders this association was no longer significant. If these findings are confirmed in larger studies, SUVmean could potentially be used (in addition to the number of positive nodes, tumour size and extranodal growth) as a factor in deciding on adjuvant systemic treatment. (orig.)

  20. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

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    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  1. Transition of historial tube flaps to free flap for 2-stage total knee arthroplasty in a patient with a history of Gustilo grade IIIB tibia fracture.

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    Spence, Sean A; Doren, Erin L; Dayicioglu, Deniz; Bernasek, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old patient who had posttraumatic bilateral knee arthritis and underwent sequential bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The left knee joint required 2-stage reconstruction: a free flap for enhanced soft-tissue coverage and then left knee TKA. Uniquely, at age 16 years this patient sustained a left tibia grade IIIB high-energy crush injury in a car crash and underwent reconstruction with multiple pedicle tube flaps and transfer of soft tissues. Most of that reconstruction was done between the ages of 16 and 19. At age 56 years, staged TKA was performed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a knee reconstructed with pedicle tube flaps for a grade IIIB tibial fracture, followed years later by free-flap coverage before TKA. This report offers insights and treatment recommendations through long-term follow-up of a unique case and a historical perspective on how reconstructive options have evolved.

  2. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for cStage IIIA/IIIB locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsushi; Suto, Hiromasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) with radio-enhancing S-1 for locally advanced gastric cancer. Patients who had a gastric cancer infiltrating into other organs (T4) or with bulky N2 were enrolled in this study. They received oral S-1 (65 mg/m 2 /day) administration and 50 Gy radiotherapy followed by radical surgery. In 12 subjects (male:female ratio, 7:5; mean age, 70.0 years), 10 (83.3%) completed NACRT and 12 (100%) underwent curative resection. Histopathological efficacy (≥Grade 1b) and down staging were observed 6 patients (75.0%) and 5 (62.5%), respectively, in 8 T4 patients. The efficacy was ≥Grade 2 in all 4 patients with bulky N2. No extra-nodal invasion was noted. In this series 1-and 3-year survival rates were 90.9% and 60.6%, respectively, during a mean observation period of 18.6 months. This procedure is applicable even to hemorrhaging patients. Outstanding antineoplastic effects are expected in locally advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  3. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy in patients with IIIb and IIIc stages of locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of efficiency of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT with Photosens as the step of combined modality treatment in patients with IIIВ and IIIС stages of breast cancer was performed. The long-term outcomes were evaluated in two groups of patients: group 1 – after radical extended mastectomy combined with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and chemo- and hormonal therapy (138 patients, group 2 – the same treatment combined with intraoperative PDT (36 patients. For the patients with PDT photosens was administered i.v. in single dose 0.3 mg/kg for 2 h before surgery. The irradiation of operative field was performed single time (the light dose 30 J/cm2, with separate irradiation of subclavian, axillar and adjacent regions (the light dose 50 J/cm2. The results showed that intraoperative PDT was associated with better recurrence-free survival rates in patients with breast cancer: in the PDT group the average recurrence free survival was 44.9±3.4 months, in the group without PDT — 35.3±2.1 months. The obtained results confirm that intraoperative PDT for locally advanced breast cancer can be used successfully for devitalization of cancer cells on the wound superface and for prevention of intraoperative tumor dissemination and post-operative recurrence. 

  4. Smoking habits of patients with newly diagnosed stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.; Bonner, J.A.; McGinnis, W.L.; Stella, P.; Marks, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to assess the smoking habits and changes in the cigarette smoking habits of patients prior to, at the time of and after the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer who had agreed to enter a phase III North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial comparing twice daily thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) given with chemotherapy to once daily TRT given with chemotherapy were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their past and present cigarette smoking habits. This questionnaire included information regarding the number of years of smoking, number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day and the time frame of smoking history. Subsequently, patients were given questionnaires to assess changes in smoking history at the halfway point of treatment, and during follow-up visits. Results: Of the 140 patients who were entered on the above noted trial, 132 filled out baseline questionnaires and were the subject of this study. Of these 132 patients, 126 (95%) had either smoked cigarettes in the past or smoked at the time of study entry. The median pack years of smoking. (years of smoking x packs per day) was 43 with a range of 3-169 pack years. Of the 126 patients with a smoking history, 124 provided information regarding the status of their smoking at the time of entry on the study: 89 (72%) claimed to have quit smoking and, 35 (28%) reported that they continued to smoke an average of one pack per day. Of the 89 patients who had quit smoking, roughly one third had quit within the month before study entry and 45% had quit during the 8 month period prior to entry on the study. Of the 35 patients who continued to smoke at the time of entry on the study, 21 indicated that they stopped smoking during the period following randomization. Hence 10% of the original 140 patients entered on study continued to smoke an average of one

  5. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  6. Brachytherapy for stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: survival and toxicity Braquiterapia para carcinoma epidermóide do colo do útero estádio IIIB: sobrevida e toxicidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Zuliani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare survival and toxicity of three different treatments for stage IIIB cervix cancer: low-dose-rate (LDR, high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy and association of HDR and chemotherapy. METHODS. Between 1985 and 2005, 230 patients with FIGO stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix received 4-field pelvic teletherapy at doses between 40 and 50.4 Gy, with a different complementation in each group. The LDRB group, with 42 patients, received one or two insertions of LDR, with Cesium-137, in a total dose of 80 to 100Gy at point A. The HDR group, 155 patients received HDR in 4 weekly 7 Gy fractions and 9 Gy to 14.4 Gy applied to the involved parametria. The CHT group, 33 patients, were given the same treatment as the HDR group and received 5 or 6 weekly cycles of cisplatin, 40 mg per m2. RESULTS: The five-year progression-free survival (PFS was 60% for the HDR group and 45% for the LDR group, and the two-year PFS for the CHT group was 65% (p = 0.02. The five-year Overall Survival (OS was 65% for the HDR group and 49% for the LDR group. The two-year OS was 86% for the CHT group (p = 0.02. Rectum toxicity grade II was 7% for the LDR group, 4% for the HDR group and 7% for the CHT group that had one case of rectum toxicity grade IV. CONCLUSION: Patients that received HDR had better OS and PFS. The Chemotherapy-HDR association showed no benefit when compared to HDR only. Toxicity rates showed no difference between the three groups.OBJETIVO: Comparar três diferentes tratamentos para câncer de colo do útero, estádio IIIB: braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (LDR, alta taxa de dose (HDR e associação entre HDR e quimioterapia, quanto à sobrevida e toxicidade. MÉTODOS: Entre 1985 e 2005, 230 pacientes com carcinoma epidermoide de colo do útero estádio IIIB receberam teleterapia pélvica em quatro campos, doses entre 40 e 50.4 Gy, e três complementações diferentes. Grupo LDR, com 42 pacientes, recebeu uma ou duas inser

  7. Uterine cervix cancer treatment in IIB, IIIA and IIIB stages with external radiotherapy versus external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose. ION SOLCA. Years 1998-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Doris; Falquez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We realized study of retrospective accomplished in course of years 1998-2000, reviewing clinical charts of statistical department of ION SOLCA. We reviewed 544 cases in 1998, 603 patients in 1999, and 630 cases in 2000. In the radiotherapy service, 133 patients received treatment with external radiotherapy between February 1998 to February 1999 in IIB, IIIA, IIIB stages and only 80 patients were treated with external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose rate in the same stages between March 1999 to March 2000. (The author)

  8. Higher percentage of CD133+ cells is associated with poor prognosis in colon carcinoma patients with stage IIIB

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    Zhang Xin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer stem cell model suggested that tumor progression is driven by the overpopulation of cancer stem cells and eradicating or inhibiting the symmetric division of cancer stem cells would become the most important therapeutic strategy. However, clinical evidence for this hypothesis is still scarce. To evaluate the overpopulation hypothesis of cancer stem cells the association of percentage of CD133+ tumor cells with clinicopathological parameters in colon cancer was investigated since CD133 is a putative cancer stem cell marker shared by multiple solid tumors. Patients and methods Tumor tissues matched with adjacent normal tissues were collected from 104 stage IIIB colon cancer patients who were subject to radical resection between January, 1999 to July, 2003 in this center. The CD133 expression was examined with immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of the percentage of CD133+ cell with clinicopathological parameters and patients' 5-year survival was analyzed. Results The CD133+ cells were infrequent and heterogeneous distribution in the cancer tissue. Staining of CD133 was localized not only on the glandular-luminal surface of cancer cells but also on the invasive budding and the poorly differentiated tumors with ductal structures. Both univariate and multivariate survival analysis revealed that the percentage of CD133+ cancer cells and the invasive depth of tumor were independently prognostic. The patients with a lower percentage of CD133+ cancer cells (less than 5% were strongly associated with a higher 5-year survival rate than those with a higher percentage of CD133+ cancer cells (greater than or equal to 55%. Additionally, no correlation was obtained between the percentage of CD133+ cancer cells and the other clinicopathological parameters including gender, age, site of primary mass, pathologic types, grades, and invasive depth. Conclusion The fact that a higher percentage CD133+ cells were strongly associated

  9. Satellite pulmonary nodule in the same lobe (T4N0) should not be staged as IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Pereira, Sara J; Miller, Daniel L; Cerfolio, Robert James

    2006-11-01

    Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer depends on stage. Patients with T4 lesions represent a heterogeneous group. A case-control study of patients with pathologically proven, node-negative T4 lesions (T4 N0 M0) was conducted. Patients with T4 disease were stratified as T4 from a satellite nodule (T4-satellite) or T4 from local invasion (T4-invasion). T4-satellite patients were matched 1:4 for sex and histology with resected control patients with stage IA, IB, and IIA non-small cell lung cancer and matched 1:3 with stage II non-small cell lung cancer. Survival and the maximal standardized uptake value on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans were compared. There were 337 patients, 26 patients with T4-satellite lesions, 25 with T4-invasion lesions, and 286 controls (104 patients with T1 N0 M0, 104 with T2 N0 M0, and 78 with T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0 lesions). The two T4 groups were similar for age, race, sex, and neoadjuvant therapy rates. The 5-year survival was 80% for the T1 N0 M0 patients, 68% for T2 N0 M0, 57% for T4-satellite N0 M0, 45% for T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0, and 30% for the T4-invasion N0 M0 patients (p = 0.016). Multivariate analysis showed that only the type of T4 impacted survival (p = 0.011). The median maximal standardized uptake values of the cancers were 4.2 for T1 N0 M0, 4.8 for T4-satellite, 5.4 for T2 N0 M0, 7.8 for T1 N1 M0 or T2 N1 M0, and 8.8 for the T4-invasion patients. Larger studies are needed; however, patients with T4-satellite non-small cell lung cancer who undergo complete resection have survival and maximal standardized uptake values similar to patients with stage IB and stage IIA lesions. Their survival is significantly better than those with T4-invasion. Patients with T4-satellite N0 M0 lesions should not be classified as stage IIIB and should not be grouped with patients with T4-invasion, and resection should be considered.

  10. Assessment of Parametrial Response by Growth Pattern in Patients With International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB and IIIB Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Patients From a Prospective, Multicenter Trial (EMBRACE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kenji [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Jastaniyah, Noha [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sturdza, Alina, E-mail: alina.sturdza@akhwien.at [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Lindegaard, Jacob [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Segedin, Barbara [Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Rai, Bhavana [Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina [University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris (France); Sasaki, Ryohei [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Pötter, Richard [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To assess disease response along the parametrial space according to tumor morphology in patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB and IIIB cervical cancer at the time of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO stage IIB and IIIB cervical cancer registered as of November 2013 in the EMBRACE study were evaluated. Tumors were stratified according to morphologic subtype on magnetic resonance imaging (expansive and infiltrative), and the characteristics of those subtypes were analyzed. Parametrial involvement at diagnosis and at brachytherapy was evaluated, and the response to chemo-radiotherapy was classified as good, moderate, or poor. The response grade was compared between the 2 groups and analyzed with regard to tumor volumes, and dosimetric parameters. Results: A total of 452 patients were evaluated, of whom 186 had expansive growth type and 266 had infiltrative morphology. Patients with infiltrative tumors had more extensive disease, as indicated by a higher rate of FIGO stage IIIB disease, as well as radiologic evidence of extension into the distal parametrial space and to the pelvic side wall on magnetic resonance imaging. Cervical necrosis was more common in the infiltrative group. Good response was more common in the expansive group (34% vs 24%; P=.02), and poor response was more common in the infiltrative group (11% and 19%; P=.02). Mean gross tumor volume at diagnosis was equal in both groups (51.7 cm{sup 3}). The high-risk clinical target volume was larger in infiltrative tumors (37.9 cm{sup 3} vs 33.3 cm{sup 3}, P=.005). The mean high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was slightly higher in expansive tumors (92.7 Gy and 89.4 Gy, P<.001). Conclusion: Infiltrative tumors are more advanced at presentation and respond less favorably to chemo-radiotherapy when compared with expansive tumors that are more or less equivalent in size. The use of image

  11. A case report of successful intraoperative photo- dynamic therapy as the step of combined modality treatment in patient with stage IIIb breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. К. Saribekyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of successful combined modality treatment in patient with stage IIIB T4bN1M0 breast cancer is reported. The first step included 2 courses of neoadjuvant polychemotherapy in CAF regimen with decrease of tumor size. The second step was irradiation (total dose of 45 Gy of breast and areas of regional metastasis. The third step was radical mastectomy by Madden with polypositional intraoperative photodynamic therapy with photosens (the output laser power 1500 mW, light dose 30 J/cm2, total time of irradiation – 25.6 min. The histological study of surgical specimen showed infiltrative ductal carcinoma with metastases in 3 nodes without fat invasion. In the post-operative period the patient had 3 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy in CAF regimen. Currently the duration of recurrence-free survival after treatment is 4 years. 

  12. Co-expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic HMGB1 is inversely associated with infiltration of CD45RO+ T cells and prognosis in patients with stage IIIB colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Rui-Qing; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Ya; Li, Chun-Yan; Yu, Xing-Juan; Zhang, Xing; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen; Zheng, Li-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The intratumoral infiltration of T cells, especially memory T cells, is associated with a favorable prognosis in early colorectal cancers. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. This study examined whether high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule, is involved in the infiltration of T cells and disease progression in locally advanced colon cancer. Seventy-two cases of pathologically-confirmed specimens were obtained from patients with stage IIIB (T3N1M0) colon cancer who underwent radical resection between January 1999 and May 2002 at the Cancer Center of Sun Yat-Sen University. The density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) within the tumor tissue and the expression of HMGB1 in the cancer cells were examined via immunohistochemical analysis. The phenotype of CD45RO+ cells was confirmed using a flow cytometric assay. The association between HMGB1 expression, the density of TILs, and the 5-year survival rate were analyzed. The density of CD45RO+ T cells within the tumor was independently prognostic, although a higher density of CD3+ T cells was also associated with a favorable prognosis. More importantly, the expression of HMGB1 was observed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm (co-expression pattern) in a subset of colon cancer tissues, whereas nuclear-only expression of HMGB1 (nuclear expression pattern) existed in most of the cancer tissues and normal mucosa. The co-expression pattern of HMGB1 in colon cancer cells was inversely associated with the infiltration of both CD3+ and CD45RO+ T cells and 5-year survival rates. This study revealed that the co-expression of HMGB1 is inversely associated with the infiltration of CD45RO+ T cells and prognosis in patients with stage IIIB colon cancer, indicating that the distribution patterns of HMGB1 might contribute to the progression of colon cancer via modulation of the local immune response

  13. Non-small cell lung cancer in stages I-IIIB. Long-term results of definitive radiotherapy with doses {>=} 80 Gy in standard fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Weise, Hannes; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Merz, Florian; Sedlmayer, Felix [Univ. Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology and radART - Inst. for research and development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Studnicka, Michael [Univ. Clinic of Pneumology, Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate therapeutic outcome of dose escalation {>=} 80 Gy in nonresected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: 124 consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Tumor stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was diagnosed in 30, eight, 39, and 47 patients, respectively. 38 patients (31%) had weight loss > 5% during the 3 months before diagnosis. A median dose of 88.2 Gy (range 80.0-96.0 Gy), 69.3 Gy (63.0-88.0 Gy) and 56.7 Gy was applied to primary lesions, involved lymph nodes, and elective nodes (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved nodes), respectively. Daily fractional ICRU doses of 2.0-2.2 Gy were delivered by the conformal target-splitting technique. 58 patients (47%) received induction chemotherapy, in median two cycles prior to radiotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time of all patients was 19 months, of patients alive 72.4 months (69-121 months). The cumulative actual overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years amounts to 39% and 11.3%, respectively, resulting in a median overall survival time of 19.6 months. According to stages I, II, IIIA, and IIIB, the median overall survival times are 31.8, 31.4, 19.0, and 14.5 months, respectively. The locoregional tumor control rate at 2 years is 49%. Apart from one treatment-related death (pneumonitis), acute toxicity according to EORTC/RTOG scores was moderate: lung grade 2 (n = 7), grade 3 (n = 3); esophagus grade 1 (n = 11); heart grade 3 (n = 1, pericarditis). No late toxicity grade > 1 has been observed. Conclusion: Sequential, conventionally fractionated high-dose radiotherapy by conformal target splitting is well tolerated. The results for survival and locoregional tumor control seem to at least equalize the outcome of simultaneous chemoradiation approaches, which, at present, are considered ''state of the art'' for patients with nonresected NSCLC. A higher potential of radiation therapy might be reached

  14. Antibody response to a synthetic peptide covering a LAV-1/HTLV-IIIB neutralization epitope and disease progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucher, C. A.; de Wolf, F.; Houweling, J. T.; Bakker, M.; Dekker, J.; Roos, M. T.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Noordaa, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    Sequential sera of homosexual men participating in a prospective study on the incidence of HIV-1 infection and risk factors for AIDS were tested for the presence of antibodies to a synthetic 17-mer (Neu21; KSIRIQRGPGRAFVTIG) representing a neutralization epitope as present on the LAV-1/HTLV-IIIB

  15. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Karen M.; Peltz, Gerson; Faries, Douglas E.; Lang, Kathleen; Nyambose, Joshua; Earle, Craig C.; Sugarman, Katherine P.; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Thompson, David; Marciniak, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N = 2,644) with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G) and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T) identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002). Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P = .018). No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction = .257). There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:22482053

  16. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Clements

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N=2,644 with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002. Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P=.018. No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction =.257. There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC.

  17. Long-term results for Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients receiving external beam radiotherapy combined with either HDR (252)Cf or HDR (60)Co intracavitary brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulinskas, K; Janulionis, E; Valuckas, K P; Samerdokiene, V; Atkocius, V; Rivard, M J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the long-term curative effects and complications of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIB (n = 430) as treated with Californium-252 ((252)Cf) or cobalt-60 ((60)Co) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Cervical cancer cases with a history of treatment with (252)Cf or (60)Co ICBT combined with EBRT were selected from the Lithuanian National Cancer Institute database. Complications and second primary malignancies were compared in both patients groups. Estimates of the 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were computed with the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards model applied using STATA software. At 5, 10, and 15 years, the overall survival rates were 46.9%, 39.3%, and 34.6% for the (252)Cf group and 35.4%, 26.9%, and 22.5% for the (60)Co group (p = 0.004), respectively. The disease-free survival rates were 42.1%, 35.0%, and 31.0% for the (252)Cf group and 32.0%, 25.1%, and 21.4% for the (60)Co group (p = 0.009), respectively. Histopathologic type of adenocarcinoma increased the risk of death for the (252)Cf group (hazard ratio 3.62). Histopathologic tumor type (hazard ratio 7.48) and recurrence (hazard ratio 2.83) were factors that statistically and significantly influenced the patient prognosis for the (60)Co group. Applying (252)Cf ICBT with EBRT was effective for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIB cervical cancer patients. Moreover, long-term followup data demonstrated higher survival rates in patients treated with (252)Cf ICBT than (60)Co ICBT. Complications in patients treated with neutron ICBT were not more frequent or severe than those treated with (60)Co ICBT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Our Experiences with Erlotinib in Second and Third Line Treatment Patients with Advanced Stage Iiib/ Iv Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available HeadHER1/EGFR is known to play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and is overexpressed in up to 80% of NSCLCs. The study of an Expanded Access Clinical Program of Erlotinib in NSCLC is a phase IV openlabel, non-randomized, multicenter trial in patients with advanced (inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC who were eligible for treatment with erlotinib but had no access to trial participation. Patients for the study from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H were selected from two Clinical centres (Sarajevo and Banja Luka. The aim of study was to evaluated efficacy and tolerability of erlotinib monotherapy in this setting. All patients who received at least one dose of erlotinib and data were entered in the database as of the CRF cut-off date of 14th May 2008 were included in analysis of data (n = 19. This population is defined as the Intent to Treat (ITT population and includes all patients who had at least one dose of erlotinib regardless of whether major protocol violations were incurred. The findings are consistent with the results of the randomized, placebo-controlled BR.21 study. Indicating that erlotinib is an effective option for patients with advanced NSCLC who are unsuitable for, or who have previously failed standard chemotherapy. In B&H group of patients DCR was almost 84%, and PFS was approximately 24,7 weeks (compared with 44% and 9,7 weeks for erlotinib reported in phase III. Almost three quarter of the patients received erlotinib as their second line of therapy. Overall, erlotinib was well tolerated; there were no patients who withdrew due to a treatment-related AE (mainly rash and there were few dose reductions. 24% of patients experienced an SAE (most commonly gastrointestinal (GI disorders.

  19. End-stage kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000500.htm End-stage kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is the last stage of long-term ( ...

  20. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Latif, Naeem [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James [University of Florida Hematology/Oncology, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  1. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Latif, Naeem; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James; Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board–approved protocol for de novo “classical” Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  2. A volumetric analysis of GTVD and CTVHR as defined by the GEC ESTRO recommendations in FIGO stage IIB and IIIB cervical cancer patients treated with IGABT in a prospective multicentric trial (EMBRACE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jastaniyah, Noha; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the gross tumor volume at diagnosis (GTVD) and high-risk clinical target volume (CTVHR) at brachytherapy (BT) and describe subgroups of patients with different patterns of response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with FIGO stage IIB and IIIB cervical cancer treated...... regression in these groups through adaptation of the treatment technique including the use of needles. However, major variations remain at present with regard to dose to GTVBT and to CTVHR, which are most pronounced in G4 and G5. This new classification will be validated in future in regard to clinical...

  3. In vivo 3-dimensional analysis of stage III Kienböck disease: pattern of carpal deformity and radioscaphoid joint congruity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Yohei; Moritomo, Hisao; Omokawa, Shohei; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    To examine 3-dimensional carpal alignment and radioscaphoid joint (RSJ) congruity among normal wrists and those with Lichtman stage III Kienböck disease or scapholunate dislocation (SLD). We conducted 3-dimensional analysis based on computed tomographic data to compare 10 wrists of stage III Kienböck disease (5 IIIa and 5 IIIb) with 5 normal wrists and 3 wrists with SLD. A markerless bone registration technique was used to investigate the 3-dimensional position of the scaphoid relative to the radius. To evaluate RSJ congruency, the inferred contact area between the scaphoid proximal pole and the distal radius was calculated from 3-dimensional bone models. The scaphoid position was not significantly different from normal wrists in stage IIIa Kienböck disease. Stage IIIb Kienböck disease was meaningfully associated with a flexed scaphoid and proximal translation of the centroid, but not dorsal translation of the scaphoid proximal pole, where RSJ congruity was preserved. With SLD, the scaphoid flexed to the same extent as that in stage IIIb Kienböck disease, and the proximal pole translated dorsally together with the capitate, producing RSJ incongruity. The patterns of carpal collapse differed between stage IIIb Kienböck disease and SLD in terms of RSJ congruity. Our study showed that stage IIIb Kienböck disease did not involve dorsal subluxation of the scaphoid proximal pole and that RSJ congruity was retained, unlike SLD. Our results suggest that carpal collapse in Kienböck disease is not associated with RSJ incongruity, which may explain why there are asymptomatic patients with Kienböck disease and carpal collapse. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fc gamma receptor IIIb polymorphism and systemic lupus erythematosus: association with disease susceptibility and identification of a novel FCGR3B*01 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V C; Grecco, M; Pereira, K M C; Terzian, C C N; Andrade, L E C; Silva, N P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between Fc gamma receptor IIIb polymorphism and susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus and clinical traits of the disease. Genomic DNA was obtained from 303 consecutive systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 300 healthy blood donors from the southeastern region of Brazil. The polymorphic region of the FCGR3B gene was sequenced and the alleles FCGR3B*01, FCGR3B*02 and FCGR3B*03 were analyzed. The FCGR3B*01 allele was more frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (43.1%) while the FCGR3B*02 allele prevailed among controls (63.7%) (P = 0.001). The FCGR3B*03 allele was found equally in both groups. The FCGR3B*01/*01 (20.7%) and FCGR3B*01/*02 (41.1%) genotypes were more frequent among systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.028 and P = 0.012, respectively) while the FCGR3B*02/*02 genotype was more frequent in controls (45.5%) (P lupus erythematosus was associated with the FCGR3B*01 allele, as well as with the FCGR3B*01/*01 and FCGR3B*01/*02 genotypes. No association was found between FCGR3B genotypes and clinical manifestations, disease severity or the presence of autoantibodies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Natural history of SMA IIIb: muscle strength decreases in a predictable sequence and magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymeer, Feza; Serdaroglu, Piraye; Parman, Yesim; Poda, Mehves

    2008-08-26

    To assess the natural progression of muscle weakness in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) IIIb. Ten patients with SMA IIIb were followed for at least 10 years. Age at disease onset varied between 9 and 18 years. Patients were initially seen 2 to 10 years after disease onset. They were evaluated at approximately 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years of disease duration depending on the timing of their initial visit after onset. Medical Research Council (MRC) scale was used with particular attention to proximal muscles. The MRC grade declined with years in all of the muscles. The decline was usually not more than by one MRC grade for each 5-year period. There were 5-10 year periods when some muscles appeared to remain stationary. The succession of weakness was first triceps, then biceps and deltoid for upper extremity muscles and first thigh adductors, then iliopsoas, then quadriceps femoris, then hamstrings, thigh abductors, and gluteus maximus for lower extremity muscles. There was a remarkable uniformity between patients in the MRC grade for each muscle at each stage: in the first 5 years of the disease, triceps, iliopsoas, thigh adductors, and quadriceps femoris were the muscles which had noticeable weakness. These findings show that strength in spinal muscular atrophy IIIb decreases over time, explaining the progressive functional loss. The sequence of weakness in the lower extremities suggests that the disease starts segmentally involving the upper lumbar segments of the medulla spinalis initially. The slowness of the deterioration may have implications for clinical trials.

  7. Cutaneous head and neck melanoma in OPTiM, a randomized phase 3 trial of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of unresected stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andtbacka, Robert H I; Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Ollila, David W; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Milhem, Mohammed; Amatruda, Thomas; Nemunaitis, John J; Harrington, Kevin J; Chen, Lisa; Shilkrut, Mark; Ross, Merrick; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous head and neck melanoma has poor outcomes and limited treatment options. In OPTiM, a phase 3 study in patients with unresectable stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma, intralesional administration of the oncolytic virus talimogene laherparepvec improved durable response rate (DRR; continuous response ≥6 months) compared with subcutaneous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Retrospective review of OPTiM identified patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma given talimogene laherparepvec (n = 61) or GM-CSF (n = 26). Outcomes were compared between talimogene laherparepvec and GM-CSF treated patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. DRR was higher for talimogene laherparepvec-treated patients than for GM-CSF treated patients (36.1% vs 3.8%; p = .001). A total of 29.5% of patients had a complete response with talimogene laherparepvec versus 0% with GM-CSF. Among talimogene laherparepvec-treated patients with a response, the probability of still being in response after 12 months was 73%. Median overall survival (OS) was 25.2 months for GM-CSF and had not been reached with talimogene laherparepvec. Treatment with talimogene laherparepvec was associated with improved response and survival compared with GM-CSF in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1752-1758, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Results From the Phase III Randomized Trial of Onartuzumab Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib in Previously Treated Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: METLung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Edelman, Martin J; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Paz-Ares, Luis; Mocci, Simonetta; Phan, See; Shames, David S; Smith, Dustin; Yu, Wei; Paton, Virginia E; Mok, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The phase III OAM4971g study (METLung) examined the efficacy and safety of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer selected by MET immunohistochemistry whose disease had progressed after treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive onartuzumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg or intravenous placebo plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) in the intent-to-treat population. Secondary end points included median progression-free survival, overall response rate, biomarker analysis, and safety. Results A total of 499 patients were enrolled (onartuzumab, n = 250; placebo, n = 249). Median OS was 6.8 versus 9.1 months for onartuzumab versus placebo (stratified hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.65; P = .067), with a greater number of deaths in the onartuzumab arm (130 [52%] v 114 [46%]). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 versus 2.6 months (stratified HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.20; P = .92), and overall response rate was 8.4% and 9.6% for onartuzumab versus placebo, respectively. Exploratory analyses using MET fluorescence in situ hybridization status and gene expression showed no benefit for onartuzumab; patients with EGFR mutations showed a trend toward shorter OS with onartuzumab treatment (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 0.97 to 22.63). Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were reported by 56.0% and 51.2% of patients, with serious AEs in 33.9% and 30.7%, for experimental versus control arms, respectively. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib did not improve clinical outcomes, with shorter OS in the onartuzumab arm, compared with erlotinib in patients with MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

  9. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy for stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix in Japan. A multi-institutional study of Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 2006-2007 (Study of JASTRO 2006-2007)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Kenjo, Masahiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The current study was a retrospective questionnaire survey of stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy in Japan aimed to investigate the optimal dose on the basis of the biological effective dose and prognostic factors. Between 1990 and 2000, 61 patients with stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix underwent high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy in 19 major hospitals in Japan. This retrospective questionnaire survey was performed by mail including survey charts to be fulfilled by radiation oncologists in these 19 major hospital. Fifty had only adenocarcinoma components and 11 had adenosquamous cell carcinoma components. All patients were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy. Total biological effective dose (T-BED 10 ) was calculated from the sum of the biological effective doses of the external beam radiation therapy and the intracavitary brachytherapy. Thirty-two patients underwent chemotherapy. The 5-year overall survival rate of all patients was 20.2%. Stratified by total biological effective dose, the 5-year overall survival rate was 0% for T-BED 10 10 between 75 and 100 Gy and 0% for T-BED 10 >110 Gy (P=0.15). Stratified by histopathology, the 5-year overall survival rate was 22.1% for adenocarcinoma and 13.6% for adenosquamous cell carcinoma (P=0.43). Stratified by chemotherapy, the 5-year overall survival rate was 20.3% in patients who received chemotherapy and 20.4% in patients who did not receive chemotherapy (P=0.96). The 5-year overall survival rate of stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix in this retrospective questionnaire survey was 20.2%. The optimal T-BED 10 and evident prognostic factors were not clear from this questionnaire survey. (author)

  10. Stages of Huntington's Disease (HD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... END TO HD? WHERE TO FIND HELP PUBLICATIONS Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal genetic disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve ... personal and there is no "right" answer. The Huntington's Disease Society of ... who are considering genetic testing do so at a genetic testing center ...

  11. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  12. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Improving Well-Being in Patients With Stage III-IV Cancer and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Partner; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  13. [Treatment of early stage Hodgkin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1993-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment is still an unresolved issue. Twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out world-wide. The preliminary results of a global meta-analysis of these trials...... a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against early chemotherapy is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may be kept at a minimum. Recently, trials have been carried out...

  14. Surgical treatment of advanced stage Freiberg disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Özkul

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Freiberg disesase is an avascular necrosis of the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal head and which kind of surgical option to be used is controversial in symptomatic patients. In this study the results of the advanced stage Freiberg’s disease patients, who were treated with surgery were evaluated. Methods: 12 patients (8 female, 4 male whose pain could not be solved with conservative method and underwent surgery (6 debridement, 3 osteotomy, 3 excision of the metatarsal head were included in this study. Themean age of the patients 19.1 (range 13- 31 and the mean follow-up 30.8(range 25-94 months. According to the Smillie classification 3 patients had type 5, 8 patients had type 4 and 1 patient had type 3 osteonecrosis. The results of the patients were evaluated according to Lesser Metatarsophalangeal-Interphalangeal Scale. Results: According to Lesser MetatarsophalangealInterphalangeal Scale 3 patients (%25 had excellent, 6 patients (%50 had good and 3 patients had poor results were obtained. 2 of 3 patients with poor results were type 5, and 1 patient was type 4 and all three patients underwent joint debridement. Conclusion:The method of surgical treatment of Freiberg disease determined according to the stage of the disease. Debridement alone in the treatment of patients with late stage is not enough, it should be combined with other methods.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  16. Initial Staging of Hodgkin’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin’s disease (HD). Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard. No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor). Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients. PMID:25121354

  17. Real-time pcr (qpcr) assay for rhizoctonia solani anastomoses group ag2-2 iiib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.J.; Ahmad, B.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group AG2-2 IIIB is a severe sugar beet and maize pathogen. It causes crown and root rot disease which leads to yield losses world-wide. The soil-borne pathogen is difficult to detect and quantify by conventional methods. We developed a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the quantification of genomic DNA of Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2 IIIB based on the ITS region of rDNA genes. The limit of quantification of the assay is 1.8 pg genomic DNA. The amplification efficiency was 96.4. The assay will be helpful in the diagnoses of Rhizoctonia solani infection of sugar beet and maize roots and in the quantification of R. solani AG2-2 IIIB inoculum in plant debris and soil. (author)

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the facility...

  19. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounissi, M; Gargueh, T; Mahfoudhi, M; Boubaker, K; Hedri, H; Goucha, R; Abderrahim, E; Ben Hamida, F; Ben Abdallah, T; El Younsi, F; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men) had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied. Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite) accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%), primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI), medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate. Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of ESRD. These findings highlight the crucial importance of accurate stone analysis and metabolic evaluation to provide early diagnosis and efficient treatment for conditions leading to ESRD. PMID:21694924

  20. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Ounissi¹, T Gargueh², M Mahfoudhi¹, K Boubaker¹, H Hedri¹, R Goucha¹, E Abderrahim¹, F Ben Hamida¹, T Ben Abdallah¹, F El Younsi¹, H Ben Maiz³, A Kheder¹1Internal Medicine Department, 2Pediatric Department, 3Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, TunisiaIntroduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD.Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied.Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI, medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate.Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of

  1. FIGO IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: an analysis of prognostic factors emphasizing the balance between external beam and intracavitary radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdon, Mark D.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To define patient, tumor, and treatment factors that influence the outcome of patients with FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: The records of 1,096 patients treated with radiation therapy between 1960 and 1993 for FIGO Stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix were reviewed retrospectively. Of these, 983 (90%) were treated with curative intent and 113 were treated only to achieve palliation of symptoms. Of 907 patients who completed the intended curative treatment, 641 (71%) were treated with a combination of external beam irradiation (EBRT) and intracavitary irradiation (ICRT) and 266 (29%) were treated with EBRT only. The median duration of treatment for these 907 patients was 51 days. Between 1966 and 1980, only 52% of patients who completed treatment with curative intent received ICRT, compared with 92% of patients treated during 1981-1993, an increase that reflects an evolution in the philosophy of treatment for advanced tumors. In general, the intensity of ICRT correlated inversely with the dose of EBRT to the central pelvis. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 134 months. Results: For 983 patients treated with initial curative intent, disease-specific survival (DSS) was significantly worse for those who were 52 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis had DSS rates of 27-34%, compared with 53% for patients treated with lower doses of EBRT to the central pelvis and more intensive ICRT (p 52 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis (57-68%), compared with those who had 48-52 Gy (28%) and those who had ≤ 47 Gy of EBRT to the central pelvis (15%) (p < 0.0001). Outcome was also compared for four time periods during which different treatment policies were in place for patients with Stage IIIB disease. The highest DSS (51%) and lowest actuarial complication rate (17%) were achieved during the most recent period (1981-1993) when modest doses of EBRT were combined with relatively

  2. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often continue to progress spontaneously towards end stage renal disease (ESRD). In this report we studied the natural history of progression of CKD in a cohort of patients with stage 4 and 5 CKD. Methods: We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients in stage 4 ...

  3. Biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine as second-line chemotherapy for patients with stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer: a phase II study of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP 013-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Sergio; Huidobro, Gerardo; Amenedo, Margarita; Fírvida, José Luis; León, Luis; Lázaro, Martín; Grande, Carlos; Mel, José Ramón; Ramos, Manuel; Salgado, Mercedes; Casal, Joaquín

    2007-11-01

    The current report aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of a biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine to patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, who had previously been treated for this disease. In a prospective, multicenter, open-label, phase II trial, patients received 40 mg/m of docetaxel and 20 mg/m of vinorelbine on days 1 and 15, every 28 days. Treatment continued for up to a maximum of six cycles, unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred, or consent was withdrawn. Fifty patients were enrolled in the study and they received 174 cycles of chemotherapy, with a median of three cycles per patient. All patients were evaluated for efficacy and toxicity in an intention-to-treat analysis. The overall response rate was 10% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1-19], including one complete response (2%) and four partial responses (8%). Previous chemotherapy of 80% of the responders included paclitaxel. Median time to disease progression was 2.7 months (95% CI: 2.2-4.3) and median overall survival was 6.5 months (95% CI: 2.5-9.2). The survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 18% (95% CI: 7-29) and 4% (95% CI: 0-10), respectively. The most frequent severe toxicities were neutropenia (20% of patients) and leukopenia (8% of patients). Other toxicities appeared in 4% or fewer of the patients. Biweekly administration of docetaxel and vinorelbine is feasible as a second-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer patients, but its level of activity and toxicity does not suggest any advantage compared with the results obtained with single-agent docetaxel in the same setting.

  4. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  5. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  6. Radius Core Decompression for Kienböck Disease Stage IIIA: Outcomes at 13 Years Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Pablo; Zaidenberg, Ezequiel Ernesto; Alfie, Veronica; Donndorff, Agustin; Boretto, Jorge Guillermo; Gallucci, Gerardo Luis

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to analyze the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of a series of patients with Kienböck disease stage IIIA treated with radius core decompression. This retrospective study included 15 patients with Kienböck disease (Lichtman stage IIIA) who underwent distal radius metaphyseal core decompression between 1998 and 2005 and who were followed-up for at least 10 years. At the last follow-up, the patients were evaluated for wrist range of motion and grip strength. The overall results were evaluated by the modified Mayo wrist score and visual analog scale pain score. We also compared the radiological changes between the preoperative and the final follow-up in their Lichtman classification and the modified carpal height ratio. The mean follow-up period was 13 years (range, 10-18 years). Based on the modified Mayo wrist score, clinical results were excellent in 6 patients, good in 8 patients, and poor in 1 patient who required a proximal row carpectomy as revision surgery. The mean preoperative pain according to the visual analog scale was 7 (range, 6-10) and was 1.2 (range, 0-6) at the final follow-up. Compared with the opposite side, the average flexion/extension arc was 77% and the grip strength was 80%. All patients, except 1, returned to their original employment. At the final follow-up, 3 patients had decreased modified carpal height ratio, 12 remained unchanged. Radiographic disease progression according to the Lichtman classification to stages IIIB to IV occurred in only 2 wrists. There were no complications related to the core decompression. In this limited series, the radius core decompression demonstrated favorable long-term results and could be considered as a surgical alternative for stage IIIA of Kienböck disease. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravital Microscopy for Identifying Tumor Vessels in Patients With Stage IA-IV Melanoma That is Being Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  8. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. MELT-IIIB: an updated version of the melt code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabb, K.K.; Lewis, C.H.; O'Dell, L.D.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1979-04-01

    The MELT series is a reactor modeling code designed to investigate a wide variety of hypothetical accident conditions, particularly the transient overpower sequence. MELT-IIIB is the latest in the series

  10. Stages of Crohn's disease examined by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, H.; Braun, H.

    1986-01-01

    Since X-ray examination of patients with Crohn's disease are not only used for initial diagnostic purposes, but also to follow the course of the disease, exact criteria for interpreting X-ray findings are required. In the past, X-ray criteria have been arbitravily chosen by various investigation resulting in large differences in diagnostic interpretation. In order to develop standardized criteria for diagnostic interpretation, patients with Crohn's disease were classified in 8 stages of disease. The bases for this staging were the frequency of recurrent disease and the intestinal anatomy causing the X-ray findings. (orig.) [de

  11. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Márcio Rodrigues; Ponciano, Viviane Campos; Costa, Théo Rodrigues; Gomes, Caio Pereira; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2018-01-01

    The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in con-servative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages) worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  12. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Rodrigues Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Conclusions The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression.

  13. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    blood values, together with exploratory laparotomy and treatment were examined in multivariate analyses. With regard to disease-free survival, the only factors of independent prognostic significance were sex and lymphocytopenia. With regard to overall survival the factors of independent significance...

  14. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative promotes ongoing CMS strategies to improve the quality of care provided to ESRD patients. This initiative...

  15. Hepatitis C: What Happens in End-Stage Liver Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Michael F. Picco, M.D. End-stage hepatitis C means the liver has been severely damaged by the hepatitis C ... C virus returns. If you're diagnosed with hepatitis C or end-stage liver disease, see a doctor who specializes in gastrointestinal ...

  16. Autologous graft-versus-host disease induction in advanced breast cancer: role of peripheral bloodprogenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, E. van der; Horn, T.; Bright, E.; Passos-Coehlo, J-L.; Bond, S.; Clarke, B.; Altomonte, V.; McIntyre, K.; Vogelsang, G.; Noga, S.J.; Davis, J.M.; Thomassen, J.; Ohly, K.V.; Lee, S.M.; Fetting, J.; Armstrong, D.K.; Davidson, N.E.; Hess, A.D.; Kennedy, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of the use of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) on the induction of autologous graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients with advanced breast cancer. 14 women with stage IIIB and 36 women with stage IV breast cancer received

  17. Macrophage enzyme and reduced inflammation drive brain correction of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB by stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rebecca J; Ellison, Stuart M; Fil, Daniel; O'Leary, Claire; McDermott, John; Senthivel, Nishanthi; Langford-Smith, Alexander W W; Wilkinson, Fiona L; D'Souza, Zelpha; Parker, Helen; Liao, Aiyin; Rowlston, Samuel; Gleitz, Hélène F E; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Dickson, Patricia I; Bigger, Brian W

    2018-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB is a paediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate. Absence of NAGLU leads to accumulation of partially degraded heparan sulphate within lysosomes and the extracellular matrix, giving rise to severe CNS degeneration with progressive cognitive impairment and behavioural problems. There are no therapies. Haematopoietic stem cell transplant shows great efficacy in the related disease mucopolysaccharidosis I, where donor-derived monocytes can transmigrate into the brain following bone marrow engraftment, secrete the missing enzyme and cross-correct neighbouring cells. However, little neurological correction is achieved in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB. We have therefore developed an ex vivo haematopoietic stem cell gene therapy approach in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, using a high-titre lentiviral vector and the myeloid-specific CD11b promoter, driving the expression of NAGLU (LV.NAGLU). To understand the mechanism of correction we also compared this with a poorly secreted version of NAGLU containing a C-terminal fusion to IGFII (LV.NAGLU-IGFII). Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB haematopoietic stem cells were transduced with vector, transplanted into myeloablated mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB mice and compared at 8 months of age with mice receiving a wild-type transplant. As the disease is characterized by increased inflammation, we also tested the anti-inflammatory steroidal agent prednisolone alone, or in combination with LV.NAGLU, to understand the importance of inflammation on behaviour. NAGLU enzyme was substantially increased in the brain of LV.NAGLU and LV.NAGLU-IGFII-treated mice, with little expression in wild-type bone marrow transplanted mice. LV.NAGLU treatment led to behavioural correction, normalization of heparan sulphate and sulphation patterning, reduced inflammatory cytokine

  18. Comprehension of Complex Discourse in Different Stages of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Fors, Angelika; Stroberg, Sofia; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease not only affects motor speech control, but also may have an impact on the ability to produce and understand language in communication. Aims: The ability to comprehend basic and complex discourse was investigated in three different stages of Huntington's disease. Methods & Procedures: In this experimental group…

  19. Providing quality palliative care in end-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Paul A; Ford, James L; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Providing quality palliative care is a daunting task profoundly impacted by diminished patient capacity at the end of life. Alzheimer disease (AD) is a disorder that erases our memories and is projected to increase dramatically for decades to come. By the time the patients with AD reach the end stage of the disease, the ability of patients to provide pertinent subjective complaints of pain and discomfort would have vanished. Historical perspectives of palliative care, exploration of the AD process, ethical issues, and crucial clinical considerations are provided to improve the understanding of disease progression and quality of care for patients with end-stage AD.

  20. Radiation therapy in clinical stage I and II Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.; Bergsagel, D.E.; Chua, T.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the Princess Margaret Hospital (Toronto, Canada) experience over the last 20 years in treating clinically staged patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's disease was performed to analyse the impact of patient selection and extended field radiation on relapse and survival. Of the 878 patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's disease, 521 with clinical stages I and II received radiation alone as the initial treatment. The actuarial survival for all stage I and II patients was 85.1% at 5 years and 76.2% at 10 years, and for clinically stages patients treated with radiation alone, 87.2 and 77.6%, respectively. The relapse-free rate (RFR) for all clinical stage I and II patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone was 70.1% at 5 years and 65.8% at 10 years. Significant prognostic factors for RFR and survival included age, stage and histology. In addition, the extent of radiation was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival as well as for relapse. (Author)

  1. Radiation therapy alone in the treatment of cervix cancer stages IIB and IIB. Results from Hospital Mario Gatti, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Campinas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Oliveira Faria, Sergio Luis Campos de

    1995-01-01

    From September 1989 to December 1992, 178 patients with cervix cancer were treated with radiation therapy alone, being 81 stage IIIB patients were randomized according to the number of intracavitary brachytherapy insertion realized after external irradiation. Of these, 34 were treated with two intracavitary insertion (group A) and 47 with one insertion (group B). Among stage IIIB patients, 54 were treated with one intracavitary insertion after external irradiation (group C) and 47 with external irradiation alone as they had no geometrical condition for intracavitary insertion (group D). There were no statistical difference in 50 months disease free survival among patients stage IIB treated with one or two intracavitary insertion, 72,3% and 70.6% respectively (P=0,711). The 50 months disease free survival were better in patients stage IIIB treated with external irradiation followed by one intracavitary insertion, compared with those treated with external irradiation alone, 51,8% and 30,2% respectively (P=0,007). This series suggests that there is no difference in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer with one or two intracavitary insertion. Among stage IIIB patients, the worse result of those treated with external irradiation alone was probably due to the unfavorable prognostic factors, as they were excluded for brachytherapy because they showed no geometrical condition for intracavitary insertion and larger tumor volume. (author)

  2. [Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Symptoms, basic diagnosis and staged therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, H F; Kettmann, R; Grothe, A

    2002-06-13

    Intermittent claudication or rest pain are typical symptoms of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) affecting the lower limbs. The pain is localized one level below that of the occlusion. Initial investigations should determine skin temperature and color, pulse status, stenotic sounds and Doppler occlusive pressures. If intermittent claudication is present, angiography of the pelvis and legs then follows. Treatment is stage-dependent: while in stages I and IIa conservative treatment such as cessation of smoking, administration of acetylsalicylic acid and walking training suffices, stages IIb and higher require invasive measures extending from PTA to amputation of gangrenous parts of the limb.

  3. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Tumour Calcification and Calciphylaxis in End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although soft tissue and vascular calcifications are common in CKD and progress as an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality, tumour calcification and calciphylaxis are uncommon in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Here, we discuss a rare case of a patient with tumour calcification complicated with calciphylaxis developed septic shock from infection. Our patient is a 57-year-old man in his late stage of renal disease who presented with a huge mass at the right hip and necrotic cutaneous ulcers on the lower legs followed by local and systemic infection and death due to septic shock.

