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Sample records for stage ii disease

  1. Subdiaphragmatic stage I and II Hodgkin's disease - long-term follow-up and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhongxing; Ha, Chul S.; Fuller, Lillian M.; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Cabanillas, Fernando; Tucker, Susan L.; Hess, Mark A.; Cox, James D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report long term follow-up results and analyze prognostic factors for overall and disease-free survival in patients with subdiaphragmatic stage I and II Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: From September 1962 to April 1995, 109 patients presented to the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-two patients who received no treatment at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center or who had radiation therapy at other institutions were excluded. The remaining 87 patients formed the basis of this study. The median age of our group was 33 years with a male:female ratio of 3.3:1. The histological subtypes were nodular sclerosis in 21 (24.1%) patients, mixed cellularity in 31 (35.6%), lymphocyte predominence in 33 (37.9%), lymphocyte depletion in 1 (1.1%) and unclassified histology in 1 (1.1%). Thirty three (37%) patients underwent laparotomy, 74 (85.1%) had lymphangiography, and 35 (40.2%) had computerized tomography of the abdomen. Twenty two (25%) patients had more than three sites of nodal involvement at presentation, 56 (64.4%) had pelvic or abdominal disease, and 14 (18.4%) had bulky disease which was defined as disease with largest dimension ≥ 7 cm. Stage distribution was IA in 33.3%, IIA in 39.1%, and IIB in 27.6%. Sixty (69%) patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 23 (26.4%) with chemotherapy and radiation, and 4 (4.6%) with chemotherapy alone. Results: The 10 and 20 year actuarial overall survival rates for all the patients were 74.6% and 55.3%, and the corresponding disease free survival rates were 72.4% and 67.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, B symptoms, nodular sclerosis or mixed cellularity histology, and decreased albumin and hemoglobin level were statistically significant adverse pretreatment factors for overall survival. B symptoms, decreased albumin level, more than 3 sites of disease at presentation, and stage were

  2. Site of relapse after chemotherapy alone for stage I and II Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, Mehdi; Kamangari, Nahid; Ashley, Sue; Cunningham, David; Horwich, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Short course chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy is a standard treatment for early Hodgkin's disease. There is yet no consensus regarding the appropriate radiotherapy portal following chemotherapy. A good guide to the adjuvant radiotherapy field is the site of relapse in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Patients and methods: From 1980 to 1996, 61 patients with stage I and II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease were treated with chemotherapy alone at the Royal Marsden Hospital. We undertook a retrospective review and failure analysis to define the pattern of recurrence. Results: After a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 24 patients had relapsed giving a 5-year relapse rate of 40%. The 5 and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 94 and 89%, respectively with cause-sepecific survival being 94% at 5 and 10 years. Two-thirds of the relapses were nodal and supradiaphragmatic. Twenty patients (83%) relapsed in the initially involved sites of disease and this was the sole site of recurrence in 11 (45%) of patients. In retrospect, it appeared that at least 12 recurrences could have been prevented by involved field radiotherapy. Review of detailed imaging data (available in 9 out of 11 patients with recurrences in initial sites of disease) showed that the relapses were always in the initially involved nodes. Conclusion: After chemotherapy alone in early stage HD most initial recurrences are nodal. Loco-regional recurrences are in the originally involved nodes. Based on limited data it appears that involved nodal RT is equivalent to involved field radiotherapy and may halve the risk of recurrence

  3. Salvage of relapse of patients with Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy and initially treated with radiotherapy alone. A report from the international database on Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Horwich, A.; Ashley, S.

    1994-01-01

    patients in the International Database on Hodgkin's Disease who were initially in clinical Stages I or II, who were staged with laparotomy, and who relapsed after initial treatment with irradiation alone. Factors analyzed for outcome after first relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology......PURPOSE: To analyze presentation variables that might indicate a high or low likelihood of success of the treatment of patients relapsing after initial radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease in clinical Stages I or II who were staged with laparotomy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data were analyzed on 681...