  5. Applying artificial intelligence to disease staging: Deep learning for improved staging of diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Takahashi

    Full Text Available Disease staging involves the assessment of disease severity or progression and is used for treatment selection. In diabetic retinopathy, disease staging using a wide area is more desirable than that using a limited area. We investigated if deep learning artificial intelligence (AI could be used to grade diabetic retinopathy and determine treatment and prognosis.The retrospective study analyzed 9,939 posterior pole photographs of 2,740 patients with diabetes. Nonmydriatic 45° field color fundus photographs were taken of four fields in each eye annually at Jichi Medical University between May 2011 and June 2015. A modified fully randomly initialized GoogLeNet deep learning neural network was trained on 95% of the photographs using manual modified Davis grading of three additional adjacent photographs. We graded 4,709 of the 9,939 posterior pole fundus photographs using real prognoses. In addition, 95% of the photographs were learned by the modified GoogLeNet. Main outcome measures were prevalence and bias-adjusted Fleiss' kappa (PABAK of AI staging of the remaining 5% of the photographs.The PABAK to modified Davis grading was 0.64 (accuracy, 81%; correct answer in 402 of 496 photographs. The PABAK to real prognosis grading was 0.37 (accuracy, 96%.We propose a novel AI disease-staging system for grading diabetic retinopathy that involves a retinal area not typically visualized on fundoscopy and another AI that directly suggests treatments and determines prognoses.

  6. TREATMENT OF THE CHRONIC WAR TIBIAL OSTEOMYELITIS, GUSTILIO TYPE IIIB AND CIERNY MADER IIIB, USING VARIOUS METHODS. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrag Grubor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: War osteomyelitis is an inflammation of all the bone elements at the place of bone fracture resulting from a war wound. Method of work: During the Bosnian (1992-1995), 2,195 wounded people underwent primary surgical treatment for their wounded extremities. Tibia wounds were dominant in 695 (31.66%) of the cases, and 59 (8.48%) of which developed chronic osteomyelitis. The Gustilo’s Classification score was IIIB and the Cierny-Mader’s Classification score was IIIB. The average...

  7. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. Endodontic management of dens invaginatus Type IIIb: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Jorge N R; da Costa, Rui Pereira; Anderson, Craig; Quaresma, Sérgio André; Corte-Real, Luís S M; Monroe, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus may be seen as a developmental malformation. It is characterized by an invagination of the enamel and dentin, creating a lumen inside the affected tooth, which may extend as deep as the apical foramen. Oehlers Type IIIb is considered the most challenging clinical conditions. The purpose of this study is to discuss the nonsurgical endodontic management of vital and necrotic dens invaginatus Type IIIb cases. Due to the complex anatomical consideration of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, endodontic treatment is extremely technique sensitive. A conservative approach was used in a vital case to treat the invaginated lumen only, to preserve the vitality of the pulp, and a more invasive approach was used in a necrotic case to debride the lumen and necrotic pulp for proper disinfection of the root canal system. Although different, all the approaches were successful. The clinical signs and symptoms were resolved. The vital case remains vital after 19 months, and the recall radiographs were able to show satisfactory periapical healing both in vital and necrotic cases. Due to the highly complex anatomy of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, the decision of preserving the pulp vitality may not be related only to pulpal diagnosis but also to the technical requirements of the treatment. Although very technically sensitive, it may be possible to treat the invaginated lumen exclusively, while preserving the vitality of the pulp. Necrotic cases may require a more aggressive approach to achieve a favorable prognosis.

  9. The neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shapiro

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: On most behavioral measures, MPS IIIB patients did not differ substantially from MPS IIIA patients over age six, demonstrating autistic features and a Klüver Bucy-like syndrome including lack of fear and poor attention. Delay in onset of behavioral symptoms was associated with later diagnosis in two patients. Lack of fear, poor attention, and autistic-like symptomatology are as characteristic of MPS IIIB as they are of MPS IIIA. A possible difference is that the some behavioral abnormalities develop more quickly in MPS IIIB. If this is so, these patients may become at risk for harm and present a challenge for parenting even earlier than do those with MPS IIIA. In future clinical trials of new treatments, especially with respect to quality of life and patient management, improvement of these behaviors will be an essential goal. Because very young patients were not studied, prospective natural history documentation of the early development of abnormal behaviors in MPS IIIB is needed.

  10. Delivery of an enzyme-IGFII fusion protein to the mouse brain is therapeutic for mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Shih-Hsin; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Le, Steven Q; Vincelette, Jon; Ohmi, Kazuhiro; Bullens, Sherry; Wendt, Daniel J; Christianson, Terri M; Tiger, Pascale M N; Brown, Jillian R; Lawrence, Roger; Yip, Bryan K; Holtzinger, John; Bagri, Anil; Crippen-Harmon, Danielle; Vondrak, Kristen N; Chen, Zhi; Hague, Chuck M; Woloszynek, Josh C; Cheung, Diana S; Webster, Katherine A; Adintori, Evan G; Lo, Melanie J; Wong, Wesley; Fitzpatrick, Paul A; LeBowitz, Jonathan H; Crawford, Brett E; Bunting, Stuart; Dickson, Patricia I; Neufeld, Elizabeth F

    2014-10-14

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB, Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by profound intellectual disability, dementia, and a lifespan of about two decades. The cause is mutation in the gene encoding α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU), deficiency of NAGLU, and accumulation of heparan sulfate. Impediments to enzyme replacement therapy are the absence of mannose 6-phosphate on recombinant human NAGLU and the blood-brain barrier. To overcome the first impediment, a fusion protein of recombinant NAGLU and a fragment of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) was prepared for endocytosis by the mannose 6-phosphate/IGFII receptor. To bypass the blood-brain barrier, the fusion protein ("enzyme") in artificial cerebrospinal fluid ("vehicle") was administered intracerebroventricularly to the brain of adult MPS IIIB mice, four times over 2 wk. The brains were analyzed 1-28 d later and compared with brains of MPS IIIB mice that received vehicle alone or control (heterozygous) mice that received vehicle. There was marked uptake of the administered enzyme in many parts of the brain, where it persisted with a half-life of approximately 10 d. Heparan sulfate, and especially disease-specific heparan sulfate, was reduced to control level. A number of secondary accumulations in neurons [β-hexosaminidase, LAMP1(lysosome-associated membrane protein 1), SCMAS (subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase), glypican 5, β-amyloid, P-tau] were reduced almost to control level. CD68, a microglial protein, was reduced halfway. A large amount of enzyme also appeared in liver cells, where it reduced heparan sulfate and β-hexosaminidase accumulation to control levels. These results suggest the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IIIB.

  11. End Stage Renal Disease: Racial Differences | Chijioke | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The prevalence and aetiological of end stage renal disease (ESRD) differ from race to race and from location to location even among people of the same race. There is paucity of data on the comparison of ESDR in whites and blacks living in their native environment. The study was undertaken to retrospectively ...

  12. Correlation of clinical data, anatomical site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the colorectal cancer clinical data with respect to the anatomical location and stage of disease. Design: Retrospective observational study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and fifty three tumours were categorised as right colonic (RCC), left colonic ...

  13. Cost Evaluation of Haemodialysis for End Stage Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maintenance haemodialysis is a life sustaining mode of treatment of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients. However, the widespread and sustained application of this mode of treatment has been largely unsuccessful because of costs. Objectives: To assess the costs and use of haemodialysis in a ...

  14. Cortical hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in Parkinson's disease is extensive: probably even at early disease stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, Mallar; Jonsdottir, Kristjana Yr

    2010-01-01

    independent samples of PD patients. We compared SPECT CBF images of 32 early-stage and 33 late-stage PD patients with that of 60 matched controls. We also compared PET FDG images from 23 late-stage PD patients with that of 13 controls. Three different normalization methods were compared: (1) GM normalization...... likely has widespread cortical hypometabolism, even at early disease stages. In contrast, extensive subcortical hypermetabolism is probably not a feature of PD....

  15. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Nutritional management of stage 5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasticci, Franca; Fantuzzi, Anna Laura; Pegoraro, Marisa; McCann, Margaret; Bedogni, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Nutrition is a critical issue in the management of patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Malnutrition is common among these patients and affects their survival and quality of life. A basic knowledge of the nutritional management of stage 5 CKD is essential for all members of the nephrology team to improve patient care. This paper demonstrates that the needs of haemodialysis patients are more complex than those receiving peritoneal dialysis. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  19. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  20. Nutritional status according to the stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Larissa Vieira; Ramos, Liliana Figueiredo Andrade de Oliveira; Chiarello, Paula Garcia

    2015-08-01

    To assess the nutritional status of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with no other associated dementia, according to disease stage. Cross-sectional observational study. Neurobehavioral Diseases Outpatient Clinic, Clinical Hospital, Ribeirao Preto Medical School (University of São Paulo). The sample consisted of 36 individuals of both genders with AD diagnosis, and no other associated type of dementia, in various stages of the disease, according to the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR 0.5-3). Nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and anthropometric measurements such as weight, body mass index (BMI) and arm, waist, abdomen and hip circumferences. In addition, body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). The mean age of the group was 74.2 ± 10.1 years, 72.2 % of them were women. The MNA showed that most of these individuals were at risk for malnutrition (55.5 %) and many of them (43.7 %) were underweight according to BMI. Data from BIA analysis revealed that 41.7 % of these individuals had a quantity of body fat classified as malnutrition and 11.1 % had a phase angle (PA) below recommended values for age group. There was a negative and significant correlation of lean mass and PA with age, and of global MNA evaluation with CDR, as well as a positive correlation of MNA total score with fat mass and BMI. Worse classifications of nutritional status obtained by MNA scores were also observed in the more severe stages of the disease, according to the CDR. Patients with AD are mostly elderly with changes in body composition that are typical of aging, with signs of peripheral malnutrition and preservation of abdominal fat. However, greater impairment of general nutritional status was observed in the more advanced stages of AD, creating a situation of greater vulnerability for these patients.

  1. Esophageal dysfunction in different stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Suttrup, J; Suntrup-Krueger, S; Siemer, M-L; Bauer, J; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Domagk, D; Dziewas, R; Warnecke, T

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a clinically relevant symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to pronounced reduction in quality of life and other severe complications. Parkinson's disease-related dysphagia may affect the oral and pharyngeal, as well as the esophageal phase of swallowing. To examine the nature and extend of esophageal dysphagia in different stages of PD and their relation to oropharyngeal dysfunction, we examined 65 PD patients (mean age 66.3±9.7 years, mean disease duration 7.9±5.8 years, mean Hoehn & Yahr [H&Y] stage 2.89±0.91) and divided into three groups (early [H&Y I+II; n=21], intermediate [H&Y III; n=25], and advanced stadium [H&Y IV+V; n=19]), using esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) to detect esophageal motor disorders. Oropharyngeal impairment was assessed using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Major esophageal motor disorders were detected in nearly one third of the PD patients. Minor impairment of the esophageal body was present in 95% of participants and throughout all disease stages with pathological findings especially in peristalsis and intrabolus pressure (IBP). The IBP was found to significantly increase in the advanced stadium. Although dysfunction of the upper and lower esophageal sphincters was observed in individual patients, alterations in these esophageal segments revealed no statistical significance compared with normative data. No clear association was found between the occurrence of oropharyngeal dysphagia and esophageal impairment. Esophageal body impairment in PD is a frequent phenomenon during all disease stages, which possibly reflects α-synucleinopathy in the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC....... METHODS: We randomly assigned patients who were referred for preoperative staging of NSCLC to either conventional staging plus PET-CT or conventional staging alone. Patients were followed until death or for at least 12 months. The primary end point was the number of futile thoracotomies, defined as any...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  3. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis for Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD, is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed 9 types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging.

  4. Biomarkers for diagnosing and staging of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Johannes; Weidemann, Frank

    2017-06-16

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of α -galactosidase A which leads to progressive intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues and organs including heart, kidney, vascular endothelium, the nervous system, the eyes and the skin. Cardiac involvement is common, leads to fatal complications and is mainly responsible for reduced life expectancy in Fabry disease. The exact staging of disease progression and timely initiation of treatment is essential in Fabry disease. Therefore it is essential to use the possibilities of specific biomarkers for early detection of organ involvement or early diagnosis. By the use of Pubmed all relevant papers for biomarkers in Fabry disease were screened. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. Finally 56 peer reviewed paper were included. In the past biomarkers for Fabry disease biomarkers did not have clinical relevance. Nowadays, a lot of research is focusing on identification of new biomarkers and their clinical relevance. Only two biomarkers reached clinical applicability. Lyso-GB3 for identification of atypical FD variants and hsTNT for identification of cardiac involvement, which should indicate further diagnostics. Treatment response to ERT can be monitored by lyso-GB3 but data for long-time outcome are missing. A lot of GB3-related analogues are identified in urine and plasma, some of which might play an important role for managing Fabry disease in future. In conclusion, we suggest to measure lyso-GB3 and hsTNT at least once a year. The routinely measurement of these two biomarkers will help now for the staging of every individual patient and in addition, will help for a better general understanding of Fabry disease . Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Myung Jin; Moon, Min Hoan; Koh, Young Hwan; Im, Jung Gi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The medical records, chest radiographs, and CT scans of 42 patients with tuberculosis among 871 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease were reviewed. Patterns of initial chest radiographs were categorized as primary, postprimary, miliary, or atypical, according to the predominant radiologic findings. Chest radiographs and CT scans revealed pulmonary tuberculosis in 28 patients and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 15. The pattern of chest radiographs indicative of pulmonary tuberculosis was primary in 12 cases, postprimary in 11, miliary in one, demonstrated atypical infiltrates in three, and was normal in one. Tuberculosis involved the extrathoracic lymph nodes in six cases, the peritoneum in four, the spine in three, and the bone marrow in two. The primary pattern, seen in 12 patients, manifested as pleural effusion or segmental consolidation, and in ten of the twelve the former was dominant. The radiological pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis in end-stage renal disease is often primary, and extrapulmonary involvement is frequent

  6. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  7. [The role of stress-induced chronic subclinical inflammation in the pathogenesis of the chronic pelvic pain syndrome IIIB in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shormanov, I S; Mozhaev, I I; Sokolova, Kh A; Solovev, A S

    2017-12-01

    This literature review of recent clinical and experimental studies describes the role of oxidative stress in the multifactorial and interdisciplinary pathogenesis of non-inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome IIIB (CPPS-IIIB) in men. The authors outline general biological nature of oxidative stress and its mechanisms. More detailed information is presented on cytokine-mediated chronic subclinical inflammation, one of the key mechanisms of oxidative stress, which is currently being actively studied. It is shown that the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines observed in patients with CPPS-IIIB can explain some features of the clinical course (in particular, the characteristics of the pain syndrome) and the progression of this disease. In this regard, cytokine profiling of prostatic secretion can provide valuable diagnostic, prognostic and monitoring information in the management of this category of patients. Recently published evidence has demonstrated the essential role of the cytokine-mediated chronic inflammatory response as a mechanism of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CPPS-IIIB. Further studies in this area are warranted and in the long term may become a basis for the development of new effective pathogenetic pharmacotherapy of CPPS-IIIB.

  8. Disease stage, but not sex, predicts depression and psychological distress in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Shimozaki, Steve

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression and anxiety significantly affect morbidity in Huntington's disease. Mice. models of Huntington's disease have identified sex differences in mood-like behaviours that vary across disease lifespan, but this interaction has not previously been explored in humans with Huntington......'s disease. However, among certain medical populations, evidence of sex differences in mood across various disease stages has been found, reflecting trends among the general population that women tend to experience anxiety and depression 1.5 to 2 times more than men. The current study examined whether...... disease stage and sex, either separately or as an interaction term, predicted anxiety and depression in Huntington's disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of REGISTRY data involving 453 Huntington's disease participants from 12 European countries was undertaken using the Hospital Anxiety...

  9. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  10. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  11. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap W.; Lilien, Marc R.; van de Kar, Nicole C. A. J.; Wolff, Eric D.; Davin, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    As in older adults, cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in adolescents and young adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since childhood. This concerns patients on dialysis as well as transplant patients, despite the fact that a long duration of dialysis during

  12. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, J.W.; Lilien, M.R.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Wolff, E.D.; Davin, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    As in older adults, cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in adolescents and young adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since childhood. This concerns patients on dialysis as well as transplant patients, despite the fact that a long duration of dialysis during

  13. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from –72 to –3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid......A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority......, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk...

  14. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  15. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E; Neimat, Joseph S; Molinari, Anna L; Tramontana, Michael G; Finder, Stuart G; Gill, Chandler E; Bliton, Mark J; Kao, Chris; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M; Cannard, Kevin R; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50-75, on medication ≥6 months but ≤4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n = 15) or DBS + ODT (n = 15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. Medication requirements in the DBS + ODT group were lower at all time points with a maximal difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS + ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disease severity staging system for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kataoka, Kensuke; Furukawa, Taiki; Ando, Masahiko; Murotani, Kenta; Mishima, Michiaki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Ogura, Takashi; Bando, Masashi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Suda, Takafumi; Chiba, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Homma, Sakae

    2017-11-01

    In Japan, the classification of disease severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (J-system) has been used in making decisions on medical care subsidies. The present J-system consists of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO 2 ) and exercise desaturation in stages of I-IV. It provides a good prognostic classification in stages III and IV, but not in stages I and II. Therefore, we propose a revised system to improve discriminative ability in stages I and II. We compared the revised J-system with the present J-system using Cox proportional hazards model to predict mortality rate. We also evaluated the recently proposed GAP (Gender, Age and Physiology) system in comparison to both J-systems. Two-hundred and fifteen IPF patients were studied retrospectively. A univariate model showed that the present and revised J-systems and a modified GAP system were all significant prognostic factors. The C-statistic for discriminating prognosis was higher in the revised J-system than the modified GAP system and the present J-system (0.677, 0.652 and 0.659, respectively). The C-statistics of these models produced from the 10 000 bootstrap samples were similar to those of the original models, suggesting good internal validation (0.665 (95% CI: 0.621-0.705), 0.645 (0.600-0.686) and 0.659 (0.616-0.700), respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that the revised J-system (P = 0.0038) and the modified GAP system (P = 0.0029) were independent prognostic factors. The revised J-system can provide a better mortality prediction than the present one. Both the revised J-system and the modified GAP system are independent and valuable tools for prognostication and clinical management for IPF. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Cochlear sensitivity in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime; Renda, Levent; Selçuk, Ömer Tarık; Eyigör, Hülya; Yılmaz, Mustafa Deniz; Osma, Üstün

    2015-12-01

    Auditory system abnormalities commonly occur in patients with chronic renal disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between cochlear sensitivity and hemodialysis in dialytic and non-dialytic chronic kidney disease patients. The study included children aged 6-18 years that were divided into 3 groups: 36 non-dialytic patients with chronic kidney disease, 16 end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis, and 30 healthy controls. Blood urea nitrogen, serum cystatin C levels, duration of chronic kidney disease, and the duration of hemodialysis were compared between the chronic kidney disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. Hearing health was measured via tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry and distortion product otoacoustic emissions testing. Distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios were significantly lower at all frequencies tested in the non-dialytic and dialytic groups than in the control group (pchronic renal disease-both dialytic and non-dialytic-should be monitored to prevent any further deterioration by avoiding potential ototoxic agents, even if their hearing thresholds are within normal limits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns for disease duration and stage in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badoud, Simon [Geneva University Hospitals, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Fribourg, Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Fribourg (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Nicastro, Nicolas; Burkhard, Pierre R. [Geneva University Hospitals, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Garibotto, Valentina [University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University Hospitals, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Unit, Department of Medical Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Haller, Sven [University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Centre de Diagnostique Radiologique de Carouge, Geneva (Switzerland); Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To assess correlations between the degree of dopaminergic depletion measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and different clinical parameters of disease progression in Parkinson's disease (PD). This retrospective study included 970 consecutive patients undergoing {sup 123}I-ioflupane SPECT scans in our institution between 2003 and 2013, from which we selected a study population of 411 patients according to their clinical diagnosis: 301 patients with PD (69.4 ± 11.0 years, of age, 163 men) and 110 patients with nondegenerative conditions included as controls (72.7 ± 8.0 years of age, 55 men). Comprehensive and operator-independent data analysis included spatial normalization into standard space, estimation of the mean uptake values in the striatum (caudate nucleus + putamen) and voxel-wise correlation between SPECT signal intensity and disease stage as well as disease duration in order to investigate the spatiotemporal pattern of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration. To compensate for potential interactions between disease stage and disease duration, one parameter was used as nonexplanatory coregressor for the other. Increasing disease stage was associated with an exponential decrease in {sup 123}I-ioflupane uptake (R {sup 2} = 0.1501) particularly in the head of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001), whereas increasing disease duration was associated with a linear decrease in {sup 123}I-ioflupane uptake (p < 0.0001; R {sup 2} = 0.1532) particularly in the contralateral anterior putamen (p < 0.0001). We observed two distinct spatiotemporal patterns of posterior to anterior dopaminergic depletion associated with disease stage and disease duration in patients with PD. The developed operator-independent reference database of 411 {sup 123}I-ioflupane SPECT scans can be used for clinical and research applications. (orig.)

  19. Cardiorespiratory fitness in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jeffrey M; Mayo, Matthew S; Anderson, Heather S; Smith, Holly J; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in exercise and fitness in Alzheimer disease (AD) given evidence suggesting a role in the maintenance of cognitive health. There is, however, little data on the objective measure of cardiorespiratory fitness in individuals with AD. Thus, we assessed cardiorespiratory fitness in early AD and its relationship with physical activity levels, health markers, and cognitive performance in nondemented (Clinical Dementia Rating 0, n=31) and early-stage AD (Clinical Dementia Rating 0.5 and 1, n=31) participants. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with maximal exercise testing to determine peak oxygen consumption (VOpeak2). Additionally, dual emission x-ray absorptiometry scanning for body composition and glucose tolerance tests were conducted. Despite reductions in physical performance and habitual physical activity levels in early AD, cardiorespiratory fitness (VOpeak2) was comparable in the 2 groups (19.8 in early AD vs. 21.2 mL/kg/min in nondemented, P=0.26). AD participants performed well on treadmill tests with similar levels of perceived exertion, maximal heart rate, and respiratory exchange ratio compared with nondemented individuals. After controlling for age and sex, VOpeak2 was associated with a beneficial glucoregulatory profile and inversely associated with percent body fat, body mass index, and triglycerides. A relationship between cognitive performance measures and VOpeak2 was not apparent. These results suggest that individuals in the early stages of AD have the capacity for maximal exercise testing and have comparable levels of cardiorespiratory fitness as nondemented individuals. Reduced physical activity associated with early AD underscores the need for further defining the role of exercise as a potential therapeutic intervention in the early stages of AD.

  20. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    The most frequently used model to describe the exponential increase in mortality rate over age is the Gompertz equation. Logarithmically transformed, the equation conforms to a straight line, of which the slope has been interpreted as the rate of senescence. Earlier, we proposed the derivative...... function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...... kidney transplant have mortality rates comparable to the general population. Therefore, we calculated the age-specific mortality rates for European patients on dialysis (n=274 221; follow-up=594 767 person-years), for European patients with a functioning kidney transplant (n=61 286; follow-up=345 024...

  1. Endometriosis: frequency and correlation between symptomatology and disease stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmud, G.; Akhtar, T.; Sadia, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of endometriosis in general gynecological and infertile women presenting to hospital and to correlate symptomatology and stage of disease. Fifty patients with diagnosis of endometriosis on laparoscopy were included in the study. The degree of pain symptoms was graded according to 1-4 point verbal rating scale designed by Biberoglu and Behrman. Endometriosis was staged according to Revised American Fertility Society (R-AFS) scoring on laparoscopy. Correlation coefficient-Spearman rank order correlation test was applied to analyze data. The frequency of endometriosis in infertile women was 24% (33) and in women with general gynecological complaints, it was 23% (17). There was a significant positive correlation between chronic pelvic pain and R-AFS scoring. Increasing severity of pelvic pain was also positively correlated with presence of endometrioma and complete obliteration of pouch of Douglas. No correlation between dysmenorrhoea and R-AFS scoring could be detected. Dysmenorrhoea was strongly and positively correlated with the presence of superficial implants. Dyspareunia was found to have positive correlation with R-AFS score and also with complete obliteration of pouch of Douglas. The frequency of endometriosis in infertile women was 24% (33) and in women with general gynecological complaints, it was 23% (17). Chronic pelvic pain and dyspareunia had strong positive correlation with R-AFS score while dysmenorrhoea had no such correlation. (author)

  2. Questions and Answers for Transplant Candidates about Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Pediatric End-Stage ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 patients have acute (sudden and severe onset) liver failure and a life expectancy of hours to a ... younger are placed in categories according to the Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease (PELD) scoring system. Again there is a ...

  3. Anti-SEMA4D Monoclonal Antibody VX15/2503 With Nivolumab or Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or IV Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Metastatic Melanoma; Stage III Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7

  4. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  6. Intravital Microscopy in Evaluating Patients With Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, or Stage IA-IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-28

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  7. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  8. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Yuang Lin; Shiuh-Ming Huang

    2016-01-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992–1996, followed up to 2009...

  9. Caregiver burden and coping in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchella, Chiara; Bartolo, Michelangelo; Pasotti, Chiara; Chiapella, Laura; Sinforiani, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This study was set out to describe caregiver-perceived burden and coping in early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD). A total of 163 consecutive pairs of patients with AD and their principal caregivers were initially recruited. The caregivers completed the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI) and the Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced scale, and also provided sociodemographic information; the patients with AD were assessed by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Data from 126 patient-caregiver pairs were analyzed. The caregivers (mean age 56.11±12.37 y) were mainly women (76%); 64% were the patient's offspring; 39% lived with the patient. From the CBI data, it emerged that caregivers perceived loss of personal time (objective burden, 33%) and the feeling of missing out on opportunities (developmental burden, 25%) as their main stressors. Total CBI score was negatively correlated with Mini Mental State Examination (P=0.005). As regards coping strategies, the caregivers predominantly used problem-oriented strategies associated with a positive attitude. The use of dysfunctional strategies was predictive of caregiver burden. It is important to be aware that avoidance and dysfunctional coping strategies predispose caregivers of patients with AD to higher level of distress, whereas successful caregiving seems to be based on the use of problem-oriented strategies early in the disease when solutions are still available. (C) 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  10. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  11. Cardiovascular disease as a late complication of end-stage renal disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap; Gruppen, Mariken; de Groot, Eric; Offringa, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the late cardiovascular outcome of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. Design: A nation-wide Long-term follow-up study. Determinants of outcomes and causes of death were retrospectively assessed. Patients underwent assessment of overall health state, B- and M-mode

  12. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess...... stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. CONCLUSIONS: Later stages...... HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. METHODS: A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland...

  13. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  14. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  15. Utility of Modeling End-Stage Liver Disease in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Kianifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic liver diseases consist of wide spectrum disorders that may be complicated by cirrhosis and therefore need to transplantation. The pediatric end-stage liver disease (PELD score and model of end-stage liver disease (MELD score has been used as predictors of mortality chronic liver diseases listed for liver transplantation. The aim of this study is evaluation of relation between PELDMELD score and evidence of cirrhosis in children with choronic liver disease.   Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on 106 patients of chronic liver disease referred to Ghaem Haspital, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Iran during 24 months period (2010-2013. PELD and MELD score were calculated for all patients. Clincal and patholoogical findings of cirrhosis were recorded.   Results: Mean age of patients was 68/3 ± 41.8 months. Mean PELDMELD score was -1/59± 9/64. There was significant correlation between PELDMELD score and clinical icter, spelenomegaly, evidence of hepatopulminary syndrome, esophageal varices, evidence of cirrhosis in tissue specimences.   Conclusion: PELDMELD score appear to be benefit for detection of cirrhotic children among paients with choronic liver disease.

  16. Interactive Tailored Website to Promote Sun Protection and Skin Self-Check Behaviors in Patients With Stage 0-III Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage 0 Skin Melanoma; Stage I Skin Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage II Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma

  17. Epidemiological Transition of End-Stage Kidney Disease in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ismaili, Faisal; Al Salmi, Issa; Al Maimani, Yaqoub; Metry, Abdul Massiah; Al Marhoobi, Humood; Hola, Alan; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2017-01-01

    The number of persons receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) is estimated at more than 2.5 million worldwide, and is growing by 8% annually. Registries in the developing world are not up to standards compared to the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). Herein we examine the causes, progression, and magnitude of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) over 3 decades in Oman. We examined ESKD data from 1983 to 2013. Data from 1998 to 2013 were obtained through an Information Management System. Data before 2008 were collected from patients' files. A questionnaire based on USRDS form 2728 was completed by nephrologists once a citizen reached ESKD. A total of 4066 forms were completed, with a response rate of 90% (52% male). The mean (SD) age was 50.1 (14.0) years. By 31 December 2013, there were 2386 patients alive on RRT, of whom 1206 were on hemodialysis (50.5%), 1080 were living with a functioning kidney transplant (45.3%), and 100 were receiving peritoneal dialysis (4.2%). The incidence of ESKD on RRT was 21, 75, and 120 per million population in 1983, 2001, and 2013, respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of ESKD was 49, 916, and 2386 in 1983, 2001, and 2013 respectively. Among patients with ESKD on RRT, a progressive rise was seen in diabetic nephropathy, with 5.8%, 32.1%, and 46% in 1983, 2001, and 2013 respectively. The incidence and prevalence of ESKD has increased progressively over last 30 years. This is anticipated to continue at an even higher rate in view of the progressive rise in noncommunicable diseases. Continuous improvement in registries is required to improve capturing of ESKD patients for providing accurate data to health authorities, and enhancing public awareness of the magnitude, future trends, treatments, and outcomes regarding ESKD.

  18. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar; Dieperink, Hans; Honkanen, Eero; Melin, Jan; Selvig, Kristian; Lundberg, Johan

    2017-12-01

    A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Patients were enrolled into four mutually exclusive stages of the disease: CKD stages 1-3; CKD stages 4-5; transplant recipients; and dialysis patients. Overall HRQoL was generally highest in patients with CKD stages 1-3, followed by transplant recipients, patients with CKD stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. Later stages of ADPKD are associated with reduced physical health. The value of early treatment interventions that can delay progression of the disease should be considered. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  19. Disease stage, but not sex, predicts depression and psychological distress in Huntington's disease: A European population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Shimozaki, Steve; Cramp, Rebecca; Rickards, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Depression and anxiety significantly affect morbidity in Huntington's disease. Mice. models of Huntington's disease have identified sex differences in mood-like behaviours that vary across disease lifespan, but this interaction has not previously been explored in humans with Huntington's disease. However, among certain medical populations, evidence of sex differences in mood across various disease stages has been found, reflecting trends among the general population that women tend to experience anxiety and depression 1.5 to 2 times more than men. The current study examined whether disease stage and sex, either separately or as an interaction term, predicted anxiety and depression in Huntington's disease. A cross-sectional study of REGISTRY data involving 453 Huntington's disease participants from 12 European countries was undertaken using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A series of multiple regression analyses were undertaken to discover to what extent disease stage and sex predicted anxiety, depression, and general distress after controlling for a number of known predictors of mood difficulties. Disease stage, but not sex, was found to predict depressive symptoms and general distress. Neither disease stage nor sex predicted anxiety. Furthermore, an interaction term computed for disease stage and sex did not contribute to the models tested. In terms of considering risks to developing depression and anxiety in the Huntington's disease population, practitioners may need to pay special attention to disease stage progression (but not sex differences) to enable early detection and treatment of depression (but not anxiety). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual who has end-stage renal disease. 406.13... Premiums § 406.13 Individual who has end-stage renal disease. (a) Statutory basis and applicability. This... renal disease, and specifies the beginning and end of the period of entitlement. It implements section...

  1. History of Childhood Kidney Disease and Risk of Adult End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Margalit, Ronit; Golan, Eliezer; Twig, Gilad; Leiba, Adi; Tzur, Dorit; Afek, Arnon; Skorecki, Karl; Vivante, Asaf

    2018-02-01

    The long-term risk associated with childhood kidney disease that had not progressed to chronic kidney disease in childhood is unclear. We aimed to estimate the risk of future end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among adolescents who had normal renal function and a history of childhood kidney disease. We conducted a nationwide, population-based, historical cohort study of 1,521,501 Israeli adolescents who were examined before compulsory military service in 1967 through 1997; data were linked to the Israeli ESRD registry. Kidney diseases in childhood included congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease; all participants included in the primary analysis had normal renal function and no hypertension in adolescence. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio for ESRD associated with a history of childhood kidney disease. During 30 years of follow-up, ESRD developed in 2490 persons. A history of any childhood kidney disease was associated with a hazard ratio for ESRD of 4.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.52 to 4.99). The associations between each diagnosis of kidney disease in childhood (congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pyelonephritis, and glomerular disease) and the risk of ESRD in adulthood were similar in magnitude (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of 5.19 [95% CI, 3.41 to 7.90], 4.03 [95% CI, 3.16 to 5.14], and 3.85 [95% CI, 2.77 to 5.36], respectively). A history of kidney disease in childhood was associated with younger age at the onset of ESRD (hazard ratio for ESRD among adults kidney disease in childhood, even if renal function was apparently normal in adolescence, was associated with a significantly increased risk of ESRD, which suggests that kidney injury or structural abnormality in childhood has long-term consequences.

  2. A study of the impact of disease burden in quality of life of people with pre-End-Stage and End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Georgiadou; Theodora Kafkia; Eugenia Minasidou; Kyriakos Kazakos; Alexandra Dimitriadou

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a common chronic disease accompanied by severe complications. It is the leading cause of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) requiring management either by haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). The chronicity of the disease, and its complications, affects the psychological, family and social life of the patients and their Quality of Life (QoL). Aim: of the present study was to estimate the disease burden of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) d...

  3. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  4. Association of rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease with plausible early & late-stage disease markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subendu; Rastogi, Mukul; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Kumar, Rajesh; Arora, Priya; Sagar, Vivek; Sahni, Inderpal Singh; Shethi, Sunil; Thakur, Khemraj; Ailawadhi, Sourav; Toor, Devinder; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the autoimmune sequelae caused by Group A Streptococcus. RHD still remains a major concern in the developing countries due to its poor diagnosis, lack of vaccines and social awareness among population. This study was aimed to identify the plausible early- and late-stage disease markers associated with RF/RHD. A total of 84 patients with confirmed pharyngitis (n=18), RF (n=23) and RHD (n=43) were included in the comparative analysis of different factors involved in host-pathogen interaction during RF/RHD pathogenesis. This study revealed high titre of serum antistreptolysin O (ASO) antibody in pharyngitis compared to RF and RHD patients, whereas procollagen type 1 C-peptide (PICP) level was elevated in RHD which showed an inverse correlation with serum ASO titre. The significant elevation of serum anti-peptide associated with RF (PARF) antibody in RF patients was correlated as a probable stage-specific determinant. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine profile revealed high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23p40, IL-17A in RF, whereas IL-6 concentration was higher in RHD compared to healthy controls. The overall assessment of the factors/ disease markers involved in host-pathogen interaction in RF/RHD may be suggestive of plausible disease marker in different groups of patients. Further studies with larger sample need to be done to better understand RF/RHD pathogenesis.

  5. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going through ...

  6. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a

  7. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  8. Chronic Granulomatous Disease; fundamental stages in our understanding of CGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Tracy

    2006-09-21

    It has been 50 years since chronic granulomatous disease was first reported as a disease which fatally affected the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries from the insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to destroy microbial particles to the underlying genetic predispositions through which the disease is inherited have had important consequences. Longterm antibiotic prophylaxis has helped to fight infections associated with chronic granulomatous disease while the steady progress in bone marrow transplantation and the prospect of gene therapy are hailed as long awaited permanent treatment options. This review unearths the important findings by scientists that have led to our current understanding of the disease.

  9. TREATMENT OF THE CHRONIC WAR TIBIAL OSTEOMYELITIS, GUSTILIO TYPE IIIB AND CIERNY MADER IIIB, USING VARIOUS METHODS. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrag Grubor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: War osteomyelitis is an inflammation of all the bone elements at the place of bone fracture resulting from a war wound. Method of work: During the Bosnian (1992-1995, 2,195 wounded people underwent primary surgical treatment for their wounded extremities. Tibia wounds were dominant in 695 (31.66% of the cases, and 59 (8.48% of which developed chronic osteomyelitis. The Gustilo’s Classification score was IIIB and the Cierny-Mader’s Classification score was IIIB. The average age of the patients was 38.2 years, sex representation: 57 (97% males and 2 (3% females. Cause of fracture: bullets 18 (31%, shell pieces 39 (66%, and combined 2 (3%, with polytrauma in 31 (52.54%. The most dominant infective agent was Staphylo-coccus aureus 31 (52%. We used Papineau’s method in 5 (8.50%, sequestration in 28 (47.45%, fenestration and sequestration in 17 (29%, only Forage of the tibia in 3 (5%, and decortication and resection in 6 (10%. We used the instantaneous vacuum for 36 (61% patients. The aim of this work is to evaluate some perceptions in the therapy of the chronic fistulous war osteomyelitis tibia in a decade-long work. The study is retrospective and analyzes the use of surgical methods in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis tibia caused by the high kinetic energy projectiles. Results: Each of the 59 patients had an average of three surgical treatments. In spite of the above-mentioned treatments, 9 (15.25% out of the 59 patients had chronic fistulous osteomyelitis. The average length of treatment was 36 days, and the duration of the ex-acerbation was 7 months. Transfusion was used for 23 (40% patients. In the group of patients, the microbiological finding after operation was negative in 44 (75%. In 13 (22% patients, infection manifested very early (i.e. during the first hospitalization. Conclusion: Primary treatment of the war wound with sterilization is a crucial factor of acute (i.e. chronic osteomyelitis prevention and

  10. Can GOLD Stage 0 provide information of prognostic value in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    In the recently published guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the staging system included a Stage 0 for subjects without airways obstruction but with respiratory symptoms, denoting these subjects "at ris...

  11. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  12. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy.......Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  13. Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Jiro; Ikari, Yuji

    2017-12-25

    Cardiovascular disease is a major concern for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), especially those on hemodialysis. ESRD patients with coronary artery disease often do not have symptoms or present with atypical symptoms. Coronary lesions in ESRD patients are characterized by increased media thickness, infiltration and activation of macrophages, and marked calcification. Several studies showed worsened clinical outcomes after coronary revascularization, which were dependent on the severity of renal dysfunction. ESRD patients on hemodialysis have the most severe renal dysfunction; thus, the clinical outcomes are worse in these patients than in those with other types of renal dysfunction. Medications for primary or secondary cardiovascular prevention are also insufficient in ESRD patients. Efficacy of drug-eluting stents is inferior in ESRD patients, compared to the excellent outcomes observed in patients with normal renal function. Unsatisfactory outcomes with trials targeting cardiovascular disease in patients with ESRD emphasize a large potential to improve outcomes. Thus, optimal strategies for diagnosis, prevention, and management of cardiovascular disease should be modified in ESRD patients.

  14. Baseline characteristics of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 and stage 4 in spain: the MERENA observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain information on cardiovascular morbidity, hypertension control, anemia and mineral metabolism based on the analysis of the baseline characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study of patients with stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney diseases (CKD. Methods Multicenter study from Spanish government hospital-based Nephrology outpatient clinics involving 1129 patients with CKD stages 3 (n = 434 and 4 (n = 695 defined by GFR calculated by the MDRD formula. Additional analysis was performed with GFR calculated using the CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault formula. Results In the cohort as a whole, median age 70.9 years, morbidity from all cardiovascular disease (CVD was very high (39.1%. In CKD stage 4, CVD prevalence was higher than in stage 3 (42.2 vs 35.6% p 300 mg/day was present in more than 60% of patients and there was no significant differences between stages 3 and 4 CKD (1.2 ± 1.8 and 1.3 ± 1.8 g/day, respectively. A majority of the patients had hemoglobin levels greater than 11 g/dL (91.1 and 85.5% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively p Conclusion This study provides an overview of key clinical parameters in patients with CKD Stages 3 and 4 where delivery or care was largely by nephrologists working in a network of hospital-based clinics of the Spanish National Healthcare System.

  15. Efficiency of Staging Work-Ups in the Evaluation of Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Ha, Sung Whan

    1991-01-01

    A series of 510 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix given the curative radiation therapy from March 1979 through December 1986 was evaluated to determine the value of intravenous pyelography(IVP), cystoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and abdomino-pelvic CT as staging work-up prior to treatment. On IVP and cystoscopy, 10.7%(49/456) and 5/3%(24/452) showed abnormality, respectively, but only 0.7% (3/413) did on signoidoscopy. As a result of these work-ups prerequisite to FIGO staging, twenty six (5.1%) out of 510 patients were upstaged from the stage determined by the findings of physical examination alone. The proportions of upstaging in each stage were as follows none in stage IB(35), IIA (89) and IIIA(8), 7.9%(20/252) in stage IIB(14 patients to FIGO Stage IIIB, 6 patients to FIGO stage IVA), and 4.8% (6/126) in stage IIIB (all to FIGO stage IVA). Positive findings of staging work-ups were found only in patients with advanced stages of stage IIB or over determined by physical examination alone but not in those with earlier stages. CT was performed in 337 patients. CT detected pelvic lymph node (LN) enlargement in 25.2% (85/337) and paraaortic LN enlargement in 7.4% (25/337). Pelvic LN positivity was well correlated with increasing stage but paraaortic LN positivity was not. In the evaluation of parametrial involvement, CT findings were in accordance with those of physical examination only in 65.6%(442/674). When compared with endoscopic studies, CT had much lower positive predictive value than negative predictive value in the evaluation of adjacent organ invasion. The staging work-ups should be individualized by the disease extent of each patient, and then the efficiency of work-ups may be increased without compromising the appropriate FIGO staging and treatment

  16. Economic evaluation of end-stage renal disease treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. de Wit (Ardine)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOne of the main functions of the human kidney is the clarification of blood from human waste products, such as ureum and creatinine. Failure of functioning of the kidneys may ultimately lead to death. When the stage of very limited kidney functioning (5 to 10% of norm-al) is reached,

  17. [Etiological analysis of 264 cases with chronic kidney disease stage 2 to 5 in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qianfan; Shen, Qian; Xu, Hong; Sun, Li; Tang, Xiaoshan; Fang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Haimei; Zhai, Yihui; Bi, Yunli; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    To study and summarize the etiology of children patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 to 5 seen in Children's Hospital of Fudan University from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013. By complying with the NKF-K/DOQI guidelines, we collected data of 264 cases of children patients with CKD stage 2-5 from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 in the medical record system of Children's Hospital of Fudan University. And we retrospectively analyzed their age and CKD stage at first diagnosis, primary diseases, complications, etc. In the collected 264 cases, 52 cases (19.7%) were diagnosed at stage 2, 67 (25.4%) at stage 3, 52 (19.7%) at stage 4 and 93 (35.2%) at stage 5. For disease causes, 116 cases (43.9%) had congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), 61 cases (23.1%) had glomerular disease, 15 (5.7%) had hereditary kidney disease, 14 (5.3%) had other diseases and in 58 cases (22.0%) the causes of disease were unknown. In the group with age between 0 and 3.0 and 3.1 and 6.0 years, 57.1% (24 cases) and 60.0% (30 cases) had primary disease with CAKUT. In the group with age older than 10 years, 49.2% (30 cases) had primary disease with glomerular disease and 32.0% (32 cases) with unknown causes. The major cause of CKD stage 2-5 in children in our hospital during the last ten years was CAKUT (43.9%), followed by glomerular disease (23.1%). The primary diseases of CKD were significantly different between the 2 age groups. CAKUT was more common in infants and preschool children while for adolescents, glomerular disease was the major cause.

  18. Esophageal dysfunction in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttrup, I; Suttrup, J; Suntrup-Krueger, S; Siemer, M-L; Bauer, J; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Domagk, D; Dziewas, R; Warnecke, T

    BACKGROUND: Dysphagia is a clinically relevant symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to pronounced reduction in quality of life and other severe complications. Parkinson's disease-related dysphagia may affect the oral and pharyngeal, as well as the esophageal phase of swallowing.

  19. A study of the impact of disease burden in quality of life of people with pre-End-Stage and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Georgiadou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a common chronic disease accompanied by severe complications. It is the leading cause of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD requiring management either by haemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD. The chronicity of the disease, and its complications, affects the psychological, family and social life of the patients and their Quality of Life (QoL. Aim: of the present study was to estimate the disease burden of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN during pre-ESRD and during End-Stage Renal Disease. Methods: A sample of 103 patients with DN treated at the General Hospital of Veria were studied during May and June 2016. The study was conducted using the Dialysis Symptoms Index (DSI for the assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD symptom load and the European Quality of Life (EuroQol questionnaire for assessing the QoL of patients in the Renal Outpatient Clinic, Haemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Unit. Results: It was found that the Renal Replacement Method (HD or PD, the presence of DM and CKD’s stage affect significantly the patients’ self-assessment regarding painful symptoms of DN. Furthermore, the above factors have major impact on some aspects of patients’ QoL, such as mobility and self-care. Conclusions: Pre-End Stage patients experience more severe painful symptoms of DN compared to patients on Renal Replacement Therapies.

  20. Optimization of treatment of children with 3 stage Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobikov, S.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    147 children younger than 15 years suffering from the 3rd stage of Hodgkins children is performed using gamma therapeutic Rocus type devices and betatron (B5M-25) and linear accelerator (LUEh-25) of 15-27.5 MeV energy electrons. Immediate and delayed treatment results are evaluated. Unfavourable clinical factors effecting the recurrence frequency are revealed. Inconsistence of supporting chemotherapy in the reduction of the number of recurrents is confirmed

  1. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  2. White/black racial differences in risk of end-stage renal disease and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Andy I; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Bacchetti, Peter; Bertenthal, Daniel; Hernandez, German T; O'Hare, Ann M

    2009-07-01

    End-stage renal disease disproportionately affects black persons, but it is unknown when in the course of chronic kidney disease racial differences arise. Understanding the natural history of racial differences in kidney disease may help guide efforts to reduce disparities. We compared white/black differences in the risk of end-stage renal disease and death by level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline in a national sample of 2,015,891 veterans between 2001 and 2005. Rates of end-stage renal disease among black patients exceeded those among white patients at all levels of baseline eGFR. The adjusted hazard ratios for end-stage renal disease associated with black versus white race for patients with an eGFR > or = 90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and death among black persons at all levels of eGFR. The highest risk of mortality associated with black race also was observed among those with an eGFR 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m2 (hazard ratio 1.32, 95% CI, 1.27-1.36). Racial differences in the risk of end-stage renal disease appear early in the course of kidney disease and are not explained by a survival advantage among blacks. Efforts to identify and slow progression of chronic kidney disease at earlier stages may be needed to reduce racial disparities.

  3. A liminal stage after predictive testing for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Marcela; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Jutras, Marie France; Herson, Ariane; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Durr, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    Following predictive testing for Huntington disease (HD), knowledge of one's carrier status may have consequences on disease onset. Our study aimed to address two questions. First, does knowledge of being a carrier of the pathological HD mutation trigger onset of the disease? Second, does this knowledge influence self-awareness and allow carriers to identify signs and symptoms of disease onset? Between 2012 and 2015, 75 HD mutation carriers were examined using the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor score. Onset estimation made with the disease burden score was compared with UHDRS findings. We collected qualitative data with questionnaires and semistructured interviews. 38 women and 37 men, aged 43.7 years±10.5 (20-68), were interviewed after a mean delay between test and study interview of 10.5 years±4.7 (from 4 to 21 years). Estimation of age at onset was 4.5±8.5 years earlier than data-derived age at onset. Participants were categorised according to their motor score: scores 5 were manifest carriers (n=40). Self-observation was a major preoccupation for all, independent of their clinical status (82% vs 74%, p=0.57). Among manifest carriers, 56% thought they showed symptoms, but only 33% felt ill. Interestingly, this was also observed in those without motor signs (20% and 9%). Being a mutation carrier did not significantly facilitate recognition of motor signs. Interviews with premanifest carriers allowed the burden of self-observation to be illustrated despite lack of motor signs. Estimating age at onset based on disease burden score may not be accurate. The transition to disease was experienced as an ambiguous or liminal experience. The view of mutation carriers is not always concordant with medical onset estimation, highlighting the difficulties involved in the concept of onset and its use as an outcome in future disease-modifying trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  4. End-stage renal disease in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Alkhunaizi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell nephropathy is a severe complication of sickle cell disease (SCD that has a wide range of manifestations, from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The data on patients with SCD who develop ESRD are scarce. The aim of this study was to explore the course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and received renal replacement therapy (RRT. The course of patients with SCD who developed ESRD and started dialysis at two centers in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia was retrospectively analyzed. Parameters included age at initiation of dialysis, survival until death or kidney transplantation, hospitalization due to pain crisis, disease-related parameters, and requirement for blood transfusion. Sixteen patients with SCD developed ESRD and started RRT with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The mean age at initiation of dialysis was 46.6 years. The majority of patients (10 out of 16 were resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA and required blood transfusion repeatedly. Pain crises were infrequently encountered. Median survival was 54 months. Four patients received kidney transplantation with good outcome. In conclusion, most patients with SCD who developed ESRD were resistant to ESA and required repeated blood transfusion. The rate of hospitalization due to pain crisis was relatively low. Survival on dialysis was comparable to that of patients with no SCD, and the post-transplant course was relatively benign.

  5. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage III with special reference to tumour burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    of lymphographically involved regions), histologic subtype, B-symptoms, number of involved regions, mediastinal involvement, pretreatment ESR, sex, age, laparotomy, and substage were examined in multivariate analysis. With regard to disease-free survival, total tumour burden (intraabdominal and peripheral...... regarding early stage disease to the effect that tumour burden is the single most important prognostic factor in Hodgkin's disease....

  6. Cognitive impairment in early-stage non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Helle Cecilie Viekilde; Løkkegaard, A; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) are common. PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing PDD. Knowledge of cognition in early-stages PD is essential in understanding and predicting the dementia process....

  7. Long-term outcomes of children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term survival of children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased in the last 20 years, but the mortality rate remains high. Cardiovascular disease accounts for 40 to 50% of all deaths, infectious disease for about 20%. A prolonged period of dialysis versus having a renal graft and

  8. Hypertension, end-stage renal disease and mesangiocapillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methamphetamine abuse has risen dramatically in South Africa. The chronic effects of abuse on the kidneys and blood pressure have not been documented. This study reviewed patients referred for evaluation of kidney disease and/or hypertension, who had been abusing methamphetamines. Methods: The ...

  9. Symptoms of fatigue and depression in ischemic heart disease are driven by personality characteristics rather than disease stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Otto R F; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Van Domburg, Ron T

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of fatigue and depression are prevalent across stages of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined (i) the effect of both the IHD stage and type-D personality on fatigue and depressive symptoms at 12-month follow-up, and (ii) whether the effect of type-D personality on these symptoms...

  10. Childhood Albuminuria and Chronic Kidney Disease is Associated with Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yuang; Huang, Shiuh-Ming

    2016-08-01

    We do not yet fully grasp the significance of childhood albuminuria. Based on mass urinary screening (MUS) using albumin-specific dipsticks in school children, we studied the independent association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A prospective cohort of 5351 children with albuminuria detected by school MSU during the period 1992-1996, followed up to 2009. Cumulative mortality rate, prevalence of CKD, and ESRD were higher in children with albuminuria than those without. Albuminuria category was associated with the risk of mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 3.4] and ESRD (HR 3.24). Lower eGFR and albuminuria predicted mortality and ESRD among children with albuminuria and CKD. We found that being below a threshold of 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was significantly associated with ESRD. The highest renal function decline, along with the steepest slope of cumulative ESRD number, occurred in Stage 3, the critical point in renal progression. Risk factors for renal progression among different age groups with albuminuria were hypercholesterolemia and low serum albumin at 7-17 years of age. Beyond 18 years of age, besides the risk factor, a higher fasting blood sugar (BS) was also noted. Childhood albuminuria is a risk factor for CKD in later life, albuminuria provides additional prognostic information, and complications of CKD should be defined in each case. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Intradialytic Muscle Cramp and its Association with Peripheral Arterial Disease in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, M; Sharma, S K; Chimoriya, R; Das, G C

    2014-01-01

     Muscle cramp is a common intradialytic complication observed in hemodialysis patients. Similarly Peripheral arterial disease is a common condition in the hemodialysis population.  Fifty patients with a diagnosis of End Stage Renal Disease who were on hemodialysis were studied over a period of one year. Muscle cramp was defined clinically as contractions of a large muscle group and Peripheral arterial disease was diagnosed on the basis of the ankle -brachial index (ABI).  A total of 50 End Stage Renal Disease patients were analyzed. The major causes of End Stage Renal Disease in the study population was Chronic Glomerulonephritis 40 % (n=20). Muscle cramps were present in 26% (n=13) cases. Peripheral arterial disease was present in 30% (n=15) of patients. However there was no statistically significant association between the presence of Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease (p value =0.18) CONCLUSIONS: Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease were common occurrence in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis patients, however there was no association between the presence of intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease.

  12. Epidemiological Transition of End-Stage Kidney Disease in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al Ismaili

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: The incidence and prevalence of ESKD has increased progressively over last 30 years. This is anticipated to continue at an even higher rate in view of the progressive rise in noncommunicable diseases. Continuous improvement in registries is required to improve capturing of ESKD patients for providing accurate data to health authorities, and enhancing public awareness of the magnitude, future trends, treatments, and outcomes regarding ESKD.

  13. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  14. Social consequences in adult life of end-stage renal disease in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Jaap W.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Offringa, Martin; Stronks, Karin; Hutten, Gerard J.; Heymans, Hugo S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To describe employment achievement and social independence of adults with childhood end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to explore determining factors. Study design Employment, occupational level, living arrangements, social engagements, and subjective health perception were

  15. Prevalence, predictors, and survival in pulmonary hypertension related to end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Hasseriis; Iversen, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, prognostic importance, and factors that predict the presence and degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed with right heart catheterization (RHC) in patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain unclear....

  16. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pontillo

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target.

  17. Improving Outcomes in Patients with Lupus and End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inda-Filho, Antonio; Neugarten, Joel; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The development of lupus-related end stage renal disease (ESRD) confers the highest mortality rates among individuals with lupus. Lupus-related ESRD is also associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with non-lupus ESRD.

  18. PARTIAL SPLENECTOMY IN CHILDREN - AN ALTERNATIVE FOR SPLENECTOMY IN THE PATHOLOGICAL STAGING OF HODGKINS-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, HJ; TAMMINGA, RYJ; TIMENS, W

    1994-01-01

    Background: The more accurate staging of Hodgkin's disease in children is achieved with a staging laparotomy and splenectomy. A disadvantage of the splenectomy is the high risk for an overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis (OPSI). Therefore, the partial splenectomy was introduced as an alternative to

  19. Plasma S100A12 Levels and Peripheral Arterial Disease in End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Shiotsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: S100A12 is an endogenous ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE. Plasma S100A12 levels are high in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is common in HD patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates in this population. To date, however, no study has specifically assessed the relationship between plasma S100A12 and PAD in HD patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 152 HD patients in our affiliated hospital. We investigated PAD history and patient characteristics and quantified plasma S100A12 levels in all participants. Results: HD patients with PAD (n = 26; 21.9 [13.6–33.4] ng/ml showed significantly higher plasma S100A12 levels than HD patients without PAD (n = 126; 11.8 [7.5–17.6]ng/ml; p Conclusion: These results suggest that plasma S100A12 levels are strongly associated with PAD prevalence in ESRD patients undergoing HD.

  20. Speech and Voice Response to a Levodopa Challenge in Late-Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Margherita Fabbri; Isabel Guimarães; Isabel Guimarães; Rita Cardoso; Rita Cardoso; Miguel Coelho; Miguel Coelho; Leonor Correia Guedes; Leonor Correia Guedes; Mario M. Rosa; Mario M. Rosa; Mario M. Rosa; Catarina Godinho; Daisy Abreu; Nilza Gonçalves

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundParkinson’s disease (PD) patients are affected by hypokinetic dysarthria, characterized by hypophonia and dysprosody, which worsens with disease progression. Levodopa’s (l-dopa) effect on quality of speech is inconclusive; no data are currently available for late-stage PD (LSPD).ObjectiveTo assess the modifications of speech and voice in LSPD following an acute l-dopa challenge.MethodLSPD patients [Schwab and England score <50/Hoehn and Yahr stage >3 (MED ON)] performed severa...

  1. COPD stage and risk of hospitalization for infectious disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Lange, Peter; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    COPD, to 230 (95% CI, 207 to 253) for moderate COPD, and 394 (95% CI, 330 to 459) for severe/very severe COPD. The trend in risk persisted after the control of background characteristics using Cox proportional hazards analysis (adjusted relative risks: 1.06 [95% CI, 0.92 to 1.23], 1.39 [95% CI, 1.......24 to 1.56], and 2.21 [95% CI, 1.84 to 2.64], respectively; p=0.001). In subgroup analysis, the increased risk was associated with lower and upper respiratory tract infections, pyothorax, and tuberculosis, but not with influenza, sepsis, skin infections, urinary tract infections, diarrheal disease...

  2. Evaluation of functional changes in the evolutionary stages of Parkinson's disease: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Feitoza do Nascimento

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Parkinson's disease is one of the fastest growing neurological disorders in the world and is considered to be predominantly a motor disorder, classified as neurodegenerative, chronic and extrapyramidal, characterized by tremors, muscular rigidity, postural balance deficit and bradykinesia. Objective : To analyze the functional changes presented by Parkinson's disease patients in the different evolutionary stages of the disease. Methods : The sample included 30 patients of both genders, aged between 51 and 75 years, with clinical diagnoses of Parkinson's disease in different evolutionary stages, undergoing physiotherapy in the Pernambuco Parkinson Association. The patients were evaluated through the Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS. Results : The results highlighted an increase in the presence and severity of the changes presented by the Parkinson's disease patients, according to the evolution of the stages of the disease, especially considering aspects relating to motor activity and activities of daily living, including changes related to speech, swallowing, the ability to get dressed, personal hygiene, turning in bed and arising from a chair, occurrence of falls, posture, gait, postural stability and the presence of bradykinesia/hypokinesia. Conclusion : It is believed that the classification of the evolutionary stage of patients through the Hoehn and Yahr Scale and the registration of functional change through the UPDRS are useful for the development of the physiotherapy treatment plan.

  3. [End stage of chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaboch, J; Opatrná, S; Matoušovic, K; Schück, O

    2012-01-01

    Renal function disorder is inevitably associated with metabolic acidosis. An adult produces approximately 1 mmol of acids/kg of body weight every day (3 mmol/kg in children), derived from metabolization of proteins from food. Development of metabolic acidosis in patients with kidney disease is based on accumulation of acids and insufficient production of bicarbonates; alkaline loss represents a marginal issue here limited to patients with type II renal tubular acidosis only. The prevalence of this disorder increases with declining glomerular filtration (GFR) from 2% in patients with GFR 1.0-1.5 ml/s/1.73 m2 to 39% in patients with GFR ammoniac production in residual nephrons. This is an adaptive mechanism aimed at maintaining sufficient elimination of acids despite reduced volume of functional tissue. However, an increased ammoniac production simultaneously becomes a stimulus for activation of the complement via an alternative route and is thus one of the factors contributing, through this induced inflammation, to progression of tubular interstitial fibrosis that subsequently leads to further GFR reduction. Metabolic acidosis has a number of severe adverse effects on the organism, e.g. deterioration of kidney bone disease through stimulation of bone resorption and inhibition of bone formation, inhibition of vitamin D formation, increased muscle catabolism, reduced albumin production, glucose metabolism disorder, increased insulin resistance, reduced production of thyroid hormones, increased accumulation of β2-microglobulin etc. Non-interventional studies suggest that alkali supplementation may slow down progression of chronic nephropathies. However, this approach, safe and inexpensive, has not been widely implemented in clinical practice yet. With respect to dialyzed patients, abnormal levels of bicarbonates are associated with increased mortality. Both metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, rather regularly seen in a considerable number of patients, have a negative

  4. Trace minerals in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasama, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The kidneys are famously responsible for maintaining external balance of prevalent minerals, such as sodium, chloride, and potassium. The kidney's role in handling trace minerals is more obscure to most nephrologists. Similarly, the impact of kidney failure on trace mineral metabolism is difficult to anticipate. The associated dietary modifications and dialysis create the potential for trace mineral deficiencies and intoxications. Indeed, there are numerous reports of dialysis-associated mishaps causing mineral intoxication, notable for the challenge of assigning causation. Equally challenging has been the recognition of mineral deficiency syndromes, amid what is often a cacophony of multiple comorbidities that vie for the attention of clinicians who care for patients with chronic kidney disease. In this paper, I review a variety of minerals, some of which are required for maintenance of normal human physiology (the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's list of essential minerals), and some that have attracted attention in the care of dialysis patients. For each mineral, I will discuss its role in normal physiology and will review reported deficiency and toxicity states. I will point out the interesting inter-relationships between several of the elements. Finally, I will address the special concerns of aluminum and magnesium as they pertain to the dialysis population. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Clinical stages and outcomes of severe cases on hand, foot and mouth disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jin, Y; Sun, J L; Wang, Y X; Wang, X J; Fu, X Q; Miao, Z P; Lyu, J

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To understand the characteristics and relation of clinical stage and outcome of severe cases on hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and to establish the evaluation method for understanding severity of this disease. Methods: According to factors as geographical location, economic and epidemic levels, five provinces (Henan, Shandong, Yunnan, Zhejiang and Sichuan provinces) were selected. Reported severe cases of HFMD from the National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System were selected randomly in the five provinces. Basic epidemiological information, clinical data, and pathogen testing results in the involved hospitals were collected. Clinical stages on all the patients were decided in accordance with"the clinical expert consensus on diagnosis and treatment for severe case of enterovirus type 71 (EV71) infections (2011 edition)" . Data were analyzed using SPSS software 18.0 and other epidemiological methods. Results: A total of657 severe HFMD cases were investigated, with 326 cases positive of EV71, accounting for 91.3 % (326/357) among all the laboratory-confirmed cases. Of the 657 cases, 542 cases (82.5 % , 95 %CI : 79.4 %- 85.3 % ) were diagnosed as in stage 2 (with nervous system involvement), 99 cases (15.1 % , 95 %CI : 12.4 %- 18.0 % ) in stage 3 (early phase of function failure on heart and lung), and 16 cases (2.4 % , 95 %CI : 1.4 %- 3.9 % ) were in stage 4 (function failure of heart and lung). 11 cases (1.7 % , 95 %CI : 0.9 %- 3.0 % ) were with squeal when discharged from hospital with 8 cases (1.2 % , 95 %CI : 0.6 %- 2.3 % ) died. When comparing the proportions among stage 2, stage 3 and stage 4, significant differences were found between age groups ( χ (2)=22.632, P =0.012). The younger the patient was the lower the proportions of stage 2 and the more proportion of stage 3 appeared. When comparing the proportions of clinical stages among the five provinces, significant differences ( χ (2)=41.481, P =0.000) were noticed. Proportions of

  6. Staging in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; PET-CT versus Standard Staging Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Yalçın

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important factor for accurate treatment of patients with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is accuracy of the initial staging. The aim of this study was to determine how often patients, staged as local or local-advanced disease by standard staging procedures (SSPs, would be staged to have a metastatic disease based on the findings of the positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT scan. Methods: Patients with SCLC who were staged as I, II, or III disease by SSPs (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging, 7th edition formed the study population. SSPs included computed tomography of chest, abdomen, brain (or magnetic resonance imaging of brain, and bone scintigraphy. These patients were re-staged with 18F-FDG PET-CT scan. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, 27 patients were prospectively studied. Of these patients, 92.5% were male and the median age was 61. Among 27 patients, distant metastasis was detected by PET-CT in 7 (25.9% patients. Two of 7 patients were determined as stage IIIA by SSPs and 5 of 17 patients that were determined as stage IIIB by SSPs were upstaged to metastatic disease by PET-CT. All of the 7 patients had bone metastasis by PET-CT. But bone metastasis could not be detected with bone scintigraphy. Conclusion: PET-CT detected distant metastasis in one quarter of SCLC stage III patients by SSPs. Patients who staged local-advanced SCLC with CT of the chest have to be assessed by PET-CT for extracranial distant metastasis.

  7. Correlation of CliniCal data, anatomiCal site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... and stage of disease. Design: retrospective observational study. ... Design: this was a retrospective review of medical records, analysing the ... nodal basins. Dukes 'D: Metastatic disease. Statistical analysis: the data were analysed using the computer statistical program sPss (version 11.5 for Windows, sPss ...

  8. Hepatic levels of bile acids in end-stage chronic cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, S.; Beuers, U.; Spengler, U.; Zwiebel, F. M.; Koebe, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    In chronic cholestatic liver disease hydrophobic and potentially cytotoxic bile acids are assumed to accumulate in the liver. To test this hypothesis we investigated bile acid levels and pattern in livers and serum of patients with, (A) end-stage chronic cholestatic liver disease, and with (B)

  9. A deformation-based morphometry study of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, P; Østergaard, Karen; Cumming, P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) utilized primarily voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and investigated mostly patients with moderate- to late-stage disease. We now use deformation-based morphometry (DBM), a method...

  10. Challenges in the management of a child with end stage renal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) is on the rise among children in Nigeria. The cost of its management with renal replacement therapy is quite enormous for the average Nigerian family. There is no support yet from the Nigerian government or the National Health Insurance Scheme to cushion the burden of this disease.

  11. The Case for Combined-Modality Therapy for Limited-Stage Hodgkin's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Plastaras, John P.; Tochner, Zelig; Glatstein, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Results of the Hodgkin's Disease.6 trial are critically examined in light of the advances in radiation therapy techniques that have occurred since it was initiated. The ultimate findings of the HD.6 trial do not close the case for combined-modality treatment of limited-stage Hodgkin's disease.

  12. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm disturbances in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, B.C.P.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Kerkhof, G.A.; ter Wee, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an increasing health problem worldwide. Given the increasing prevalence of this disease, the high cost of hemodialysis treatment and the burden of hemodialysis on a patient's life, more research on improving the clinical outcomes and the quality of life of

  13. A Two-Stage Meta-Analysis Identifies Several New Loci for Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, Vincent; Nalls, Michael A.; Bras, Jose M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Amouyel, Philippe; Arepalli, Sampath; Band, Gavin; Barker, Roger A.; Bellinguez, Celine; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Guenther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Duerr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Freeman, Colin; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gustafsson, Omar; Harris, Clare; Hellenthal, Garrett; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pearson, Richard; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Petursson, Hjoervar; Pirinen, Matti; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; de Silva, Rohan; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, Francois; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Vukcevic, Damjan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Weale, Michael E.; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefansson, Kari; Martinez, Maria; Donnelly, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study focused on the set

  14. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  15. CIMAvax-EGF®: Therapeutic Vaccine Against Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in Advanced Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rosa Fernández Ruiz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is one of the scientific activities deployed by the Cuban State, which shows greater results and impact on the of the Cuban population health. It has increased the therapeutic repertoire in dealing with oncological diseases with products such as CIMAvax-EGF®, the first therapeutic vaccine of its kind, from the Molecular Immunology Center, against non-small cell lung cancer in advanced stages IIIB IV. The application of this product already extends to Primary Health Care with encouraging results, by prolonging the survival of patients with higher quality of life.

  16. Incidence and causes of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susan M; Foster, Bethany J; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Crowshoe, Lynden; Alexander, R Todd; Soo, Andrea; Tonelli, Marcello A

    2012-10-02

    Although Aboriginal adults have a higher risk of end-stage renal disease than non-Aboriginal adults, the incidence and causes of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal children and young adults are not well described. We calculated age- and sex-specific incidences of end-stage renal disease among Aboriginal people less than 22 years of age using data from a national organ failure registry. Incidence rate ratios were used to compare rates between Aboriginal and white Canadians. To contrast causes of end-stage renal disease by ethnicity and age, we calculated the odds of congenital diseases, glomerulonephritis and diabetes for Aboriginal people and compared them with those for white people in the following age strata: 0 to less than 22 years, 22 to less than 40 years, 40 to less than 60 years and older than 60 years. Incidence rate ratios of end-stage renal disease for Aboriginal children and young adults (age diseases were less common among Aboriginal people aged less than 22 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, 95% CI 0.36-0.86), and glomerulonephritis was more common (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.55-3.07). An excess of glomerulonephritis, but not diabetes, was seen among Aboriginal people aged 22 to less than 40 years. The converse was true (higher risk of diabetes, lower risk of glomerulonephritis) among Aboriginal people aged 40 years and older. The incidence of end-stage renal disease is higher among Aboriginal children and young adults than among white children and young adults. This higher incidence may be driven by an increased risk of glomerulonephritis in this population.

  17. A Case of Immunotactoid Glomerulopathy with Rapid Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotactoid glomerulopathy (IGN is a rare immunoglobulin deposition disease. It is often mistaken for cryoglobulinemia or amyloidosis due to the similarities on biopsy findings. The disease progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD within 7 months to 10 years. This is the first case reported of a patient with a diagnosis of IGN who developed acute kidney injury (AKI and ESRD within 1 week of initial presentation.

  18. Clinical approach to quality of life in children with end-stage renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Min Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life in addition to various medical problems in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be objectively assessed to accomplish normal growth and development during childhood. However, unfortunately, studies of quality of life (QoL) in children with ESRD have been not popular yet and there are only fewer suitable assessment tools compared with adults. Recently, disease-specific modules to evaluate QoL in children with chronic disease such as ESRD have been developed. This...

  19. Cerebral perfusion in the predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimercenter Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benedictus, Marije R.; Prins, Niels D.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Teunissen, Charlotte E. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    To investigate arterial spin-labelling (ASL) cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data were obtained from 177 patients with subjective complaints, mild cognitive impairment and AD from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. AD stages were based on diagnosis and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ) and total-tau (tau). General-linear-models were used to assess relationships between AD stages and total and regional CBF, correcting for age and sex. Decreasing CBF was related to more advanced AD stages in all supratentorial regions (p for trend < 0.05). Post-hoc testing revealed that CBF was lower in AD compared to controls and stage-1 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and normal tau) in temporal and parietal regions, and compared to stage-2 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and tau) in temporal regions. CBF values of stage-2 predementia patients were numerically in between those of stage-1 predementia patients and AD. The continuing decrease of CBF along the continuum of AD indicates the potential of ASL-CBF as a measure for disease progression. (orig.)

  20. Cerebral perfusion in the predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik; Benedictus, Marije R.; Prins, Niels D.; Scheltens, Philip; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Teunissen, Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate arterial spin-labelling (ASL) cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data were obtained from 177 patients with subjective complaints, mild cognitive impairment and AD from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. AD stages were based on diagnosis and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ) and total-tau (tau). General-linear-models were used to assess relationships between AD stages and total and regional CBF, correcting for age and sex. Decreasing CBF was related to more advanced AD stages in all supratentorial regions (p for trend < 0.05). Post-hoc testing revealed that CBF was lower in AD compared to controls and stage-1 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and normal tau) in temporal and parietal regions, and compared to stage-2 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and tau) in temporal regions. CBF values of stage-2 predementia patients were numerically in between those of stage-1 predementia patients and AD. The continuing decrease of CBF along the continuum of AD indicates the potential of ASL-CBF as a measure for disease progression. (orig.)

  1. [END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE, DIALYSIS TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF COMORBIDITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarić, D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease is clearly defined as a state of damaged kidney function lasting for more than three months. Changes manifest in serum and urine pathological findings with frequent morphological changes in the kidneys and reduction in glomerular filtration. The aim is to show the possibilities of renal replacement therapy and waste related disease during dialysis treatment. The methods are based on strong evidence and guidelines. Glomerular filtration is the basis in evaluating the stage of chronic kidney disease. Based on the measures of glomerular filtration reduction, chronic kidney disease is classified into five stages, thus facilitating approach to treatment of particular groups of patients depending on the level of glomerular filtration damage. Kidney function can be replaced by dialysis or transplantation and in certain cases symptomatically if the patient refuses dialysis treatment. Malnutrition, hypertension, kidney anemia and bone-mineral disease are often present in patients with higher stages of chronic kidney disease, particularly stage 5 and kidney function replacement by dialysis. In conclusion, timely treatment reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  2. Talimogene Laherparepvec in Combination With Ipilimumab in Previously Untreated, Unresectable Stage IIIB-IV Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzanov, Igor; Milhem, Mohammed M; Minor, David; Hamid, Omid; Li, Ai; Chen, Lisa; Chastain, Michael; Gorski, Kevin S; Anderson, Abraham; Chou, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Howard L; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2016-08-01

    Combining immunotherapeutic agents with different mechanisms of action may enhance efficacy. We describe the safety and efficacy of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC; an oncolytic virus) in combination with ipilimumab (a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 checkpoint inhibitor) in patients with advanced melanoma. In this open-label, multicenter, phase Ib trial of T-VEC in combination with ipilimumab, T-VEC was administered intratumorally in week 1 (10(6) plaque-forming units/mL), then in week 4 and every 2 weeks thereafter (10(8) plaque-forming units/mL). Ipilimumab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every 3 weeks for four infusions, beginning in week 6. The primary end point was incidence of dose-limiting toxicities. Secondary end points were objective response rate by immune-related response criteria and safety. Median duration of treatment with T-VEC was 13.3 weeks (range, 2.0 to 95.4 weeks). Median follow-up time for survival analysis was 20.0 months (1.0 to 25.4 months). Nineteen patients were included in the safety analysis. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and no new safety signals were detected. Grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were seen in 26.3% of patients; 15.8% had AEs attributed to T-VEC, and 21.1% had AEs attributed to ipilimumab. The objective response rate was 50%, and 44% of patients had a durable response lasting ≥ 6 months. Eighteen-month progression-free survival was 50%; 18-month overall survival was 67%. T-VEC with ipilimumab had a tolerable safety profile, and the combination appeared to have greater efficacy than either T-VEC or ipilimumab monotherapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Methods for surgical targeting of the STN in early stage Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C R Camalier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson’s disease experience progressive neurological decline, and future interventional therapies are thought to show most promise in early stages of the disease. There is much interest in therapies that target the subthalamic nucleus (STN with surgical access. While locating STN in advanced disease patients (Hoehn-Yahr III or IV is well understood and routinely performed at many centers in the context of deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS, the ability to identify this nucleus in early stage patients has not previously been explored in a sizeable cohort. We report surgical methods used to target the STN nucleus in fifteen patients with early Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn-Yahr II, using a combination of image guided surgery, microelectrode recordings and clinical responses to macrostimulation of the region surrounding the STN. Measures of electrophysiology (firing rates, root mean squared activity have previously been found to be lower than in later stage patients, however, the patterns of electrophysiology seen and dopamimetic macrostimulation effects are qualitatively similar to those seen in advanced stages. Our experience with surgical implantation of Parkinson’s patients with minimal motor symptoms suggest that it remains possible to accurately target the STN in early stage Parkinson’s disease using traditional methods.

  4. Challenges and barriers to managing quality in an end-stage renal disease facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanValkenburgh, D; Snyder, S

    1994-08-01

    The End-Stage Renal Disease Program is underfunded and overregulated. Objective parameters of end points of care do not correlate to specific clinical practice patterns. We do not have consensus between payers, providers, and patients as to what the objectives of the End-Stage Renal Disease Program are or should be. This report will address the need for an integrated health care delivery system that would benefit the end-stage renal disease patient and the barriers to designing such a system. The quality improvement program of a five-unit dialysis system will be described. The deficiencies of the quality improvement program and the limitation of the facilities to improve outcome will be discussed, and constructive alternatives to achieve an integrated health care delivery system that promotes improvement in patient outcomes will be suggested.

  5. Temporal order of RNase IIIb and loss-of-function mutations during development determines phenotype in pleuropulmonary blastoma / DICER1 syndrome: a unique variant of the two-hit tumor suppression model [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Brenneman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB is the most frequent pediatric lung tumor and often the first indication of a pleiotropic cancer predisposition, DICER1 syndrome, comprising a range of other individually rare, benign and malignant tumors of childhood and early adulthood. The genetics of DICER1-associated tumorigenesis are unusual in that tumors typically bear neomorphic missense mutations at one of five specific “hotspot” codons within the RNase IIIb domain of DICER 1, combined with complete loss of function (LOF in the other allele. We analyzed a cohort of 124 PPB children for predisposing DICER1 mutations and sought correlations with clinical phenotypes. Over 70% have inherited or de novo germline LOF mutations, most of which truncate the DICER1 open reading frame. We identified a minority of patients who have no germline mutation, but are instead mosaic for predisposing DICER1 mutations. Mosaicism for RNase IIIb domain hotspot mutations defines a special category of DICER1 syndrome patients, clinically distinguished from those with germline or mosaic LOF mutations by earlier onsets and numerous discrete foci of neoplastic disease involving multiple syndromic organ sites. A final category of PBB patients lack predisposing germline or mosaic mutations and have sporadic (rather than syndromic disease limited to a single PPB tumor bearing tumor-specific RNase IIIb and LOF mutations. We propose that acquisition of a neomorphic RNase IIIb domain mutation is the rate limiting event in DICER1-associated tumorigenesis, and that distinct clinical phenotypes associated with mutational categories reflect the temporal order in which LOF and RNase IIIb domain mutations are acquired during development.

  6. Dialysis modality choice in diabetic patients with end-stage kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchoud, Cecile; Bolignano, Davide; Nistor, Ionut

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Because of conflicting results in observational studies, it is still subject to debate whether in diabetic patients the dialysis modality selected as first treatment (haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) may have a major...... on diabetes, end-stage kidney disease and dialysis modality. Selection of relevant studies, data extraction and analysis were performed by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: Twenty-five observational studies (23 on incident and 2 on prevalent cohorts) were included in this review. Mortality was the only main...

  7. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival. Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14–1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08–1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00–1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04–1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12–1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12–1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01–1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04–1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72–17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB. Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality. PMID:26962806

  8. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  9. Hodgkin's disease: problems of staging. [/sup 67/Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, D.L. Jr.; Kinnealey, A.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1978-08-01

    The preferred histopathological classification of Hodgkin's disease (HD) is suggested by Lukes and Butler as modified at the Rye Symposium; the histologic subtypes are highly reproducible and correlate well with the anatomic sites of involvement, clinical stage, and survival. The accuracy of the bipedal lymphangiogram, /sup 67/gallium scan, and ultrasonography in predicting abdominal involvement by HD is 90 percent, 50 percent, and 88 percent, respectively. Staging laparotomy remains the most accurate method of detecting intra-abdominal disease and has added immensely to new concepts in the management of HD. These concepts suggest that patients with nodal disease limited to the celiac axis or upper para-aortic areas (substage III/sub 1/) or pathologic stage (PS) III/sub S+N-/A, when treated with extended field radiotherapy alone have survival rates comparable to PS IIA patients. In contrast, patients in PS IIIA with lower abdominal nodal disease (substage III/sub 2/), regardless of splenic involvement, have a prognosis comparable to PS IV disease. Thus, there may only be two stages of HD, those curable with extended mantle or smaller radiotherapy fields alone, and those requiring chemotherapy with or without supplemental radiotherapy.

  10. The sensitivity of auxiliary examinations in different stages of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-jiao JIANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the sensitivity of auxiliary examinations in different periods of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. Methods The clinical data of 53 sCJD patients were retrospectively analyzed including the different stages of skull diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI, 24-hour ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG, 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET-CT and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein. When calculating the sensitivity of an auxiliary examination, the diagnostic criteria were defined by combining the specific clinical manifestations with two or more positive results of other auxiliary examinations. Results There were 24, 53 and 22 sCJD patients, respectively, met the criterion of early (E, middle (M and later (L stage of disease (some patients fit 2 or 3 stages. The sensitivity of DWI (E: 58.3%, M: 85.4%, L: 94.7%, EEG (E: 45.8%, M: 62.7%, L: 77.8%, 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid (E: 11.1%, M: 52.9% and PET-CT (E: 80%, M: 100% increased gradually with disease progression. The sensitivity of PET-CT was higher than the other auxiliary examinations for E and M stages; no PET-CT was conducted in L stage. High signal regions mainly distributed in the cortex in E and M stages, but in L stage, no significant difference was found on the distribution of high signal regions between cortex and basal ganglia. Conclusions The sensitivities of the auxiliary examinations were different for sCJD patients in different stages. Reexaminations in different periods may improve the sensitivity for sCJD diagnosis. The sensitivity of PET-CT was high, and the combination of PET-CT and other auxiliary examinations may play a key role in the diagnosis of sCJD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.15

  11. Salvage of relapse of patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy and initially treated with radiotherapy alone. A report from the international database on Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Horwich, A; Ashley, S

    1994-01-01

    To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy.......To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy....

  12. What is the impact of chronic kidney disease stage and cardiovascular disease on the annual cost of hospital care in moderate-to-severe kidney disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Seamus; Schlackow, Iryna; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable estimates of the impacts of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, with and without cardiovascular disease, on hospital costs are needed to inform health policy. METHODS: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized trial prospectively collected information on kidney...... disease progression, serious adverse events and hospital care use in a cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. In a secondary analysis of SHARP data, the impact of participants' CKD stage, non-fatal cardiovascular events and deaths on annual hospital costs (i.e. all hospital admissions, routine...... or vascular disease incurred annual hospital care costs ranging from £403 (95% confidence interval: 345-462) in CKD stages 1-3B to £525 (449-602) in CKD stage 5 (not on dialysis). Patients in receipt of maintenance dialysis incurred annual hospital costs of £18,986 (18,620-19,352) in the year of initiation...

  13. Radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease: Australasian patterns of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Michael; Boyages, John; Crennan, Elizabeth; Davis, Sidney; Fisher, Richard J.; Hook, Carolyn; Johnson, Neva; Joseph, David; Liew, Kuen H.; Morgan, Graeme; O'Brien, Peter; Pendlebury, Sue; Pratt, Gary; Quong, George; Thornton, Deborah; Walker, Quenten; Wallington, Margaret; Trotter, Grant

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of treatment outcome for Stage I-IIA supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated solely by irradiation in Australia and New Zealand. Methods and Materials: Patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease only who were treated by irradiation alone with curative intent between 1969 to 1988 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand contributed patient data to the study. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were recorded. Disease-free interval, survival, and complications were analyzed. Results: Eight hundred and twenty patients were reviewed. The median age was 29 years. There were 437 men and 383 women. The distribution of 310 clinically staged patients was 170 stage IA, 5 IB, and 135 IIA. Five hundred and ten patients received laparotomies, and pathologic staging was as follows: IA 214, IB 13, IIA 283. The 10-year acturial disease-free rate was 69% and overall survival rate was 79%. Increasing age, male sex, higher number of involved sites, the use of involved field irradiation, no staging laparotomy, and earlier year of treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse and lower survival. Actuarial 10-year survival following recurrence was 48%. Acute complications requiring interruption to treatment occurred in 46 patients (6%), but < 1% had their treatment permanently suspended. Actuarial complication rates at 10 years were: cardiac 2%, pulmonary 3% and thyroid 5%. There were 44 second malignancies including 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3 leukemias, 7 lung, and 6 breast cancers. Mean delay to the development of a second cancer was 6 years. The 10-year actuarial rate of second malignancy was 5%. Conclusions: The Australasian experience of early stage Hodgkin's disease is consistent with the results in the published literature and confirms that irradiation produces a high cure rate with minimal toxicity

  14. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients: progression markers of mild to moderate stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Raissa Carla; Zonta, Marise Bueno; Araújo, Ana Paula Serra de; Israel, Vera Lúcia; Teive, Hélio A G

    2017-08-01

    To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson's disease patients from mild to moderate stages. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p life was related to stigma (p = 0.043), greater impairment in cognition (p = 0.002), mobility (p = 0.013) and for daily living activities (p = 0.05), and was considered more significant in men, married, older individuals, and those with a longer time of disease. The quality of life worsening markers at the moderate stage were related to stigma, worsening of cognition, and to greater impairment in mobility and daily living activities.

  15. Speech and Voice Response to a Levodopa Challenge in Late-Stage Parkinson?s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, Margherita; Guimar?es, Isabel; Cardoso, Rita; Coelho, Miguel; Guedes, Leonor Correia; Rosa, Mario M.; Godinho, Catarina; Abreu, Daisy; Gon?alves, Nilza; Antonini, Angelo; Ferreira, Joaquim J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients are affected by hypokinetic dysarthria, characterized by hypophonia and dysprosody, which worsens with disease progression. Levodopa’s (l-dopa) effect on quality of speech is inconclusive; no data are currently available for late-stage PD (LSPD). Objective To assess the modifications of speech and voice in LSPD following an acute l-dopa challenge. Method LSPD patients [Schwab and England score 3 (MED ON)] performed several vocal ...

  16. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Zhigang; Ma, Xiaofen; Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18?61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22?58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain i...

  17. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontillo, Claudia; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Schanstra, Joost P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CKD273 is a urinary biomarker, which in advanced chronic kidney disease predicts further deterioration. We investigated whether CKD273 can also predict a decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to ... threshold (P = 0.086). Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target....

  18. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Petschow

    Full Text Available Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels.13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ and higher (E = 640 mJ target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale.No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson's disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson's disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex.Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson's disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Evaluation of the World Health Organization staging system for HIV infection and disease in Ethiopia: association between clinical stages and laboratory markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassa, E.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Hailu, E.; Girma, M.; Messele, T.; Mariam, H. G.; Yohannes, S.; Jurriaans, S.; Yeneneh, H.; Coutinho, R. A.; Fontanet, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between the clinical axis of the World Health Organization (WHO) staging system of HIV infection and disease and laboratory markers in HIV-infected Ethiopians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Clinical manifestations and stage of HIV-positive individuals

  20. Melatonin and cortisol serum levels in lung cancer patients at different stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Carughi, Stefano; De Cata, Angelo; La Viola, Marco; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    Numerous interactions exist among the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, mediated by neurotransmitters, hormones, and cytokines. Melatonin may modulate the integrated functions of a unique neuro-immune-endocrine system. Neoplastic diseases may be linked to progressive loss of integration among these systems. We investigated whether there are differences among healthy elderly people and elderly people suffering from lung cancer at different stages of disease in 24-hour melatonin and cortisol secretory profiles. In seventeen healthy subjects (mean age +/-S.E.: 68.8+/-1.92 years), seventeen patients with stage I and II lung cancer (mean age: 67.2+/-0.80), seventeen patients with stage III and IV lung cancer (mean age: 69.5+/-2.26), melatonin and cortisol serum levels were measured in blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours. The area under the curve (AUC) and the presence of circadian rhythmicity were evaluated. The circadian rhythm of melatonin was present in all the groups, but serum levels were decreased in the subjects suffering from lung cancer (Pcortisol serum levels were increased (not in a significant way), with a loss of the circadian rhythm of secretion. The melatonin/cortisol ratio was decreased in stage III and IV cancer patients (Pmelatonin secretion and altered cortisol secretion pattern with advancing stage of neoplastic disease may be an expression of a gradual alteration of the integrated function of the neuro-endocrine system in lung cancer patients.

  1. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Predictors of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Hanna-Pladdy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to identify mild cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD prior to extensive neurodegeneration and to evaluate the extent to which dopamine depletion and other disease-related predictors can explain cognitive profiles. Methods: Neuropsychological performances of 40 nondemented early-stage PD patients and 42 healthy controls were compared across on or off dopaminergic medications. Stepwise regression evaluated cognitive predictors of early-stage PD and disease-related predictors of PD cognition (levodopa dose, disease duration, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score, sleep, quality of life, and mood across on and off states. Results: Neuropsychological performance was lower in PD patients across cognitive domains with significant memory, naming, visuomotor, and complex attention/executive deficits, but with intact visuospatial, simple attention, and phonemic fluency functions. However, medication effects were absent except for simple attention. Regression analyses revealed age, working memory, and memory recall to be the best cognitive predictors of PD, while age, quality of life, disease duration, and anxiety predicted PD cognition in the off state. Conclusion: Nondemented early-stage PD patients presented with extensive mild cognitive deficits including prominent memory impairment. The profile was inconsistent with expected isolated frontostriatal dysfunction previously attributed to dopamine depletion and this highlights the need to further characterize extranigral sources of mild cognitive impairment in PD.

  3. Lack of miRNA misregulation at early pathological stages in Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita eReinhardt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Late onset neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health concern as the population in many countries ages. Both frequent diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD, 14% incidence for 80-84 year old Europeans or Parkinson disease (PD, 1.4% prevalence for > 55 years old share, with other low-incidence neurodegenerative pathologies such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs, 0.01% prevalence and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, 0.02% prevalence, a lack of efficient treatment in spite of important research efforts. Besides significant progress, studies with animal models have revealed unexpected complexities in the degenerative process, emphasizing a need to better understand the underlying pathological mechanisms. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small regulatory non-coding RNAs, have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. The current data supporting a role of miRNAs in PD, tauopathies, dominant ataxias and FTLD will first be discussed to emphasize the different levels of the pathological processes which may be affected by miRNAs. To investigate a potential involvement of miRNA dysregulation in the early stages of these neurodegenerative diseases we have used Drosophila models for 7 diseases (PD, 3 FTLD, 3 dominant ataxias that recapitulate many features of the human diseases. We performed deep sequencing of head small RNAs after 3 days of pathological protein expression in the fly head neurons. We found no evidence for a statistically significant difference in miRNA expression in this early stage of the pathological process. In addition, we could not identify small non coding CAG repeat RNAs (sCAG in polyQ disease models. Thus our data suggest that transcriptional deregulation of miRNAs or sCAG is unlikely to play a significant role in the initial stages of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Loss of KCNQ1 expression in stage II and stage III colon cancer is a strong prognostic factor for disease recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Uil, Sjoerd H; Coupé, Veerle M H; Linnekamp, Janneke F; van den Broek, Evert; Goos, Jeroen A C M; Delis-van Diemen, Pien M; Belt, Eric J Th; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Scott, Patricia M; Vermeulen, Louis; Medema, Jan Paul; Bril, Herman; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Cormier, Robert T; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A

    2016-12-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurately identifying stage II CRC patients at risk for recurrence is an unmet clinical need. KCNQ1 was previously identified as a tumour suppressor gene and loss of expression was associated with poor survival in patients with CRC liver metastases. In this study the prognostic value of KCNQ1 in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients was examined. KCNQ1 mRNA expression was assessed in 90 stage II colon cancer patients (AMC-AJCCII-90) using microarray gene expression data. Subsequently, KCNQ1 protein expression was evaluated in an independent cohort of 386 stage II and stage III colon cancer patients by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. Low KCNQ1 mRNA expression in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancers was associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.025). Loss of KCNQ1 protein expression from epithelial cells was strongly associated with poor DFS in stage II MSS (PKCNQ1 seemed an independent prognostic value in addition to other high-risk parameters like angio-invasion, nodal stage and microsatellite instability-status. We conclude that KCNQ1 is a promising biomarker for prediction of disease recurrence and may aid stratification of patients with stage II MSS colon cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  5. Correlation of CliniCal data, anatomiCal site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... Objective: to evaluate the colorectal cancer clinical data with respect to the anatomical location and stage of disease. Design: retrospective observational study. Setting: Kenyatta national Hospital (KnH), nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and fifty three tumours were categorised as right colonic (RCC), ...

  6. Assessment of Respiratory Complications Associated with End Stage Renal Disease in Northern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosayfir Mohammed Abdulrahman S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD is increasing in different parts of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, particularly Hail Region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the respiratory complications that associated with ESRD.

  7. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Repeated puncture PD although inferior to HD biochemically, is easily and freely available across Rajasthan, India, and is simple to perform, and does not require sophisticated machines, thus making it an attractive option for dialysis ...

  8. Discrepancy between subjective and objective sleep disturbances in early and moderate stage Alzheimer’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Most, E.I.S.; Aboudan, S.; Scheltens, P.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances such as nocturnal awakenings frequently occur in demented elderly persons and can contribute to depression, cognitive impairment, and caregiver burden. Recognizing sleep disturbances at an early stage of the disease progress is a first prerequisite of intervention and

  9. Late-stage disease at presentation to an HIV clinic in eastern Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African patients. Little is known about the proportion and characteristics of patients presenting to HIV care and treatment clinics in the later stages of the disease. Most reports in sub-Saharan Africa focus on the CD4 count at. ART initiation and reveal that a majority of patients initiate. ART at low CD4 levels6. This study aimed ...

  10. Complexity Analysis of Resting-State MEG Activity in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez, C.; Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Stam, C.J.; Abasolo, D.; Berendse, H.W.; Hornero, R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze resting-state brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were recorded with a 151-channel whole-head radial gradiometer MEG system in 18 early-stage

  11. Global variation in renal replacement therapy for end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caskey, Fergus J.; Kramer, Anneke; Elliott, Robert F.; Stel, Vianda S.; Covic, Adrian; Cusumano, Ana; Geue, Claudia; Macleod, Alison M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Stengel, Benedicte; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    Incidence rates of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease vary considerably worldwide. This study examines the independent association between the general population, health care system and renal service characteristics and RRT incidence rates. RRT incidence data (2003-2005)

  12. Results of two different surgical techniques in the treatment of advanced-stage Freiberg's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Ozkul

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The decision of performing osteotomy or resection arthroplasty in the patients with advanced-stage Freiberg's disease should be based on the joint injury and the patients should be informed about the cosmetic problems like shortening which may arise from resection.

  13. Longitudinal observations on circadian blood pressure variation in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, T.; Strandgaard, S.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    /non-dipper status prospectively in a study on dosage of enalapril in progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-5. METHODS: In 34 patients, 24-h ambulatory BP (A&D TM2421) was measured at baseline and every 4 months for 1 year or until the need for renal replacement therapy. For each BP recording patients...

  14. Prevalence and Pattern of Renal Bone Disease in End Stage Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Information on renal bone disease (RBD) is sparse in Nigeria. The prevalence of RBD in a dialysis population worldwide ranges between 33% and 67% and it increases with progression of renal insufficiency. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and magnitude of. RBD in patients with end stage renal ...

  15. The storm before the quiet : neuronal hyperactivity and Aβ in the presymptomatic stages of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stargardt, Anita; Swaab, Dick F; Bossers, K.

    Neuronal activity directly promotes the production and secretion of amyloid β (Aβ). Interestingly, neuronal hyperactivity can be observed in presymptomatic stages of both sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in several AD mouse models. In this review, we will highlight the recent

  16. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Steffen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on occurrence and risk factors for pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are sparse. Methods: This was a nationwide population-based study assessing occurrence and risk factors for PCP among patients with ESRD and population controls over a 21...

  17. Potential benefits of palliative care for polysymptomatic patients with late-stage nonmalignant disease in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shin Hung

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Hospice care with good symptom control is warranted for patients with late-stage nonmalignant disease who need appropriate end-of-life care. Medical personnel need education in the importance of palliative care and the identification of patients who could benefit from it. In addition, patients should be informed of its availability.

  18. Low agreement between cardiologists diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy in children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, Nikki J.; van der Lee, Johanna H.; Groothoff, Jaap W.; van Iperen, Gabrielle G.; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M. E.; Tanke, Ronald B.; Ottenkamp, Jaap; Kuipers, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of the appearance of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by echocardiography is currently recommended for in the management of children with End-stage renal disease (ESRD). In order to investigate the validity of this method in ESRD children, we assessed the intra- and inter-observer

  19. Etiology and epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in Dutch children 1987-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miklovicova, Daniela; Cornelissen, Marlies; Cransberg, Karlien; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Dedik, Ladislav; Schroder, Cornelis H.

    2005-01-01

    In this retrospective study 351 children ( <16.0 years) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) accepted for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the four Dutch pediatric centers were analyzed for the period 1987-2001. The data were compared with a previous study performed in 1979-1986. Eighty patients

  20. End-stage renal disease in Slovak children : epidemiology from a European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolvek, G.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Podracka, L.; Rosenberger, J.; Nagyova, I.; Stewart, R.E.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Slovak children, to compare it with earlier Slovak data and with data from other European countries, and to explore etiology. Over the years 2003-2009, data on the incidence and prevalence of all cases of ESRD

  1. Nutrition and growth in European children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonthuis, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focused on nutrition and growth in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Europe. ESRD in childhood is a rare condition, with a total number of children of 4.4 per million age related population who started renal replacement therapy in 2011. Therefore, in order to conduct

  2. Hodgkin's disease stages I and II with infradiaphragmatic presentation: a rare and prognostically unfavourable combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    . The 34 remaining early stage patients were treated by irradiation plus combination chemotherapy (21 patients), irradiation only (9 patients), or combination chemotherapy only (4 patients). They were followed until death or from 4 to 171 months after initiation of therapy. With regard to disease......-free survival, combined modality treatment (as opposed to radiotherapy only) was found to be of prognostic significance....