  4. Stage II Seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagerman, R.H.; Kotlove, D.J.; Regine, W.; Chung, C.T.; King, G.A.; Dalai, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1985, 32 patients with stage II (21 A,11 B) testicular seminoma were treated with postorchiectomy irradiation to the retroperitoneal and ipsilateral iliac nodes; 28 received elective mediastinal-supraclavicular irradiation. The median follow-up was 8 1/2 years; 29 patients were followed up for over 3 years and 24 for over 5 years. Twenty-eight patients remain alive and well and four have die, two of a second primary cancer. Two patients developed recurrent seminoma in the mediastinum; these patients showed a variant lymphangiographic pattern. Both remain well after further irradiation or irradiation plus chemotherapy. A third patient developed nonseminomatous ''recurrence'' in the radiation field and is well after chemotherapy

  5. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

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    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer.

  6. The Outcome of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Cancer (T3 or N1 Disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Chun, Misun; Kim, Myung Wook; Kim, Wook Hwan; Kang, Seok Yun; Kang, Seung Hee; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Juno

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the outcome of postoperative radiation therapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for curatively resected stage II pancreatic cancer with T3 or N1 disease. Materials and Methods: Between January 1996 and December 2005, twenty-eight patients completed adjuvant radiation therapy at Ajou University Hospital. The patients had either pathologic T3 stage or N1 stage. The radiation target volume encompassed the initial tumor bed identified preoperatively, resection margin area and celiac nodal area. In the case of N1 patients, the radiation field extended to the lower margin of the L3 vertebra for covering both para-aortic lymph nodes bearing area. The median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Thirteen patients (46%) showed loco-regional recurrences. The celiac axis nodal area was the most frequent site (4 patients). Five patients showed both loco-regional recurrence and a distant metastasis. Patients with positive lymph nodes had a relatively high probability of a distant metastasis (57.1%). Patients that had a positive resection margin showed a relatively high local failure rate (57.1%). The median disease-free survival period of all patients was 6 months and the 1- and 2-year disease free survival rates were 27.4% and 8.2%, respectively. The median overall survival period was 9 months. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 31.6% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusion: The pancreatic cancer patients with stage II had a high risk of local failure and a high risk of a distant metastasis. We suggest the concurrent use of an effective radiation-sensitizing chemotherapeutic drug and adjuvant chemotherapy after postoperative radiation therapy for the treatment of patients with stage II pancreatic cancer

  7. The influence of pelvic lymph node disease on survival for stage I and II carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, C.J.; Toplis, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two hundred and eighteen patients were referred to the Oxford Radiotherapy Department in the 5 years 1973-77 with stages I and II tumours of the uterine cervix. One hundred and eighty-one underwent pre-operative intracavitary radiotherapy followed by Wertheim hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Twenty-three per cent of these patients had metastatic disease in pelvic lymph nodes. Fifty-five per cent of patients with positive pelvic nodes died of carcinoma of the cervix compared with 9% of negative node cases. Prognostic factors are discussed and management of carcinoma of the cervix reviewed. (author)

  8. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the uterus and fallopian tube. The second panel (stage IIB) shows cancer inside both ovaries that has spread to the colon. The third ...

  9. Survival analysis of patients with clinical stages I or II Hodgkin's disease who have relapsed after initial treatment with radiotherapy alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwich, A.; Specht, L.; Ashley, S.

    1997-01-01

    relapse included initial stage, age, sex, histology, number of involved areas, mediastinal involvement, E-lesions, B-symptoms, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin and haemoglobin. As well as presentation variables, we analysed the disease-free interval after initial......To aid treatment choice in early stage of Hodgkin's disease, we analysed patients registered in the IDHD Database with clinical stages I or II Hodgkin's disease who were not staged with laparotomy and whose initial treatment was with radiotherapy alone. The factors analysed for outcome after first...... radiotherapy and the extent of disease at relapse. A total of 1364 patients with clinical stage I or II Hodgkin's disease were treated with initial radiotherapy, of whom 473 relapsed. The probability of survival 10 years after relapse was 63%. For cause-specific survival (CSS), both multivariate and univariate...