  3. Vitamin D and Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Paradigm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Joffe, Preben; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor agonists (VDRA) are currently recommended for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in stage 5 CKD. They are considered to be contraindicated in the presence of low or normal (for a dialysis patient) levels of PTH due to the risk of developing adynamic bone disease...

  4. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-29

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Encephaloduroateriosynangiosis versus conservative treatment for patients with moyamoya disease at late Suzuki stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peicong; Ye, Xun; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Jizong

    2018-01-20

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the long-term outcomes after conservative and encephaloduroateriosynangiosis procedures for patients with moyamoya disease at late Suzuki stage. We retrospectively reviewed 64 patients (128 hemispheres) with moyamoya disease at late Suzuki Stage at Beijing Tiantan Hospital. Clinical features, radiologic findings, and outcomes were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 29.0 ± 14.9 years. The distribution of the initial Suzuki stage of MMD was as follows: stage 4, n = 75; stage 5, n = 46; stage 6, n = 7, PCA involvement was observed in 4 (37.5%) hemispheres. The incidence of postoperative stroke was 6.7%. During the average follow-up of 46.9 ± 21.1 months, including postoperative and follow-up strokes, seven of 75 (9.3%) conservatively treated hemispheres and 10 of 87 (10.1%) surgically treated patients experienced a stroke event there was not statistically significant in the Kaplan-Meier curve of stroke incidence between the surgical group and conservative group (log-rank test, p = .848). However, the rate of perfusion improvement in indirect bypass surgically treated patients was higher than in those conservative treated patients 3 months after discharge (p Suzuki stage, it failed to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke compared to conservative treatment. Further study is needed to determine whether direct bypass surgery is effective in MMD patients at late Suzuki stage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy in lung cancer. A retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, D. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano (Milan) (Italy); De Rose, F.; Navarria, P.; Clerici, E.; Franzese, C.; Comito, T.; Tozzi, A.; Iftode, C.; D' Agostino, G. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Cozzi, L.; Sorsetti, M. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to analyse the feasibility and acute toxicity of radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy (RT) for elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We conducted a retrospective evaluation of treatment with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of elderly patients affected by stage III inoperable NSCLC. The dose prescription was 56 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 22 fractions, or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. Target volume included only the primary lesion and the infiltrated lymph nodes. The primary end point was acute and late toxicity, while secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In all, 41 patients were included in this analysis. The mean age of the patients was 78.6 years, and 22 patients had staged IIIA while 19 patients had stage IIIB disease. All but one patient had pathological nodal involvement; 15 patients received chemotherapy before RT. Acute grade 1-2 toxicity was recorded in 25 (61%) patients. Late toxicity was recorded in 13 (32%) patients. No cases of G3 or G4 toxicity were recorded. Complete response was obtained in two (5%) patients, 26 (63%) showed a partial response, and two (5%) experience disease progression. At a mean follow-up of 9.9 months (range, 1.1-25.4), 17 patients had died from disease progression, one died from other causes, and 23 were alive. Median OS was 13.7 ± 1.5 months (95% CI: 10.7-16.7), OS at 12 and 18 months was 51.3 ± 9.5% and 35.1 ± 10.1%, respectively. Median PFS was 13.7 ± 2.3 months (95% CI: 9.1-18.2), and PFS at 12 and 18 months was 50.1 ± 9.9% and 38.9 ± 10.4%, respectively. Radical hypo-fractionated VMAT is a promising treatment for locally advanced NSCLC in the elderly. The use of hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer in older patients can be considered a valuable approach, particularly for patients with poor performance status or refusing other treatment approaches. (orig.) [German] Durchfuehrbarkeit und Nebenwirkungen der radikalen

  7. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke during active stages of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. L.; Lindhardsen, J.; Ahlehoff, O.

    2014-01-01

    patients with new-onset IBD and 236 275 age- and sex-matched controls. Poisson regression analyses with continuously updated covariates were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of AF and stroke. Disease activity stages of flare (new disease activity), persistent activity, and remission were...... defined by corticosteroid prescriptions, IBD hospital admissions, and biological treatment. Inflammatory bowel disease patients had a mean age of 43.9 years, 53.9 were women, and mean follow-up was 6.8 years. Among IBD patients, 685 had AF and 549 had a stroke, corresponding to incidence rates per 1000...

  8. Clinical approach to quality of life in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Hyun

    2013-08-01

    Quality of life in addition to various medical problems in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be objectively assessed to accomplish normal growth and development during childhood. However, unfortunately, studies of quality of life (QoL) in children with ESRD have been not popular yet and there are only fewer suitable assessment tools compared with adults. Recently, disease-specific modules to evaluate QoL in children with chronic disease such as ESRD have been developed. This review was made to introduce these QoL instruments for children and help the clinical application of them.

  9. Testosterone effect on brain metabolism in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease: comparing two cases at different disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, R S

    2013-06-01

    To describe the effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on the brain activity of two demented, hypogonadal male patients with early and late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. We describe the clinical and positron emission tomography (PET) findings for two individuals, one with early stage and the other with late-stage Alzheimer's disease, before and after treatment with a topical testosterone gel. Both patients were hypogonadal at baseline. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism (CGM) via (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated whether there are testosterone-susceptible areas within cerebral structures in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Under testosterone replacement therapy, changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were observed in both patients. Improvement in glucose uptake was observed most consistently in the parietal lobe and brainstem; decreased glucose metabolism was observed in the temporal lobe, the limbic system and the insula for these two subjects. These case reports demonstrate the potential for PET scanning to detect changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in hypogonadal men with Alzheimer's disease who are treated with testosterone. Further study will be needed to investigate the consistency and significance of these changes in terms of magnitude and brain region, and the correlation with functional changes.

  10. Trefoil Factor 1 Excretion Is Increased in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lebherz-Eichinger

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In many patients CKD is diagnosed late during disease progression. Therefore, the implementation of potential biomarkers may facilitate the early identification of individuals at risk. Trefoil factor family (TFF peptides promote restitution processes of mucous epithelia and are abundant in the urinary tract. We therefore sought to investigate the TFF peptide levels in patients suffering from CKD and their potential as biomarkers for CKD. We analysed TFF1 and TFF3 in serum and urine of 115 patients with CKD stages 1-5 without dialysis by ELISA. 20 healthy volunteers served as controls. Our results showed, that urinary TFF1 levels were significantly increased with the onset of CKD in stages 1-4 as compared to controls and declined during disease progression (p = 0.003, 0.8. In conclusion our results show increased levels of TFF1 and TFF3 in CKD patients with a pronounced elevation of urinary TFF1 in lower CKD stages. Furthermore, TFF1 and TFF3 seems to be differently regulated and show potential to predict various CKD stages, as shown by ROC curve analysis.

  11. The relationship between clinical phenotype and early staged bilateral deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Victor W; Watts, Ray L; Schrandt, Christian J; Guthrie, Stephanie; Wang, Deli; Amara, Amy W; Guthrie, Barton L; Walker, Harrison C

    2013-12-01

    While many centers place bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems simultaneously, unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS followed by a staged contralateral procedure has emerged as a treatment option for many patients. However, little is known about whether the preoperative phenotype predicts when staged placement of a DBS electrode in the opposite STN will be required. The authors aimed to determine whether preoperative clinical phenotype predicts early staged placement of a second STN DBS electrode in patients who undergo unilateral STN DBS for Parkinson disease (PD). Eighty-two consecutive patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral STN DBS contralateral to the most affected hemibody and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined preoperative characteristics that predicted staged placement of a second electrode in the opposite STN. Preoperative measurements included aspects of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), motor asymmetry index, and body weight. At 2-year follow-up, 28 (34%) of the 82 patients had undergone staged placement of a contralateral electrode while the remainder chose to continue with unilateral stimulation. Statistically significant improvements in UPDRS total and Part 3 scores were retained at the end of the 2-year follow-up period in both subsets of patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the most important predictors for early staged placement of a second subthalamic stimulator were low asymmetry index (OR 13.4, 95% CI 2.8-64.9), high tremor subscore (OR 7.2, CI 1.5-35.0), and low body weight (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.4-22.3). This single-center study provides evidence that elements of the preoperative PD phenotype predict whether patients will require early staged bilateral STN DBS. These data may aid in the management of patients with advanced PD who undergo STN DBS.

  12. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  13. Screening for a Chronic Disease: A Multiple Stage Duration Model with Partial Observability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Thomas A; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy P

    2016-08-01

    We estimate a dynamic multi-stage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, while the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

  14. Salvage of relapse of patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy and initially treated with radiotherapy alone. A report from the international database on Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Horwich, A.; Ashley, S.

    1994-01-01

    patients in the International Database on Hodgkin's Disease who were initially in clinical Stages I or II, who were staged with laparotomy, and who relapsed after initial treatment with irradiation alone. Factors analyzed for outcome after first relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology......PURPOSE: To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were analyzed on 681...

  15. Salvage of relapse of patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy and initially treated with radiotherapy alone. A report from the international database on Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Horwich, A.; Ashley, S.

    1994-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were analyzed on 681...... patients in the International Database on Hodgkin's Disease who were initially in clinical Stages I or II, who were staged with laparotomy, and who relapsed after initial treatment with irradiation alone. Factors analyzed for outcome after first relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology...

  16. Reduced Uptake of FDOPA PET in End-Stage Liver Disease with Elevated Manganese Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, Susan R; Perlmutter, Joel S; Crippin, Jeffrey S; Videen, Tom O; Moerlein, Stephen M; Flores, Hubert P; Birke, Angela M; Racette, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether manganese toxicity secondary to end state liver disease is associated with nigrastriatal dysfunction as measured by 6-[18F]fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) PET imaging. Design Observational case report. Setting The Movement Disorder Center at Washington University in St. Louis. Patients An individual with manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. His FDOPA PET was compared with those of 10 idiopathic Parkinson disease patients and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Main Outcome Measure The average estimated net FDOPA uptake by Patlak graphical analysis for caudate, anterior putamen and posterior putamen. Results The FDOPA uptake for the patient with secondary manganese toxicity was reduced across all regions by more than 2 SDs compared with healthy controls: caudate (reduced 24.7%), anterior putamen (28.0%), and posterior putamen (29.3%). The ratio of uptake between the caudate/posterior putamen was 0.99 and was different from that of idiopathic Parkinson disease patients, in whom the greatest reduction of FDOPA was in the posterior putamen (mean [SD] ratio, 1.65 [0.41]). Conclusions Reduce striatal uptake of FDOPA uptake indicates dysfunction of the nigrostriatal pathways in manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. The pattern of striatal involvement with equal reduction of FDOPA uptake in the caudate compared with posterior putamen appears different from those previously reported in individuals with occupational manganese toxicity and idiopathic Parkinson disease and may be specific to manganese toxicity secondary to end stage liver disease. PMID:22410448

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF END-STAGE LIVER DISEASE AND LIVER TRANSPLANTATION ON THYROID HORMONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Rocha PENTEADO

    Full Text Available Background Thyroid dysfunction has been reported in most chronic illnesses including severe liver disease. These defects in thyroid hormone metabolism result in the sick euthyroid syndrome, also known as low T3 syndrome. Objectives Our objective was to evaluate the thyroid function in patients with end stage liver disease prior and after deceased donor liver transplantation and to correlate thyroid hormonal changes with the MELD score (Model for End stage Liver Disease. Methods In a prospective study, serum levels of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone TSH, total thyroxine (tT4, free thyroxine (fT4 and triiodothyronine (T3 from 30 male adult patients with end stage liver disease were measured two to four hours before and 6 months after liver transplantation (LT. MELD was determined on the day of transplant. For this analysis, extra points were not added for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results The patients had normal TSH and fT4 levels before LT and there was no change after the procedure. Total thyroxine and triiodothyronine were within the normal range before LT, except for four patients (13.3% whose values were lower. Both hormones increased to normal values in all four patients after LT (P=0.02 and P18, it was observed that there was no change in the TSH, freeT4, and total T4 levels in both groups after LT. Although there was no significant variation in the level of T3 in MELD 18 group after LT (P=0.003. Conclusion Patients with end stage liver disease subjected to liver transplantation had normal TSH and fT4 levels before and after LT. In a few patients with lower tT4 and T3 levels before LT, the level of these hormones increased to normal after LT.

  18. The influence of end-stage liver disease and liver transplantation on thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Karla Rocha; Coelho, Júlio Cezar Uili; Parolin, Mônica Beatriz; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto; Freitas, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction has been reported in most chronic illnesses including severe liver disease. These defects in thyroid hormone metabolism result in the sick euthyroid syndrome, also known as low T3 syndrome. Our objective was to evaluate the thyroid function in patients with end stage liver disease prior and after deceased donor liver transplantation and to correlate thyroid hormonal changes with the MELD score (Model for End stage Liver Disease). In a prospective study, serum levels of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone TSH), total thyroxine (tT4), free thyroxine (fT4) and triiodothyronine (T3) from 30 male adult patients with end stage liver disease were measured two to four hours before and 6 months after liver transplantation (LT). MELD was determined on the day of transplant. For this analysis, extra points were not added for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The patients had normal TSH and fT4 levels before LT and there was no change after the procedure. Total thyroxine and triiodothyronine were within the normal range before LT, except for four patients (13.3%) whose values were lower. Both hormones increased to normal values in all four patients after LT (P=0.02 and P18), it was observed that there was no change in the TSH, freeT4, and total T4 levels in both groups after LT. Although there was no significant variation in the level of T3 in MELD 18 group after LT (P=0.003). Patients with end stage liver disease subjected to liver transplantation had normal TSH and fT4 levels before and after LT. In a few patients with lower tT4 and T3 levels before LT, the level of these hormones increased to normal after LT.

  19. Dialysis for end stage renal disease financed through the Brazilian National Health System, 2000 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease has become a public health problem worldwide. Its terminal stage requires renal replacement therapy – dialysis or transplantation – for the maintenance of life, resulting in high economic and social costs. Though the number of patients with end-stage renal disease treated by dialysis in Brazil is among the highest in the world, current estimates of incidence and prevalence are imprecise. Our aim is to describe incidence and prevalence trends and the epidemiologic profile of end-stage renal disease patients receiving publically-financed dialysis in Brazil between 2000 and 2012. Methods We internally linked records of the High Complexity Procedure Authorization/Renal Replacement Therapy (APAC/TRS) system so as to permit analyses of incidence and prevalence of dialysis over the period 2000-2012. We characterized temporal variations in the incidence and prevalence using Joinpoint regression. Results Over the period, 280,667 patients received publically-financed dialysis, 57.2% of these being male. The underlying disease causes listed were hypertension (20.8%), diabetes (12.0%) and glomerulonephritis (7.7%); for 42.3%, no specific cause was recorded. Hemodialysis was the therapeutic modality in 90.1%. Over this period, prevalence increased 47%, rising 3.6% (95% CI 3.2% - 4.0%)/year. Incidence increased 20%, or 1.8% (1.1% – 2.5%)/year. Incidence increased in both sexes, in all regions of the country and particularly in older age groups. Conclusions Incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease receiving publically-financed dialysis treatment has increased notably. The linkage approach developed will permit continuous future monitoring of these indicators. PMID:25008169

  20. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of cortical lipids from preclinical to severe stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gónzalez de San Román, E; Manuel, I; Giralt, M T; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Puertas, R

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of patients worldwide. Previous studies have demonstrated alterations in the lipid composition of lipid extracts from plasma and brain samples of AD patients. However, there is no consensus regarding the qualitative and quantitative changes of lipids in brains from AD patients. In addition, the recent developments in imaging mass spectrometry methods are leading to a new stage in the in situ analysis of lipid species in brain tissue slices from human postmortem samples. The present study uses the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS), permitting the direct anatomical analysis of lipids in postmortem brain sections from AD patients, which are compared with the intensity of the lipid signal in samples from matched subjects with no neurological diseases. The frontal cortex samples from AD patients were classified in three groups based on Braak's histochemical criteria, ranging from non-cognitively impaired patients to those severely affected. The main results indicate a depletion of different sulfatide lipid species from the earliest stages of the disease in both white and gray matter areas of the frontal cortex. Therefore, the decrease in sulfatides in cortical areas could be considered as a marker of the disease, but may also indicate neurochemical modifications related to the pathogenesis of the disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards non-invasive diagnostic imaging of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kirsten L.; Sbarboro, James; Sureka, Ruchi; de, Mrinmoy; Bicca, Maíra A.; Wang, Jane; Vasavada, Shaleen; Satpathy, Sreyesh; Wu, Summer; Joshi, Hrushikesh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Macrenaris, Keith; Waters, E. Alex; Lu, Chang; Phan, Joseph; Lacor, Pascale; Prasad, Pottumarthi; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    One way to image the molecular pathology in Alzheimer's disease is by positron emission tomography using probes that target amyloid fibrils. However, these fibrils are not closely linked to the development of the disease. It is now thought that early-stage biomarkers that instigate memory loss are composed of Aβ oligomers. Here, we report a sensitive molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast probe that is specific for Aβ oligomers. We attach oligomer-specific antibodies onto magnetic nanostructures and show that the complex is stable and binds to Aβ oligomers on cells and brain tissues to give a magnetic resonance imaging signal. When intranasally administered to an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, the probe readily reached hippocampal Aβ oligomers. In isolated samples of human brain tissue, we observed a magnetic resonance imaging signal that distinguished Alzheimer's disease from controls. Such nanostructures that target neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are potentially useful for evaluating the efficacy of new drugs and ultimately for early-stage Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and disease management.

  2. Hypercoagulability in end-stage liver disease: prevalence and its correlation with severity of liver disease and portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ashish; Karachristos, Andreas; Bromberg, Michael; Daly, Ellen; Maloo, Manoj; Jain, Ashok Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Contrary to well-recognized bleeding diathesis in chronic liver disease, thrombotic events can occur in these patients due to reduction or loss of synthesis of anticoagulant proteins. Forty-seven consecutive patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) were investigated for activity of protein C, protein S, antithrombin, and factor V Leiden mutation. Forty-two (89.4%) patients had low levels of at least 1 while 33 (70.2%) patients were deficient for all anticoagulant proteins studied. Forty-six (97.9%) patients were negative for factor V Leiden mutation. The deficiencies were more marked in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and patients with model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15. Six (12.8%) patients had portal vein thrombosis (PVT), and all had diminished protein S activity. In conclusions, deficiency of anticoagulant proteins occur in early phase of chronic liver disease. The severity of deficiency is proportional to the severity of liver disease. Despite the high prevalence of hypercoagulability, the incidence of PVT is low. Further studies with larger cohort of patients are needed to support these conclusions and to study other associated factors.

  3. [Working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of studies demonstrated that some forms of memory for music are spared in dementia, but only few studies have investigated patients with early stages of dementia. In this pilot-study we tested working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with a newly created test. The test probed working memory using 7 gradually elongated tone-lines and 6 chords which were each followed by 3 similar items and 1 identical item. The participants of the study, namely 10 patients with MCI, 10 patients with early stage AD and 23 healthy subjects were instructed to select the identical tone-line or chord. Subjects with MCI and early AD showed significantly reduced performance than controls in most of the presented tasks. In recognizing chords MCI- participants surprisingly showed an unimpaired performance. The gradual increase of the impairment during the preclinical phase of AD seems to spare this special ability in MCI.

  4. Treatment of stage i and ii mediastinal Hodgkin disease: a comparison of involved fields, extended fields, and involved fields followed by MOPP in patients stage by laparotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemeister, F.B.; Fuller, L.M.; Sullivan, J.A.; North, L.; Velasquez, W.; Conrad, F.G.; McLaughlin, P.; Butter, J.J.; Shullenberger, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    Three treatment programs for Stage I and II mediastinal Hodgkin disease (established by laparotomy) were compared. Involved-field radiotherapy + MOPP gave a disease-free survival rate of 97%, significantly different from 62% and 55% for involved and extended fields, respectively. Corresponding survival figures of 97%, 88%, and 84% were not signiticantly different statistically due to salvage with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Among patients given radiotherapy alone, the survival figure of 94% for limited mediastinal disease was significantly better than 63% for extensive mediastinal and hilar disease; corresponding disease-free figures of 72% and 35% were also significantly different. Constitutional symptoms were an important prognostic factor in disease-free survival following the use of involved fields; hilar disease was important only with large mediastinal masses. Most relapses were intrathoracic; MOPP alone salvaged only 47%. Treatment of State I and II Hodgkin disease should be based on symptoms, extent of mediastinal disease, and hilar involvement

  5. Role of low protein diet in management of different stages of chronic kidney disease - practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat V; Patel, Zamurrud M

    2016-10-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem and more so in India. With limited availability and high cost of therapy, barely 10 % of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases get treatment in India. Therefore, all possible efforts should be made to retard progression of CKD. This article reviews the role of low protein diet (LPD) in management of CKD subjects and suggests how to apply it in clinical practice. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. However, its role in human subjects with CKD is perceived to be controversial based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study. We believe that beneficial effect of LPD could not be appreciated due to shorter duration of follow-up in the MDRD study. Had the study been continued longer, it may have been possible to appreciate beneficial effect of LPD. It is our contention that in all cases of CKD that are slowly progressive, LPD can significantly retard progression of CKD and delay the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be able to apply LPD for a long period, it is important to prescribe LPD at earlier stages (1,2,3) of CKD and not at late stage as recommended by KDIGO guidelines. Many clinicians are concerned about worsening nutritional status and hence reluctant to prescribe LPD. This actually is true for patients with advanced CKD in whom there is spontaneous decrease in calorie and protein intake. In our experience, nutritional status of patients in early stages (1,2,3) of CKD is as good as that of healthy subjects. Prescribing LPD at an early stage is unlikely to worsen status. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. Even in human subjects, there is enough evidence to suggest that LPD retards progression of CKD in carefully selected subjects. It should be prescribed to those with good appetite, good nutritional status and a slowly

  6. Multi-stage subunit vaccine development against Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Johne’s disease in ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers

    paratuberculosis provide only partial protection and interfere with diagnostic tests for JD and surveillance for bovine TB. In contrast, recombinant subunit vaccines can be designed to be used without compromising control of bTB and Map. Taking advantage of data from mouse TB studies, and early Map vaccination......- and field-studies we developed a vaccine with a single recombinant fusion protein comprising four acute-stage antigens (Ags) and one latent-stage Ag formulated in adjuvant (FET-vaccine). In post-exposure vaccination of calves and goats with necropsy 8-12 months post inoculation, we determined...... in macrophages. The disease progression is very slow with neonatal animals being the most susceptible to infection, but without development of detectable IFN-γ responses for months after infection and rarely with clinical disease before the second or third year of life. Available whole cell vaccines against...

  7. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod

    2017-01-01

    were age (p = .001), diabetes (p = .017) and active endocarditis (p = .012). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference in mortality was found between patients in hemo- or peritoneal dialysis. However, we observed that patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have two times higher...... and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register....... RESULTS: Hemodialysis was undertaken in 73% and peritoneal dialysis in 22% of patients aged 59.7 ± 12.9 years, mean EuroSCORE 8.6% ± 3.5. Isolated coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 46%, isolated valve procedure in 29% and combined procedures in 24% with no significant statistical difference...

  8. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...... in antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...

  9. Memory consolidation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression during different sleep stages in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dean; Tseng, Ing-Jy; Yuan, Rey-Yue; Hsieh, Chia-Yu; Hu, Chaur-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor dysfunctions, which include sleep disturbances. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with numerous physiologic changes such as memory consolidation. Compelling evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) is crucial to both sleep regulation and memory consolidation. In our study, we explored changes in biologic molecules during various sleep stages and the effects of sleep on memory consolidation in PD. Ten PD patients and 14 volunteers without PD participated in our study. The gene expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in all sleep stages was measured using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on polysomnography (PSG)-guided peripheral blood sampling. In addition, the efficiency of memory consolidation during the sleep of the participants was measured using the Wechsler Memory Scale, third edition (WMS-III). The iNOS expression increased in all sleep stages among the PD patients compared to the control participants, in whom iNOS expression decreased during REM sleep. Regarding memory consolidation, the performance of the controls in logic memory and the patients in visual reproduction tasks improved after sleep. The iNOS synthase expression was different from control participants among PD patients, and the expression was dissimilar in various sleep stages. Sleep might enhance memory consolidation and there are different memory consolidation profiles between PD and control participants demonstrating distinct memory consolidation profiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Restless Legs Syndrome in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Irfan; Anees, Muhammad; Shahid, Syed Adnan Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was cross sectional survey conducted to find the prevalence of Restless legs syndrome (RLS) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on haemodialysis (HD). Methods: Data were obtained from 250 patients on chronic maintenance HD. To assess the prevalence of RLS, Clinical diagnostic criteria for RLS was used which is established by the International RLS Study Group. Results: Total 250 patients were included in this study. 153 (61.2%) patients were male and 97 (38.8%) wer...

  11. Dosing of radioactive iodine in end-stage renal disease patient with thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Bhat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe detailed administration of thyroidal and extrathyroidal doses of radioiodine to a patient with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. A thorough description of area under curve measurements in a patient with compromised renal function has rarely been described in the literature. Few publications have described thyroid cancer management of patients on hemodialysis, and we believe our management will aid in patient treatment in the future.

  12. Targeting the Prodromal Stage of Alzheimer’s Disease: Bioenergetic and Mitochondrial Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Charles C.; Yao, Jia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a complex and progressive neurodegenerative phenotype, with hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics among the earliest pathogenic events. Bioenergetic deficits are well documented in preclinical models of mammalian aging and AD, emerge early in the prodromal phase of AD, and in those at risk for AD. This review discusses the importance of early therapeutic intervention during the prodromal stage that precedes irreversible degeneration in AD. Mechan...

  13. Ischemic Stroke among the Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Who Were Undergoing Maintenance Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, San; Kwon, Seok-Beom; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Noh, Jung Woo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of higher incidence of stroke in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients compared to general population, the risk factor for stroke which is specific to ESRD is not fully understood. The ESRD patients who develop stroke may have certain additional risk factors compared to ESRD patients without stroke. We used registered data of Hallym Stroke Registry to elucidate the factors which affect development of ischemic stroke among the dialysis patients. Materials and Methods We recr...

  14. Incidence and predictors of end-stage renal disease in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic HF...... were identified in The Danish Heart Failure database and new-onset ESRD from the Danish Registry on Dialysis. Renal function was estimated by The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation and patients grouped by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-group I: ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m...

  15. Markers, Cofactors and Staging Systems in the Study of HIV Disease Progression: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Portela

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at providing a comprehensive review of markers, cofactors and staging systems used for HIV disease, focusing on some aspects that nowadays could even be considered historical, and advancing in current issues such as the prognostic value of viral load measurements, viral genotypic and phenotypic characterization, and new HIV disease treatment protocols. CD4+ cell values, combined with the new viral markers mentioned are promising as a parsimonious predictor set for defining both severity and progression. An adequate predictor of patient resource use for planning purposes still needs to be defined

  16. 3D printing lunate prosthesis for stage IIIc Kienböck's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mei-Ming; Tang, Kang-Lai; Yuan, Chen-Song

    2018-04-01

    Stage IIIc Kienböck's disease is a clinical challenge to treat collapse of the lunate bone. A new reconstructive surgery was described in one patient using 3D printing lunate prosthesis. The prosthesis shape was designed by tomographic image processing and segmentation using technology compared with the intact side matched by mirror symmetry and 3D post-processing technologies. The patient recovered nearly full range of motion of the wrist after 12 months. The visual analog scale scores and Cooney scores were 2 points and 91 points. We demonstrated that an anatomical reconstruction to Kienböck's Disease is possible using 3D printing lunate prosthesis.

  17. Echocardiographic assessment of left atrial size in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçinaj, Dardan; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Merita; Koçinaj, Allma; Ramadani, Naser; Korça, Hajrije

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. It is assumed that the high rate of cardiovascular mortality is related to accelerated atherosclerosis. Patients with chronic renal insufficiency have an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease, silent myocardial ischaemia, complex ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular hypertrophy, annular mitral and aortic valve calcification, and enlargement of the left atrium, than patients with normal renal function. It is also well known that haemodialysis is associated with cardiovascular structural changes and rapid fluctuations in electrolyte levels. In this study, we sought to estimate left atrial size by means of echocardiography and to determine any correlations between different echocardiographic measurements in patients with end-stage renal disease. We analysed data from 123 patients who were on regular haemodialysis, by means of traditional transthoracic echocardiographic examination. The usual statistical parameters, correlations and the Student's t-test were performed, with levels of significance of p < 0.01 and p < 0.05. The most presented age group was 60 to 69 years old, with a predomination of females (56.1%). We found dilated left atrium in 26.02% of the study patients and a high statistical correlation between different methods of measurement and calculated volumes of the left atrium. Evaluation of left atrial size should be determined by several different measurements, and left atrial enlargement should be seen as a risk factor for advancing disease.

  18. Predicting 6-month mortality risk of patients commencing dialysis treatment for end-stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sara E; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Khandakar, Yeasmin; Kasza, Jessica; Zoungas, Sophia; Steenkamp, Retha; Roderick, Paul; Wolfe, Rory

    2017-09-01

    There is evidence that end-stage kidney disease patients who are older or with more comorbidity may have a poor trade-off between benefits of dialysis and potential harms. We aimed to develop a tool for predicting patient mortality in the early stages of receiving dialysis. In 23 658 patients aged 15+ years commencing dialysis between 2000 and 2009 in Australia and New Zealand a point score tool was developed to predict 6-month mortality based on a logistic regression analysis of factors available at dialysis initiation. Temporal validation used 2009-11 data from Australia and New Zealand. External validation used the UK Renal Registry. Within 6 months of commencing dialysis 6.1% of patients had died. A small group (4.7%) of patients had a high predicted mortality risk (>20%), as predicted by the point score tool. Predictive variables were: older age, underweight, chronic lung disease, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease (particularly for patients new point score tool outperformed existing models, and had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.755 on temporal validation with acceptable calibration and 0.713 on external validation with poor calibration. Our point score tool for predicting 6-month mortality in patients at dialysis commencement has sufficient prognostic accuracy to use in Australia and New Zealand for prognosis and identification of high risk patients who may be given appropriate supportive care. Use in other countries requires further study.

  19. Apathy in untreated early-stage Parkinson disease: relationship with other non-motor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Kathy; Langlois, Carole; Plomhause, Lucie; Carette, Anne-Sophie; Delliaux, Marie; Duhamel, Alain; Defebvre, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Apathy is a frequent and disabling behavioral disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Its prevalence in treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD has not been extensively investigated. Moreover, whether apathy is related to other non-motor symptoms in early-stage PD is unknown. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and features of apathy and associated factors in a group of treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD. Ninety-five treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD participated in the study. Apathy, depression, motor symptoms, and overall cognitive efficiency were assessed. The presence of the main non-motor symptoms was checked during a detailed clinical interview. Group comparisons were carried out to investigate the association with apathy. Eighteen patients (18.95%) were diagnosed as apathetic, and five of the latter had concomitant depression. Apathetic patients had significantly more severe motor symptoms (P apathy was significantly associated only with fatigue (P = 0.007) and anhedonia (P = 0.010), both of which were more prevalent in apathetic patients than in non-apathetic patients. In treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD, apathy was significantly associated with more severe motor symptoms and a lower cognitive status. After adjustment for these factors, apathy appeared to be a relatively isolated, independent symptom because the only other associated non-motor symptoms were fatigue and anhedonia. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase in setting of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Masood, Umair; Khan, Babar; Chawla, Kunal; Manocha, Divey

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level is a rare phenomenon. This is especially true in patient with end-stage renal disease as lipase and amylase are renally excreted. Literature review reveals previous case report of pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level, however, none of them occurred in the setting of end-stage renal disease. Our case is the first such reported case of pancreatitis in such setting. Here we report a 30year old male with past medical history of end-stage renal disease who presented in emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Laboratory work up revealed normal lipase and amylase level. However, radiological work up was consistent with pancreatitis. This case report highlight the importance of taking the overall clinical picture rather than laboratory work up to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Furthermore, this should also serve an important reminder for clinicians to further investigate where clinical suspicion for pancreatitis is high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient-Reported Dyspnea in COPD Reliability and Association With Stage of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joseph; Waterman, Laurie A.; McCusker, Corliss; ZuWallack, Richard; Baird, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although questionnaires are used frequently with patients to self-report the severity of dyspnea as related to activities of daily living, the reliability of these instruments has not been established. The two purposes of this study were to examine the test-retest reliability of three widely used dyspnea instruments and to compare dyspnea scores at different stages of disease. Methods: At paired baseline visits, 101 stable patients with COPD were tested; at paired follow-up visits at 3 months, 89 of these patients were tested. At each visit, patients rated dyspnea with three instruments presented in random order and then performed post-bronchodilator therapy lung function tests. Results: Patient-reported dyspnea scores and lung function were similar at baseline (interval, 6 ± 5 days) and follow-up visits (interval, 4 ± 2 days). Intraclass correlation coefficients at baseline and at follow-up were 0.82 and 0.82, respectively, for the modified Medical Research Council scale; 0.90 and 0.84, respectively, for the self-administered computerized versions of the baseline dyspnea index and transition dyspnea indexes; and 0.95 and 0.89 for the University of San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire results. Dyspnea ratings were significantly related to the stage of disease severity based on percent predicted FEV1 (p the 3-month follow-up. Our results demonstrate for the first time that patient-reported dyspnea ratings are related to the stage of disease severity. PMID:19696126

  2. The Coagulation Profile of End-Stage Liver Disease and Considerations for Intraoperative Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkin, Katherine T; Colquhoun, Douglas A; Nemergut, Edward C; Huffmyer, Julie L

    2018-01-01

    The coagulopathy of end-stage liver disease results from a complex derangement in both anticoagulant and procoagulant processes. With even minor insults, cirrhotic patients experience either inappropriate bleeding or clotting, or even both simultaneously. The various phases of liver transplantation along with fluid and blood product administration may contribute to additional disturbances in coagulation. Thus, anesthetic management of patients undergoing liver transplantation to improve hemostasis and avoid inappropriate thrombosis in the perioperative environment can be challenging. To add to this challenge, traditional laboratory tests of coagulation are difficult to interpret in patients with end-stage liver disease. Viscoelastic coagulation tests such as thromboelastography (Haemonetics Corporation, Braintree, MA) and rotational thromboelastometry (TEM International, Munich, Germany) have helped to reduce transfusion of allogeneic blood products, especially fresh frozen plasma, but have also lead to the increased use of fibrinogen-containing products. In general, advancements in surgical techniques and anesthetic management have led to significant reduction in blood transfusion requirements during liver transplantation. Targeted transfusion protocols and pharmacologic prevention of fibrinolysis may further aid in the management of the complex coagulopathy of end-stage liver disease.

  3. Risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among individuals with and without end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Have; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    transplant recipients (8.9 per 1,000 person-years). In persons with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, ninety-day case fatality was 18.2% (95% CI, 16.2%-20.3%) for end-stage renal disease patients and 33.7% (95% CI, 30.3-37.3) for population controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with end-stage renal disease......BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections among hemodialysis patients and of exit-site infections among peritoneal dialysis patients. However, the risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among end-stage renal disease patients have not been...... delineated. METHODS: In this Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study patients with end-stage renal disease and matched population controls were observed from end-stage renal disease diagnosis/sampling until first episode of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, death, or end of study period...

  4. [Risk factors for anemia in the early stages of chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Yu S; Kozlovskaya, L V; Milovanova, L Yu; Markina, M M; Kozlov, V V; Taranova, M V; Fomin, V V

    To identify the early markers of anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and glomerulonephritis (GN) in systemic diseases. Seventy-nine patients with some male preponderance who were aged 21 to 65 years (45.3±11.1 years) and had CKD (CGN and GN) in systemic diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis) in the early stages (Stages I-II) of CKD were examined. GN was diagnosed by a lifetime renal biopsy. Systemic diseases were diagnosed according to the criteria for each nosological entity. The stages of CKD were defined according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria; the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using the CKD EPI equation (2012). According to the presence or absence of anemia, all the patients included in the study were divided into 2 groups: 1) 43 (54.4%) anemic patients; 2) 36 (45.6%) non-anemic patients (a control group). In addition to general clinical examination adopted for a nephrology department, special studies, such as determination of the serum levels of hepcidin, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), soluble Klotho protein (s-Klotho), as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation (TSAT) ratio, were performed to solve the set tasks. Forty-three anemic patients who had a hemoglobin level of 110 (100; 119) g/l and 36 control patients who had the similar values were noted to have statistically significantly (panemia were also found to have a statistically significantly (panemia, its detection rate in the presence of systemic diseases was 3.2 times higher than that in CGN patients (41.7 and 12.7%). ROC analysis revealed that in the CKD patients with CGN and GN, the serum hepcidin level ≥ 25 ng/ml, with the sensitivity and specificity being of 89.7% and 74%, respectively (p > 0.001), was associated with the development of anemia. Moreover, the hemoglobin level ofdiseases, elevated serum hepcidin levels should be regarded as a predictor

  5. Advanced renal disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    followed from baseline (first eGFR after 1/1/2004) until last eGFR, ARD/ESRD/renal death; whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. 8817 persons were included, the majority were white (87.3%), males (73.9%) infected though homosexual contact (41.5%) and with a median age......Many studies have focused on chronic kidney disease in HIV-positive individuals, but few have studied the less frequent events, advanced renal disease (ARD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for ARD/ESRD and renal death...... in EuroSIDA. ARD was defined as confirmed eGFR 3 months apart) using Cockcroft-Gault. ESRD was defined as hemo- or peritoneal dialysis>1 month/renal transplant. Renal deaths were defined as renal failure as the underlying cause of death, using CoDe methodology. Patients were...

  6. Acquired cystic kidney disease: an under-recognized condition in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene Y H; Warady, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is a condition that occurs predominantly in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In contrast to hereditary cystic kidney disease, ACKD is characterized by the presence of multiple small cysts in bilaterally small kidneys. Limited pediatric data suggest a high incidence (21.6-45.8%) of ACKD in children on dialysis, comparable to that in adults, with an increased frequency associated with a longer duration of dialysis. Recent research has shed light on the pathogenesis of ACKD, such as activation of proto-oncogenes. Although most patients with ACKD are asymptomatic, the condition can be complicated by renal cell carcinoma. Routine surveillance should therefore be considered in at-risk populations.

  7. End-stage renal disease in Nigeria: An overview of the epidemiology and the pathogenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Odubanjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity of information on the magnitude of the burden of renal disease in our environment. Obtaining accurate data is hampered by the poor socioeconomic status of most patients with lack of access to specialized care in tertiary institutions, where most of the data is generated. The incidence of chronic renal failure (CRF and end-stage renal disease (ESRD in any specified area is known to be influenced by the prevalence of specific disease entities resulting in CRF. Hypertension, glomerulonephritis (GN, sickle cell disease, quartan malaria nephropathy, urinary tract schistosomiasis and other parasite-related forms of chronic GN are known to contribute significantly to the incidence of CRF in Nigeria. As is the situation in other parts of the world, diabetic nephropathy appears to be of increasing importance in the causation of ESRD in Nigeria. Even though the underlying cause of renal disease can often not be treated, extensive studies in experimental animals and preliminary studies in humans suggest that progression in chronic renal disease may largely be due to secondary factors, attention to which may be important in the prevention and/or control of renal disease.

  8. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. End-stage renal disease with atrial fibrillation: uncharted territory in the modern world of anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Sandra D; McMaster, Justin; Rizvi, Syed A; Ahmed, Sultan

    2014-08-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and atrial fibrillation are increasingly common concurrent findings among many patients. Coexisting ESRD and atrial fibrillation can further exacerbate each disease process; thus, evidence-based medicine protocols are needed for the treatment of patients with both ESRD and new-onset atrial fibrillation to clarify the appropriate anticoagulant management of such patients. The manuscript surveys the literature to look for a suitable answer to the pressing question that requires development of an evidence-based protocol: 'Which anticoagulant is best for the patient with ESRD and atrial fibrillation?' Unlike many disease processes that have ample evidence available in order to better manage the patient, in the patient with end-stage kidney disease and new onset of atrial fibrillation, the situation becomes much more complicated. We believe randomized controlled trials for both the classical and the newer oral anticoagulants could provide evidence-based medicine protocols for the treatment of patients with ESRD and new-onset atrial fibrillation.

  10. Experiences in early stage Alzheimer's disease: understanding the paradox of acceptance and denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQuarrie, Colleen R

    2005-09-01

    A wealth of information about the biomedical aspects of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent dementia among people over age 65, stands in counterpoint to the lack of systematic inquiry around the lived experiences of people with AD. Thirteen (four women, nine men) people, recently diagnosed with early stage AD, participated in this 6-month longitudinal study. This paper reports on AD participant's interviews which focussed on their experiences of AD symptoms, relationships with family and friends, and thoughts about the future. The transcribed interviews, analysed using methodological hermeneutics, revealed a constitutive theme of agency versus objectification and explained the paradox of why people with AD use both acceptance and denial when speaking about their experiences. Participants simultaneously acknowledged and resisted aspects of their disease in order to maintain agency in the face of cognitive losses. Acknowledgement was expressed through the themes involving acceptance of the disease and its symptoms, expression of feelings about the disease, and strategies to cope with the symptoms. Resistance was expressed in themes involving denial, minimization, normalization, and reminiscence about achievements and experiences of competence. Longitudinal analyses of the narratives indicated themes held across time. This research contributes to understanding how people live with early stage AD. Living with AD should not be described as either denial or acceptance, but rather as a paradox of understanding that includes both acknowledgement and resistance.

  11. Quality of life in Parkinson’s disease patients: progression markers of mild to moderate stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissa Carla Moreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson’s disease patients from mild to moderate stages. Methods The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. Results The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p < 0.004, need for assistance with hygiene (p = 0.02, greater freezing frequency (p = 0.042, bradykinesia (p = 0.031, greater intensity of the resting tremor (p = 0.035 and “pill rolling” (p = 0.001. The decline in quality of life was related to stigma (p = 0.043, greater impairment in cognition (p = 0.002, mobility (p = 0.013 and for daily living activities (p = 0.05, and was considered more significant in men, married, older individuals, and those with a longer time of disease. Conclusions The quality of life worsening markers at the moderate stage were related to stigma, worsening of cognition, and to greater impairment in mobility and daily living activities.

  12. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic.

  13. Political, social and technical risks in the last stages of disease eradication campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Christopher J M

    2015-09-01

    Eradication of a disease is one of the greatest gifts any generation can give to subsequent ones, but most attempts have failed. The biggest challenges occur in the final stages of eradication and elimination campaigns. These include falling public support as a disease becomes less common; the emergence of groups who do not support eradication; spiralling costs; and the evolution of drug, vaccine or insecticide resistance. Mass campaigns become less effective as the disease fragments and modelling becomes less reliable. Optimism bias is the biggest risk to any eradication campaign and the long endgame must be planned for from the beginning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in End-Stage Renal Disease: No Longer a Matter for Surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mario; Elli, Francesca; Carugo, Stefano; Ciceri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia and vitamin D deficiency are the main factors involved in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). Moreover, the skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone is not only a high-turnover bone accompanying SHPT, but may also play a crucial role in the onset of low-turnover bone disease in uremia. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that other hormones play a key role in this disease, such as fibroblast growth factor 23, Klotho and sclerostin. SHPT causes both bone-associated and non-skeletal consequences, including cardiovascular calcifications. Furthermore, vitamin D and calcium (Ca)-containing phosphate binders may increase Ca load. Anyway, the rate of parathyroidectomy in end-stage renal disease has greatly decreased during the last decade. Is there any room left for surgeons? © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Spectrum of bone marrow changes in patients of chronic kidney disease (stage iii, iv and v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, R.K.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.Q.; Arshad, U.

    2017-01-01

    To see the various hematological changes in the bone marrow of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III, IV and V. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study.Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in the department of haematology (Pathology), Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration was one year, from Mar 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Patients of both sexes and all age groups with CKD stage III, IV and V were included in this study. Patients' histories were recorded. Complete blood counts, bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy were done and evaluated microscopically. Mean blood counts of the patients in three groups of CKD were compared. Frequencies of various bone marrow (BM) findings in patients of CKD were calculated. Results: Out of 57 patients, 41 (71.9%) were males while 16 (28%) were females. Mean age was 60 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean hemoglobin, mean white cell count and mean platelets count of the patients in three groups of CKD. Reactive changes due to underlying CKD and inflammation were the most frequent findings in the BM of the patients. Conclusion: Anaemia of mild to moderate severity and reactive changes in the BM are the most frequent haematological findings encountered in patients suffering from advanced stage CKD. Since CKD is predominantly a disease of the elderly so it is not rare to find the co-morbidities including plasmacytosis, malignancies and their effects on the BM in patients of CKD. (author)

  16. [Clinical stages of patients with Alzheimer disease treated in specialist clinics in Spain. The EACE study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alom Poveda, J; Baquero, M; González-Adalid Guerreiro, M

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic paradigm of Alzheimer disease (AD) is changing; there is a trend toward diagnosing the disease in its early stages, even before the complete syndrome of dementia is apparent. The clinical stage at which AD is usually diagnosed in our area is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical stages of AD patients at time of diagnosis. Multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study. Patients with probable AD according to NINCDS-ARDRA criteria, attended in specialist clinics in Spain, were included in the study. We recorded the symptom onset to evaluation and symptom onset to diagnosis intervals and clinical status of AD (based on MMSE, NPI questionnaire, and CDR scale). Participants in this study included 437 specialists representing all of Spain's autonomous communities and a total of 1,707 patients, of whom 1,694 were included in the analysis. Mean MMSE score was 17.6±4.8 (95% CI:17.4-17.9). Moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE between 10 and 20) was detected in 64% of the patients, and severe cognitive impairment (MMSEde Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Fetal Origins of Life Stage Disease: A Zebrafish Model for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years, affects 35% of adults, and costs the U.S. healthcare industry >$200 billion annually. The chemical environment in the womb may cause susceptibility to different life-stage and life-long metabolic diseases including obesity. The challenge is to understand if exposures during developmentally sensitive windows impact life-stage disease, such as obesity, by increasing adipose tissue mass. In vitro models lack the integrated systems approach needed to assess adipose development, while mammalian models are impractical in a screen of thousands of chemicals. Therefore, an obesogen screening method was developed to interrogate bioactivity using a full systems approach, in a vertebrate zebrafish model with complete metabolic activity, at a time when the full signaling repertoire is expressed and active, to optimally examine how chemical dose and duration impact life-stage adipose mass. A time-line for adipose depot formation was mapped in zebrafish 6−14 days post fertilization (dpf) using the lipophilic dye, Nile Red, in combination with fluorescent microscopy. Those time points were then used to investigate the impact of embryonic tributyltin chloride (TBT, a known obesogen) exposure (10nM daily renewal, 0−5dpf) on adipose mass. Fluorescent microscopy revealed adipose depots that were larger and appeared 2 days earlier in TBT treated compared to contro

  18. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  19. [Rasagiline in monotherapy in patients with early stages of Parkinson's disease and in combined and adjunct therapy to levodopa with moderate and advanced stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonabarraga, Javier; Rodríguez-Oroz, María Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Rasagiline is effective in the early stages of the disease and has shown a possible effect of modifying disease progression at a dose of 1 mg. The accurate management of dopaminergic drugs in Parkinson's disease is able to delay the appearance of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. The combination of different drugs that provide a more continuous dopaminergic stimulation (rasagiline, dopamine agonists) not only exerts a benefit through diminishing the impact of pulsatile stimulation on post-synaptic dopamine receptors, but allows to decrease total daily levodopa requirements. The combination of rasagiline with other dopaminergic drugs has demonstrated to be as efficacious as entacapone for improving both the frequency and severity of motor fluctuations. Likewise, new evidences have shown that the earlier introduction of rasagiline is associated with a delay in introducing other dopaminergic drugs, thus indicating that the symptomatic benefit of rasagiline on daily motor function is not only present in the early Parkinson's disease stages, but is maintained over time.

  20. The reorganization of functional architecture in the early-stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Noora; Seppi, Klaus; de Pasquale, Francesco; Müller, Christoph; Nocker, Michael; Schocke, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Kremser, Christian; Wenning, Gregor K; Poewe, Werner; Djamshidian, Atbin; Scherfler, Christoph; Seki, Morinobu

    2018-02-08

    The study aim was to identify longitudinal abnormalities of functional connectivity and its relation with motor disability in early to moderately advanced stages of Parkinson's disease patients. 3.0T structural and resting-state functional MRI was performed in healthy subjects (n = 16) and Parkinson's disease patients (n = 16) with mean disease duration of 2.2 ± 1.2 years at baseline with a clinical follow-up of 1.5 ± 0.3 years. Resting-state fMRI analysis included region-to-region connectivity in correlation with UPDRS-III scores and computation of Global Efficiency and Degree Centrality. At baseline, patients' connectivity increased between the cerebellum and somatomotor network, and decreased between motor regions (Rolandic operculum, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area, postcentral gyrus) and cingulate connectivity. At 1.5 years follow-up, connectivity remained altered in the same regions identified at baseline. The cerebellum showed additional hyperconnectivity within itself and to the caudate nucleus, thalamus and amygdala compared to controls. These differences correlated with UPDRS-III scores. Seed-based connectivity revealed increased involvement of the default mode network with precentral gyrus in patients at follow-up investigation. Resting-state fMRI identified marked disturbances of the overall architecture of connectivity in Parkinson's disease. The noted alterations in cortical motor areas were associated with cerebellar hyperconnectivity in early to moderately advanced stages of Parkinson's disease suggesting ongoing attempts of recovery and compensatory mechanism for affected functions. The potential to identify connectivity alterations in regions related to both motor and attentional functions requires further evaluation as an objective marker to monitor disease progression, and medical, as well as surgical interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low PCSK9 levels are correlated with mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Schlegel

    Full Text Available Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 plays a key role in the cholesterol metabolism and is synthesized by the liver. It interacts with the LDL-receptor to promote its degradation. The model of end-stage liver disease (MELD score is a well-established tool to estimate the risk of mortality in patients with end-stage chronic liver disease. The study aims to assess the associations between PCSK9, hypocholesterinemia, liver synthesis, cholestasis, MELD score and mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease.Serum samples were obtained from 74 patients with severe liver disease. The study participants were aged between 23 and 70 y (mean: 55.8 y; 47 males [63.5%], 27 females [36.5%]. Samples were selected from those with a wide range of MELD scores (7 to 40. Patients that underwent liver transplantation (17 / 74 were censored at the time of transplantation for mortality analysis.PCSK9 values ranged from 31.47 ng/mL to 261.64 ng/mL. The median value was 106.39 ng/ml. PCSK9 was negatively correlated with markers of liver function and cholestasis (INR, bilirubin. Over a 90-d follow-up, 15 of 57 (26,3% patients died within the 90-d follow-up without receiving liver transplantation. Thirteen of 31 (42% patients with PCSK9 levels below the median died compared to 2/26 (8% patients with higher PCSK9 levels (p = 0.006. In this cohort, there were no significant correlations between PCSK9, cholesterol, its precursors and several phytosterols.Low PCSK9 serum concentrations were associated with higher mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. The mean PCSK9 levels in the study population were much lower than those found in normal or healthy populations. Further studies are required to acquire a more detailed understanding of the role of PCSK9 in liver-related mortality.

  2. Efficacy and safety of paricalcitol in children with stages 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas J A; Lerner, Gary; Warady, Bradley A; Dell, Katherine M; Greenbaum, Larry A; Ariceta, Gema; Hoppe, Bernd; Linde, Peter; Lee, Ho-Jin; Eldred, Ann; Dufek, Matthew B

    2017-07-01

    Elevated intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels can contribute to morbidity and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of oral paricalcitol in reducing iPTH levels in children with stages 3-5 CKD. Children aged 10-16 years with stages 3-5 CKD were enrolled in two phase 3 studies. The stage 3/4 CKD study characterized paricalcitol pharmacokinetics and compared the efficacy and safety of paricalcitol with placebo followed by an open-label period. The stage 5 CKD study evaluated the efficacy and safety of paricalcitol (no comparator) in children with stage 5 CKD undergoing dialysis. In the stage 3/4 CKD study, mean peak plasma concentration and area under the time curve from zero to infinity were 0.13 ng/mL and 2.87 ng•h/((or ng×h/))mL, respectively, for 12 children who received 3 μg paricalcitol. Thirty-six children were randomized to paricalcitol or placebo; 27.8% of the paricalcitol group achieved two consecutive iPTH reductions of ≥30% from baseline versus none of the placebo group (P = 0.045). Adverse events were higher in children who received placebo than in those administered paricalcitol during the double-blind treatment (88.9 vs. 38.9%; P = 0.005). In the stage 5 CKD study, eight children (61.5%) had two consecutive iPTH reductions of ≥30% from baseline, and five (38.5%) had two consecutive iPTH values of between 150 and 300 pg/mL. Clinically meaningful hypercalcemia occurred in 21% of children. Oral paricalcitol in children aged 10-16 years with stages 3-5 CKD reduced iPTH levels and the treatment was well tolerated. Results support an initiating dose of 1 μg paricalcitol 3 times weekly in children aged 10-16 years.

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with end-stage kidney disease on hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Louis L; Warming, Peder E; Nielsen, Ture L

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in hemodialysis patients with spirometry and to examine the effects of fluid removal by hemodialysis on lung volumes. Patients ≥18 years at two Danish hemodialysis centers were included....... Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1 /FVC ratio were measured with spirometry before and after hemodialysis. The diagnosis of COPD was based on both the GOLD criteria and the lower limit of normal criteria. There were 372 patients in treatment at the two...... centers, 255 patients (69%) completed spirometry before dialysis and 242 of these (65%) repeated the test after. In the initial test, 117 subjects (46%) had airflow limitation indicative of COPD with GOLD criteria and 103 subjects (40.4%) with lower limit of normal criteria; COPD was previously diagnosed...

  4. Vitamin status and needs for people with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L; Kopple, Joel D

    2011-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often experience a decline in their nutrient intake starting at early stages of CKD. This reduction in intake can affect both energy-producing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, as well as vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Knowledge of the burden and bioactivity of vitamins and their effect on the health of the patients with CKD is very incomplete. However, without sufficient data, the use of nutritional supplements to prevent inadequate intake may result in either excessive or insufficient intake of micronutrients for people with CKD. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding vitamin requirements for people with stages 3, 4, or 5 CKD who are not receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding the management of early-stage chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Tom; Protheroe, Joanne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care is recognised to have an important role in the delivery of care for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is evidence that CKD management is currently suboptimal, with a range of practitioner concerns about its management. Aim To explore processes underpinning the implementation of CKD management in primary care. Design and setting Qualitative study in general practices participating in a chronic kidney disease collaborative undertaken as part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs and practice nurses (n = 21). Normalisation Process Theory provided a framework for generation and analysis of the data. Results A predominant theme was anxiety about the disclosure of early-stage CKD with patients. The tensions experienced related to identifying and discussing CKD in older people and patients with stage 3A, embedding early-stage CKD within vascular care, and the distribution of work within the practice team. Participants provided accounts of work undertaken to resolve the difficulties encountered, with efforts having tended to focus on reassuring patients. Analysis also highlighted how anxiety surrounding disclosure influenced, and was shaped by, the organisation of care for people with CKD and associated long-term conditions. Conclusion Offering reassurance alone may be of limited benefit, and current management of early-stage CKD in primary care may miss opportunities to address susceptibility to kidney injury, improve self-management of vascular conditions, and improve the management of multimorbidity. PMID:22520910

  6. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. SPECT neuroimaging and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Vassilakos, Pavlos [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Patras (Greece); Messinis, Lambros; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Neurology, Neuropsychology Section, Patras (Greece); Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Constantoyannis, Costantinos [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Patras (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    The present study investigated differences and associations between cortical perfusion, nigrostriatal dopamine pathway and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We recruited 53 non-demented PD patients divided into four groups according to the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging system and 20 healthy controls who were used in the comparison of the neuropsychological findings. Each patient underwent two separate brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies (perfusion and dopamine transporter binding) as well as neuropsychological evaluation. Perfusion images of each patient were quantified and compared with a normative database provided by the NeuroGam software manufacturers. Mean values obtained from the cortical areas and neuropsychological measures in the different groups were also compared by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for disease duration and educational level. We found cognitive deficits especially in the late PD stages (HY 3, 4 and 5) compared to the early stages (HY 1 and 2) and associations between cognitive decrements and cortical perfusion deterioration mainly in the frontal and posterior cortical areas. Compared with controls, PD patients showed impairments of cognition and cerebral perfusion that increased with clinical severity. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the performance on the phonemic fluency task and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left frontal lobe. Dopamine transporter binding in the left caudate nucleus significantly correlated with blood flow in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not with measures of executive functions. There are significant cognitive and perfusion deficits associated with PD progression, implying a multifactorial neurodegeneration process apart from dopamine depletion in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). (orig.)

  8. SPECT neuroimaging and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Vassilakos, Pavlos; Messinis, Lambros; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Constantoyannis, Costantinos

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated differences and associations between cortical perfusion, nigrostriatal dopamine pathway and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We recruited 53 non-demented PD patients divided into four groups according to the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging system and 20 healthy controls who were used in the comparison of the neuropsychological findings. Each patient underwent two separate brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies (perfusion and dopamine transporter binding) as well as neuropsychological evaluation. Perfusion images of each patient were quantified and compared with a normative database provided by the NeuroGam software manufacturers. Mean values obtained from the cortical areas and neuropsychological measures in the different groups were also compared by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for disease duration and educational level. We found cognitive deficits especially in the late PD stages (HY 3, 4 and 5) compared to the early stages (HY 1 and 2) and associations between cognitive decrements and cortical perfusion deterioration mainly in the frontal and posterior cortical areas. Compared with controls, PD patients showed impairments of cognition and cerebral perfusion that increased with clinical severity. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the performance on the phonemic fluency task and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left frontal lobe. Dopamine transporter binding in the left caudate nucleus significantly correlated with blood flow in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not with measures of executive functions. There are significant cognitive and perfusion deficits associated with PD progression, implying a multifactorial neurodegeneration process apart from dopamine depletion in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). (orig.)

  9. Hematopoietic cytokines as therapeutic players in early stages Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eFarmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a devastating age related neurodegenerative disease that is believed to have a lengthy prodromal state. It is critical to find methods of interfering with the progression of this early degenerative stage by inducing compensatory recovery processes to slow or prevent the eventual clinical symptoms. The current perspective article argues that immune system signalling molecules represent such a promising therapeutic approach. Two cytokines of interest are granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and erythropoietin (EPO. These hematopoietic cytokines have been protective in models of stroke, neuronal injury, and more recently PD. It is our belief that these trophic cytokines can be used not only for cell protection but also regeneration. However, success is likely dependent on early intervention. This paper will outline our perspective on the development of novel trophic recovery treatments for PD. In particular, we present new data from our lab suggesting that EPO and GM-CSF can foster neural re-innervation in a mild or partial lesion PD model that could be envisioned as reflecting the early stages of the disease.

  10. Behavioural research in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; van Dijk, Sandra; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Falzon, Louise; Thong, Melissa; Dekker, Friedo W

    2010-10-01

    To suggest a behavioural research agenda for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) based on a concise review of seven stages of psychosocial research, a literature review, and current behavioural research in other chronic somatic diseases. Historical behavioural ESRD research was classified. The specialized register of the Cochrane Behavioral Medicine Field was also checked, and additional papers were selected by screening reference lists and related behavioural science journals, to identify promising areas for future research. The top-five topics identified via the literature search pertain to (1) psychological aspects and interventions, (2) adaptation, coping, and depression, (3) exercise, (4) counseling and education, and (5) compliance. 'Illness and treatment beliefs', 'sexuality', 'suicide', 'family support', and 'self-management interventions', were identified on the basis of research in other chronic illnesses as topics for future research. Regarding theory, the Common-Sense Model (CSM) was judged to offer useful theoretical perspectives; regarding methods, qualitative methods can be a valuable addition to quantitative research methods. Illness beliefs, treatment beliefs, and self-management behaviours are promising concepts in the assessment and clinical care of ESRD-patients. Cognitive-behavioural treatments appear to have potential and should be specified and elaborated for specific categories and problems of ESRD-patients. This research agenda is in line with moves towards patient-centred disease-management to improve the quality of medical care for ESRD-patients. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. QT prolongation is associated with increased mortality in end stage liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Moon; George, Bennet; Alcivar-Franco, Diego; Campbell, Charles L; Charnigo, Richard; Delisle, Brian; Hundley, Jonathan; Darrat, Yousef; Morales, Gustavo; Elayi, Samy-Claude; Bailey, Alison L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of QT prolongation in a large series of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients and its association to clinical variables and mortality. METHODS The QT interval was measured and corrected for heart rate for each patient, with a prolonged QT cutoff defined as QT > 450 ms for males and QT > 470 ms for females. Multiple clinical variables were evaluated including sex, age, serum sodium, international normalized ratio, creatinine, total bilirubin, beta-blocker use, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD), MELD-Na, and etiology of liver disease. RESULTS Among 406 ESLD patients analyzed, 207 (51.0%) had QT prolongation. The only clinical variable associated with QT prolongation was male gender (OR = 3.04, 95%CI: 2.01-4.60, P < 0.001). During the study period, 187 patients (46.1%) died. QT prolongation was a significant independent predictor of mortality (OR = 1.69, 95%CI: 1.03-2.77, P = 0.039). In addition, mortality was also associated with viral etiology of ESLD, elevated MELD score and its components (P < 0.05 for all). No significant reversibility in the QT interval was seen after liver transplantation. CONCLUSION QT prolongation was commonly encountered in an ESLD population, especially in males, and served as a strong independent marker for increased mortality in ESLD patients. PMID:28515853

  12. Restless legs syndrome in end stage renal disease patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, Y.; Siddiqui, U.A.

    2014-01-01

    To study the frequency of restless legs syndrome in patients of end stage renal disease undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of medicine, CMH Multan from Nov 2010 to April 2011. Patients and Methods: One hundred and ninety four (n=194) patients of End stage renal disease who had been on maintenance hemodialysis for at least 3 months, were included in the study after full informed consent and using consecutive sampling. Patients having dementia, psychiatric illness, pregnancy, hypothyroidism, Parkinson's disease and alcoholics were excluded from the study. Patients who fulfilled all four diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome as proposed by International restless legs syndrome study group (IRLSSG), by direct questioning were diagnosed as having restless legs syndrome. Results: The frequency of restless legs syndrome was found to be 12.4% in patients undergoing hemodialysis (10.5% in males versus 16% in females). The mean duration of hemodialysis was higher among RLS positive patients (12.88 +- 5.543 months) as compared to RLS negative patients (6.94 +- 4.610 months). Conclusion: RLS is a frequent, under-diagnosed co-morbidity in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. (author)

  13. Characteristics and survival of patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in the United States renal data system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Lijing; Bolen, Julie; Valdez, Rodolfo; Joseph, David; Baum, Michelle A; Thibadeau, Judy

    2015-02-01

    We describe the characteristics, treatments and survival of patients with spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed from 2004 through 2008 in the United States Renal Data System. We used ICD-9-CM code 741.* to identify individuals with spina bifida using hospital inpatient data from 1977 to 2010, and physician and facility claims from 2004 to 2008. We constructed a 5:1 comparison group of patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida matched by age at first end stage renal disease service, gender and race/ethnicity. We assessed the risk of mortality and of renal transplantation while on dialysis using multivariate cause specific proportional hazards survival analysis. We also compared survival after the first renal transplant from the first end stage renal disease service to August 2011. We identified 439 patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida in whom end stage renal disease developed at an average younger age than in patients without spina bifida (41 vs 62 years, p spina bifida those who had spina bifida showed a similar mortality hazard on dialysis and after transplantation. However, patients with end stage renal disease without spina bifida were more likely to undergo renal transplantation than patients with spina bifida (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03). Hospitalizations related to urinary tract infections were positively associated with the risk of death on dialysis in patients with end stage renal disease and spina bifida (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.33-1.53). Spina bifida was not associated with increased mortality in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis or after renal transplantation. Proper urological and bladder management is imperative in patients with spina bifida, particularly in adults. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Term Outcome After Conservative Treatment and Direct Bypass Surgery of Moyamoya Disease at Late Suzuki Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peicong; Zhang, Qian; Ye, Xun; Liu, Xingju; Deng, Xiaofeng; Li, Hao; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the long-term outcomes after conservative and direct surgical treatment for patients with moyamoya disease (MMD) at late Suzuki stage. We retrospectively reviewed 82 patients (164 hemispheres) with MMD at late Suzuki stage at Beijing Tiantan Hospital. Clinical features, radiologic findings, and outcomes were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 36.4 ± 11.7 years. The distribution of the initial Suzuki stage of MMD was as follows: stage 4, n = 113; stage 5, n = 45; stage 6, n = 6, posterior cerebral artery involvement was observed in 41 hemispheres (25.0%). The incidence of postoperative stroke (Suzuki stage, compared with conservative treatment, it did not reduce the risk of recurrent stroke. Further study is needed to determine whether direct bypass surgery is effective in patients with MMD at late Suzuki stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Initial staging of Hodgkin's disease: role of contrast-enhanced 18F FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin's disease (HD).Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard.No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor).Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients.

  16. Single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for Hirschsprung′s disease : Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras R Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary single-stage pull-through for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD has been reported to give comparable surgical outcomes to staged operations with less morbidity. Herein, we present our experience with single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for management of HD. Patients and Methods: This was a review of 48 cases of HD who underwent single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure without a protective colostomy. Results: The age at surgery ranged from 6 months to 10 years (median - 9 months, mean - 2.3 years. The average weight of the child was 7.2 kg (range, 4.9-22 kg. 38 (79.2% patients had classical rectosigmoid HD, the rest being long segment HD (the proximal most level being the splenic flexure. The average duration of surgery was 175 minutes (range, 130-245 minutes. The average blood loss was 45 ml. The average hospital stay was 7.2 days (range: 6-10 days. The major postoperative complications (n=3 included postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, anastomotic leak and persistent constipation due to residual aganglionosis. Each required a re-exploration. Minor complications included surgical site infection (n=3 and post-operative enterocolitis (n=3, which were managed conservatively. Six patients had constipation for a limited period post-operatively. All patients have a satisfactory functional outcome and normal development and growth. Conclusions: For HD, we recommend that single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure should be the preferred approach in view of its low morbidity, satisfactory functional outcome and avoidance of stoma, multiple surgeries and economic benefit in view of decreased hospital stay.

  17. (131)I treatment in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A J M; Vázquez, R G; Cuenca, J I C; Brocca, M A M; Castilla, J; Martínez, J M M; González, E N

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) is a cornerstone in the treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). In patients on haemodialysis due to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), it must be used cautiously, considering the renal clearance of this radionuclide. Also, the safety of the procedure and subsequent long-term outcome is still not well defined. In 2001, we described a dosimetric method and short-term results in three patients, with a good safety profile. We hypothesize that our method is safe in a long-term scenario without compromising the prognosis of both renal and thyroid disease. Descriptive-retrospective study. A systematic search was carried out using our clinical database from 2000 to 2014. DTC and radioiodine treatment while on haemodialysis. peritoneal dialysis. Final sample n=9 patients (n=5 males), age 48 years (median age 51 years males, 67 years female group); n=8 papillary thyroid cancer, n=1 follicular thyroid cancer; n=5 lymph node invasion; n=1 metastatic disease. Median RAI dose administered on haemodialysis 100mCi. 7.5 years after radioiodine treatment on haemodialysis, n=7 deemed free of thyroid disease, n=1 persistent non-localised disease. No complications related to the procedure or other target organs were registered. After 3.25 years, n=4 patients underwent successful renal transplantation; n=4 patients did not meet transplantation criteria due to other conditions unrelated to the thyroid disease or its treatment. One patient died due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (free of thyroid disease). Radioiodine treatment during haemodialysis is a long-term, safe procedure without worsening prognosis of either renal or thyroid disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Renal Failure in Patients with End Stage Liver Disease and its Impact on Clinical Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M. O.; Shafqat, F.; Dar, F. S.; Salih, M.; Khokhar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of renal failure (RF) in the patients of end stage liver disease (ESLD), to determine the causes of RF in these patients and its impact on patient's outcome. Study Design: Descriptive, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2011 to March 2013. Methodology: A total of 523 patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) were evaluated, renal failure (RF) and its causes were recognized in these patients according to established criteria. Outcome of these patients was assigned as reversal of RF or mortality. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Chi-square test was used for comparing proportions and t-test was used for comparing mean values. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Out of 523 patients, 261 (49.9%) had RF. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was the most common presentation seen in 160 (61%) patients. Hypovolemia and infections were the most frequent causes of RF. Mortality was significantly higher in the patients with RF, when compared to the patients without RF (31% vs. 4.5%, p < 0.001). Reversal of RF was seen in 98 (37%) of the affected patients. Reversal was more common in the patients with hypovolemia. The mortality was higher in the patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) and infections. Conclusion: Renal failure in the end stage liver disease is an important prognostic factor. Etiology of RF is the key factor in patients' outcome. Patients of ESLD with RF had higher mortality. Majority of the cases of RF were reversible in patients of ESLD coming in the setup. (author)

  19. Daily Physical Activity Patterns During the Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Vijay R; Watts, Amber

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that results in severe disability. Very few studies have explored changes in daily physical activity patterns during early stages of AD when components of physical function and mobility may be preserved. Our study explored differences in daily physical activity profiles, independent of the effects of non-cognitive factors including physical function and age, among individuals with mild AD compared to controls. Patients with mild AD and controls (n = 92) recruited from the University of Kansas Alzheimer's Disease Center Registry, wore the Actigraph GT3X+ for seven days, and provided objective physical function (VO2 max) and mobility data. Using multivariate linear regression, we explored whether individuals with mild AD had different daily average and diurnal physical activity patterns compared to controls independent of non-cognitive factors that may affect physical activity, including physical function and mobility. We found that mild AD was associated with less moderate-intensity physical activity (p lower peak activity (p lower physical activity complexity (p lower-intensity physical activity across the day after adjusting for non-cognitive covariates. These findings suggest that factors independent of physical capacity and mobility may drive declines in moderate-intensity physical activity, and not lower-intensity or sedentary activity, during the early stage of AD. This underscores the importance of a better mechanistic understanding of how cognitive decline and AD pathology impact physical activity. Findings emphasize the potential value of designing and testing time-of-day specific physical activity interventions targeting individuals in the early stages of AD, prior to significant declines in mobility and physical function.

  20. Cut-off point of body mass index for malnutrition screening in end stage lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sadegh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is one of the serious complications in end stage lung disease that affects quality of life, mortality rate and lung transplantation outcome. Objective: The aim of this was to determine the cut-off point of body mass index (BMI for malnutrition screening in end stage lung disease. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 86 patients referred to the lung transplant clinic of Masih Daneshvari Hospital from July 2012 to February 2013. Nutritional status was evaluated using anthropometric measurements including Mid-Arm Muscle Circumference (MAMC, Triceps Skinfold (TSF, BMI, and Fat-Free Mass Index (FFMI. With ROC curve analysis, the cut-off point of BMI for diagnosis of patients with MAMC and SFT<25% and FFMI<5% of normal range was determined. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and T-test. Findings: Mean age was 36.7±13.73. Mean BMI was 21.1±5.12 kg/m2, mean TSF was 11.76±7.79 mm, mean MAMC was 21.41±3.93 cm2, and mean FFMI was 16.69±2.35 kg/m2. Twenty eight patients (32.6% had FFMI<5% and MAMC and SFT<25% of normal range. In ROC curve analysis, the cut-off point of BMI for malnutrition was 19.4 kg/m2 with sensitivity of 0.844, specificity of 0.842, Youden Index of 0.686 and Shortest distance from the point (0, 1 of 0.0493. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that the cut-off point of BMI for malnutrition screening is 19.4 kg/m2 in patients with end stage lung disease.

  1. End-Stage Renal Disease From Cast Nephropathy in a Teenager With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Ducore, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Cast nephropathy is the most common manifestation of renal injury in patients with multiple myeloma but is rarely reported in other conditions. We are reporting our experience in caring for a teenager with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma who developed rapidly progressive kidney injury that advanced to end-stage renal disease. On renal biopsy extensive tubular necrosis and intratubular eosinophilic casts were noted. This previously unreported finding should prompt oncologists to closely monitor for such a complication in patients with secretory tumors. Whether early plasmapheresis could be of benefit, as has been tried in multiple myeloma, remains to be determined.

  2. Coping with chronic illness: A study with end-stage renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Cassaretto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies coping styles and strategies used by 40 end-stage renal disease patients over 20 years old who receive treatment in a general hospital in Peru. The instruments applied were a personal sociodemographic questionnaire and the Coping Inventory (Carver, Scheier & Weintraub, 1989. Results showed that emotion focused coping were most frequently used followed by problem focused coping. Planning, acceptance and positive reinterpretation-growth coping strategies were more frequently used by these patients, whereas mental disengagement, suppression of competing activities and behavioral disengagement were the less frequently used coping strategies. Other differences between coping styles and strategies and sociodemographic and medical variables were analyzed.

  3. Identification and validation of novel cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for staging early Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Perrin

    Full Text Available Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD will be applied during the 'preclinical' stage (pathology present with cognition intact before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome.CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1 (n = 24 and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0 (n = 24 were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs to a larger independent cohort (n = 292 that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85-0.94 95% confidence interval [CI] and 0.88 (0.81-0.94 CI, respectively.Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel might improve clinical trial efficiency by guiding

  4. Patient Perspectives on Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Research in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, Lauren; Hacker, Mallory; Turchan, Maxim; Bollig, Madelyn; Tamargo, Christina; Fisher, William; McLaughlin, Lauren; Martig, Adria; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    The FDA has approved a multicenter, double-blind, Phase III, pivotal trial testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) in 280 people with very early stage Parkinson's disease (PD; IDE#G050016). In partnership with The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, we conducted a survey to investigate motivating factors, barriers, and gender differences among potentially eligible patients for participation in a trial testing DBS in early PD compared to standard medical treatment. The majority of survey respondents (72%) indicated they would consider learning more about participating. Early PD patients are therefore likely to consider enrolling in trials of invasive therapies that may slow symptom progression and help future patients.

  5. Severe pulmonary hypertension in a young patient with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Satyavan; Kirpalani, Ashok L; Kulkarni, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Severe pulmonary hypertension in a teenager with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis via arteriovenous access is reported. Clinical presentation included persistent volume overload and pericardial effusion. Serial hemodynamic data obtained at cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis. In addition, detailed biochemical and imaging data (echo- Doppler, computed tomography of chest, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, VQ lung scan, etc.) were obtained to find out the mechanism. The exact cause of pulmonary hypertension remains unclear, and a multi- factorial mechanism is postulated. This rare case is presented to highlight the role of aggressive dialysis, pericardiocentesis, and use of sildenafil and bosentan in the management

  6. Changes in the Papez Circuit in early stages of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    García-Polo, Pablo; Pajares, Gonzalo; Hernández Tamames, J.A.; Alfayate, E.; Frank, A.; Alvarez Linera, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of demenMa. Neuronal and synapMc losses occur iniMally and predominantly in the medial temporal lobe structures including hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus, structures that belong to the Papez circuit. The integrity of the connecMons amongst them is essenMal for episodic memory, which is specifically impaired in AD. For this reason we have invesMgated the degeneraMon paRern of subcorMcal structures and its relaMon to early stages of AD, i.e. ...

  7. The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luño, José

    2007-12-01

    While the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Spain is high, the incidence in comparison to the United States and Japan is low. Spain's rate of deceased organ donation is the highest in the world, and its renal transplant incidence rate is also relatively high. In addition, ESRD care represents a large portion of the overall health care budget. Quality of care in the National Health Service is not determined by competition or performance rewards; instead, several health agencies and scientific societies monitor it. Nevertheless, nephrologists with low salaries have relatively few professional and economic incentives to improve quality.

  8. Predictive properties of different multidimensional staging systems in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oga T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Toru Oga1, Mitsuhiro Tsukino2, Takashi Hajiro3, Akihiko Ikeda4, Koichi Nishimura5 1Department of Respiratory Care and Sleep Control Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hikone Municipal Hospital, Hikone, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tenri Hospital, Tenri, Japan; 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nishi-Kobe Medical Center, Kobe, Japan; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, Rakuwakai Otowa Hospital, Kyoto, Japan Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is considered to be a respiratory disease with systemic manifestations. Some multidimensional staging systems, not based solely on the level of airflow limitation, have been developed; however, these systems have rarely been compared. Methods: We previously recruited 150 male outpatients with COPD for an analysis of factors related to mortality. For this report, we examined the discriminative and prognostic predictive properties of three COPD multidimensional measurements. These indices were the modified BODE (mBODE, which includes body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity; the ADO, composed of age, dyspnea, and airflow obstruction; and the modified DOSE (mDOSE, comprising dyspnea, airflow obstruction, smoking status, and exacerbation frequency. Results: Among these indices, the frequency distribution of the mBODE index was the most widely and normally distributed. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analyses revealed that the scores on three indices were significantly predictive of 5-year mortality of COPD (P < 0.001. The scores on the mBODE and ADO indices were more significantly predictive of mortality than forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the Medical Research Council dyspnea score, and the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score. However, peak oxygen uptake on progressive cycle ergometry was more significantly related to mortality than the scores on

  9. Calculation of Atmospheric Transmittance by IBM 3033 Computer Code LOWTRAN IIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    empir- ical expression was obtained by Roberts et al [Ref. 6] for the temperature dependence which is given in 2qn 2.9 belcw. It was fcund that the...vapor continuum described in Roberts et al £Bef. 6] have been used in LOWTRAN IIIB with the appropriate conversion of units as follows. The...XX ». « HOUZ ^SCS » » »-MM »-»- #*" S* *_» •.>—«PS •N*-^^T«JC

  10. A novel interference mechanism by a type IIIB CRISPR-Cmr module in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Garrett, Roger Antony; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on CRISPR-based adaptive immune systems have revealed extensive structural and functional diversity of the interference complexes which often coexist intracellularly. The archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A encodes three interference modules, one of type IA and two of type IIIB...... targeting. A rationale is provided for the intracellular coexistence of the different interference systems in S.¿islandicus REY15A which cooperate functionally by sharing a single Cas6 protein for crRNA processing and utilize crRNA products from identical CRISPR spacers....

  11. Prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkowiec, I; Klawe, J J; Tafil-Klawe, M; Jeske, K; Laudencka, A; Bielicka, B; Manitius, J; Zlomańczuk, P

    2006-09-01

    The majority of hemodialyzed patients suffer from sleep disturbances. In the present study the prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD-patients) was investigated by the survey, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and polysomnography (PSG). Sixty-one patients: 24 women and 37 men were involved in the study. All subjects participated in the first part of the study consisting of the survey and ESS. The second and third parts consisted of nighttime PSG, performed the night after hemodialysis (17 patients) and between hemodialyses (11 patients). Eleven out of the 61 patients had the symptoms of sleep apnea and heavy daily sleepiness. Eleven subjects were involved in the double PSG study: after and between hemodialyses. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 7 of those patients during both nights analyzed. Our results confirm the occurrence of sleep disorders in ESRD-patients. Hemodialysis does not change the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in chronic renal disease.

  12. Non-pharmacological interventions and neuroplasticity in early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Herholz, Regina S; Herholz, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Non-pharmacological interventions have the potential to reduce cognitive decline and to improve psychosocial aspects in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's dementia, and the absence of side effects makes them a favorable option also for preventive strategies. We provide an overview on recent studies involving cognitive training and reminiscence, stimulating and challenging experiences such as visual art and music, physical activities, and electromagnetic stimulation. We review findings on neuroplasticity in the aging brain and their relevance for cognitive improvement in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss cognitive reserve and possible mechanisms that drive neuroplasticity and new learning. Finally, we identify promising avenues for future intervention strategies and research, such as combinations of cognitive and pharmaceutical interventions, and individual strategies adapted to the disease stage and tailored to the needs, predispositions and preferences of patients.

  13. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-03-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients-specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements-in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status.

  14. Early Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease with Renal Injury Caused by Hypertension in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yabuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old spayed female Papillon weighing 4.0 kg presented with a history of persistent hematuria and pollakiuria. Concurrent bladder calculi, a mammary gland tumor, and nonazotemic early stage of chronic kidney disease with contracted kidneys were noted in this dog. The dog underwent cystectomy, unilateral mastectomy, and intraoperative renal biopsy. On the basis of histopathological analysis of renal biopsy results, it was suspected that renal injury of the dog was caused by persistent hypertension, and a follow-up examination revealed severe hypertension. The dog was treated with a combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and calcium channel blocker. The treatment produced a good outcome in the dog, and there has been no progression of the chronic kidney disease for over 2 years.

  15. A retrospective study of end-stage renal disease in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDouceur, Elise E B; Davis, Barbara; Tseng, Flo

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study summarizes 11 cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from eight zoologic institutions across the United States and Canada. Ten bears were female, one was male, and the mean age at the time of death was 24 yr old. The most common clinical signs were lethargy, inappetence, and polyuria-polydipsia. Biochemical findings included azotemia, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. Histologic examination commonly showed glomerulonephropathies and interstitial fibrosis. Based on submissions to a private diagnostic institution over a 16-yr period, ESRD was the most commonly diagnosed cause of death or euthanasia in captive polar bears in the United States, with an estimated prevalence of over 20%. Further research is needed to discern the etiology of this apparently common disease of captive polar bears.

  16. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaramki, Jumana H; Al-Ammouri, Iyad A; Akl, Kamal F

    2016-05-01

    Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  17. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  18. Burden of end-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, S

    2010-11-01

    To review prevalence, causes and management of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Review of literature and data. Approximately 70% of the least developed countries of the world are in SSA. Rapid urbanization is occurring in many parts of the continent, contributing to overcrowding and poverty. While infections and parasitic diseases are still the leading cause of death in Africa, non-communicable diseases are coming to the forefront. There is a continuing "brain drain" of healthcare workers (physicians and nurses) from Africa to more affluent regions. There are large rural areas of Africa that have no health professionals to serve these populations. There are no nephrologists in many parts of SSA; the numbers vary from 0.5 per million population (pmp) in Kenya to 0.6 pmp in Nigeria, 0.7 pmp in Sudan and 1.1 pmp in South Africa. Chronic kidney disease affects mainly young adults aged 20 - 50 years in SSA and is primarily due to hypertension and glomerular diseases. HIV- related glomerular disease often presents late, with patients requiring dialysis. Diabetes mellitus affects 9.4 million people in Africa. The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is estimated to be 6 - 16% in SSA. The current dialysis treatment rate is Africa, Nigeria, Mauritius and Ghana, with most of the transplants being living donor transplants, except in South Africa where the majority are from deceased donors. Chronic kidney disease care is especially challenging in SSA, with large numbers of ESRD patients, inadequate facilities, funding and support.

  19. Prognostic significance of residual disease after radiation therapy of stage III breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, J.; Toth, J.; Szentirmay, Z.; Gyenes, G.

    1987-01-01

    239 Consecutive women with stage III carcinoma of the breast were treated by primary radiation therapy (RT) from 1977 to 1985. The response rate was 89%, the 5-year survival 40% and the local-regional tumor control (LTC) 59%. For the 27 non-responders, postirradiation chemotherapy was initiated but they died within 3 years. 105 Patients were subjected to mastectomy and axillary dissection after RT. In 107 cases, the RT was not followed by surgery. Systemic treatment consisted of hormonal therapy in both groups. The RT plus surgery group had better survival rate, 58% vs. 35% at 5 years. However, the incidence of less favorable cases was higher in the RT alone group. Histological findings in the operated group are analysed to determine prognostic significance of residual disease. No residual or only damaged microscopic disease was found in the breast in 36% of the cases. The axillary lymph nodes (ALN) were free of disease in 42% of the women. Patients with negative ALN after RT had significantly better 5-year survival (82% vs. 43%) and LTC (85% vs. 60%) rates. Decreased chest wall recurrence rate was associated with no residual or damaged microscopic disease in the breast (5% vs. 21%). The disease-free ALN were more common after 50-80 Gy telecobalt than after 40-50 Gy kV irradiation (51% vs. 33%). Primary tumor size ( 5 cm) had no significant impact on histological findings or on prognosis. Residual disease is mainly a marker of tumor-host relationship which indicates the biological aggressiveness of the disease. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Association between Low Serum Bicarbonate Concentrations and Cardiovascular Disease in Patients in the End-Stage of Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaia D. Raikou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic acidosis, a common condition particularly in the end-stage of renal disease patients, results in malnutrition, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the association between low serum bicarbonate and cardiovascular disease in patients on intermittent dialysis. Methods: We studied 52 on-line-pre-dilution hemodiafiltration (on-l HDF patients, 32 males and 20 females, with a mean age of 58.01 ± 15.4 years old. Metabolic acidosis was determined by serum bicarbonate concentrations less than 22 mmol/L. Residual renal function (RRF was defined by interdialytic urine volume. Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox regression models were performed to predict coronary artery disease (CAD, defined by ejection fraction <50%, or diastolic dysfunction congestive heart failure (CHF and peripheral vascular disease (PVD. Results: Kaplan–Meier analyses showed that a lower or higher than 22 mmol/L serum bicarbonate metabolic acidosis status was significantly associated with both PVD and diastolic dysfunction (log-rank = 5.07, p = 0.02 and log-rank = 5.84, p = 0.01, respectively. A similar prevalence of serum bicarbonate on CAD or CHF by low ejection fraction was not shown. The RRF was associated with PVD event and serum bicarbonate less than 22 mmol/L (log-rank = 5.49, p = 0.01 and log-rank = 3.9, p = 0.04, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that serum bicarbonate and RRF were significant risk factors for PVD after adjustment for confounders. Furthermore, RRF adjusted for covariates was shown to be a significant risk factor for diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate was associated with peripheral vascular disease and diastolic dysfunction in intermittent dialysis. The residual renal function may impact patients’ outcomes through its relationship with metabolic acidosis status, particularly for peripheral vascular disease manifestation.

  1. Speech and Voice Response to a Levodopa Challenge in Late-Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Fabbri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundParkinson’s disease (PD patients are affected by hypokinetic dysarthria, characterized by hypophonia and dysprosody, which worsens with disease progression. Levodopa’s (l-dopa effect on quality of speech is inconclusive; no data are currently available for late-stage PD (LSPD.ObjectiveTo assess the modifications of speech and voice in LSPD following an acute l-dopa challenge.MethodLSPD patients [Schwab and England score <50/Hoehn and Yahr stage >3 (MED ON] performed several vocal tasks before and after an acute l-dopa challenge. The following was assessed: respiratory support for speech, voice quality, stability and variability, speech rate, and motor performance (MDS-UPDRS-III. All voice samples were recorded and analyzed by a speech and language therapist blinded to patients’ therapeutic condition using Praat 5.1 software.Results24/27 (14 men LSPD patients succeeded in performing voice tasks. Median age and disease duration of patients were 79 [IQR: 71.5–81.7] and 14.5 [IQR: 11–15.7] years, respectively. In MED OFF, respiratory breath support and pitch break time of LSPD patients were worse than the normative values of non-parkinsonian. A correlation was found between disease duration and voice quality (R = 0.51; p = 0.013 and speech rate (R = −0.55; p = 0.008. l-Dopa significantly improved MDS-UPDRS-III score (20%, with no effect on speech as assessed by clinical rating scales and automated analysis.ConclusionSpeech is severely affected in LSPD. Although l-dopa had some effect on motor performance, including axial signs, speech and voice did not improve. The applicability and efficacy of non-pharmacological treatment for speech impairment should be considered for speech disorder management in PD.

  2. Peptic ulcer bleeding outcomes adversely affected by end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Justin; Yu, Andrea; LaBossiere, Joseph; Zhu, Qiaohao; Fedorak, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) bleeding may be at high risk of bleeding complications. To investigate the outcomes of patients with ESRD and PUD bleeding. ESRD patients with PUD bleeding were evaluated retrospectively. Two tertiary, university-affiliated hospitals. A total of 150 PUD bleeding patients were evaluated in 3 groups; end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on dialysis (ESRD group) (n = 50) were age matched with patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not requiring dialysis (CKD group) (n = 50) and those with normal kidney function (normal group) (n = 50). Rebleeding, transfusions, length of hospitalization, mortality. Multivariate analysis showed significant predictors of rebleeding to be ESRD and high-risk stigmata. The ESRD group had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.8 (95% CI, 1.4-10.5; P = .008) for rebleeding compared with the normal group, and an OR of 3.8 (95% CI, 1.4-10.3; P = .01) compared with the CKD group. The mean number of (+/- SD) transfusions was higher in the ESRD group (6.3 +/- 5.7 units) than in the normal group (3.6 +/- 3.9 units; P = .01). The mean length of hospitalization was higher in the ESRD group than in the normal group (34.0 vs 16.6 days; P = .01). A greater level of comorbidity was the only significant predictor of mortality (OR 6.0; 95% CI, 2.9-12.3; P = .001). Retrospective study. ESRD dialysis patients with PUD bleeding have greater rebleeding than patients not on dialysis. ESRD patients should be managed as a high-risk group. 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron deficiency across chronic kidney disease stages: Is there a reverse gender pattern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Aoun

    Full Text Available In non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients, looking for iron deficiency is highly variable in practice and there is a great variability regarding the cutoffs used to treat iron deficiency. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree of iron deficiency in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. We included all non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients that applied to the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents' coverage during a 5-month period. Iron requirement was assessed based on two guidelines' target-to-treat cutoffs: 1-ferritin <100 ng/ml and/or TSAT < 20% (KDOQI 2006, 2- ferritin ≤500 ng/ml and TSAT ≤30% (KDIGO 2012. A total of 238 CKD patients were included over 5 months. All patients had a ferritin level in their record and 64% had an available TSAT. Median age was 71.0 (59.8-79.3 years and 61.8% were female. All had an eGFR<60 ml/min. The proportion of patients found to require iron therapy ranged between 48 and 78% with a trend towards higher values when using KDIGO-based criteria. Using ANCOVA test, inverse normal transformations of ferritin and TSAT showed a reverse pattern between men and women with women being more iron deficient in the early stage. Iron deficiency is highly prevalent in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents' therapy. These findings reflect a lack in effective iron supplementation when managing anemia in pre-dialysis patients, especially in men at advanced stages. Renal societies should spread awareness about iron deficiency screening in those patients.

  4. FOOD CONSUMPTION OF CIRRHOTIC PATIENTS, COMPARISON WITH THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND DISEASE STAGING

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    Flavia Feijó NUNES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Patients with liver disease often present protein-energy malnutrition. The assessment of food intake is very important in the investigation regarding the "health-disease" process. Objective To assess dietary intake of cirrhotic patients through food record during 3 days, correlating it with the nutritional status of the patient and the stage of the disease. Methods Cirrhotic outpatients from the Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital, RS, Brazil, were assessed. Nutritional assessment was performed by anthropometry; non-dominating handgrip strength; adductor pollicis muscle thickness; phase angle by bioelectrical impedance analysis; and Subjective Global Assessment. For analysis of food consumption we used the food records of 3 days using scales for weighing of all foods. Results We evaluated 25 (68% patients, in which there was a prevalence of cirrhosis by hepatitis C virus. The upper arm circumference, handgrip strength and phase angle by bioelectrical impedance analysis diagnosed 56% of malnourished. Phase angle by bioelectrical impedance analysis and upper arm circumference were associated with Child-Pugh score (P<0.05. The average consumption of calories, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids were within the recommended. However, sodium was above the recommendations, 106±57.2 mEq, and was inversely associated with Child-Pugh score (rs=-0.410; P=0.042. Conclusion Food intake did not have a significant difference between the Child-Pugh scores and nutritional status. In addition, food intake did not vary neither according to the stage of the disease, nor to the nutritional assessment, by the phase angle by bioelectrical impedance analysis.

  5. Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer's disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Testa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a gradually debilitating disease that leads to dementia. The molecular mechanisms underlying AD are still not clear, and at present no reliable biomarkers are available for the early diagnosis. In the last several years, together with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain has become increasingly implicated in AD progression. A significant body of evidence indicates that oxidized cholesterol, in the form of oxysterols, is one of the main triggers of AD. The oxysterols potentially most closely involved in the pathogenesis of AD are 24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, respectively deriving from cholesterol oxidation by the enzymes CYP46A1 and CYP27A1. However, the possible involvement of oxysterols resulting from cholesterol autooxidation, including 7-ketocholesterol and 7β-hydroxycholesterol, is now emerging. In a systematic analysis of oxysterols in post-mortem human AD brains, classified by the Braak staging system of neurofibrillary pathology, alongside the two oxysterols of enzymatic origin, a variety of oxysterols deriving from cholesterol autoxidation were identified; these included 7-ketocholesterol, 7α-hydroxycholesterol, 4β-hydroxycholesterol, 5α,6α-epoxycholesterol, and 5β,6β-epoxycholesterol. Their levels were quantified and compared across the disease stages. Some inflammatory mediators, and the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloprotease-9, were also found to be enhanced in the brains, depending on disease progression. This highlights the pathogenic association between the trends of inflammatory molecules and oxysterol levels during the evolution of AD. Conversely, sirtuin 1, an enzyme that regulates several pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory response, was reduced markedly with the progression of AD, supporting the hypothesis that the loss of sirtuin 1 might play a key role in AD. Taken together, these results strongly support the

  6. Combined type IIIB with bilateral type I thyroplasty for pitch lowering with maintenance of vocal fold tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Matthew R; Devine, Erin E; Remacle, Marc; Ford, Charles N; Wadium, Elizabeth; Jiang, Jack J

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate type IIIB thyroplasty using the excised larynx bench apparatus and determine how altering vocal fold contour by performing bilateral medialization of the inferior vocal fold affects phonation. This procedure could be performed in patients for whom pitch lowering is desirable, such as female-to-male transsexuals or male patients with mutational falsetto in whom intensive voice therapy was insufficient. Aerodynamic, acoustic, and high-speed videokymographic data were collected for nine larynges at three subglottal pressure inputs for each of three conditions: normal; type IIIB thyroplasty; and combined type IIIB with modified bilateral type I thyroplasty intended to create a more rectangular glottal configuration. Each larynx served as its own control. Phonation threshold flow (p = 0.005), phonation threshold power (p = 0.031), and airflow varied across conditions with highest values for type IIIB thyroplasty and lowest for the combined procedure. Fundamental frequency was significantly different (p thyroplasty provided some further decrease in frequency, but mostly served to increase tension, reduce airflow, and produce a vibratory pattern which more closely mirrored control trials. Exploration of this combined procedure in patients may be warranted if not completely satisfied with the results from type IIIB thyroplasty alone.

  7. Clinical staging and survival in refractory celiac disease: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Kelly, Darlene G; Lahr, Brian D; Dogan, Ahmet; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Murray, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Refractory celiac disease (RCD) occurs when both symptoms and intestinal damage persist or recur despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. In RCD, the immunophenotype of intraepithelial lymphocytes may be normal and polyclonal (RCD I) or abnormal and monoclonal (RCD II). The aim is to describe the clinical characteristics, treatment, and long-term outcome in a large single-center cohort of patients with RCD. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcome in 57 patients with RCD: 42 with RCD I and 15 with RCD II. Fifteen of 57 patients died during follow-up (n=8 with RCD I and n=7 with RCD II), each within the first 2 years after RCD diagnosis. The overall 5-year cumulative survival is 70%, 80%, and 45% for the entire cohort, RCD I, and RCD II, respectively. The refractory state itself and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) were the most common causes of death, respectively. A new staging system is proposed based on the cumulative effect of 5 prognostic factors investigated at the time of the refractory state diagnosis: for patients in stages I, II, and III, the 5-year cumulative survival rate was 96%, 71%, and 19%, respectively (PRCD is associated with high mortality with RCD II having an especially poor prognosis because of the development of EATL. A new staging model is proposed that may improve the precision of prognosis in patients with RCD.