  10. [Combination of NAFLD Fibrosis Score and liver stiffness measurement for identification of moderate fibrosis stages (II & III) in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolz, Andreas; Wehmeyer, Malte; Diedrich, Tom; Piecha, Felix; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Kluwe, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver disease. Currently, therapeutic options for NAFLD patients are limited, but new pharmacologic agents are being investigated in the course of clinical trials. Because most of these studies are focusing on patients with fibrosis stages II and III (according to Kleiner), non-invasive identification of patients with intermediate fibrosis stages (II and III) is of increasing interest. Evaluation of NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for prediction of fibrosis stages II/III. Patients with histologically confirmed NAFLD diagnosis were included in the study. All patients underwent a clinical and laboratory examination as well as a LSM prior to liver biopsy. Predictive value of NFS and LSM with respect to identification of fibrosis stages II/III was assessed. 134 NAFLD patients were included and analyzed. Median age was 53 (IQR 36 - 60) years, 55 patients (41 %) were female. 82 % of our patients were overweight/obese with typical aspects of metabolic syndrome. 84 patients (66 %) had liver fibrosis, 42 (50 %) advanced fibrosis. LSM and NFS correlated with fibrosis stage (r = 0.696 and r = 0.685, respectively; p stages II/III. If both criteria were met, probability of fibrosis stage II/III was 61 %. If none of the two criteria was met, chance for fibrosis stage II/III was only 6 % (negative predictive value 94 %). Combination of LSM and NFS enables identification of patients with significant probability of fibrosis stage II/III. Accordingly, these tests, especially in combination, may be a suitable screening tool for fibrosis stages II/III in NAFLD. The use of these non-invasive methods might also help to avoid unnecessary biopsies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Prognostic implications of occult nodal tumour cells in stage I and II colon cancer: The correlation between micrometastasis and disease recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloothaak, D. A. M.; van der Linden, R. L. A.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Bemelman, W. A.; Lips, D. J.; van der Linden, J. C.; Doornewaard, H.; Tanis, P. J.; Bosscha, K.; van der Zaag, E. S.; Buskens, C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Occult nodal tumour cells should be categorised as micrometastasis (MMs) and isolated tumour cells (ITCs). A recent meta-analysis demonstrated that MMs, but not ITCs, are prognostic for disease recurrence in patients with stage I/II colon cancer. The objective of this retrospective multicenter study

  12. Hodgkin's disease: correlation of clinical characteristics with probabilities for negative lymphangiogram vs. negative laparotomy findings in patients with stage I supradiaphragmatic presentations vs. those in patients with stage II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Lillian M.; Mirza, Nadeem Q.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Davis, Barry R.; Ha, Chul S.; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Cabanillas, Fernando; McLaughlin, Peter; Butler, James J.; North, Luceil B.; Martin, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: At a time both when late complications and second malignancies have become a growing concern and when staging laparotomy has been largely abandoned and comparative studies for staging Hodgkin's disease by state of the art computed tomography (CT) vs. lymphangiography have revealed minimal differences in results for these procedures, our purpose for undertaking this study was twofold. Our initial reason was to determine and compare probabilities for negative abdominal findings for patients with Stage I presentations with those for patients with Stage II as determined by lymphangiography and subsequently by laparotomy for those patients who had negative lymphangiograms. Our second reason, being an extension of the first, was to create a resource that can be used in conjunction with other information for arriving at appropriate treatment decisions including giving either more or particularly less than standard institutional therapy and especially with respect to the abdomen. Methods and Materials: Data on 714 patients with prelymphangiogram Stage I-II upper torso presentations of Hodgkin's disease were entered prospectively in our database between 1968 and 1987. Twenty-eight with lymphocyte predominant disease, who had both negative lymphangiogram and negative laparotomy findings and 17 with questionable diagnoses of lymphocyte-depleted or unclassified disease were excluded from subsequent analyses of 669 patients with nodular sclerosis (NS) and mixed cellularity (MC) diagnoses. Results: Stage I: in final logistic models, negative lymphangiogram findings were associated strongly with a combination of no constitutional symptoms and nodular sclerosis histology, whereas negative laparotomy findings correlated strongly with a combination of no constitutional symptoms and female sex. Predicted probabilities depended on the ratios of favorable to unfavorable characteristics. Stage II: in final logistic models, negative lymphangiogram findings were associated

  13. High levels of microRNA-21 in the stroma of colorectal cancers predict short disease-free survival in stage II colon cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jørgensen, Stine; Fog, Jacob Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all patients with stage II colorectal cancer will experience recurrent disease and subsequently die within 5 years. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is upregulated in several cancer types and has been associated with survival in colon cancer. In the present study we developed a robust...... in situ hybridization assay using high-affinity Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes that specifically detect miR-21 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. The expression of miR-21 was analyzed by in situ hybridization on 130 stage II colon and 67 stage II rectal cancer specimens. The mi...... relative to the nuclear density (TBR) obtained using a red nuclear stain. High TBR (and TB) estimates of miR-21 expression correlated significantly with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004, HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.06-1.55) in the stage II colon cancer patient group, whereas no significant correlation...