  8. Targeting the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease: bioenergetic and mitochondrial opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles C; Yao, Jia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a complex and progressive neurodegenerative phenotype, with hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics among the earliest pathogenic events. Bioenergetic deficits are well documented in preclinical models of mammalian aging and AD, emerge early in the prodromal phase of AD, and in those at risk for AD. This review discusses the importance of early therapeutic intervention during the prodromal stage that precedes irreversible degeneration in AD. Mechanisms of action for current mitochondrial and bioenergetic therapeutics for AD broadly fall into the following categories: 1) glucose metabolism and substrate supply; 2) mitochondrial enhancers to potentiate energy production; 3) antioxidants to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reduce oxidative damage; 4) candidates that target apoptotic and mitophagy pathways to either remove damaged mitochondria or prevent neuronal death. Thus far, mitochondrial therapeutic strategies have shown promise at the preclinical stage but have had little-to-no success in clinical trials. Lessons learned from preclinical and clinical therapeutic studies are discussed. Understanding the bioenergetic adaptations that occur during aging and AD led us to focus on a systems biology approach that targets the bioenergetic system rather than a single component of this system. Bioenergetic system-level therapeutics personalized to bioenergetic phenotype would target bioenergetic deficits across the prodromal and clinical stages to prevent and delay progression of AD.

  9. Sequence Variations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Are Associated with Different Stages of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Frank; Easterbrook, Philippa J.; Douglas, Nigel; Troop, Maxine; Greenough, Thomas C.; Weber, Jonathan; Carl, Silke; Sullivan, John L.; Daniels, Rod S.

    1999-01-01

    nef alleles derived from a large number of individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were analyzed to investigate the frequency of disrupted nef genes and to elucidate whether specific amino acid substitutions in Nef are associated with different stages of disease. We confirm that deletions or gross abnormalities in nef are rarely present. However, a comparison of Nef consensus sequences derived from 41 long-term nonprogressors and from 50 individuals with progressive HIV-1 infection revealed that specific variations are associated with different stages of infection. Five amino acid variations in Nef (T15, N51, H102, L170, and E182) were more frequently observed among nonprogressors, while nine features (an additional N-terminal PxxP motif, A15, R39, T51, T157, C163, N169, Q170, and M182) were more frequently found in progressors. Strong correlations between the frequency of these variations in Nef and both the CD4+-cell count and the viral load were observed. Moreover, analysis of sequential samples obtained from two progressors revealed that several variations in Nef, which were more commonly observed in patients with low CD4+-T-cell counts, were detected only during or after progression to immunodeficiency. Our results indicate that sequence variations in Nef are associated with different stages of HIV-1 infection and suggest a link between nef gene function and the immune status of the infected individual. PMID:10364298

  10. Health-related quality of life in different stages of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, H K; Jain, D; Pawar, S; Yadav, R K

    2016-11-01

    Improved survival of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has led to an increased focus on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for evaluating treatment effectiveness and assessing health outcomes of these patients. To evaluate HRQoL in patients in different stages of CKD and to explore possible correlating and influencing factors. Cross-sectional design with 200 patients from India in CKD stages 1-5 assessed for HRQoL through 36-item short-form together with biomarkers. Patients were divided into four groups according to their estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR); group A with GFR range > 90 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , group B with GFR range 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , group C with GFR range 15-29 ml/min/1.73 m 2 and group D with GFR stages. A statistically significant decreasing trend in physical composite summary and mental composite summary scores was found in patients from group A to D (Plife. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinkley KE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katy E Trinkley,1 S Michelle Nikels,2 Robert L Page II,1 Melanie S Joy11Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD.Methods: A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013 was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors.Results: Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients.Conclusion: Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the

  12. Transient elastography for diagnosis of stages of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in people with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Chavdar S; Casazza, Giovanni; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2015-01-01

    of the diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease was not provided in one study and was not clearly defined in two studies, but it was clear in the remaining 11 studies. The study authors used different liver stiffness cut-off values of transient elastography for the hepatic fibrosis stages.There was only one study (103......BACKGROUND: The presence and progression of hepatic (liver) fibrosis into cirrhosis is a prognostic variable having impact on survival in people with alcoholic liver disease. Liver biopsy, although an invasive method, is the recommended 'reference standard' for diagnosis and staging of hepatic...... fibrosis in people with liver diseases. Transient elastography is a non-invasive method for assessing and staging hepatic fibrosis. OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of transient elastography for diagnosis and staging hepatic fibrosis in people with alcoholic liver disease when compared...

  13. Caring for Migrants and Refugees With End-Stage Kidney Disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond; Ernandez, Thomas; Drewniak, Daniel; Luyckx, Valerie

    2018-05-01

    With the number of migrants and refugees increasing globally, the nephrology community is increasingly confronted with issues relating to the management of end-stage kidney disease in this population, including medical, logistical, financial, and moral-ethical questions. Beginning with data for the state of affairs regarding refugees in Europe and grounded in moral reasoning theory, this Policy Forum Perspective contends that to improve care for this specific population, there is a need for: (1) clear demarcations of responsibilities across the societal (macro), local (meso), and individual (micro) levels, such that individual providers are aware of available resources and able to provide essential medical care while societies and local communities determine the general approach to dialysis care for refugees; (2) additional data and evidence to facilitate decision making based on facts rather than emotions; and (3) better information and education in a broad sense (cultural sensitivity, legal rights and obligations, and medical knowledge) to address specific needs in this population. Although the nephrology community cannot leverage a change in the geopolitical framework, we are in a position to generate accurate data describing the dimensions of care of refugee or migrant patients with end-stage kidney disease to advocate for a holistic approach to treatment for this unique patient population. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of end stage kidney disease on costs and outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Abhinav; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Yadlapati, Sujani; Rangaswami, Janani

    2017-09-01

    To assess the impact of end stage kidney disease (ESKD) on the outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including complications of infection, length of hospital stay, overall mortality, and healthcare burden. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database created by the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) was used, covering the years 2009 through 2013. Manufacturer-provided sampling weights were used to produce national estimates. All-cause unadjusted in-hospital mortality was significantly higher for patients with CDI and ESKD than for patients without ESKD (11.6% vs. 7.7%, paverage cost of hospitalization for patients with CDI and ESKD was also significantly higher compared to the non-ESKD group (USD $35 588 vs. $23 505, in terms of the 2013 value of the USD, pend stage kidney disease in hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection is associated with higher mortality, a longer length of stay, and a higher cost of hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Renal involvement of mantle cell lymphona leading to end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Seo, Jong Woo; Cho, Hyun Seop; Kang, Yeojin; Bae, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong Won; Jeon, Dae-Hong; Lee, Jong Sil; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), owing to its insensitivity to chemotherapy, has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 3 years to 4 years. MCL frequently infiltrates other organs. However, reports involving kidney in living patients are rare. Here, we report a case of MCL with renal involvement leading to end stage renal disease that required renal replacement therapy. A 69-year-old man diagnosed with MCL 3 years earlier was admitted to our emergency room due to uremic symptoms. After eight cycles of chemotherapy, he had displayed complete remission, but experienced a recurrence 1.5 years later; after refusing chemotherapy, the patient was lost on follow-up in the final 10 months. On presentation at the emergency room, the patient's serum blood urea nitrogen was 109.5 mg/dL, and creatinine was 11.1 mg/dL. All serological markers for secondary glomerulonephritis were negative. Renal biopsy revealed 50% sclerosis of the glomerulus and small dense lymphocyte infiltration of the tubulo-interstitium. Similar cells were found on the gastric mucosa. Despite our recommendation for chemotherapy, he refused all treatments except for hemodialysis, which was maintained for 12 months until his death. This patient represents the first case report of the renal involvement of MCL leading to end stage renal disease.

  16. Dentomaxillofacial Radiographic Changes in a Group of Iranian Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shakibaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the dentomaxillofacial radiographic changes in end stage renal disease (ESRD patients who were on hemodialysis. Methods: Parathyroid hormone (PTH, calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase (ALP measurements, as well as Panoramic and periapical radiographs were obtained from seventy four patients with a history of end stage renal disease (ESRD. Results: 74 patients examined with age range of 15 to 68 years, and a mean age of 41.4±14.6 years. The duration of dialysis ranged between 3 to 156 months with a mean duration of 40.4 months. Thinning or loss of lamina dura was observed in 16 patients (51.4% and calcification of the pulp in 28 patients (40%. Changes in trabecular pattern was observed in 30 patients (40.6%, alterations in jaw bone density in 29 patients (39.2% and bilateral calcification of stylohyoid ligaments in 13 patients (17.6%. We did not notice any non periapical origin radiolucent lesion. There was a significant relationship between bone trabecular pattern with P level, age and duration of dialysis. Changes in bone density showed significant relationship with frequency and hours of dialysis per week. Conclusion: No correlation was found between the radiographic changes and Ca level. Although changes in trabecular pattern and density were observed mostly in those who were on hemodialysis for a relatively long time, but we could not establish a definitive relation of radiographic manifestations in ESRD patients with the duration and frequency of dialysis.

  17. Hypo Activity of Cholinergic System in Patients with Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidescu, L.; Codorean, I.; Matei, C.; Barret, O.; Mazere, J.; Guyot, M.; Rimbu, A.; Allard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Objective A cholinergic dysfunction was documented in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease. In order to specify the cholinergic involvement in early stages, we performed a presynaptic imaging study of the cholinergic system using a vesicular Acetylcholine transporter ligand labelled with iodine 123 ( 123 I-IBVM - Iodobenzovesamicol) Materials And Methods Eight patients (5 women and 3 men, 74-89 years, MMS>23) and 8 controls (6 women and 2 men, 72-80 years, MMS>30) have been evaluated using the neuropsychological tests; cerebral SPECT was performed 6 hours after intravenous injection of 218±19 MBq of 123 I - IBVM (30 min, 3 volume, 128x128) and the 3D MRI (T1 weighted images). Acquisition data were processed by filtered retroprojection (Butterworth 5.35) and analysed with SPM software. Each examination was co-registered with the MRI of the patient, normalised in the MNI template and smoothed (10mm). Results The analyse of the group (two sample T-test, p 123 I-IBVM has been detected in the patients group, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results indicate that cholinergic dysfunctions appear very early in the development of Alzheimer's disease and affect the cortical structures involved in the attention process. Some studies are in progress to analyze imaging data with cognitive impairments of each patient. (author)

  18. Etiology of end stage renal disease in dialysis patient in Gilan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khosravi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD in every community differ according to genetic, nutrition, and public health status. ESRD,the terminal stage of chronic renal failure,needs replacement therapy otherwise could lead to death. The aim of the study is to determine the relative frequency of ESRD etiology in hemodialysis patients of Gilan province. Methods:This descriptive study was performed on 407 patients who were being hemodialysis in all hemodialysis centers of the Gilan province from September 2002 to September 2003. The original data was collected from the medical records of patients. Results: The most prevalent causes were: hypertension 35.4% ; unknown etiology 16.2% ; diabetes melitus 13.8% , glomerulopathies 9.6% , urologic causes 9.1%, cystic kidney diseases 7.6 % ; other causes 5.9 % ; congenital 2.5%. Conclusion: In our study hypertension was the first etiology of ESRD, followed by unknown causes, however nephrology textbooks indicate diabetes melitus as the primary and hypertension as the secondary etiology of ESRD,.

  19. Effects of hemodialysis on ventricular activation time in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszki-Szcząchor, Krystyna; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota; Zwolińska, Danuta; Makulska, Irena; Rehan, Leopold; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are affected by cardiovascular complications, including disturbances of the heart intraventricular conduction. Body surface potential mapping is a non-invasive electrocardiographic detection method of initial disturbances in heart activation propagation. A goal of the study was to analyze the effects of single hemodialysis (HD) session on ventricular activation time (VAT) maps obtained from hemodialyzed children. The study group consisted of 13 hemodialyzed children (age: 6-18 years). The control group is composed of 26 healthy subjects. In each HD patient, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiography examinations were performed. Isochrone heart maps, reflecting body surface distribution of VAT isolines, were recorded from an 87-electrode HPM-7100 system for body surface potential mapping, before (group B) and after HD session (group A). The distribution of isochrones and VAT values, as recorded in the HD patients, differed significantly from the reference VAT map for controls. The highest VAT maximal value was noted in group B (Me: 110 vs. 62 ms in the control group; P children with end-stage renal disease exhibited disturbances of intraventricular conduction within the left bundle branch block, undetectable on standard electrocardiogram. A single HD session resulted in VAT map improvement related to overall HD treatment duration. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  20. Specific passage of simian immunodeficiency virus from end-stage disease results in accelerated progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, L.; Niphuis, H.; ten Haaft, P. J.; Goudsmit, J.; Baskin, G.; Heeney, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether passage of late-stage variants of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) would lead to a more virulent infection and rapid disease progression, a study was designed to examine the effects of selective transmission of SIV from late-stage cases of AIDS in Macaca mulatta. In a uniform

  1. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: Key players in all stages of disease and promising therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramji, Dipak P.; Davies, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the arteries, is responsible for most deaths in westernized societies with numbers increasing at a marked rate in developing countries. The disease is initiated by the activation of the endothelium by various risk factors leading to chemokine-mediated recruitment of immune cells. The uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages along with defective cholesterol efflux gives rise to foam cells associated with the fatty streak in the early phase of the disease. As the disease progresses, complex fibrotic plaques are produced as a result of lysis of foam cells, migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and continued inflammatory response. Such plaques are stabilized by the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells and destabilized by matrix metalloproteinase from macrophages. Rupture of unstable plaques and subsequent thrombosis leads to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction. Cytokines are involved in all stages of atherosclerosis and have a profound influence on the pathogenesis of this disease. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles of different cytokines in atherosclerosis together with therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating their actions. PMID:26005197

  2. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L; Currie, Amanda D; Molinari, Anna L; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD.

  3. The Clinical Stages of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with Met/Met Genotype in Korean Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Wang, Min Jeong; Jang, Jae-Won; Park, Young Ho; Lim, Jae-Sung; Youn, Young Chul; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is currently based on changes occurring in the late disease stages, which limits early-stage detection. Therefore, we investigated the disease course from the vague symptomatic to the terminal phase. We retrospectively reviewed 36 sCJD patient records, classifying the disease progression into 4 stages based on clinical manifestations: vague symptomatic, possible CJD, probable CJD and chronic vegetative state. We analyzed findings from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), electroencephalography (EEG) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein testing performed at each stage. In stage 1, the most distinctive feature was DWI hyperintensities in the neocortex, even with negative CSF 14-3-3 protein and EEG results. In stage 2, DWI hyperintensities in the limbic cortex were more remarkable. CSF 14-3-3 protein testing yielded positive results in >80% of patients; EEG showed sensitivity in disease stage-dependent differences in clinical symptoms and laboratory test results will facilitate early and accurate diagnosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-22

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. A type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex mediating massive target DNA destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenyuan; Li, Yingjun; Deng, Ling; Feng, Mingxia; Peng, Wenfang; Hallstrøm, Søren; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yun Xiang; White, Malcolm F; She, Qunxin

    2017-02-28

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system protects archaea and bacteria by eliminating nucleic acid invaders in a crRNA-guided manner. The Sulfolobus islandicus type III-B Cmr-α system targets invading nucleic acid at both RNA and DNA levels and DNA targeting relies on the directional transcription of the protospacer in vivo. To gain further insight into the involved mechanism, we purified a native effector complex of III-B Cmr-α from S. islandicus and characterized it in vitro. Cmr-α cleaved RNAs complementary to crRNA present in the complex and its ssDNA destruction activity was activated by target RNA. The ssDNA cleavage required mismatches between the 5΄-tag of crRNA and the 3΄-flanking region of target RNA. An invader plasmid assay showed that mutation either in the histidine-aspartate acid (HD) domain (a quadruple mutation) or in the GGDD motif of the Cmr-2α protein resulted in attenuation of the DNA interference in vivo. However, double mutation of the HD motif only abolished the DNase activity in vitro. Furthermore, the activated Cmr-α binary complex functioned as a highly active DNase to destroy a large excess DNA substrate, which could provide a powerful means to rapidly degrade replicating viral DNA. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Advanced chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and renal death among HIV-positive individuals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Kirk, O; Lundgren, Jd

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Knowledge about advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in HIV-positive persons is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate incidence, predictors and outcomes for advanced CKD/ESRD and renal death. METHODS: Advanced CKD was defined as confirmed...... (two consecutive measurements ≥ 3 months apart) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using Cockcroft-Gault, and ESRD as haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for ≥ 1 month or renal transplant. Renal death was death with renal disease as the underlying cause, using Coding...... Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. Follow-up was from 1 January 2004 until last eGFR measurement, advanced CKD, ESRD or renal death, whichever occurred first. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors. RESULTS: Of 9044 individuals included in the study, 58 (0.64%) experienced advanced...

  8. How patients with end-stage renal disease manage their condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasiak, E

    2005-01-01

    The main research problem is to answer the following question: What ways of coping with situations of end-stage renal disease are used by the studied patients? To measure strategies of coping with stressful situations, The Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ), devised by Folkman and Lazarus, was used. As examined group, the men with end-stage renal disease (N=113), including patients with a transplanted kidney (N=54) and dialyzed patients (N=59), was chosen. The analysis of these situations shows that from the psychological point of view, they are, to a certain extent, different situations. In this connection, the following question appears: Is there a relationship between the ways of coping with disease and the applied methods of treatment: dialysis therapy and transplantation? Our findings shows that there are no perceptible, statistically essential differences in the applied strategies, evaluated by means of WCQ, between patients with a transplanted kidney and the ones dialyzed. Perhaps, despite the differences presented above in this argument, situations of patients with a transplanted kidney and the ones dialyzed are similar in some significant way, and this is reflected in the strategies they adopt. One of such common features for the situations of both groups of patients is a real, continuous threat of losing life. The situations studied are uncontrollable situations that can actually be influenced by nobody. The results of research have been shown the lack of statistically essential differences in the applied strategies, evaluated by means of WCQ, between patients with a transplanted kidney and the dialyzed ones.

  9. Deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease: operative experience from a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Elyne; D'Haese, Pierre-Francois; Dawant, Benoit; Allen, Laura; Kao, Chris; Charles, P David; Konrad, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) may have a disease modifying effect in early Parkinson's disease (PD). A randomised, prospective study is underway to determine whether STN-DBS in early PD is safe and tolerable. 15 of 30 early PD patients were randomised to receive STN-DBS implants in an institutional review board approved protocol. Operative technique, location of DBS leads and perioperative adverse events are reported. Active contact used for stimulation in these patients was compared with 47 advanced PD patients undergoing an identical procedure by the same surgeon. 14 of the 15 patients did not sustain any long term (>3 months) complications from the surgery. One subject suffered a stroke resulting in mild cognitive changes and slight right arm and face weakness. The average optimal contact used in symptomatic treatment of early PD patients was: anterior -1.1±1.7 mm, lateral 10.7±1.7 mm and superior -3.3±2.5 mm (anterior and posterior commissure coordinates). This location is statistically no different (0.77 mm, p>0.05) than the optimal contact used in the treatment of 47 advanced PD patients. The perioperative adverse events in this trial of subjects with early stage PD are comparable with those reported for STN-DBS in advanced PD. The active contact position used in early PD is not significantly different from that used in late stage disease. This is the first report of the operative experience from a randomised, surgical versus best medical therapy trial for the early treatment of PD.

  10. Physician specialty and the outcomes and cost of admissions for end-stage liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, C W; Kelley, K; Meyer, K E

    2001-12-01

    Chronic liver disease is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of physician specialty on length of stay, mortality, and costs during hospitalizations for end-stage liver disease. We used data from the HBS International EXPLORE database. Patients hospitalized for treatment of variceal hemorrhage, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, or hepatic encephalopathy were identified from primary discharge diagnoses. Patients were characterized by the specialty of the attending physician and by whether a gastroenterology consultation was obtained. Procedures performed were identified using ICD-9CM procedure codes. Costs were computed using proprietary HBS International Standard Transaction Codes. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the effect of physician specialty and consultation on length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and costs. Attending gastroenterologist care was associated with a shorter length of stay compared to nongastroenterologist attending care (median 4 vs 5 days, p = 0.01), which persisted after adjustment for differences in patient age, comorbidity, and number of procedures performed. There was a strong trend toward greater in-hospital mortality for patients without a gastroenterology attending or consultant (adjusted OR 1.72; 95% CI = 0.99, 2.98) compared to patients with a gastroenterology attending. Costs of hospital care were not significantly different between physician groups. Gastroenterologist involvement in inpatient care for end-stage liver disease was associated with shorter length of stay and a strong trend toward improved survival. Hospital costs were similar for patients cared for by the different physician groups.

  11. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  12. Subjective cognitive concerns and neuropsychiatric predictors of progression to the early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Nancy J; Amariglio, Rebecca E; Zoller, Amy S; Rudel, Rebecca K; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Blacker, Deborah; Hyman, Bradley T; Locascio, Joseph J; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Marshall, Gad A; Rentz, Dorene M

    2014-12-01

    To examine neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological predictors of progression from normal to early clinical stages of Alzheimer disease (AD). From a total sample of 559 older adults from the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center longitudinal cohort, 454 were included in the primary analysis: 283 with clinically normal cognition (CN), 115 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 56 with subjective cognitive concerns (SCC) but no objective impairment, a proposed transitional group between CN and MCI. Two latent cognitive factors (memory-semantic, attention-executive) and two neuropsychiatric factors (affective, psychotic) were derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Centers' Uniform Data Set neuropsychological battery and Neuropsychiatric Inventory brief questionnaire. Factors were analyzed as predictors of time to progression to a worse diagnosis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model with backward elimination. Covariates included baseline diagnosis, gender, age, education, prior depression, antidepressant medication, symptom duration, and interaction terms. Higher/better memory-semantic factor score predicted lower hazard of progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.4 for 1 standard deviation [SD] increase, p diagnosis as a sole predictor of transition to MCI, the SCC diagnosis carried a fourfold risk of progression compared with CN (HR = 4.1, p <0.0001). These results identify affective and memory-semantic factors as significant predictors of more rapid progression from normal to early stages of cognitive decline and highlight the subgroup of cognitively normal elderly with SCC as those with elevated risk of progression to MCI. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. ANALYSIS OF HIV SUBTYPES AND CLINICAL STAGING OF HIV DISEASE/AIDS IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ismail

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 known to cause Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS disease are divided into several subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K and Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF. Different characteristics of subtype of the virus and its interaction with the host can affect the severity of the disease. This study was to analyze HIV-1 subtypes circulating in HIV/AIDS patients from the East Java region descriptively and to analyze its relationship with clinical stadiums of HIV/AIDS. Information from this research was expected to complement the data of mocular epidemiology of HIV in Indonesia. This study utilited blood plasma from patients who had been tested to be HIV positive who sected treatment to or were reffered to the Intermediate Care Unit of Infectious Disease (UPIPI Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya from various area representing the East Java regions. Plasma was separated from blood samples by centrifugation for use in the the molecular biology examination including RNA extraction, nested PCR using specific primer for HIV gp120 env gene region, DNA purifying, DNA sequencing, and homology and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the HIV gp120 env gene, it was found that the most dominant subtypes in East Java were in one group of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF that is CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B which was also found in Southeast Asia. In the phylogenetic tree, most of HIV samples (30 samples are in the same branch with CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B, except for one sample (HIV40 which is in the same branch with subtype B. HIV subtypes are associated with clinical stadiums (disease severity since samples from different stages of HIV disease have the same subtype.

  15. Diseases that precede disability among latter-stage elderly individuals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Sakai, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Nagata, Satoko

    2015-08-01

    Understanding causes of disability among elderly individuals is an important public health issue, particularly because of the increasing rate of disabled elderly individuals and the social costs in a rapidly aging society. Accordingly, we aimed to describe the diseases that precede disability and investigate the types of diseases that are related to severe disability among Japanese elderly individuals aged over 75 years. Using claim data from the latter-stage elderly healthcare system and long-term care insurance system, we identified 76,265 elderly individuals over 75 years old who did not qualify as disabled on April 1, 2011. Among them, 3,715 elderly individuals who had been newly qualified as disabled between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012 were selected. Disease codes from the medical claim data in the 6 months prior to disability were collected. All descriptions were developed separately for six groups divided by gender and disability level (low, middle, and high). The results of the ordinal logistic analysis including sex and age revealed that men tended to have significantly higher levels of disability (β = 0.417, p disability level groups. In low-level disability groups, cancer in men (12.8%) and arthropathy and fracture in women (11.9% and 13.5%, respectively) were as common as cerebrovascular disorder (12.2% and 9.7%, in men and women, respectively). Stroke was the most common disease for all genders and disability levels. The diseases preceding low-level disability differed by gender. This study demonstrated the need to consider arthropathy and fracture as well as CVD in order to prevent disability.

  16. Ultrasensitive sensor for detection of early stage chronic kidney disease in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dignya; Kumar, Ashok; Bose, Debajyoti; Datta, Manali

    2018-05-15

    A facile label free, ultrasensitive platform for a rapid detection of chronic kidney disease has been fabricated. Early intervention in patients with chronic kidney disease has the potential to delay, or even prevent, the development of end stage renal disease and complications, leading to a marked impact on life expectancy and quality of life. Thus, a potable electrochemical diagnostic biosensor has become an attractive option as electrochemical analysis is feasible to use for on-site detection of samples. In human, Cystatin C present in human body fluids is freely filtered by the glomerulus, but reabsorbed and catabolised by the renal tubules. Trace detectable amount is eliminated in urine, giving this molecular marker an edge over serum creatinine's disadvantages. A carboxyl functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes screen printed electrode was immobilized with papain (cysteine protease) where amino group of papain covalently bound carboxyl group on electrode surface by EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide) and NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) chemistry. The modifications on sensor surface were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Interaction between papain and chronic kidney disease specific biomarker, Cystatin C was detected by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry within 10min. The sensor is highly specific to Cystatin C and showed negligible response to non-specific macromolecules present in urine. The sensitivity of the sensor was 1583.49µAcm -2 µg -1 and lower limit of detection of Cystatin C was found 0.58ngL -1 which presents as a promising platform for designing potable kidney disease detector. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Compensatory Structural and Functional Adaptation after Radical Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma According to Preoperative Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Don Kyoung; Jung, Se Bin; Park, Bong Hee; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han-Yong; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated structural hypertrophy and functional hyperfiltration as compensatory adaptations after radical nephrectomy in patients with renal cell carcinoma according to the preoperative chronic kidney disease stage. We retrospectively identified 543 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1997 and 2012. Patients were classified according to preoperative glomerular filtration rate as no chronic kidney disease--glomerular filtration rate 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) or greater (230, 42.4%), chronic kidney disease stage II--glomerular filtration rate 60 to less than 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (227, 41.8%) and chronic kidney disease stage III--glomerular filtration rate 30 to less than 60 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (86, 15.8%). Computerized tomography performed within 2 months before surgery and 1 year after surgery was used to assess functional renal volume for measuring the degree of hypertrophy of the remnant kidney, and the preoperative and postoperative glomerular filtration rate per unit volume of functional renal volume was used to calculate the degree of hyperfiltration. Among all patients (mean age 56.0 years) mean preoperative glomerular filtration rate, functional renal volume and glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume were 83.2 ml/minute/1.73 m(2), 340.6 cm(3) and 0.25 ml/minute/1.73 m(2)/cm(3), respectively. The percent reduction in glomerular filtration rate was statistically significant according to chronic kidney disease stage (no chronic kidney disease 31.2% vs stage II 26.5% vs stage III 12.8%, p kidney was not statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 17.3% vs stage III 16.5%, p=0.250). The change in glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume was statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 20.1% vs stage III 45.9%, p chronic kidney disease stage (p <0.001). Patients with a lower preoperative glomerular filtration rate had a smaller reduction in

  18. Soluble HLA-G is a differential prognostic marker in sequential colorectal cancer disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Chandra; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Stubbs, Richard S; Hardingham, Jennifer E; Hewett, Peter J; Maddern, Guy J; Hauben, Ehud

    2017-06-01

    The expression of HLA-G by tumour cells is an established mechanism to escape recognition and immune mediated destruction, allowing tumour survival, growth and metastasis. However, the prognostic value of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) remains unknown. Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of colorectal cancer (CRC) found in 10 to 15% of patients, which has long been associated with poor response to treatment. To investigate the prognostic value of plasma sHLA-G levels in CRC patients, preoperative plasma sHLA-G levels were determined by ELISA in CRC patients (n = 133). In addition, the local expression of HLA-G in tumour biopsies was assessed using tissue microarray analysis (n = 255). Within the high 33rd percentile of sHLA-G levels (265-890 U/mL; n = 44) we observed higher frequency of MC patients (p = 0.012; Chi-square), and higher sHLA-G levels in patients with vascular invasion (p = 0.035; two-tailed t-test). Moreover, MC patients had significantly higher sHLA-G levels compared to those with adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (p = 0.036; two-tailed t-test). Surprisingly, while stage II patients showed negative correlation between sHLA-G levels and liver metastasis free survival (LMFS) (p = 0.041; R = -0.321), in stage III patients high sHLA-G levels were associated with significantly longer LMFS (p = 0.002), and sHLA-G levels displayed positive correlation with LMFS (p = 0.006; R = 0.409). High HLA-G expression in tumours was associated with poor cancer specific overall survival in stage II to III (p = 0.01), and with shorter LMFS in stage II patients (p = 0.004). Our findings reveal that sHLA-G levels are associated with distinct progression patterns in consecutive disease stages, indicating a potential value as surrogate marker in the differential prognosis of CRC. © 2017 UICC.

  19. The challenging problem of disease staging in human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness): a new approach to a circular question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njamnshi, Alfred K; Gettinby, George; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2017-05-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, puts millions of people at risk in sub-Saharan Africa and is a neglected parasitic disease that is almost always fatal if untreated or inadequately treated. HAT manifests itself in two stages that are difficult to distinguish clinically. The problem of staging in HAT is extremely important since treatment options, some of which are highly toxic, are directly linked to the disease stage. Several suggested investigations for disease staging have been problematic because of the lack of an existing gold standard with which to compare new clinical staging markers. The somewhat arbitrary current criteria based on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white blood cell (WBC) count have been widely used, but the new potential biomarkers are generally compared with these, thereby making the problem somewhat circular in nature. We propose an alternative 'reverse' approach to address this problem, conceptualised as using appropriate statistical methods to test the performance of combinations of established laboratory variables as staging biomarkers to correlate with the CSF WBC/trypanosomes and clinical features of HAT. This approach could lead to the use of established laboratory staging markers, potentially leading to a gold standard for staging and clinical follow-up of HAT. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Chronic kidney disease stages among diabetes patients in the Cape Coast Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Richard K D; Arthur, Eric; Owiredu, W K B A; Adoba, Prince; Agbodzakey, Hope; Eghan, Ben A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes patients worldwide are at a high risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) which affects their quality of life and increases the risk of early death. This study used the new kidney disease improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines to establish the prevalence and also identify the factors associated with CKD among diabetes patients in the Cape Coast Metropolis. Two hundred (200) diabetes patients were randomly recruited from the diabetic clinic of the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital from January to April 2014. Blood and urine samples were collected for the estimation of serum creatinine and urine protein, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation; the 2012 KDIGO guidelines was used to assess CKD. Based on these guidelines, 37% of our participants had CKD. Sixteen percent (16%) of the participants had Stage 1 CKD and 17% had an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Albuminuria was higher among female diabetic patients compared to males (69.2% vs. 30.8%, P = 0.017). CKD was present in participants on oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) alone or both OHA and insulin. Duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, older age, and use of OHA were associated with CKD (P <0.05).

  1. Aberrant functional connectome in neurologically asymptomatic patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofen Ma

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the topological organization of intrinsic functional brain networks in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Resting-state functional MRI data were collected from 22 patients with ESRD (16 men, 18-61 years and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 19 men, 32-61 years. Whole-brain functional networks were obtained by calculating the interregional correlation of low-frequency fluctuations in spontaneous brain activity among 1,024 parcels that cover the entire cerebrum. Weighted graph-based models were then employed to topologically characterize these networks at different global, modular and nodal levels.Compared to HCs, the patients exhibited significant disruption in parallel information processing over the whole networks (P < 0.05. The disruption was present in all the functional modules (default mode, executive control, sensorimotor and visual networks although decreased functional connectivity was observed only within the default mode network. Regional analysis showed that the disease disproportionately weakened nodal efficiency of the default mode components and tended to preferentially affect central or hub-like regions. Intriguingly, the network abnormalities correlated with biochemical hemoglobin and serum calcium levels in the patients. Finally, the functional changes were substantively unchanged after correcting for gray matter atrophy in the patients.Our findings provide evidence for the disconnection nature of ESRD's brain and therefore have important implications for understanding the neuropathologic substrate of the disease from disrupted network organization perspective.

  2. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Bai

    Full Text Available To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease.Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18-61 years and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22-58 years. A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients.Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM but also gray matter (GM regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA and increased mean diffusivity (MD, axial diffusivity (AD and radial diffusivity (RD. Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part in the patients.Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease.

  3. Protocols for treating patients with end-stage renal disease: a survey of nephrology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Maureen Munnelly; Howell, Scott; Patel, Nipa

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 14% of Americans are living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the result of progressing CKD continues to rise by 21,000 per year. Currently, the only antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines for patients with ESRD undergoing dental treatment were published by the AHA in 2003. Presented in three parts, the first and second parts of this study found no consistent protocols amongst U.S. dental schools and U.S. GPRs and AEGDs, respectively. The goal of the third part of the project was to determine the current protocol being used to treat ESRD patients at U.S. nephrology fellowship programs. An 18 multiple-choice question survey was e-mailed to 130 directors of nephrology fellowships within the U.S. regarding renal treatment protocol details and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with renal disease. Note that, 34.6% of respondents reported having an established renal treatment protocol. For programs with a protocol, 69% of programs reported following AHA guidelines. There is a lack of consistent, established protocols amongst U.S. nephrology fellowships. It is suggested that updated and evidence based guidelines for the safe treatment of patients be developed. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. End-stage renal disease in Japanese children: a nationwide survey during 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Motoshi; Sako, Mayumi; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Ashida, Akira; Matsunaga, Akira; Igarashi, Tohru; Itami, Noritomo; Ohta, Toshiyuki; Gotoh, Yoshimitsu; Satomura, Kenichi; Honda, Masataka; Igarashi, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children is considered a rare, but serious condition. Epidemiological and demographic information on pediatric ESRD patients around the world is important to better understand this disease and to improve patient care. The Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology (JSPN) reported epidemiological and demographic data in 1998. Since then, however, there has been no nationwide survey on Japanese children with ESRD. The JSPN conducted a cross-sectional nationwide survey in 2012 to update information on the incidence, primary renal disease, initial treatment modalities, and survival in pediatric Japanese patients with ESRD aged less than 20 years during the period 2006-2011. The average incidence of ESRD was 4.0 per million age-related population. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract were the most common cause of ESRD, present in 39.8 % of these patients. In addition, 12.2 % had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and 5.9 % had glomerulonephritis. Initial treatment modalities in patients who commenced renal replacement therapy (RRT) consisted of peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, and pre-emptive transplantation (Tx) in 61.7, 16.0, and 22.3 %, respectively. The Japanese RRT mortality rate was 18.2 deaths per 1000 person-years of observation. The incidence of ESRD is lower in Japanese children than in children of other high-income countries. Since 1998, notably, there has been a marked increase in pre-emptive Tx as an initial treatment modality for Japanese children with ESRD.

  5. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings.

  6. Relative risks of Chronic Kidney Disease for mortality and End Stage Renal Disease across races is similar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chi-Pang; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Islam, Muhammad; Katz, Ronit; McClellan, William; Peralta, Carmen A; Wang, HaiYan; de Zeeuw, Dick; Astor, Brad C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera

    2014-01-01

    Some suggest race-specific cutpoints for kidney measures to define and stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), but evidence for race-specific clinical impact is limited. To address this issue, we compared hazard ratios of estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and albuminuria across races using meta-regression in 1.1 million adults (75% Asians, 21% whites, and 4% blacks) from 45 cohorts. Results came mainly from 25 general population cohorts comprising 0.9 million individuals. The associations of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were largely similar across races. For example, in Asians, whites, and blacks, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for eGFR 45–59 vs. 90–104 ml/min/1.73m2 were 1.3 (1.2–1.3), 1.1 (1.0–1.2) and 1.3 (1.1–1.7) for all-cause mortality, 1.6 (1.5–1.8), 1.4 (1.2–1.7), and 1.4 (0.7–2.9) for cardiovascular mortality, and 27.6 (11.1–68.7), 11.2 (6.0–20.9), and 4.1 (2.2–7.5) for ESRD, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30–299 mg/g or dipstick 1-positive vs. an albumin-to-creatinine ratio under 10 or dipstick negative were 1.6 (1.4–1.8), 1.7 (1.5–1.9) and 1.8 (1.7–2.1) for all-cause mortality, 1.7 (1.4–2.0), 1.8 (1.5–2.1), and 2.8 (2.2–3.6) for cardiovascular mortality, and 7.4 (2.0–27.6), 4.0 (2.8–5.9), and 5.6 (3.4–9.2) for ESRD, respectively. Thus, the relative mortality or ESRD risks of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria were largely similar among three major races, supporting similar clinical approach to CKD definition and staging, across races. PMID:24522492

  7. Propionyl-L-carnitine in Leriche-Fontaine stage II peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier Luigi; Schachter, Ilana; Koverech, Aleardo; Messano, Masa; Virmani, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD) of the lower limbs affects 5% of the adult population. Uncontrolled arteriopathy is established due to a microcirculatory deficit, which may be present despite a good Winsor index and which leads to exhaustion of the functional microcirculatory reserve. The target of this study was to examine possible improvements in microvascular and tissue homeostasis by the administration of propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC). A total of 26 patients were enrolled in this study, aged 65 +/- 15 years; two males were diagnosed at stage IIA and 17 males and seven females at stage IIB PAOD. The main criterion of inclusion was the worsening of walking distance during the last month. In this study the duration of therapy was 33 days. PLC was administered in three flasks, each containing 300 mg in 250 cc saline by continuous infusion. The following parameters were measured before and after treatment: pain-free and maximum walking distance (measured on a treadmill at 3.2 km/hr with a gradient of 12%), recovery time from pain after maximum walking distance, ankle-brachial index by means of the Doppler apparatus, and evaluation of the microcirculation using capillaroscopy. The results showed that therapy with PLC was effective at restoring activity of skeletal muscle in ischemic conditions. In particular, capillaroscopy showed improvement in the angioarchitecture in the microcirculation fields, expressed as increased numbers of visible capillaries and diminution in the time of loss of sodium fluorescein marker. The clinical data showed increased walking distance and diminished time to recover from pain, and the clinical improvement correlated with improved microcirculatory function. From these preliminary data has emerged an indication of therapy with PLC for chronic obstructive arteriopathy of the lower limbs at stage II. Further studies with higher numbers of patients and more controlled variables are planned.

  8. The physical performance test predicts aerobic capacity sufficient for independence in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Eric D; Billinger, Sandra A; Lee, Charesa; Hamilton, Jenna; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Early identification of physical impairment related to Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasingly identified as an important aspect of diagnosis and care. Clinically accessible tools for evaluating physical capacity and impairment in AD have been developed but require further characterization for their effective use. To assess the utility of the Physical Performance Test (PPT) for identifying functionally limiting aerobic capacity in older adults with AD and without dementia. Secondary analysis of a dataset of community dwelling older adults, 70 without dementia and 60 with early-stage AD. Participants were administered the PPT and performed a graded maximal exercise test. The clinical utility of 2 versions of the PPT was described by determining sensitivity and specificity to functionally limiting aerobic capacity. The 9-item PPT is predictive of diminished aerobic capacity in older adults with AD. A score of 28 or less indicates likelihood of functionally limiting aerobic capacity that would limit independent function with 67% sensitivity and 67% specificity. The 4-item mini-PPT demonstrates improved capability for identifying impaired functional aerobic capacity with 85% sensitivity and 62% specificity. The PPT was not useful for identifying impaired functional aerobic capacity in older adults without dementia. The PPT, which incorporates basic and instrumental activities of daily living as test items, and the mini-PPT which focuses on basic activities of daily living and simple physical functions, are both clinically useful tool for the evaluation for individuals in the earliest stages of AD and both provide important information about functional performance. The mini-PPT additionally inform the clinician as to whether or not individual with early-stage AD is likely to have insufficient aerobic capacity to perform instrumental daily functions.

  9. Appropriate Biomarkers For Oxidative Stress In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejanov Petar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate biomarkers for oxidative stress (OS in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD are important in renal pathology. Patients (56 with ESRD were investigated (35 men and 21 women. Patients, with mean age of 45±17 years, defined education, specific HD duration and calculated body mass index (BMI, were exposed to a polysulphone type HD membrane for approximately 4 hours per HD session, 3 times per week. The control group was composed of 31 healthy volunteers. The total antioxidative capacity (TAC and the antioxidative (AO enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, were assessed. Analyses included Randox Crumlin GB; lipid peroxidation (LP using its end product, malonyldialdehyde (MDA (fluorimetric; and a LDL-ox immunoassay (Biomedica gruppe, Vienna, Austria. The TAS was higher in ESRD patients before HD (1.63±0.1 mmol/L compared to the control group (1.23±0.03 mmol/L.

  10. The end-stage renal disease industry and exit strategies for nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to identify exit strategies for nephrologists under changing conditions in the dialysis market. The end-stage renal disease service provider market continues to be highly receptive to consolidation. Taking advantage of large economies of scale, large for-profit dialysis chains have surpassed independent operators in both number of clinics and total patients. With relatively low barriers to entry, new smaller clinics continue to open, serving a niche outside the larger chains. Additional competition comes in the form of medium players funded by venture capitalists with the added pressure of rapid growth and financial return. To ensure market power in both dialysis products and managed care negotiation leverage, medium and large service providers will continue to seek out attractive acquisition targets. For nephrologists to capitalize on investment, clinic and business preparation will continue to be the driving force for these divestitures.

  11. YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ture Lange; Plesner, Louis Lind; Warming, Peder Emil

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine serum YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) and to evaluate the prognostic value of serum YKL-40. METHODS: Patients >18 years on maintenance HD were included. Serum YKL-40 was measured using ELISA before and after...... a single HD treatment. RESULTS: A total of 306 patients were included. Median serum YKL-40 concentration was 238 µgL-1(IQR: 193-291 µgL-1) before HD treatment and 198 µgL-1(IQR: 147-258 µgL-1) after HD treatment, which corresponded to age-corrected 93th percentile in healthy subjects. All-cause mortality...

  12. Penile necrosis due to calciphylaxis in a patient of end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, T.; Al-Nakshabandi, Nizar A.

    2009-01-01

    A case of a 72-year-old diabetic, hypertensive male with end stage renal disease as a result of the underlying condition of calciphylaxis, presenting with gangrene of the glans penis is reported. In calciphylaxis, calcification of small and medium-sized arteries occurs, which may result in ischemia and gangrene. A computed tomography scan of the lower abdomen, pelvis and the upper thigh was performed, which showed diffuse and extensive calcification of the walls of the small and medium-sized arteries, with almost complete obliteration of the lumen of the small arteries. A 3-dimensional reconstruction of the penis using volume rendering technique, demonstrated the ulceration of the glans penis in an exquisite manner. The appearance is so peculiar that no histological confirmation is needed. A review of relevant literature related to the etiopathogenesis, radiological findings, treatment and prognosis is also discussed. (author)

  13. Improved survival rate in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Heaf, J

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We investigated the survival rate of Danish diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between 1990 and 2005 and evaluated possible predictors of survival rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were obtained from the Danish National Register on Dialysis and Transplantation...... and from the Scandiatransplant database. Survival rates in different patient groups and association with age, sex, calendar time, waiting-list status and renal transplantation were evaluated using a multivariate Cox regression model. RESULTS: During the study period 8,421 patients (13% type 1 diabetic, 9......% type 2 diabetic and 78% non-diabetic) started renal replacement therapy. The overall survival rate improved by 15% per five calendar years (hazard ratio [HR]=0.85, 95% CI: 0.81-0.88). The percentage of patients within each group who received renal transplantation was: type 1 diabetic: 26%, type 2...

  14. Malignant hypertension in a patient with end of stage renal disease (esrd) treated by renal transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondal, M.; Farook, K.; Moin, S.; Bano, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Control of hypertension is often a problem in the management of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Multiple modalities of treatment are required to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality and morbidity. These include fluid and salt restriction, multidrug regimes and dialysis. We report a case of young 25 years old patient, admitted with chronic renal failure, complicated by malignant and refractory hypertension, not responding to hemodialysis and antihypertensive agent. During stay in hospital, patient also had intracerebral hemorrhage, fits due to uncontrolled hypertension requiring ventilatory support followed. Renal transplant was considered to be the final therapeutic modality. After gradual recovery, a successful live-related renal transplant was performed. As soon as good graft was established, the blood pressure settled and 4 of the 5 antihypertensives were withdrawn. After 2 weeks, patient was discharged in a stable condition with a total stay of about 2 months. (author)

  15. The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease treatment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Yamazaki, Chikao; Hayashino, Yasuaki; Higashi, Takahiro; Eichleay, Margaret A; Akiba, Takashi; Akizawa, Tadao; Saito, Akira; Port, Friedrich K; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) affects 230,000 Japanese, with about 36,000 cases diagnosed each year. Recent increases in ESRD incidence are attributed mainly to increases in diabetes and a rapidly aging population. Renal transplantation is rare in Japan. In private dialysis clinics, the majority of treatment costs are paid as fixed fees per session and the rest are fee for service. Payments for hospital-based dialysis are either fee-for-service or diagnosis-related. Dialysis is widely available, but reimbursement rates have recently been reduced. Clinical outcomes of dialysis are better in Japan than in other countries, but this may change given recent ESRD cost containment policies.

  16. [Physical exercises in rehabilitation of patients with coronary heart disease at in-patient stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chursina, T V; Molchanov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The main directions of state-of-the-art physical rehabilitation of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are early activation and development of new harmless programs of physical training (PT), improving indices of central hemodynamics and physical efficiency (PE) of patients. The purpose of the work is to study how bicycle training (BT) by the method of free choice of load (FCL) influence on central hemodynamics and PE of patients with various clinical forms of CHD at in-patient stage of physical rehabilitation. 185 patients with various forms of CHD at the age from 46 to 76 years (average age 68.4 +/- 1.6 years), 99 males and 86 females, were examined. Including of BT by the method of FCL in combined treatment of CHD patients was accompanied by significant improvement of heart pumping ability: increase in beat index, ejection fraction and PE in all clinical groups. Use only traditional therapy leaded to significant improvement only of ejection fraction, volume of performed work and threshold power in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and angina, but less expressive than with the use of BT. Absence of complication in our patients during treatment makes possible to recommend use of the method for CHD patients at in-patients stage of medical rehabilitation.

  17. Aerobic Exercise Sustains Performance of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Early-Stage Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Eric D; Perales, Jaime; Alshehri, Mohammed; Giles, Abdul-Mannaan; Siengsukon, Catherine F; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2017-12-28

    Individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) experience progressive loss of independence-performing activities of daily living. Identifying interventions to support independence and reduce the economic and psychosocial burden of caregiving for individuals with AD is imperative. The purpose of this analysis was to examine functional disability and caregiver time in individuals with early-stage AD. This was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of 26 weeks of aerobic exercise (AEx) versus stretching and toning (ST). We measured functional dependence using the Disability Assessment for Dementia, informal caregiver time required using the Resources Utilization in Dementia Lite, and cognition using a standard cognitive battery. We saw a stable function in the AEx group compared with a significant decline in the ST group (4%; F = 4.2, P = .04). This was especially evident in more complex, instrumental activities of daily living, with individuals in the AEx group increasing 1% compared with an 8% loss in the ST group over 26 weeks (F = 8.3, P = .006). Change in memory was a significant predictor of declining instrumental activities of daily living performance (r = 0.28, 95% confidence interval = 0.08 ∞, P = .01). Informal caregiver time was not different between the AEx and ST groups. Our analysis extends recent work by revealing specific benefits for instrumental activities of daily living for individuals in the early stages of AD and supports the value of exercise for individuals with cognitive impairment.