  14. Mapping the extent of disease by multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and sentinel node evaluation in stage I and II cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaram S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: (1 To map the extent of disease in women with stage I and II carcinoma cervix by multislice spiral computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sentinel nodes. (2 To assess accuracy of each modality individually and in conjunction with FIGO clinical staging. Design and Setting: Prospective, single-blind study. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radiodiagnosis, and Pathology, UCMS and GTBH and Division of Radiological Imaging and Bioinformatics, INMAS, Delhi. Material and Method: The study was conducted on 25 women with cervical cancer FIGO stage I and II. Each woman underwent clinical staging, multislice spiral CT and MRI which was compared to the gold-standard histopathology/cytology. The overall accuracy of each modality and improvement of clinical staging by CT/MRI were noted. Sentinel nodes were evaluated by intracervical Patent Blue V dye injection. Statistical Analysis: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated by 2Χ2 contingency tables. Results: The accuracy of staging by FIGO, CT and MRI was 68%, 52% and 80%, respectively. MRI and CT improved the overall accuracy of FIGO staging to 96% and 80%, respectively. Sentinel nodes were identified in 89% of patients with 91% accuracy. Conclusion: MRI emerges as the most valuable stand-alone modality improving accuracy of FIGO staging to 96%. Sentinel lymph-node evaluation appears promising in evaluating spread beyond cervix.

  15. Mantle irradiation alone for pathologic stage I and II Hodgkin's disease: long-term follow-up and patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhongxing; Ha, Chul S.; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Hagemeister, Frederick; Cabanillas, Fernando; Hess, Mark; Tucker, Susan; Cox, James D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a retrospective study to determine the long-term outcome, patterns of failure, and prognostic factors for patients with pathologic Stage I or II Hodgkin's disease (HD) who were treated with mantle irradiation alone. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 145 patients with pathologic Stage I or II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle irradiation alone between June 1967 and June 1991 were reviewed. Patterns of failure, overall survival (OS) rate, and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were determined. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify adverse prognostic factors for OS and PFS. The number of adverse prognostic factors per patient was counted, and a prognostic score was assigned to each patient. The log-rank test was used to compare the OS or PFS rates among patients with prognostic scores 0, 1, and 2. Results: The median patient age was 27 years (range 10-66), with almost even male to female distribution. Every patient had splenectomy and negative laparotomy (LAP). Fifty-one patients had Stage I disease (IA-49, IB-2) and 94 Stage II (IIA-89, IIB-5). The histologic subtypes were nodular sclerosing in 110, mixed cellularity in 28, lymphocyte predominance in 5, lymphocyte depleted in 1, and unclassified in 1. Twelve patients with Stage II disease had ≥ 3 sites of nodal involvement. Fifty-four patients had a prognostic score of 0, 70 of 1, and 21 of 2. The median follow-up time for the 109 surviving patients was 146 months (range 25-381). The 10- and 20-year actuarial OS rates for the whole group were 87.6% and 65.3%, respectively. The corresponding actuarial PFS rates were 75.3% and 74.2%, respectively. Thirty-six patients (9 Stage I, 27 Stage II) had relapses in a total of 41 sites. Failures by histology were 29 patients with nodular sclerosing, 6 with mixed cellularity, and 1 with lymphocyte predominance. Failures by sites were: trans-diaphragmatic, 22 (para-aortic nodes, 15; as the only

  16. End-stage kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stage; Kidney failure - end stage; ESRD; ESKD Images Kidney anatomy References Fogarty DG, Taal MW. A stepped care approach to the management of chronic kidney disease. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  17. Contemporary management of stage I and II seminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Peter; Warde, Padraig

    2013-10-01

    Seminoma represents about 60 % of all testicular germ cell tumors. At presentation about 80 % of patients have stage I and about 15 % have stage II disease. The last three decades have seen a substantial change in the philosophy of management with the success of surveillance as a strategy to minimize unnecessary treatment, recognition of the late effects of radiation therapy, and the success of cisplatin-based chemotherapy as curative treatment either in the first-line or salvage setting. Overall, in stage I disease where 80-85 % are cured with orchiectomy alone, efforts now are directed at reducing the burden of the disease and its diagnosis on patients with increasing utilization of surveillance and decreased employment of adjuvant therapy. For stage II disease, balancing the relative toxicities of radiation and chemotherapy while avoiding the use of multimodality therapy due to the additive long-term toxicity has become the priority.