  18. CD2AP is associated with end-stage renal disease in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyvönen, Mervi E; Ihalmo, Pekka; Sandholm, Niina

    2013-01-01

    CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) is essential for podocyte function. CD2AP mutations have been found in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a disease histologically resembling diabetic nephropathy and often progressing to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We hypothesised that variations...

  19. Integrative EEG biomarkers predict progression to Alzheimer's disease at the MCI stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon-Shlomo ePoil

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating disorder of increasing prevalence in modern society. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is considered a transitional stage between normal aging and AD; however, not all subjects with MCI progress to AD. Prediction of conversion to AD at an early stage would enable an earlier, and potentially more effective, treatment of AD. Electroencephalography (EEG biomarkers would provide a non-invasive and relatively cheap screening tool to predict conversion to AD; however, traditional EEG biomarkers have not been considered accurate enough to be useful in clinical practice. Here, we aim to combine the information from multiple EEG biomarkers into a diagnostic classification index in order to improve the accuracy of predicting conversion from MCI to AD within a two-year period. We followed 86 patients initially diagnosed with MCI for two years during which 25 patients converted to AD. We show that multiple EEG biomarkers mainly related to activity in the beta-frequency range (13–30 Hz can predict conversion from MCI to AD. Importantly, by integrating six EEG biomarkers into a diagnostic index using logistic regression the prediction improved compared with the classification using the individual biomarkers, with a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 82%, compared with a sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 62% of the best individual biomarker in this index. In order to identify this diagnostic index we developed a data mining approach implemented in the Neurophysiological Biomarker Toolbox (http://www.nbtwiki.net/. We suggest that this approach can be used to identify optimal combinations of biomarkers (integrative biomarkers also in other modalities. Potentially, these integrative biomarkers could be more sensitive to disease progression and response to therapeutic intervention.

  20. Early Detection of Learning Difficulties when Confronted with Novel Information in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease Stage 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort-Merino, Adrià; Valech, Natalia; Peñaloza, Claudia; Grönholm-Nyman, Petra; León, María; Olives, Jaume; Estanga, Ainara; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Fortea, Juan; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Molinuevo, José L; Laine, Matti; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rami, Lorena

    2017-01-01

    We employed a highly demanding experimental associative learning test (the AFE-T) to explore memory functioning in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease stage 1 (PreAD-1) and stage 2 (PreAD-2). The task consisted in the learning of unknown object/name pairs and our comprehensive setup allowed the analysis of learning curves, immediate recall, long-term forgetting rates at one week, three months, and six months, and relearning curves. Forty-nine cognitively healthy subjects were included and classified according to the presence or absence of abnormal CSF biomarkers (Control, n = 31; PreAD-1, n = 14; PreAD-2, n = 4). Control and PreAD-1 performances on the experimental test were compared by controlling for age and education. These analyses showed clear learning difficulties in PreAD-1 subjects (F = 6.98; p = 0.01). Between-group differences in long-term forgetting rates were less notable, reaching statistical significance only for the three-month cued forgetting rate (F = 4.83; p = 0.03). Similarly, relearning sessions showed only statistical trends between the groups (F = 3.22; p = 0.08). In the whole sample, significant correlations between CSF Aβ42/tau ratio and the AFE-T were found, both in the total learning score (r = 0.52; p learning and recall difficulties in these subjects when compared with the PreAD-1 group. The present results suggest that explicit learning difficulties when binding information could be one of the earliest signs of the future emergence of episodic memory difficulties on the Alzheimer's disease continuum. Our findings indicate that the AFE-T is a sensitive test, capable of detecting subtle memory difficulties in PreAD-1.

  1. Self-Motivation Is Associated With Phosphorus Control in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeukeje, Ebele M; Merighi, Joseph R; Browne, Teri; Victoroff, Jacquelyn N; Umanath, Kausik; Lewis, Julia B; Ikizler, T Alp; Wallston, Kenneth A; Cavanaugh, Kerri

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is common in end-stage renal disease and associates with mortality. Phosphate binders reduce serum phosphorus levels; however, adherence is often poor. This pilot study aims to assess patients' self-motivation to adhere to phosphate binders, its association with phosphorus control, and potential differences by race. Cross sectional design. Subjects were enrolled from one academic medical center dialysis practice from July to November 2012. Self-motivation to adhere to phosphate binders was assessed with the autonomous regulation (AR) scale (range: 1-7) and self-reported medication adherence with the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, health literacy, and medication adherence were applied to determine associations with serum phosphorus level, including any evidence of interaction by race. Among 100 participants, mean age was 51 years (±15 years), 53% were male, 72% were non-white, 89% received hemodialysis, and mean serum phosphorus level was 5.7 ± 1.6 mg/dL. More than half (57%) reported the maximum AR score (7). Higher AR scores were noted in those reporting better health overall (P = .001) and those with higher health literacy (P = .01). AR score correlated with better medication adherence (r = 0.22; P = .02), and medication adherence was negatively associated with serum phosphorus (r = -0.40; P Self-motivation was associated with phosphate binder adherence and phosphorus control, and this differed by race. Additional research is needed to determine if personalized, culturally sensitive strategies to understand and overcome motivational barriers may optimize mineral bone health in end-stage renal disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Nocturnal home hemodialysis improves baroreflex effectiveness index of end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher T; Shen, Xiou Seeger; Picton, Peter; Floras, John

    2008-09-01

    In patients with end-stage renal disease receiving conventional hemodialysis, both the frequency with which brief rises or falls in systolic blood pressure initiate concordant changes in pulse interval (arterial baroreflex effectiveness index), and the gain of reflex heart rate responses to these stimuli (arterial baroreflex sensitivity) are diminished. In chronic renal failure, low baroreflex effectiveness index and baroreflex sensitivity are associated with increased rates of all-cause mortality and sudden death, respectively. Conversion to home nocturnal hemodialysis augments baroreflex sensitivity but its effects on baroreflex effectiveness index have not been reported. In 20 consecutive hypertensive conventional hemodialysis patients training to transition to nocturnal hemodialysis (age 41 +/- 2 years; mean +/- standard error), baroreflex effectiveness index, baroreflex sensitivity (sequence method) and total arterial compliance (stroke volume/pulse pressure) were determined during quiet rest before and 2 months after conversion. With nocturnal hemodialysis, dialysis frequency doubled, the dose per session increased by 70% and antihypertensive medications were withdrawn (from 2.5 +/- 0.3 to 0.2 +/- 0.1 drugs/patient, P Baroreflex effectiveness index increased from (0.33 +/- 0.03 to 0.42 +/- 0.03, P = 0.01). Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 5.60 +/- 0.88 to 8.48 +/- 1.60 ms/mmHg (P baroreflex sensitivity (r = 0.63, P = 0.004) but not baroreflex effectiveness index (r = 0.05, P = 0.95), suggesting independent mechanisms for their attenuation and recovery in end-stage renal disease. Nocturnal hemodialysis increases baroreflex effectiveness index in addition to baroreflex sensitivity. The hypothesis that such changes might reduce cardiovascular event rates in this high-risk population merits prospective evaluation. More frequent engagement of the arterial baroreflex after conversion to nocturnal hemodialysis may improve short-term cardiovascular regulation.

  3. Unilateral renal cell carcinoma with coexistent renal disease: a rare cause of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Alvarez-Navascués, R

    2001-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of pathological renal lesions. Coexistence of unilateral RCC and associated pathology in the contralateral kidney is an unusual and challenging therapeutic dilemma that can result in renal failure. So far, data on unilateral RCC with chronic renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy have not been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from unilateral RCC, and to assess the associated pathology and possible pathogenic factors. In 1999, a survey of the 350 patients treated by chronic dialysis in Asturias, Spain, was carried out to identify and collect clinical information on patients with primary unilateral RCC whilst on their renal replacement programme. Seven patients were identified as having ESRD and unilateral RCC, giving an incidence of 2% of patients treated by dialysis. There was a wide spectrum of associated disease and clinical presentation. All patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and were free of recurrence 6--64 months after surgery. Six patients were alive and free of malignancy recurrence for 6--30 months after the onset of haemodialysis. ESRD is rare in association with unilateral RCC, but does contribute to significant morbidity. However, the data presented here are encouraging and suggest that cancer-free survival with renal replacement therapy can be achieved in such patients.

  4. Nutrition education in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl A M; Nguyen, Hoang Anh

    2018-03-01

    Diet counseling and nutrition education are recommended in the prevention and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The importance of effectively addressing nutrition with patients has grown given the increasing prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes; conditions which influence CKD/ESRD. Dietary advice for individuals with CKD/ESRD can be seen as complex; and successful dietary management requires careful planning, periodic assessment of nutritional status, as well as monitoring of dietary compliance. In spite of recommendations and pressing need, formal training in nutrition and adequate preparation for providers is limited; and for physicians the lack of nutrition education has been acknowledged, repeatedly, as an area for improvement in medical training curricula. It has also been suggested that dietitians have an essential role in management of CKD in the primary care setting; however, dietitians who do not practice renal education daily may need training on the specific challenges in CKD/ESRD. The objectives of this chapter were to: characterize select nutrition education resources for providers who care for patients with CKD/ESRD; summarize key dietary components emphasized in the care of patients with CKD/ESRD; and address practical considerations in educational efforts focused on nutrition and CKD/ESRD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation at initial HIV diagnosis in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K Drain

    Full Text Available After observing persistently low CD4 counts at initial HIV diagnosis in South Africa, we sought to determine risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation among adults.We surveyed adults prior to HIV testing at four outpatient clinics in Durban from August 2010 to November 2011. All HIV-infected adults were offered CD4 testing, and late-stage HIV disease was defined as a CD4 count <100 cells/mm(3. We used multivariate regression models to determine the effects of sex, emotional health, social support, distance from clinic, employment, perceived barriers to receiving healthcare, and foregoing healthcare to use money for food, clothing, or housing ("competing needs to healthcare" on presentation with late-stage HIV disease.Among 3,669 adults screened, 830 were enrolled, newly-diagnosed with HIV and obtained a CD4 result. Among those, 279 (33.6% presented with late-stage HIV disease. In multivariate analyses, participants who lived ≥5 kilometers from the test site [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7-4.7], reported competing needs to healthcare (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4, were male (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3, worked outside the home (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, perceived health service delivery barriers (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, and/or had poor emotional health (AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9 had higher odds of late-stage HIV disease presentation.Independent risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation were from diverse domains, including geographic, economic, demographic, social, and psychosocial. These findings can inform various interventions, such as mobile testing or financial assistance, to reduce the risk of presentation with late-stage HIV disease.

  6. Speech and Voice Response to a Levodopa Challenge in Late-Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Margherita; Guimarães, Isabel; Cardoso, Rita; Coelho, Miguel; Guedes, Leonor Correia; Rosa, Mario M; Godinho, Catarina; Abreu, Daisy; Gonçalves, Nilza; Antonini, Angelo; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are affected by hypokinetic dysarthria, characterized by hypophonia and dysprosody, which worsens with disease progression. Levodopa's (l-dopa) effect on quality of speech is inconclusive; no data are currently available for late-stage PD (LSPD). To assess the modifications of speech and voice in LSPD following an acute l-dopa challenge. LSPD patients [Schwab and England score 3 (MED ON)] performed several vocal tasks before and after an acute l-dopa challenge. The following was assessed: respiratory support for speech, voice quality, stability and variability, speech rate, and motor performance (MDS-UPDRS-III). All voice samples were recorded and analyzed by a speech and language therapist blinded to patients' therapeutic condition using Praat 5.1 software. 24/27 (14 men) LSPD patients succeeded in performing voice tasks. Median age and disease duration of patients were 79 [IQR: 71.5-81.7] and 14.5 [IQR: 11-15.7] years, respectively. In MED OFF, respiratory breath support and pitch break time of LSPD patients were worse than the normative values of non-parkinsonian. A correlation was found between disease duration and voice quality ( R  = 0.51; p  = 0.013) and speech rate ( R  = -0.55; p  = 0.008). l-Dopa significantly improved MDS-UPDRS-III score (20%), with no effect on speech as assessed by clinical rating scales and automated analysis. Speech is severely affected in LSPD. Although l-dopa had some effect on motor performance, including axial signs, speech and voice did not improve. The applicability and efficacy of non-pharmacological treatment for speech impairment should be considered for speech disorder management in PD.

  7. Emergence of viruses resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies in experimental human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IIIB infection of chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nara, P. L.; Smit, L.; Dunlop, N.; Hatch, W.; Merges, M.; Waters, D.; Kelliher, J.; Gallo, R. C.; Fischinger, P. J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1990-01-01

    Emergence in two chimpanzees of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB variants resistant to neutralization by the preexisting antibody is described. Viruses isolated from the HIV-1 IIIB gp120-vaccinated and -challenged animal were more resistant to neutralization by the chimpanzee's own

  8. Peripheral obstructive arterial disease and carotid artery stenosis in end stage renal disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilancini, S; Lucchi, M; Mangiafico, R A; Medolla, A; Ferazzoli, F; Bianchi, C; Salvatori, E

    2008-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predominance of carotid stenosis and peripheral obstructive arterial disease (POAD) in a group of patients subject to dialysis compared with a control group. It is a control-case study performed on patients at different hemodialysis facilities; the exams were carried out in ambulatory care. Two groups of patients were examined, the first group was made up of 40 dialysis patients (46.6% men, average age 58.8), the second was the control group made up of 58 subjects matched by age, sex, arterial pressure, presence of diabetes and smoking habits. All patients underwent an Eco-Color Doppler exam on the over aortal trunks and lower extremities and had their Ankle-Brakial-Index (ABI) measured. Carotid stenosis was considered only if equal or over 50%. Twenty percent of dialysis patients showed carotid stenosis (CS) versus 12% in the control group, with an OR of 7.9 (CI 95% 1.3-47.7) adjusted to sex, age and hypertension. The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed large amounts of calcium deposits. Predominance of POAD in dialysis patients was 20% versus 9% in the control group. In dialysis patients the OR adjusted to age, sex and arterial pressure was 6.3 (CI 95%, 1.2-32.6). The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed mainly underpopliteal lesions with ''rosary bead'' calcifications. In diabetic dialysis patients the OR was 7.6 (CI 95% 1.4-46.3).

  9. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effect of intradialytic resistance training on pulse wave velocity and associated cardiovascular disease biomarkers in end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Danwin; Green, Simon; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Barnard, Robert; Bonder, Claudine S; Cheema, Birinder S

    2017-12-19

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving maintenance hemodialysis treatment. This study investigated the effect of a 12-week intradialytic progressive resistance training (PRT) intervention on pulse wave velocity (PWV) and associated hemodynamic, anthropometric, and hematologic outcomes in patients with ESRD. Twenty-two patients with ESRD (59% men, 71.3 ± 11.0 years) were recruited. Supervised PRT (3 sets of 11 exercises) was prescribed three times per week during routine dialysis. The primary outcome was brachial-ankle PWV via applanation tonometry. Secondary outcomes included augmentation index, brachial and aortic blood pressures, endothelial progenitor cells, C-reactive protein, blood lipids and anthropometrics. The intradialytic PRT regimen resulted in no significant change in PWV between control and intervention periods [mean difference = 0 (95% CI = -0.1 to 0.1); P=0.58]. Similarly, no significant change was noted in any secondary outcome measures between the control and intervention periods. Post-hoc analyses limited to high adherers (≥75% attendance; n=11) did not differ from the primary analysis, indicating no dose-response effect of our intervention. Our 12-week PRT intervention did not change PWV or any secondary outcomes. Future studies should determine if higher dosages of intradialytic PRT (i.e. longer duration and/or higher intensity) can be applied as a method improve arterial stiffness to potentially reduce cardiovascular disease and associated mortality this cohort. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical pharmacy activities in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease patients: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stemer Gunar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD represent worldwide health problems with an epidemic extent. Therefore, attention must be given to the optimisation of patient care, as gaps in the care of CKD and ESRD patients are well documented. As part of a multidisciplinary patient care strategy, clinical pharmacy services have led to improvements in patient care. The purpose of this study was to summarise the available evidence regarding the role and impact of clinical pharmacy services for these patient populations. Methods A literature search was conducted using the Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases to identify relevant studies on the impact of clinical pharmacists on CKD and ESRD patients, regarding disease-oriented and patient-oriented outcomes, and clinical pharmacist interventions on drug-related problems. Results Among a total of 21 studies, only four (19% were controlled trials. The majority of studies were descriptive (67% and before-after studies (14%. Interventions comprised general clinical pharmacy services with a focus on detecting, resolving and preventing drug-related problems, clinical pharmacy services with a focus on disease management, or clinical pharmacy services with a focus on patient education in order to increase medication knowledge. Anaemia was the most common comorbidity managed by clinical pharmacists, and their involvement led to significant improvement in investigated disease-oriented outcomes, for example, haemoglobin levels. Only four of the studies (including three controlled trials presented data on patient-oriented outcomes, for example, quality of life and length of hospitalisation. Studies investigating the number and type of clinical pharmacist interventions and physician acceptance rates reported a mean acceptance rate of 79%. The most common reported drug-related problems were incorrect dosing, the need for additional

  12. Exon skipping restores dystrophin expression, but fails to prevent disease progression in later stage dystrophic dko mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B; Cloer, C; Lu, P; Milazi, S; Shaban, M; Shah, S N; Marston-Poe, L; Moulton, H M; Lu, Q L

    2014-09-01

    Antisense therapy with both chemistries of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) and 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate has demonstrated the capability to induce dystrophin expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients in phase II-III clinical trials with benefit in muscle functions. However, potential of the therapy for DMD at different stages of the disease progression is not understood. In this study, we examined the effect of peptide-conjugated PMO (PPMO)-mediated exon skipping on disease progression of utrophin-dystrophin-deficient mice (dko) of four age groups (21-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50+ days), representing diseases from early stage to advanced stage with severe kyphosis. Biweekly intravenous (i.v.) administration of the PPMO restored the dystrophin expression in nearly 100% skeletal muscle fibers in all age groups. This was associated with the restoration of dystrophin-associated proteins including functional glycosylated dystroglycan and neuronal nitric synthase. However, therapeutic outcomes clearly depended on severity of the disease at the time the treatment started. The PPMO treatment alleviated the disease pathology and significantly prolonged the life span of the mice receiving treatment at younger age with mild phenotype. However, restoration of high levels of dystrophin expression failed to prevent disease progression to the mice receiving treatment when disease was already at advanced stage. The results could be critical for design of clinical trials with antisense therapy to DMD.

  13. Liver pathology of hepatitis C, beyond grading and staging of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Sadhna; Ward, Stephen C; Thung, Swan N

    2016-01-28

    Liver biopsy evaluation plays a critical role in management of patients with viral hepatitis C. In patients with acute viral hepatitis, a liver biopsy, though uncommonly performed, helps to rule out other non-viral causes of deranged liver function. In chronic viral hepatitis C, it is considered the gold standard in assessment of the degree of necroinflammation and the stage of fibrosis, to help guide treatment and determine prognosis. It also helps rule out any concomitant diseases such as steatohepatitis, hemochromatosis or others. In patients with chronic progressive liver disease with cirrhosis and dominant nodules, a targeted liver biopsy is helpful in differentiating a regenerative nodule from dysplastic nodule or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the setting of transplantation, the liver biopsy helps distinguish recurrent hepatitis C from acute rejection and also is invaluable in the diagnosis of fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis, a rare variant of recurrent hepatitis C. This comprehensive review discusses the entire spectrum of pathologic findings in the course of hepatitis C infection.

  14. Ideomotor limb apraxia as a staging tool in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (ILIAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulsby, William D; El-Ruwie, Nezar; Gatla, Shravan; Anderson Zimmer, Katelyn; Najmi, Safa; Chen, Alexander; Chibnall, John T; Grossberg, George T

    2016-11-01

    Ideomotor apraxia (IMA) is known to affect individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Combined with impaired cognitive function, IMA can support evidence of probable AD. However, apraxia is a condition that is difficult to diagnose. The Postural Knowledge Test (PKT), developed by Mozaz et al, was designed to easily identify limb apraxia in multiple sclerosis yet demonstrated potential utility for AD. ILIAD is a pilot study to investigate correlation between the PKT and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Participants with mild, moderate, and severe AD were administered the MMSE by 1 examiner, followed by the PKT by a second blinded examiner. Seventy-seven participants with mild (25), moderate (26), and severe AD (26) met study criteria. Correlation was demonstrated between the MMSE and PKT at 0.835 among all AD groups. Correlation between MMSE and PKT-1 (transitive) and PKT-2 (intransitive) separately was 0.819 and 0.793. There is significant correlation between the MMSE (memory loss) and PKT (IMA). This suggests the PKT may be used in conjunction with the MMSE to aid in staging AD and to monitor disease severity. Correlation between the MMSE and separate PKT tests suggests that administration of only 1 test may be necessary clinically, saving valuable time.

  15. Epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in Dubai: Single-center data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhriya Alalawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis (HD was first established in Dubai in the year 1980 and was in its full capacity by the year 1983. Since then, the HD population has been growing rapidly. This report represents the demographic data and clinical characteristics of our HD patients during the period between January 2012 and October 2016. Diabetic nephropathy (57% and hypertension (12.4% are emerging as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in our data, followed by undetermined causes in those who presented as ESRD (10.9%, and then by rejected transplant in 4.6%. Obstructive uropathy in our data was 4.37% among all causes. The causes were primary glomerulonephritis (only proven cases in kidney biopsy were counted in 3.6%, adult polycystic kidney disease in 2.43%, and lupus nephritis in 1.45% of cases. The prevalence of ESRD in the current study was 152 patients per million population per year.

  16. End-stage renal disease in Tabuk Area, Saudi Arabia: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama El Minshawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiology and risk fac-tors of treated end-stage renal disease (ESRD in the region of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. We studied 460 renal replacement therapy patients through a review of medical records and patient interviews and obtained patient demographics, family history, risk factors for ESRD, environmental exposure to toxins, work conditions, social history and causes of death. The estimated prevalence of treated ESRD was 460 per million populations (PMP; 350 (76% were treated by hemodialysis, 30 (7% by peritoneal dialysis and 80 (17% by kidney transplantation. The mean age was 48 ± 17 years, body mass index was 25 ± 2 kg/m 2 and the male vs. female ratio was 64% vs. 36%. Most patients (55% were living in rural areas. Etiology of the ESRD was unknown in 33%, hypertension in 24%, chronic glomerulonephritis in 8%, obstructive uropathy in 3.5%, analgesic nephropathy in 5%, Bilhaziasis in 0.5%, chronic pyelonephritis in 2% and diabetic nephropathy in 18%. Other causes such as gouty nephropathy, collagen diseases, toxemia of pregnancy and lupus nephritis constituted 6% of the cases. We conclude that the epidemiology of the treated ESRD in Tabuk area is similar to that in Egypt, but very different from that in the United States.

  17. Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disturbances in End-Stage Liver Disease: A Physiopathological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José Víctor; Carrillo-Pérez, Diego Luis; Rosado-Canto, Rodrigo; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Torre, Aldo; Kershenobich, David; Carrillo-Maravilla, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are frequent in patients with end-stage liver disease; the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are often complex and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the physician. Usually, these disorders do not develop in compensated cirrhotic patients, but with the onset of the classic complications of cirrhosis such as ascites, renal failure, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and variceal bleeding, multiple electrolyte, and acid-base disturbances emerge. Hyponatremia parallels ascites formation and is a well-known trigger of hepatic encephalopathy; its management in this particular population poses a risky challenge due to the high susceptibility of cirrhotic patients to osmotic demyelination. Hypokalemia is common in the setting of cirrhosis: multiple potassium wasting mechanisms both inherent to the disease and resulting from its management make these patients particularly susceptible to potassium depletion even in the setting of normokalemia. Acid-base disturbances range from classical respiratory alkalosis to high anion gap metabolic acidosis, almost comprising the full acid-base spectrum. Because most electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are managed in terms of their underlying trigger factors, a systematic physiopathological approach to their diagnosis and treatment is required.

  18. Lung transplant in end-staged chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fahad; Penupolu, Sudheer; Xu, Xin; He, Jianxing

    2010-06-01

    Lung transplantation is commonly used for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, there is continuing debate on the optimal operation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary fibrosis. Single-lung transplantation (SLT) provides equivalent short- and medium-term results compared with bilateral lung transplantation (BLT), but long-term survival appears slightly better in BLT recipients (especially in patients with COPD). The number of available organs for lung transplantation also influences the choice of operation. Recent developments suggest that the organ donor shortage is not as severe as previously thought, making BLT a possible alternative for more patients. Among the different complications, re-implantation edema, infection, rejection, and bronchial complications predominate. Chronic rejection, also called obliterative bronchiolitis syndrome, is a later complication which can be observed in about half of the patients. Improvement in graft survival depends greatly in improvement in prevention and management of complications. Despite such complications, graft survival in fibrosis patients is greater than spontaneous survival on the waiting list; idiopathic fibrosis is associated with the highest mortality on the waiting list. Patients should be referred early for the pre-transplantation work-up because individual prognosis is very difficult to predict.

  19. High-Sensitivity Troponin: A Clinical Blood Biomarker for Staging Cardiomyopathy in Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydelmann, Nora; Liu, Dan; Krämer, Johannes; Drechsler, Christiane; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Schneider, Andreas; Störk, Stefan; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank

    2016-05-31

    High-sensitivity troponin (hs-TNT), a biomarker of myocardial damage, might be useful for assessing fibrosis in Fabry cardiomyopathy. We performed a prospective analysis of hs-TNT as a biomarker for myocardial changes in Fabry patients and a retrospective longitudinal follow-up study to assess longitudinal hs-TNT changes relative to fibrosis and cardiomyopathy progression. For the prospective analysis, hs-TNT from 75 consecutive patients with genetically confirmed Fabry disease was analyzed relative to typical Fabry-associated echocardiographic findings and total myocardial fibrosis as measured by late gadolinium enhancement (LE) on magnetic resonance imaging. Longitudinal data (3.9±2.0 years), including hs-TNT, LE, and echocardiographic findings from 58 Fabry patients, were retrospectively collected. Hs-TNT level positively correlated with LE (linear correlation coefficient, 0.72; odds ratio, 32.81 [95% CI, 3.56-302.59]; P=0.002); patients with elevated baseline hs-TNT (>14 ng/L) showed significantly increased LE (median: baseline, 1.9 [1.1-3.3] %; follow-up, 3.2 [2.3-4.9] %; PFabry disease and a qualified predictor of cardiomyopathy progression. Thus, hs-TNT could be helpful for staging and follow-up of Fabry patients. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jankowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients—specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements—in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status.

  1. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease:Associations with Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRusso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephro pathological changes are commonly observed in the non tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy. In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with radical nephrectomy. Despite emerging evidence that partial nephrectomy provides equivalent local tumor control to radical nephrectomy while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  2. Late latent syphilis in a patient with end-stage renal disease and presumptive penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Karen T; Day, Sarah A

    2014-04-01

    Pharmacotherapy challenges in a case of late latent syphilis complicated by end-stage renal disease and presumptive penicillin allergy are described. A 58-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital for symptoms including altered mental status, shortness of breath, and chest pain. The initial workup isolated syphilis immunoglobulin G antibody. A treponemal test was reactive, and a nontreponemal test was nonreactive; analysis of cerebrospinal fluid did not indicate neurosyphilis. The patient was diagnosed as having late latent syphilis of unknown duration, for which the standard treatment is intramuscular penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units once weekly for three weeks. Given the patient's advanced renal disease and other serious comorbidities, there were concerns about the potential need for renal dosage adjustment and repeated desensitization. However, given the slow absorption and long half-life of penicillin G and published data indicating its safe use in the context of hemodialysis, the treating clinicians decided to proceed with penicillin G therapy at the usual dose after an oral penicillin desensitization protocol; repeat desensitization before two subsequent injections was not performed. The patient completed the full course of penicillin G without incident. Notably, skin testing was not performed to definitively establish penicillin allergy. Microbiological testing to determine a cure of syphilis was not performed. After the completion of an oral desensitization protocol, the standard three-dose regimen of intramuscular penicillin G for late latent syphilis was safely administered to a hemodialysis patient without dosage adjustment or repeated desensitization.

  3. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

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    Skirnisdottir Ingiridur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Methods Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. Results The most significant differences (p  Conclusions The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome.

  4. Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts as Tracers for Electron Density Fluctuations in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, V.; Hariharan, K.; Ramesh, R.

    2017-11-01

    We present an estimation of the electron density modulation index (δ{Ne}/Ne) for the first time using solar type IIIb radio burst observations. The mean value of δ{Ne}/Ne is calculated to be ≈ 0.006±0.002 over the heliocentric distance range r ≈1.6 - 2.2 R_{⊙}. The estimated {δ{Ne}}/{Ne} shows a power law dependence on r with a power law index ≈ 0.31±0.10. The wavenumber (k) spectrum for the electron density fluctuation ({δ{Ne}/Ne})2 values shows a Kolmogorov-like behavior. Using δ{Ne}/Ne and the Kolmogorov turbulence index, we estimated the amplitude of density turbulence [Cn2{(r)}] in the aforementioned range of r.

  5. Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher albuminuria are associated with mortality and end-stage renal disease. A collaborative meta-analysis of kidney disease population cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astor, Brad C; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2011-01-01

    We studied here the independent associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a collaborative meta-analysis of 13 studies totaling 21,688 patients selected...

  6. Telomerase activity in patients with stage 2–5D chronic kidney disease

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    Veysel Kidir

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular mechanisms of increased cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD associated with biological age are not well understood. Recent studies support the hypothesis that common factors responsible for this phenomenon are cellular aging and telomere dysfunction. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between telomerase activity and CKD stages. Methods: The study included 120 patients who were followed-up for CKD stage 2–5D, composed of 30 patients of each stage and 30 healthy volunteers without any known disease who were admitted to our hospital for routine check-ups. Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was measured using the TRAP assay. Results: A significant difference was observed for telomerase activity in PBMC between groups. The detected levels were lowest in the healthy control group (0.15 ± 0.02, and highest in CKD stage 5D patients (0.23 ± 0.04. In CKD patients, telomerase activity in PBMC was positively correlated with the CKD stage, serum creatinine, potassium and parathormone levels, and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, body mass index (BMI, platelet count and serum calcium levels. According to the linear regression analysis, independent predictors for high telomerase activity in CKD patients were eGFR and BMI. Conclusion: Telomerase activity in PBMC increases with advancing CKD stage in CKD patients. Increased telomerase activity in PBMC is associated with eGFR and BMI. Resumen: Antecedentes: Los mecanismos moleculares responsables del aumento de la mortalidad cardiovascular en la enfermedad renal crónica (ERC asociada a la edad biológica no se conocen bien. Los estudios recientes apoyan la hipótesis de que los factores comunes responsables de este fenómeno son el envejecimiento celular y la disfunción telomérica. Objetivos: El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar

  7. Prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in end-stage liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathala, Ahmed; Safar, Bander; Al Muhaideb, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in end-stage liver disease (ESLD) being evaluated for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is unclear based on variable definition used for CAD. The aim of this study to investigate the prevalence of abnormal stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) imaging, as a marker for CAD, among patients with ESLD who were referred for stress MPS imaging as a routine work up before OLT. This was a single-center, retrospective study. We reviewed data on 167 patients who were referred for MPS as a routine work up before OLT over the last 2 years. All patients underwent evaluation for CAD risk factors [age, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN), and smoking], and stress MPS as per standard protocol. The total number of patients referred for stress MPS was 167. Seven patients (4% of total study population) were excluded from the study due to poor and/or nondiagnostic studies. 147 patients (92%) had normal, but only 13 patients (8%) had abnormal MPS scans. DM and male gender were the most independent risk factors for abnormal MPS with P value of 0.046, and 0.26, respectively. There was no significant association between the abnormal MPS result and HTN, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, age or etiology of the liver disease. Based on our data, the prevalence of abnormal MPS and left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with ESLD was found to be 8%. DM and male gender were the most independent predictor factors for abnormal MPS. True prevalence of CAD and usefulness of MPS in patients with ESLD can only be studied using a very large and randomized prospective study

  8. Iron Status and Inflammation in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ewelina Łukaszyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: One of the most common causes of anemia of chronic disease (ACD is chronic kidney disease. The main pathomechanism responsible for ACD is subclinical inflammation. The key element involved in iron metabolism is hepcidin, however, studies on new indices of iron status are in progress.The aim of the study was to assess the iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease, iron correlation with inflammation parameters and novel biomarkers of iron metabolism. Methods: The study included 69 patients. Standard laboratory measurements were used to measure the iron status, complete blood count, fibrinogen, prothrombin index, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP, creatinine, urea, uric acid. Commercially available kits were used to measure high-sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, hepcidin-25, hemojuvelin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and zonulin. Results: Absolute iron deficiency was present in 17% of the patients, functional iron deficiency was present in 12% of the patients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher serum levels of fibrinogen, ferritin, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, hepcidin and older age relative to patients with absolute iron deficiency. In comparison with patients without iron deficiency, patients with functional iron deficiency were older, with lower prothrombin index, higher fibrinogen, CRP, hsCRP, sTfR, GDF-15, urea and lower eGFR. Hepcidin was predicted by markers of inflammation:ferritin, fibrinogen and IL-6. Conclusion: Inflammation is correlated with iron status. Novel biomarkers of iron metabolism might be useful to distinguish iron deficiency anemia connected with inflammation and absolute iron deficiency.

  9. Renal outcome and risk factors for end-stage renal disease in pediatric rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyaphanee, Nuntawan; Ananboontarick, Chompoonut; Supavekin, Suroj; Sumboonnanonda, Achra

    2017-03-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), defined as acute nephritic syndrome with dramatic loss of renal function within a few months, is associated with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CresGN), which requires ≥50% crescents on pathology. The disease characteristics and renal outcome in children with RPGN, however, will differ according to the percentage of crescents. To evaluate the renal outcomes and factors associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), this retrospective cohort study assessed children aged ≤15 years with RPGN at a tertiary medical center. Of 67 patients with RPGN, 32 (47.8%) were male; mean age was 10.6 ± 3.0 years; median follow up was 1.1 years (range, 0.02-9.17 years) and 24 (35.8%) progressed to ESRD. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis was the most frequent cause of RPGN (50.7%). The incidence of ESRD was significantly higher in patients with ≥50% than disease etiology, serum creatinine >3 mg/dL, need for acute dialysis, ≥80% crescents and ≥20% tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis (TA/IF) were associated with ESRD. On multivariate analysis, need for acute dialysis (HR, 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1-7.3, P = 0.041) and ≥20% TA/IF (HR, 4.8; 95% CI: 1.4-16.1, P = 0.011) were independent risk factors for the development of ESRD. Approximately one-third of children with RPGN developed ESRD; and need for acute dialysis and TA/IF ≥20% were independent risk factors for ESRD. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Delayed flap reconstruction with vacuum-assisted closure management of the open IIIB tibial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhiyong; Irgit, Kaan; Strohecker, Kent A; Matzko, Michelle E; Wingert, Nathaniel C; DeSantis, Joseph G; Smith, Wade R

    2011-12-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy has been shown to be effective at reducing bacterial counts in wounds until definitive bony coverage. However, there is continued debate over timing and type of definitive wound coverage even with VAC therapy application. From 2004 to 2009, 32 patients with Gustilo type IIIB open tibia fractures were initially treated with VAC therapy were included. The number of debridements, length of treatment with VAC dressing, definitive wound coverage management, and length of hospital stay, flap-related complications, and time to radiographic fracture healing were recorded. The mean Injury Severity Score was 17.3 ± 2.0. All wounds closed after being treated with the primary VAC closure. The mean interval between the initial injury and definitive intervention was 10.9 days ± 0.3 days. Twenty of 27 patients (74%) underwent rotational muscle flaps; four received free muscle flaps and three only with split-thickness skin grafts for definitive wound coverage. Nine of 32 patients (28%) underwent below knee amputation, five without flap coverage after several VAC sessions and four after definitive flap coverage. The average time to union was 10.0 months ± 2.0 months. Eight patients developed nonunion and 11 patients developed infections. The average follow-up time is 2.4 years ± 0.2 years. Patients were divided into two groups for analysis according to the interval time. The rate of infection was significantly increased in patients who had an interval of more than 7 days from the time of injury to flap coverage. The VAC therapy may help to reduce the flap size and need for a flap transfer for type IIIB open tibial fractures. However, prolonged periods of VAC usage, greater than 7 days, should be avoided to reduce higher infection and amputation risks.

  11. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.; Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups

  12. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W. (Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland)); Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z. (Dept. of Transplantology, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups.

  13. Hepcidin-25 in diabetic chronic kidney disease is predictive for mortality and progression to end stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25--the key hormone of iron-metabolism--on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels.249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD, were enrolled (2003-2005, if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models.Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7% and forty (16.1% patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05.We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors of clinical outcome and have the

  14. Establishing a clinical phenotype for cachexia in end stage kidney disease - study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Joanne; Noble, Helen R; Adamson, Gary; Davenport, Andrew; Farrington, Ken; Fouque, Denis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Mallett, John; McKeaveney, C; Porter, S; Seres, David S; Shields, Joanne; Slee, Adrian; Witham, Miles D; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2018-02-13

    Surveys using traditional measures of nutritional status indicate that muscle wasting is common among persons with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Up to 75% of adults undergoing maintenance dialysis show some evidence of muscle wasting. ESKD is associated with an increase in inflammatory cytokines and can result in cachexia, with the loss of muscle and fat stores. At present, only limited data are available on the classification of wasting experienced by persons with ESKD. Individuals with ESKD often exhibit symptoms of anorexia, loss of lean muscle mass and altered energy expenditure. These symptoms are consistent with the syndrome of cachexia observed in other chronic diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. While definitions of cachexia have been developed for some diseases, such as cardiac failure and cancer, no specific cachexia definition has been established for chronic kidney disease. The importance of developing a definition of cachexia in a population with ESKD is underscored by the negative impact that symptoms of cachexia have on quality of life and the association of cachexia with a substantially increased risk of premature mortality. The aim of this study is to determine the clinical phenotype of cachexia specific to individuals with ESKD. A longitudinal study which will recruit adult patients with ESKD receiving haemodialysis attending a Regional Nephrology Unit within the United Kingdom. Patients will be followed 2 monthly over 12 months and measurements of weight; lean muscle mass (bioelectrical impedance, mid upper arm muscle circumference and tricep skin fold thickness); muscle strength (hand held dynamometer), fatigue, anorexia and quality of life collected. We will determine if they experience (and to what degree) the known characteristics associated with cachexia. Cachexia is a debilitating condition associated with an extremely poor outcome. Definitions of cachexia in chronic illnesses are required

  15. [Etiologies of end-stage renal disease of children in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellouli, Manel; Boussetta, Abir; Abidi, Kamel; Maalej, Bayen; Naija, Ouns; Hammi, Yousra; Zarrouk, Chokri; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Gargah, Tahar

    2016-06-01

    The end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children has special features in terms of etiologies, therapeutic modalities and access to renal transplantation. In Tunisia, there are no data on the epidemiology of ESRD in children. The aim of our study was to describe epidemiology of ESRD among Tunisian children. This retrospective study was conducted in pediatric departments in Charles-Nicolle Hospital, Tunis and Hedi Chaker hospital, Sfax, during a period of 15 years (1st January 1998-31st December 2013). We included children who develop ESRD before the age of 15 years. In total, 166 patients were included. The median duration of follow-up was 48 months. We collected respectively 24 children (14.5%) aged less than 2 years, 24 children (14.5%) aged between 2 and 6 years and 118 children (71%) older than 6 years. The sex ratio was equal to 1.4. The mean incidence was 4.25 cases per million children. The main causes were represented by congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (35.5%), hereditary renal disease (31.3%) and glomerular kidney disease (9.6%). All patients were treated in kidney transplant dialysis programs; the main mode of dialysis was represented by peritoneal dialysis, which represented the initial dialysis mode in 81% of cases. The transition to hemodialysis was noted in 43.4% cases. Thirty-eight patients (22.8%) were transplanted. The mortality rate was 27.1%. The leading cause of death was cardiovascular diseases (37.7%) and infections (22.2%). The creation of a national registry of kidney disease in Tunisia is necessary for a better knowledge of needs for dialysis and renal transplantation in children. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of liver fibrosis stage influence on clinical course of periodontal diseases in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. М. Slaba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To assess the influence of liver fibrosis stage on the clinical course of periodontal diseases in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Material and Methods. 122 patients with chronic hepatitis C, treated at the 7th department ofLvivRegionalInfectiousDiseasesHospital during 2013 – 2015 were included into dental investigation. The periodontal disease was diagnosed in accordance with the classification of M. F. Danilevsky (1994. The clinical condition of periodontium was assessed by the papillary marginal alveolar index (PMA in the modification ofParma, by the periodontal index – PI (AL Russel, 1956, by the Muhlemann and Son index – the degree of bleeding in the region of the gingival papilla (PBI. The stage of liver fibrosis was determined according to the medical history. The significance of the difference between two or more relative indicators was calculated using the Fisher test with the Metropolis algorithm. The correlation dependence between the clinical condition of periodontal tissues and the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with viral hepatitis C was studied using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results. The highest percentage of patients with stage of liver fibrosis F0 (70.00 ± 15.28 % was registered in patients with healthy periodont, the lowest - in patients with generalized periodontitis of the third stage (7.89 ± 4.37 %. The highest frequency of patients with the stage of liver fibrosis F3 (73.68 ± 7.14 % was also observed in persons suffering from generalized periodontitis stage III (73.68 ± 7.14 %. Conclusions. The distribution of periodontal lesion severity statistically significant (p < 0.001 depended on the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Direct (R = 0.70; p < 0.001 strong correlation between the clinical state of periodontal tissues and the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient has been determined

  17. Prognostic significance of endothelial dysfunctional markers of the first stage of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Mnuskina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-adaptive remodeling of cardiovascular system and progressive kidney damage at chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with the development of endothelial dysfunction (ED and apoptosis. The aim of this research was to study the changes of indicators of apoptosis and ED in patients with CKD 1 stage throughout 12 months. Complex biochemical, immunoferment and tool methods were applied at patient examinations. Arterial pressure of all observed patients was resolved on target values in 12 months. However, the indicators of endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV increased in 55 patients (1st group, and the peak of circulating blood volume in skin microvessels in 22 patients (2nd group wasn't changed: 134±4 % и 136±4 %, p>0.1. The level of the annexin A5 reduced from 3.5±0.47 to 1.27±0.31 ng/ml (p0.1 in 2nd group. Diurnal excretion of sodium chloride decreased from 6.8±0.57 g/d to 2.8±0.39 g/d (p<0.05 in patients of 1st group. Dynamics of these indicators was not marked in patients of 2nd group: accordingly from 7.39±0.63 g/d to 7.01±0.65 g/d. Diurnal excretion of sodium chloride reflected the salt intake in patients with CKD 1 stage is associated with disturbance of endothelial-dependent vasodilation and apoptosis.

  18. Self-management programmes in stages 1-4 chronic kidney disease: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Ann; Havas, Kathryn; Douglas, Clint; Thepha, Thiwawan; Bennett, Paul; Clark, Robyn

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex health problem, which requires individuals to invest considerable time and energy in managing their health and adhering to multifaceted treatment regimens. To review studies delivering self-management interventions to people with CKD (Stages 1-4) and assess whether these interventions improve patient outcomes. Systematic review. Nine electronic databases (MedLine, CINAHL, EMBASE, ProQuest Health & Medical Complete, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health, The Cochrane Library, The Joanna Briggs Institute EBP Database, Web of Science and PsycINFO) were searched using relevant terms for papers published between January 2003 and February 2013. The search strategy identified 2,051 papers, of which 34 were retrieved in full with only 5 studies involving 274 patients meeting the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomised controlled trials, a variety of methods were used to measure outcomes, and four studies included a nurse on the self-management intervention team. There was little consistency in the delivery, intensity, duration and format of the self-management programmes. There is some evidence that knowledge- and health-related quality of life improved. Generally, small effects were observed for levels of adherence and progression of CKD according to physiologic measures. The effectiveness of self-management programmes in CKD (Stages 1-4) cannot be conclusively ascertained, and further research is required. It is desirable that individuals with CKD are supported to effectively self-manage day-to-day aspects of their health. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  19. Modeling screening, prevention, and delaying of Alzheimer's disease: an early-stage decision analytic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemers Eric R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD affects a growing proportion of the population each year. Novel therapies on the horizon may slow the progress of AD symptoms and avoid cases altogether. Initiating treatment for the underlying pathology of AD would ideally be based on biomarker screening tools identifying pre-symptomatic individuals. Early-stage modeling provides estimates of potential outcomes and informs policy development. Methods A time-to-event (TTE simulation provided estimates of screening asymptomatic patients in the general population age ≥55 and treatment impact on the number of patients reaching AD. Patients were followed from AD screen until all-cause death. Baseline sensitivity and specificity were 0.87 and 0.78, with treatment on positive screen. Treatment slowed progression by 50%. Events were scheduled using literature-based age-dependent incidences of AD and death. Results The base case results indicated increased AD free years (AD-FYs through delays in onset and a reduction of 20 AD cases per 1000 screened individuals. Patients completely avoiding AD accounted for 61% of the incremental AD-FYs gained. Total years of treatment per 1000 screened patients was 2,611. The number-needed-to-screen was 51 and the number-needed-to-treat was 12 to avoid one case of AD. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that duration of screening sensitivity and rescreen interval impact AD-FYs the most. A two-way sensitivity analysis found that for a test with an extended duration of sensitivity (15 years the number of AD cases avoided was 6,000-7,000 cases for a test with higher sensitivity and specificity (0.90,0.90. Conclusions This study yielded valuable parameter range estimates at an early stage in the study of screening for AD. Analysis identified duration of screening sensitivity as a key variable that may be unavailable from clinical trials.

  20. A comparison of end-stage renal disease and Alzheimer's disease in the elderly through a comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Pinar; Isik, Ahmet Turan; Buyukaydin, Banu; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2014-08-01

    The percentage of patients receiving haemodialysis (HD) treatment and of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the elderly population is increasing day by day. Functional dependence, malnutrition, cognitive impairment or depression impairs the quality of life and increases mortality in both diseases. This study aims to assess HD and AD patients through comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and compare their results. A total of 579 patients (121 HD, 188 AD patients and 270 control subjects) over the age of 65, who were followed at geriatric and nephrology departments between January 2011 and July 2012, were included in this prospective cross-sectional study. Mini-Mental State Examination, Mini-Nutritional Assessment, Geriatric Depression Scale and basic and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living indexes were applied to all patients. The results obtained were compared among the patient groups. The mean age of the participants was 72.6 ± 8.2. Based on the CGA findings, the results for both groups were considerably different from control group. While depression scores were observed higher in HD patients than in AD patients, cognition, nutrition and functional capacity were mostly affected in AD patients. The management of geriatric HD patients is substantially complex. Depression, cognitive impairment and decrease in functional capacity can often be overlooked, so findings may be ascribed to underlying kidney impairment. Therefore, comprehensive geriatric assessment should be regularly performed in HD patients in order to detect problems at an early stage, to take necessary preventative measures, to initiate treatment as soon as possible and to enhance quality of life.

  1. Features of Ebola Virus Disease at the Late Outbreak Stage in Sierra Leone: Clinical, Virological, Immunological, and Evolutionary Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bao-Gui; Fan, Hang; Han, Jian-Feng; Hu, Yi; Zhuang, Dao-Min; Kargbo, David; An, Xiao-Ping; Mi, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Xin, Wen-Wen; Tan, Ya-Fang; He, Jun; Gao, Rong-Bao; Wang, Hong; Chen, Cao; Wang, Feng; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Cui, Yu-Jun; Bei, Zhu-Chun; Zhang, Ke; Shang, Xue-Yi; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Pei, Guang-Qian; Wang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Wei; Shu, Peng; Liu, Wen-Li; Cheng, Shi; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Kanu, Alex; Kargbo, Brima; Gao, Bo; Tong, Yi-Gang; Fang, Tong-Yu; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2017-04-01

    We performed Ebola virus disease diagnosis and viral load estimation for Ebola cases in Sierra Leone during the late stage of the 2014-2015 outbreak (January-March 2015) and analyzed antibody and cytokine levels and the viral genome sequences. Ebola virus disease was confirmed in 86 of 1001 (9.7%) patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 46.8%. Fatal cases exhibited significantly higher levels of viral loads, cytokines, and chemokines at late stages of infection versus early stage compared with survivors. The viruses converged in a new clade within sublineage 3.2.4, which had a significantly lower case fatality rate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Decrease in urinary creatinine excretion in early stage chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tynkevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about muscle mass loss in early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD. We used 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate to assess determinants of muscle mass and its evolution with kidney function decline. We also described the range of urinary creatinine concentration in this population. METHODS: We included 1072 men and 537 women with non-dialysis CKD stages 1 to 5, all of them with repeated measurements of glomerular filtration rate (mGFR by (51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and several nutritional markers. In those with stage 1 to 4 at baseline, we used a mixed model to study factors associated with urinary creatinine excretion rate and its change over time. RESULTS: Baseline mean urinary creatinine excretion decreased from 15.3 ± 3.1 to 12.1 ± 3.3 mmol/24 h (0.20 ± 0.03 to 0.15 ± 0.04 mmol/kg/24 h in men, with mGFR falling from ≥ 60 to <15 mL/min/1.73 m(2, and from 9.6 ± 1.9 to 7.6 ± 2.5 (0.16 ± 0.03 to 0.12 ± 0.03 in women. In addition to mGFR, an older age, diabetes, and lower levels of body mass index, proteinuria, and protein intake assessed by urinary urea were associated with lower mean urinary creatinine excretion at baseline. Mean annual decline in mGFR was 1.53 ± 0.12 mL/min/1.73 m(2 per year and that of urinary creatinine excretion rate, 0.28 ± 0.02 mmol/24 h per year. Patients with fast annual decline in mGFR of 5 mL/min/1.73 m(2 had a decrease in urinary creatinine excretion more than twice as big as in those with stable mGFR, independent of changes in urinary urea as well as of other determinants of low muscle mass. CONCLUSIONS: Decrease in 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion rate may appear early in CKD patients, and is greater the more mGFR declines independent of lowering protein intake assessed by 24-hour urinary urea. Normalizing urine analytes for creatininuria may overestimate their concentration in patients with reduced kidney function and low muscle mass.

  3. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Nyawira Maranga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P<0.05 elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness.

  4. IL-6 is Upregulated in Late-Stage Disease in Monkeys Experimentally Infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira Maranga, Dawn; Kagira, John Maina; Kinyanjui, Christopher Kariuki; Muturi Karanja, Simon; Wangari Maina, Naomi; Ngotho, Maina

    2013-01-01

    The management of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is constrained by lack of simple-to-use diagnostic, staging, and treatment tools. The search for novel biomarkers is, therefore, essential in the fight against HAT. The current study aimed at investigating the potential of IL-6 as an adjunct parameter for HAT stage determination in vervet monkey model. Four adult vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and treated subcuratively at 28 days after infection (dpi) to induce late stage disease. Three noninfected monkeys formed the control group. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were obtained at weekly intervals and assessed for various biological parameters. A typical HAT-like infection was observed. The late stage was characterized by significant (P < 0.05) elevation of CSF IL-6, white blood cell count, and total protein starting 35 dpi with peak levels of these parameters coinciding with relapse parasitaemia. Brain immunohistochemical staining revealed an increase in brain glial fibrillary acidic protein expression indicative of reactive astrogliosis in infected animals which were euthanized in late-stage disease. The elevation of IL-6 in CSF which accompanied other HAT biomarkers indicates onset of parasite neuroinvasion and show potential for use as an adjunct late-stage disease biomarker in the Rhodesian sleeping sickness. PMID:24194772

  5. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  6. CT and MRI findings of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the early stage. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukisu, Ryutaro; Kushihashi, Tamio; Gokan, Takehiko [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2001-02-01

    To detect subtle CT and MRI features of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in the early stage is important to prevent a human-to-human transmission. This study included 10 patients of CJD who underwent CT and/or MRI in its early stage. CT, T1- and T2-weighted MRI, DWI, and FLAIR images were obtained in 10, 6, 4, and 2 patients respectively. On DWI, abnormal hyperintensities were observed in both cerebral cortex, and in basal ganglia in all patients. On FLAIR images, abnormal hyperintensies were observed in one patient. Detection of abnormal intensities may be possible in the early stage of CJD using MRI, particularly with DWI. (author)

  7. [Symptom Distress, Depression, and Quality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Patients at Different Disease Stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Ching, Ching-Yun; Lee, Hui-Yen; Tung, Hong-Yi; Juan, Chien-Wei; Chao, Tung-Bo

    2015-12-01

    imply that healthcare professionals must provide appropriate emotional support in order to decrease depression tendency at different stages. Thus, these patients should receive nursing interventions that effectively decrease depression and symptom distress and enhance quality of life at different disease stages.

  8. Assisted peritoneal dialysis as a method of choice for elderly with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimkovic, Nada; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2008-01-01

    In the last two decades, most developed countries have seen a continuous growth in the number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease commencing renal replacement therapy. Despite the many advantages that peritoneal dialysis (PD) offers to elderly patients with ESRD, it is still underutilized in older patients. Older patients are much more vulnerable to the problems associated with aging, which may affect their level of independence and their long-term prognosis. Those patients have physiological changes related to aging and common health problems such as anxiety, depression, dementia, visual impairment, and cognitive impairment, all of which interfere with self-performing PD. Assistance with home-care nurses and assistance by a family member may overcome this problem. Some old but also more recent literature data justifies the idea that assisted PD may significantly contribute to increase the overall number of elderly patients who can be treated with PD at home. With assisted PD, free choice can be offered to patients with high comorbidity index who cannot perform their peritoneal exchanges by themselves. Automated peritoneal dialysis is the ideal treatment modality for elderly patients with end-stage renal disease who require assistance since this limits home-care nurse visits to only two a day. As expected, the elderly have a higher mortality rate than younger patients treated by assisted PD, but technique failure rate, overall peritonitis rate, and most quality-of-life (QoL) measures are comparable with those of younger patients. Peritoneal dialysis in nursing homes offers treatment for elderly patients without family support. In this regard, automated PD or nightly PD keeps the patient's daytime free for nursing home activities, increases socialization, and enables better rehabilitation that improves their QoL. Although withdrawal from dialysis is more frequent among nursing-home dialysis patients, this high discontinuation rate is not due to dialysis

  9. Anesthetic management in pediatric orthotopic liver transplant for fulminant hepatic failure and end-stage liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camkıran, Aynur; Araz, Coşkun; Seyhan Ballı, Sevgi; Torgay, Adnan; Moray, Gökhan; Pirat, Arash; Arslan, Gülnaz; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    We assessed the anesthetic management and short-term morbidity and mortality in pediatrics patients who underwent an orthotopic liver transplant for fulminant hepatic failure or end-stage liver disease in a university hospital. We retrospectively analyzed the records of children who underwent orthotopic liver transplant from May 2002 to May 2012. Patients were categorized into 2 groups: group fulminant hepatic failure (n=22) and group end-stage liver disease (n=19). Perioperative data related to anesthetic management and intraoperative events were collected along with information related to postoperative course and survival to hospital discharge. Mean age and weight for groups fulminant hepatic failure and end-stage liver disease were 8.6 ± 2.7 years and 10.8 ± 3.8 years (P = .04) and 29.2 ± 11.9 kg and 33.7 ± 16.9 kg (P = .46). There were no differences between the groups regarding length of anhepatic phase (65 ± 21 min vs 73 ± 18 min, P = .13) and operation time (9.1 ± 1.6 h vs 9.5 ± 1.8 h, P = .23). When compared with the patients in group fulminant hepatic failure, those in group end-stage liver disease more commonly had a Glasgow Coma score of 7 or less (32% vs 6%, P = .04). Compared with patients in group fulminant hepatic failure, those in group end-stage liver disease were more frequently extubated in the operating room (31.8% versus 89.5% P liver transplant (7.3% vs 0%, P = .09) were similar between the groups. During pediatric orthotopic liver transplant, those children with fulminant hepatic failure require more intraoperative fluids and more frequent perioperative mechanical ventilation than those with end-stage liver disease.

  10. [Changes in mineral metabolism in stage 3, 4, and 5 chronic kidney disease (not on dialysis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Sellares, V; Torregrosa, V

    2008-01-01

    With progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), disorders of mineral metabolism appear. The classic sequence of events begins with a deficit of calcitriol synthesis and retention of phosphorus. As a result of this, serum calcium decreases and parathyroid hormone (PTH) is stimulated, producing in the bone the high turnover (HT) bone disease known as osteitis fibrosa while on the other extreme we find the forms of low turnover (LT) bone disease. Described later and initially associated with aluminum intoxication, these diseases are now seen primarily in older and/or diabetic patients, who in a uremic setting have relatively low levels of PTH to maintain normal bone turnover. Osteomalacia is also included in this group, which after the disappearance of aluminum intoxication is rarely observed. LT forms of hyperparathyroidism facilitate the exit of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) from bone, whereas the adynamic bone limits the incorporation of Ca and P into bone tissue. Therefore, both forms facilitate the availability of Ca and P, which ends up being deposited in soft tissues such as arteries. The link between bone disease and vascular calcifications in CKD is now a well-established phenomenon. 2. Diagnostic strategies Calcium, Phosphorus They have little capacity to predict underlying bone disease, but their regular measurement is decisive for therapeutic management of the patient, especially in the dose titration stages of intestinal phosphorus binders, vitamin D analogs or calcimimetics. Ideally, Ca++ should be used, but total Ca is routinely used. It is recommended to adjust albumin levels in the event of hypoalbuminemia (for each g/dL of decrease in albumin, total serum Ca decreases 0.9 mg/dL). The following formula facilitates rapid calculation of corrected total calcium: Corrected total Ca (mg/dL) = total Ca (mg/dL) + 0.8 [4-albumina (g/dL)]. Parathyroid hormone "Intact" PTH is the biochemical parameter that best correlates with bone histology (levels

  11. Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry in Chagas' Disease: Compounds at The Final Stage of "Hit-To-Lead" Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2010-03-25

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomosiasis, has been the most relevant illness produced by protozoa in Latin America. Synthetic medicinal chemistry efforts have provided an extensive number of chemodiverse hits at the "active-to-hit" stage. However, only a more limited number of these have been studied in vivo in models of Chagas' disease. Herein, we survey some of the cantidates able to surpass the "hit-to-lead" stage discussing their limitations or merit to enter in clinical trials in the short term.

  12. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality.

  13. Exposure to radiologic contrast media and an increased risk of treated end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Coresh, Josef; Klag, Michael J; Whelton, Paul K; Perneger, Thomas V

    2003-12-01

    Radiologic contrast media can cause acute renal failure, but whether their repeated use is associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. We compared 716 incident case subjects of treated ESRD with 361 control subjects, frequency matched on age, drawn from the general population (age, 20-65 years). Participants were interviewed by telephone regarding their previous exposure (before initiation of dialysis for case subjects and the study interview for control subject) to various imaging procedures. As expected, the case subjects reported having more imaging procedures of the kidneys than did control subjects. Excluding persons who had been subjected to examinations of their kidney from the analysis and adjusting for ultrasound examinations and several possible confounders, persons who had a history of one [odds ratio (OR), 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0, 4.0], 2 or 3 (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2,5.9), or 4 or more (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.0, 12.5) radiocontrast examinations were at higher risk of treated ESRD than persons who reported not having had such procedures. Ultrasound examinations and a history of barium enema were not associated with an increased risk of treated ESRD. In the current study, a graded association was present between increasing exposure to radiologic contrast media and higher risk of treated ESRD. Whether exposure to contrast media accelerates progression to ESRD or is merely a noncausal accompaniment to multiple disease processes occurring concurrently cannot be determined from our observational data. However, if these results are confirmed in future prospective studies, they will have important clinical implications.

  14. Syndrome of rapid onset end stage renal disease in incident Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis patient

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    M. A. C. Onuigbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, a full understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD-end stage renal disease (ESRD progression remains elusive. The common consensus is a predictable, linear, progressive and time-dependent decline of CKD to ESRD. Acute kidney injury (AKI on CKD is usually assumed to be transient, with recovery as the expected outcome. AKI-ESRD association in current nephrology literature is blamed on the so-called "residual confounding." We had previously described a relationship between AKI events and rapid onset yet irreversible ESRD happening in a continuum in a high-risk CKD cohort. However, the contribution of the syndrome of rapid onset-ESRD (SORO-ESRD to incident United States ESRD population remained conjectural. In this retrospective analysis, we analyzed serum creatinine trajectories of the last 100 consecutive ESRD patients in 4 Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis units to determine the incidence of SORO-ESRD. Excluding 9 patients, 31 (34% patients, including two renal transplant recipients, had SORO-ESRD: 18 males and 13 females age 72 (range 50-92 years. Precipitating AKI followed pneumonia (8, acutely decompensated heart failure (7, pyelonephritis (4, post-operative (5, sepsis (3, contrast-induced nephropathy (2, and others (2. Time to dialysis was shortest following surgical procedures. Concurrent renin angiotensin aldosterone system blockade was higher with SORO-ESRD - 23% versus 5%, P = 0.0113. In conclusion, SORO-ESRD is not uncommon among the incident general US ESRD population. The implications for ESRD care planning, AV-fistula-first programs, general CKD care and any associations with renal ageing/senescence warrant further study.

  15. Patients with end stage renal disease: a registry at Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, Malaysia.

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    Liu, W J; Hooi, L S

    2007-08-01

    The epidemiology of new patients presenting to Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru (HSAJB) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 2003 and 2004 was analysed. Patients with ESRD were prospectively registered in the renal replacement therapy (RRT) database in the nephrology unit. The incidence of ESRD and the RRT provision rate in the district of Johor Bahru were calculated according to gender and race. There were 306 new patients in 2003 and 299 in 2004. Diabetic nephropathy contributed 56.8% new patients in 2003 and 57.9% in 2004. The mean age was 50.8 + 15.1 years in 2003 and 51.3 + 14.2 years in 2004. Males accounted for 53.3% in 2003 and 47.8% in 2004. Haemodialysis was the commonest form of RRT (60.5% in 2003, 69.9% in 2004), followed by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (30.1% in 2003, 19.4% in 2004) and renal transplantation (5.5% in 2003, 2.3% in 2004). Ninety-one percent of patients in 2003 and 90% in 2004 were alive at the end of the year they presented. The incidence of ESRD in the district of Johor Bahru was estimated as 136 per million population (p.m.p.) in 2003 and 151 p.m.p. in 2004. In the two year period the incidence of ESRD was higher among females (154 p.m.p.) than males (134 p.m.p.). Malays (194 p.m.p.) had higher ESRD incidence compared to Chinese (126 p.m.p.) and Indians (134 p.m.p.). RRT provision in Johor Bahru (92.7%) did not differ significantly with gender or race. The increasing number of patients presenting to HSAJB with ESRD especially those with diabetic nephropathy is a major concern. Prevention strategies at the primary care level may curb the burden of this chronic disease.

  16. Arterial Stiffness and Walk Time in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Abbi D.; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Kistler, Brandon; Fitschen, Peter; Tomayko, Emily; Jeong, Jin-Hee; Chung, Hae Ryung; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M.; Phillips, Shane; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Background End-stage renal disease patients experience increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Heart-artery interaction may be shifted, impacting blood pressure lability, and exercise tolerance. The coupling ratio consists of the ratio of indexed arterial elastance (EaI, arterial load) to ElvI, a measure of cardiac contractility or stiffness. Our purpose was to explore the relationship between elastances and functional capacity. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness (central pulse wave velocity, PWV) and elastances would be correlated to shuttle walk time. Methods We used applanation tonometry, ultrasonography, and a shuttle walk test to evaluate our hypothesis. Spearman's correlations were used to assess relationships between variables. Block regression was also performed. Results Forty-two subjects on maintenance hemodialysis participated. Average age=44±5 years, body surface area=2.01 kg/m2. Mean EaI=4.45 and mean ElvI=6.89; the coupling ratio=0.82. Mean aortic pulse pressure=51 mmHg and PWV=9.6 m/s. PWV(r=-0.385) and EaI (r=-0.424) were significantly and inversely related to walking time while stroke volume index (SVI) was positively correlated to shuttle walk time (r=0.337), p<0.05 for all. Conclusions We conclude that, like other clinical populations, both arterial and heart function predict walking ability and represent potential targets for intervention; arterial stiffness and SVI are strongly related to shuttle walk time in patients with ESRD. PMID:23653111

  17. End-stage renal disease in India and Pakistan: incidence, causes, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhuja, Vinay; Kohli, Harbir S

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a devastating medical, social, and economic problem for patients and their families in India and Pakistan. Reliable data on the true incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in India and Pakistan are lacking because no national registries exist. Among reported cases, chronic glomerulonephritis is the most common cause, accounting for more than one third of patients, while diabetic nephropathy accounts for approximately 20% of all patients in India. Delayed diagnosis and failure to institute measures to slow the progression of renal failure have resulted in a predominantly young ESRD population, with a median age of 44 years. Because of financial constraints, less than one third of all patients referred to a tertiary care center receive any kind of renal replacement therapy. Most hemodialysis patients who stop treatment and die do so because of cost constraints within the first three months, and approximately 5% of patients are started on ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Renal transplantation is the cheapest option, but < 10% of all patients with ESRD have a transplant. Cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone continue to be the backbone of post-transplant immunosuppression, but cyclosporine is stopped in a significant proportion of patients at one year post-transplant to cut down costs. Living related donor transplants constitute 70% of all transplants; two thirds of the donors are females, while more than three fourths of all recipients are males. Spouses account for 20% of donors from within families. Almost 30% of transplanted kidneys are donated by living unrelated donors, while cadaver donors account for only 2%. More resources must be mobilized to care for these patients; early detection of renal disease must be facilitated, and measures to delay ESRD must be implemented.

  18. Systematic Analysis of Blood Cell Transcriptome in End-Stage Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botturi, Karine; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Mussot, Sacha; Stern, Marc; Danner-Boucher, Isabelle; Mornex, Jean-François; Pison, Christophe; Dromer, Claire; Kessler, Romain; Dahan, Marcel; Brugière, Olivier; Le Pavec, Jérôme; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Gomez, Carine; Brouard, Sophie; Magnan, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background End-stage chronic respiratory diseases (CRD) have systemic consequences, such as weight loss and susceptibility to infection. However the mechanisms of such dysfunctions are as yet poorly explained. We hypothesized that the genes putatively involved in these mechanisms would emerge from a systematic analysis of blood mRNA profiles from pre-transplant patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), pulmonary hypertension (PAH), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Whole blood was first collected from 13 patients with PAH, 23 patients with CF, and 28 Healthy Controls (HC). Microarray results were validated by quantitative PCR on a second and independent group (7PAH, 9CF, and 11HC). Twelve pre-transplant COPD patients were added to validate the common signature shared by patients with CRD for all causes. To further clarify a role for hypoxia in the candidate gene dysregulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HC were analysed for their mRNA profile under hypoxia. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering allowed the identification of 3 gene signatures related to CRD. One was common to CF and PAH, another specific to CF, and the final one was specific to PAH. With the common signature, we validated T-Cell Factor 7 (TCF-7) and Interleukin 7 Receptor (IL-7R), two genes related to T lymphocyte activation, as being under-expressed. We showed a strong impact of the hypoxia on modulation of TCF-7 and IL-7R expression in PBMCs from HC under hypoxia or PBMCs from CRD. In addition, we identified and validated genes upregulated in PAH or CF, including Lectin Galactoside-binding Soluble 3 and Toll Like Receptor 4, respectively. Conclusions Systematic analysis of blood cell transcriptome in CRD patients identified common and specific signatures relevant to the systemic pathologies. TCF-7 and IL-7R were downregulated whatever the cause of CRD and this could play a role in the higher susceptibility to infection of these patients. PMID:25329529

  19. Causes and outcome of late referral of children who develop end-stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sean E; Bailey, Rohan; Kainer, Gad

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to characterise the timing of referral to a paediatric nephrology unit of children who develop end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). This study also aims to determine whether late referral (LR) influences outcomes and to explore factors that may lead to LR. A retrospective case review of all incident patients with ESKD who received renal replacement therapy (RRT) at a single paediatric centre. Time between referral to a paediatric nephrologist and commencement of RRT, demographic and clinical data were collated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at referral was calculated using height and creatinine. LR was defined as having an eGFR ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) when first seen by a paediatric nephrologist. RRT was initiated for 74 patients Children referred before age 1 year (41%) had a more prolonged course before ESKD. Median (interquartile range) eGFR at referral of children > 1 year was 27.2 (9.0-52.0) mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Twenty-two (55%) of these children were referred late (LR) with an eGFR ≤ 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . LR patients were more likely to have glomerulonephritis or haemolytic uraemic syndrome and to live in a remote or outer regional area. LR patients had higher urea, lower haemoglobin and were more likely to receive haemodialysis via a vascular catheter. A significant proportion of children who develop ESKD are referred late to nephrology units with potentially preventable complications. Aetiology of renal disease and geographic isolation contribute to LR. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Cardiovascular alterations do exist in children with stage-2 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Eroğlu, Ayşe Güler; Canpolat, Nur; Konukoğlu, Dildar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Sevim, Meltem Dönmez; Çalışkan, Salim; Sever, Lale

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. However, it is not well known when and how cardiovascular alterations start. This cross-sectional, controlled study consisted of 25 patients and 28 healthy controls. 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility coefficient and β stiffness index), and echocardiography were assessed to evaluate CVD. Routine biochemical parameters, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and high sensitive C- reactive protein were measured to determine cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertension was found in 12 patients (48 %). Patients had higher FGF23 levels and aPWV-standard deviation score (SDS) as compared to the controls (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Aortic PWV-SDS was predicted by increased daytime systolic blood pressure load (β = 0.512, p = 0.009, R 2  = 0.262). Neither cIMT nor distensibility differed between the groups; however, older age and high level of FGF23 were independent predictors of β stiffness index in patients (β = 0.507, p = 0.005, R 2  = 0.461 and β = 0.502, p = 0.005, R 2  = 0.461, respectively). As compared to controls, patients had worse left ventricular diastolic function [lower E/A ratio p = 0.006) and increased left atrial dimension (p children with stage-2 CKD. Good control of BP and decreasing the level of FGF23 may be useful to slow down the progression of cardiovascular complications.

  1. [Ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis: Two stages of disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantseva, D G; Dubinina, T V; Demina, A B; Rumyantseva, O A; Agafonova, E M; Smirnov, A V; Erdes, Sh F

    To compare the clinical manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA). A Moscow early spondyloarthritis cohort has now included 132 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, of whom 69 patients who have been followed up at least 12 months are to be involved in a preliminary analysis. The mean age at the time of inclusion in the study was 28.1±5.5 years; the mean disease duration was 24.7±15.8 months; 63 (91.3%) patients were HLA-B27 positive; 41 and 28 included patients were diagnosed with AS and nrAxSpA, respectively. Men were significantly more in the AS group than in the nrAxSpA group (58.5 and 32.1%, respectively; p=0.05). The patients of the two groups did not differ in main clinical parameters (the presence of arthritis and enthesitis), disease activity (BASDAI, ASDAS-CRP) and functional status (BASFI). All indicators of inflammatory activity decreased nearly 2-fold in both groups after 12 months of follow up. In 7 (25%) patients with nrAxSpA, radiologically detectable sacroiliitis (SI) developed over 12 months and the diagnosis of AS was verified. Among them, 2 (28.5%) patients had initially active SI detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); 4 (57.1%) had chronic SI, and 1 (14.4%) had no pathological MRI changes. Due to the fact that the clinical manifestations of AS and nrAxSpA are comparable, it can be assumed that the latter is an early stage of AS.

  2. The Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunction among the Patients with End Stage Renal Disease in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, K K; Soyibo, A K; James, K; Barton, E N

    2013-12-01

    Sexual performance and gratification impact quality of life. Although recognized in the literature as a problem, sexual dysfunction among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) has never been studied in Jamaica. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was determined among 268 adult Jamaican patients (166 males, 102 females) with ESRD who had been on haemodialysis for at least three months. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) was determined using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 classifications of sexual disorders. Prevalence, severity of sexual dysfunctions and relationships with the primary aetiology of ESRD and anaemia were assessed. Erectile dysfunction, desire and orgasmic disorderS were found in 91.4%, 88.3%, and 81.6% of male subjects, respectively. The majority of male patients were dissatisfied with their performance at intercourse after progressing to ESRD. Hypoactive sexual disorder, sexual arousal and orgasmic disorders, and aversion sexual disorder were prevalent, found in 96%, 88.1% and 87.1% of female patients. All diabetic patients with ESRD reported hypoactive sexual disorder and orgasmic dysfunction; arousal disorder was found in 94.7%. Aversion sexual disorder was found more among patients with underlying chronic glomerulonephritis. All patients with severe anaemia were found to have hypoactive sexual disorder and among these, 87.5% and 97.8% had severe arousal and orgasmic disorders, respectively. Sexual dysfunction among patients with ESRD in Jamaica was prevalent in males and females. Associations exist between sexual dysfunction and diabetes mellitus, chronic glomerulonephritis and anaemia.

  3. Development and validation of a new screening questionnaire for dysphagia in early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Janine A; Fietzek, Urban M; Waldmann, Annika; Warnecke, Tobias; Schuster, Tibor; Ceballos-Baumann, Andrés O

    2014-09-01

    Dysphagia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) significantly reduces quality of life and predicted lifetime. Current screening procedures are insufficiently evaluated. We aimed to develop and validate a patient-reported outcome questionnaire for early diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with PD. The two-phased project comprised the questionnaire, diagnostic scales construction (N = 105), and a validation study (N = 82). Data for the project were gathered from PD patients at a German Movement Disorder Center. For validation purposes, a clinical evaluation focusing on swallowing tests, tests of sensory reflexes, and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) was performed that yielded a criteria sum score against which the results of the questionnaire were compared. Specificity and sensitivity were evaluated for the detection of noticeable dysphagia and for the risk of aspiration. The Munich Dysphagia Test - Parkinson's disease (MDT-PD) consists of 26 items that show high internal consistency (α = 0.91). For the validation study, 82 patients, aged 70.9 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD), with a median Hoehn & Yahr stage of 3, were assessed. 73% of patients had dysphagia with noticeable oropharyngeal symptoms (44%) or with penetration/aspiration (29%). The criteria sum score correlated positively with the screening result (r = 0.70, p dysphagia vs. risk of aspiration (noticeable dysphagia) with a sensitivity of 90% (82%) and a specificity of 86% (71%), and yielded similar results in cross-validation, respectively. MDT-PD is a valid screening tool for early diagnosis of swallowing problems and aspiration risk, as well as initial graduation of dysphagia severity in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Profile of functional limitations and task performance among people with early- and middle-stage Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Margaret; Ellis, Terry; Christiansen, Cory; Barón, Anna E; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Hall, Deborah A; Wagenaar, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Overall functional ability declines over time in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Established benchmarks are needed to allow clinicians and researchers to facilitate meaningful interpretation of data. The purposes of this study were: (1) to report typical values for standard measures of functional ability commonly used in intervention studies and clinical practice with individuals in the early and middle stages of PD and (2) to describe the profile of functional limitations using the Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stages of disease and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 5 different studies. Three hundred thirty-nine patients were evaluated for disease severity (UPDRS motor score); functional capacity (Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance Test [CS-PFP]); balance and gait (Functional Reach Test [FRT], Timed "Up & Go" Test [TUG], 360-degree turn, Six-Minute Walk Test [6MWT], and Two-Minute Walk Test); and basic functional activities (supine-to-stand task, stand-to-supine task, and functional axial rotation [FAR]). The mean UPDRS motor score for the sample was 39.2 (SD=12.93). At each stage of PD (from least to most involved), scores on functional measures indicated a significant and progressively reduced functional status. Limitations began early in the disease for the CS-PFP and FAR. Losses in performance were consistent across all stages of disease for the CS-PFP, FRT, 6MWT, and FAR. Several measures demonstrated meaningful losses of function only in later stages of disease. Findings extend current appreciation of functional limitations that begin early in PD and can guide the choice of functional outcome measures at different stages of disease severity. Data were obtained only from participants in H&Y stages 1 through 3 and only for some of the performance measures typically used. The findings demonstrate that functional loss occurs at different points in the disease process, depending on the

  5. Psychological defense mechanisms in patients with syphilis at different stages of the disease

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    Filonova A.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the study of psychological defense mechanisms in patients with syphilis at different stages of the disease. Material and methods. We used questionnaire Plutchik-Kellerman-Comte "life style Index". The study involved 257 people (118 women (46% and 139 men (54% aged 18 to 67 years (mean age — 23,5±8,9years. Results. In patients with primary syphilis primary mecha-protection scheme is "denying"; secondary syphilis of skin and mucus-purity membranes— "replacement"; syphilis latent early — "projection"; in patients with late syphilis — intellectualization. Thus, in patients with late forms of syphilis is dominated by more Mature mechanisms of protection (projection, rationalization. Patients with early forms use more primitive mechanisms (denial, substitution. Conclusion. The obtained data may be useful in the choice of methods of psychotherapy, the formation of patients more realistic (ADAP-tive installations for the treatment, restoration of family and other social relations, the prevention of distress and improving the quality of life of patients.

  6. Plasma elimination of cardiac troponin I in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, K; Dreisbach, A W; Lertora, J L

    2001-10-01

    We retrospectively compared the decline of cardiac troponin I after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with normal renal function and those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were receiving hemodialysis. We reviewed 257 cases with a discharge diagnosis of AMI or AMI plus ESRD; 222 were excluded due to inadequate data or evidence of ongoing myocardial necrosis. Decline of cardiac troponin I values was followed over a mean (+/- SD) of 2.75 +/- 1.2 days in patients with normal renal function and 2.7 +/- 2.0 days in ESRD patients. Average apparent half-life and apparent elimination rate constant of troponin I were compared between groups. Of 35 patients with AMI, 16 had ESRD and were receiving hemodialysis, and 19 had normal renal function. Mean (+/- SD) apparent half-lives of troponin I in the ESRD group and the group with normal renal function were 1.48 +/- 0.77 days and 1.08 +/- 0.63 days, respectively. The mean apparent elimination rate constants of cardiac troponin I were 0.64 +/- 0.33 days(-1) in the ESRD group and 0.91 +/- 0.55 days(-1) in the group with normal renal function. The difference in apparent half-life and apparent elimination rate constant of cardiac troponin I between patients with normal renal function and those with ESRD is not statistically significant.

  7. Altered resting state cortico-striatal connectivity in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s disease

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    Youngbin Kwak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s patients on and off L-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off L-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by L-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off L-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02 – 0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on L-DOPA. The L-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the L-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the L-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band also correlated with the L-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and L-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and corticostriatal network coherence.

  8. YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ture Lange; Plesner, Louis Lind; Warming, Peder Emil; Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Dalsgaard, Morten; Schou, Morten; Høst, Ulla; Rydahl, Casper; Brandi, Lisbet; Køber, Lars; Johansen, Julia Sidenius; Kastrup, Jens; Iversen, Kasper Karmark

    2018-03-08

    This study aimed to determine serum YKL-40 in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) and to evaluate the prognostic value of serum YKL-40. Patients >18 years on maintenance HD were included. Serum YKL-40 was measured using ELISA before and after a single HD treatment. A total of 306 patients were included. Median serum YKL-40 concentration was 238 µgL -1 (IQR: 193-291 µgL -1 ) before HD treatment and 198 µgL -1 (IQR: 147-258 µgL -1 ) after HD treatment, which corresponded to age-corrected 93th percentile in healthy subjects. All-cause mortality after 2.8 years was 35.9%. Patients with serum YKL-40 in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile had a univariate HR of 4.0 (95% CI: 2.2-7.3, p 40 after HD treatment had significant higher area under the curves from 90 d (p = 0.004) and throughout the rest of the follow-up period when compared to serum YKL-40 before HD treatment. YKL-40 was highly elevated in patients with ESRD on HD, and dialysis reduced serum YKL-40 concentrations approximately one-sixth. YKL-40 measured after dialysis was independently associated with mortality in HD patients.

  9. Estimating average glucose levels from glycated albumin in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jwa-Kyung; Park, Jung Tak; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Seung Jun; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2012-05-01

    In patients with diabetic end stage renal disease (ESRD), glycated albumin (GA) reflects recent glycemic control more accurately than glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). We evaluated the relationship between GA and average blood glucose (AG) level and developed an estimating equation for translating GA values into easier-to-understand AG levels. A total of 185 ESRD patients, including 154 diabetic and 31 non-diabetic participants, were enrolled (108 hemodialysis, 77 peritoneal dialysis). Patients were asked to perform four-point daily self-monitoring of capillary blood glucose (SMBG) at least three consecutive days each week for four weeks. Serum levels of GA, HbA1c and other biochemical parameters were checked at baseline, as well as at 4 and 8 weeks. Approximately 74.3±7.0 SMBG readings were obtained from each participant and mean AG was 169.1±48.2 mg/dL. The correlation coefficient between serum GA and AG levels (r=0.70, paverage blood glucose level of 155-160 mg/dL could be matched to a GA value of 18-19% in patients with ESRD.

  10. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80% chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P=0.108 and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P=0.090. Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD.

  11. Improvement of resistant hypertension by nocturnal hemodialysis in a patient with end-stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojing; Hu, Xiaohong; Mei, Changlin; Yu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a common and refractory complication of hemodialysis (HD) patients and is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Here we present a case of resistant hypertension treated successfully by nocturnal HD. A 63-year-old female with end-stage kidney disease was hospitalized for severe headache, objective vertigo and persistent vomiting for 1 month on February 6, 2012. She had been on intermittent HD for 3 months, and her blood pressure maintained 200-240/100-130 mm Hg even after using 7 kinds of antihypertensive drugs including olmesartan, benazepril, nitrendipine, arotinolol, terazosin, clonidine and torasemide. A CT of the abdomen revealed a mild hyperplasia of the left adrenal gland (fig. 1). However, plasma renin, angiotensin and aldosterone were all within the normal range. Nocturnal extended HD was initiated with a blood flow rate of 150 ml/min and a dialysis time of 7 h. After 3 months of nocturnal HD, all symptoms were relieved and her systolic blood pressure started to decrease by 10-20 mm Hg. Six months later, the predialysis blood pressure was decreased to 140-160/90-100 mm Hg and the antihypertensive drugs were reduced to 4 kinds. Meanwhile, the blood biochemical parameters including hemoglobin, serum calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone were all controlled well during 2 years of treatment. This case indicates that nocturnal extended HD is probably a promising and effective choice for resistant hypertension in HD patients.

  12. Perspectives in Molecular Imaging Using Staging Biomarkers and Immunotherapies in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Benoît Leclerc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD is an emerging chronic illness characterized by a progressive pleiotropic pathophysiological mode of actions triggered during the senescence process and affecting the elderly worldwide. The complex molecular mechanisms of AD not only are supported by cholinergic, beta-amyloid, and tau theories but also have a genetic basis that accounts for the difference in symptomatology processes activation among human population which will evolve into divergent neuropathological features underlying cognitive and behaviour alterations. Distinct immune system tolerance could also influence divergent responses among AD patients treated by immunotherapy. The complexity in nature increases when taken together the genetic/immune tolerance with the patient’s brain reserve and with neuropathological evolution from early till advance AD clinical stages. The most promising diagnostic strategies in today’s world would consist in performing high diagnostic accuracy of combined modality imaging technologies using beta-amyloid 42 peptide-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF positron emission tomography (PET, Pittsburgh compound B-PET, fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, total and phosphorylated tau-CSF, and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging hippocampus biomarkers for criteria evaluation and validation. Early diagnosis is the challenge task that needs to look first at plausible mechanisms of actions behind therapies, and combining them would allow for the development of efficient AD treatment in a near future.

  13. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

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    Gurjeet S. Birdee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, few studies have examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and patients’ interest in learning mind-body interventions to address health issues. We surveyed 89 adult patients (response rate 84% at an outpatient hemodialysis center in Brookline, MA, USA regarding the utilization of CAM, including mind-body practices, and willingness to learn mind-body practices. Of respondents, 47% were female, 63% were black, and mean age was 62 years. 61% reported using CAM for health in their lifetime, and 36% reported using CAM within a month of the survey. The most frequent CAM modalities reported in ones’ lifetime and in the last month were mind-body practices (42% and 27%, resp.. Overall lifetime CAM use did not differ significantly by sex, race, dialysis vintage, diagnosis of ESRD, employment status, or education level. Subjects reported that mind-body interactions were very important to health with a median score of 9 on a 10-point Likert scale (ranging from 0 for not important to 10 for extremely important. Most patients (74% reported interest in learning mind-body practices during maintenance hemodialysis. In summary, CAM use, particularly mind-body practice, is frequent among patients with ESRD providing opportunities for future clinical research.

  14. Impact of the End Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System on the Use of Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Thamer, Mae; Kshirsagar, Onkar; Zhang, Yi

    2017-05-01

    The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System (PPS), implemented by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in January 2011, encouraged use of peritoneal dialysis (PD) through various financial incentives. Our goal was to determine whether PPS effectively increased PD use in incident dialysis patients. Our study used the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) to identify 430,927 adult patients who initiated dialysis between 2009 and 2012. The interrupted time series method was used to evaluate the association Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of PPS with PD use at dialysis initiation. We further stratified by patient demographics, predialysis care, and facility chain and profit status. Interrupted time series analysis indicated PPS was associated with increased PD use in the 2-year period after PPS (change in slope = 0.04, P  PPS ( P  = 0.512). Stratified analyses indicated PPS led to increased PD use across all age, race, and sex groups ( P  PPS. Our findings highlight the role of financial incentives in changing practice patterns to increase use of a dialysis modality considered to be both more cost-effective and empowering to ESRD patients. However, even after PPS, rates of PD use remain low among the dialysis population in the USA.

  15. Quality of life after organ transplantation in type 1 diabetics with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, Kalathil K; Patel, Bhavesh M; Markatos, Angelo; Nghiem, Dai D; Marcus, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) should be an important consideration while choosing therapeutic options for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) including dialysis, cadaver (CKT) or living kidney transplant (LKT) or simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant. QOL was assessed in four groups of patients with history of type 1 DM and ESRD: recipients of SPK (n = 43), CKT (n = 43), LKT (n = 11) and wait listed (WL) patients (n = 23). Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL), Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Quality of Well-Being (QWB) questionnaires were utilized. A subset of SPK (n = 19) and CKT (n = 12) recipients underwent longitudinal QOL evaluation. On DQOL questionnaire, SPK group had better satisfaction subscore compared with CKT (1.8 +/- 0.5 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.6, p diabetics with ESRD following transplantation when compared with remaining on WL. SPK transplantation had significant positive effect on diabetes-related QOL which was sustained longitudinally but it was difficult to show an overall improvement in general QOL.

  16. Bone aluminum measurements in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders and trace aluminum contamination of dialysate solution have led to increased body burden of this metal in patients with end-stage renal disease. Aluminum accumulates in bone and has been associated with the development of a renal osteodystrophy, called aluminum-induced osteomalacia. At present, bone biopsy is the method of diagnosis of this condition. When examined by quantitative histomorphometry, the aluminum accumulation was reported to correlate with the severity of the osteomalacia. This project was therefore undertaken to investigate the possibility of developing a non-invasive technique using neutron activation analysis for the direct in vivo assessment of bone aluminum levels. A bilateral exposure of the patient's hand is performed at the patient port of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. The induced activity is then counted for 5 min using four 4'' x 4'' x 16'' NaI(T1) detectors arranged in a quasi-4! geometry. In addition to Al, Ca is also detected and serves as each individual's internal standard for the volume of bone mass irradiated. The Al/Ca ratio provides an index of the amount of elevated aluminum per unit bone mass. When this ratio is multiplied by the total body calcium value, an estimate of total skeletal aluminum is obtained. These measurements will be presented for a pilot study of ten asymptomatic renal patients

  17. Cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation compared with chronic dialysis in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, Diego; Rueda, Juan-David; Diaz, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the costs and effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) of kidney transplantation compared with dialysis in adults suffering from end-stage renal disease from the perspective of the Colombian healthcare system, we designed a Markov model with monthly cycles over a five-year time horizon and eight transitional states, including death as an absorbing state. Transition probabilities were obtained from international registries, costs from different local sources [case studies, official tariffs (ISS 2001 + 35%) for procedures and SISMED for medications]. Data were validated by an expert panel and we performed univariate, multivariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Effectiveness indicators were months of life gained, months of dialysis averted and deaths prevented. The annual discount rate was 3% and the cost-utility threshold (willingness to pay) was three times gross domestic product (GDP) = USD 20,000 per QALY. The costs were adopted in US dollars (USD) using the 2012 average exchange rate (1 USD = COP$ 1798). The discounted average total cost for five years was USD 76,718 for transplantation and USD 76,891 for dialysis, with utilities 2.98 and 2.10 QALY, respectively. Additionally, renal transplantation represented 6.9 months gained, 35 months in dialysis averted per patient and one death averted for each of the five patients transplanted in five years. We conclude that renal transplantation improves the overall survival rates and quality of life and is a cost-saving alternative compared with dialysis.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation compared with chronic dialysis in end-stage renal disease

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    Diego Rosselli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the costs and effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALY of kidney transplantation compared with dialysis in adults suffering from end-stage renal disease from the perspective of the Colombian healthcare system, we designed a Markov model with monthly cycles over a five-year time horizon and eight transitional states, including death as an absorbing state. Transition probabilities were obtained from international registries, costs from different local sources [case studies, official tariffs (ISS 2001 + 35% for procedures and SISMED for medications]. Data were validated by an expert panel and we performed univariate, multivariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Effectiveness indicators were months of life gained, months of dialysis averted and deaths prevented. The annual discount rate was 3% and the cost-utility threshold (willingness to pay was three times gross domestic product (GDP = USD 20,000 per QALY. The costs were adopted in US dollars (USD using the 2012 average exchange rate (1 USD = COP$ 1798. The discounted average total cost for five years was USD 76,718 for transplantation and USD 76,891 for dialysis, with utilities 2.98 and 2.10 QALY, respectively. Additionally, renal transplantation represented 6.9 months gained, 35 months in dialysis averted per patient and one death averted for each of the five patients transplanted in five years. We conclude that renal transplantation improves the overall survival rates and quality of life and is a cost-saving alternative compared with dialysis.

  19. [Adding value to the care at the final stage of chronic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas Guerrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing number of people with advanced chronic health conditions and with palliative care needs who die without their health and social needs satisfied. This is enough to redefine the traditional models of care in order to focus on the person, rather than on the disease. In these new models, the important role of nursing is unquestionably to promote an approach based on comprehensive care, coordination and continuity, and at a social health level appropriate to respond to the care of patients who require complex long-term care. The nurse contribution in the end stages of chronic conditions must be in the value of care. Taking care of someone is to be concerned about them. And this is related to attitude, commitment and responsibility. In the care of patients who live in a situation of extreme vulnerability, it is possible to help them feel warmth, confident, relieve their suffering, respect their autonomy, and help them them find sense and hope, through daily tasks. With gestures, words and facial expressions that go with this care, it is possible to preserve patient dignity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in end-stage renal disease: practical aspects, indications and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Alice; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Elio; Cabassi, Aderville; Morabito, Santo; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEW) is highly prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is associated with a significant increase of the already high mortality and morbidity risk typical of this clinical setting. Since a key mechanism of PEW in ESRD is inadequate nutrient intake, oral nutritional supplements are extensively employed, and have been demonstrated to be highly effective in PEW prevention and treatment. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN), i.e. the administration of nutrients through the extracorporeal circuit during hemodialysis, has also been proposed as a modality of nutritional support for patients with ESRD. However, even though metabolic/nutritional status is improved by this nutritional approach, the evidence linking IDPN to decreased hospitalization rate and lower mortality risk is still scant. The aim of the present paper is to review the role of IDPN as a modality of nutritional supplementation for ESRD patients on hemodialysis. To this end, quantitative and qualitative aspects, practical management, the indications, and limits of IDPN are discussed. On the basis of the available evidence, it is suggested that IDPN is a safe and efficacious modality of nutritional support in ESRD, and could represent an adjunctive strategy for patients with reduced spontaneous dietary intake when intensive dietetic counseling and oral supplementation have failed.

  1. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutritional patterns, patient education on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or referral to a diabetes specialist may reduce risk of subsequent hypoglycemia. In certain situations, it is important to recognize the possibility of non-diabetic causes of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and to avoid treating pseudo-hyperglycemia caused by glucose- non-specific glucometers in patients utilizing icodextrin-based solutions for peritoneal dialysis. Adrenal insufficiency, certain medications, malnutrition and/or infection are among the most common causes of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic ESRD patients, and they should be suspected after exclusion of inadvertent use of hypoglycemic agents. The goal of this review article is to summarize approaches and recommendations for the work up and treatment of hypoglycemia in ESRD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality of life in end stage renal disease: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Julie Emelie; Dubé, Anik

    2014-01-01

    This concept analysis examines quality of life (QOL) in the context of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Quality of life is a multidimensional concept historically used by governmental bodies to measure society's satisfaction of economic and social outcomes. However, health care researchers have demonstrated that the concept of QOL relates to a deeper meaning of an individual's experience of life and health. Walker and Avant's (2010) framework of concept analysis was chosen to provide conceptual clarity for nephrology nurses and allied health care professionals. The CINHAL, EBSCO, ERIC, Medline, PsycINFO, and PubMed databases were searched for the period of 1998-2013 for literature published in English and French with a focus of peer-reviewed journals from disciplines of health sciences and psychology. Consequent to this concept analysis, QOL has been defined by three defining attributes, such as the ability to engage in vigorous activities, the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), and the ability to engage in family, social, and occupational roles. These findings enable a clear and functional definition of the concept of QOL in the context of ESRD, therefore facilitating the ability of nephrology nurses and allied health care professionals to assess clients' needs and improve their health care outcomes through their lived experience.

  3. Assessment of Quality of Life of Family Members of Inpatients with End-Stage Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bužgová, Radka; Kozáková, Radka; Sikorová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of palliative care is to ensure the highest possible quality of life (QoL) for the family members of patients. We aimed to determine the QoL of family members of hospitalized patients with end-stage disease, as well as differences in QoL based on socio-demographic characteristics and the patient's functional status, psychological distress, and QoL. Study participants were 292 family members of terminally ill patients at University Hospital, Ostrava, Czech Republic. To evaluate family members' QoL, we used the Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness--Family Carer Version (QOLLTI-F). We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Scale to assess patients' functional status and psychological distress. A statistically significant difference was found in QoL evaluation based on family members' socio-demographic characteristics in education, employment, and age. A significantly lower QoL score was observed for patients' life partners in six domains. A correlation was found between patients' poorer functional status and family members' lower QoL. We found lower global QoL in family members of patients with depression. Family support is a cornerstone of palliative care. Palliative care professionals should focus on at-risk family members--the life partners of patients, the unemployed, younger people, and those whose ill loved one has a poor functional status.

  4. Psychosocial Factors in End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients at a Tertiary Hospital in Australia

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    Charan Bale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study seeks to review the psychosocial factors affecting patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD from a tertiary hospital in Australia. Methods. We audited patients with ESKD, referred to social work services from January 2012 to December 2014. All patients underwent psychosocial assessments by one, full-time renal social worker. Patient demographics, cumulative social issues, and subsequent interventions were recorded directly into a database. Results. Of the 244 patients referred, the majority were >60 years (58.6%, male (60.7%, born in Australia (62.3%, on haemodialysis (51.6%, and reliant on government financial assistance (88%. Adjustment issues (41%, financial concerns (38.5%, domestic assistance (35.2%, and treatment nonadhere