  18. Emotional face recognition deficits and medication effects in pre-manifest through stage-II Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuschagne, Izelle; Jones, Rebecca; Callaghan, Jenny; Whitehead, Daisy; Dumas, Eve M; Say, Miranda J; Hart, Ellen P; Justo, Damian; Coleman, Allison; Dar Santos, Rachelle C; Frost, Chris; Craufurd, David; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Stout, Julie C

    2013-05-15

    Facial emotion recognition impairments have been reported in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the nature of the impairments across the spectrum of HD remains unclear. We report on emotion recognition data from 344 participants comprising premanifest HD (PreHD) and early HD patients, and controls. In a test of recognition of facial emotions, we examined responses to six basic emotional expressions and neutral expressions. In addition, and within the early HD sample, we tested for differences on emotion recognition performance between those 'on' vs. 'off' neuroleptic or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications. The PreHD groups showed significant (precognition, compared to controls, on fearful, angry and surprised faces; whereas the early HD groups were significantly impaired across all emotions including neutral expressions. In early HD, neuroleptic use was associated with worse facial emotion recognition, whereas SSRI use was associated with better facial emotion recognition. The findings suggest that emotion recognition impairments exist across the HD spectrum, but are relatively more widespread in manifest HD than in the premanifest period. Commonly prescribed medications to treat HD-related symptoms also appear to affect emotion recognition. These findings have important implications for interpersonal communication and medication usage in HD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer: A Clinical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarkatt, Joseph; Joseph, Joe; Kurniali, Peter C; Al-Janadi, Anas; Hrinczenko, Borys

    2017-04-01

    The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy can be challenging. Although the benefit of treatment is clear in most patients with stage III disease, the decision to provide chemotherapy after surgical resection in stage II disease must be made on an individual basis. Several trials have demonstrated the small but absolute benefits of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer for disease-free survival and overall survival. In an attempt to better understand the role of chemotherapy, several studies were performed that identified high-risk characteristics that can be used prognostically and predictively to aid in the clinical decision making process. ASCO, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the European Society of Medical Oncology have published guidelines describing these high-risk characteristics. Since then, several other molecular markers have emerged that may offer more information on a given patient's risk for recurrence. The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer must be made on an individual basis, considering the risks and benefits of treatment. In this short review, we will present the available evidence and offer possible directions for future study.

  20. Evaluation of lymph node numbers for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumpers Harvey L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evaluation of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs is recommended as the minimum number of nodes required for accurate staging of colon cancer patients, there is disagreement on what constitutes an adequate identification of such LNs. Methods To evaluate the minimum number of LNs for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer, 490 patients were categorized into groups based on 1-6, 7-11, 12-19, and ≥ 20 LNs collected. Results For patients with Stage II or III disease, examination of 12 LNs was not significantly associated with recurrence or mortality. For Stage II (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91, but not for Stage III patients (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 0.54-4.64, examination of ≥20 LNs was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence within 2 years. However, examination of ≥20 LNs had a 55% (Stage II, HR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87 and a 31% (Stage III, HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.38-1.26 decreased risk of mortality, respectively. For each six additional LNs examined from Stage III patients, there was a 19% increased probability of finding a positive LN (parameter estimate = 0.18510, p Conclusions Thus, the 12 LN cut-off point cannot be supported as requisite in determining adequate staging of colon cancer based on current data. However, a minimum of 6 LNs should be examined for adequate staging of Stage II and III colon cancer patients.

  1. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Sanoff, Hanna K.; Stitzenberg, Karyn B.; Baron, John A.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age < 50) populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics...

  2. Long term results of mantle irradiation(MRT) alone in 261 patients with clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, A.; Byram, D.; Chao, M.; Corry, J.; Davis, S.; Kiffer, J.; Laidlaw, C.; Quong, G.; Ryan, G.; Liew, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report our results using MRT for clinical stage I-II HD and assess the value of published prognostic criteria in our study population. Pts and Methods: Between 1969 and 1994, 261 pts were treated with MRT alone for clinical stage I-II supradiaphragmatic HD. Pt characteristics: median age-30; M-54%/F-46%; stage IA-52%, IB-2%, IIA-37%, IIB-8%; histology LP-21%, NS-51%, MC-23%, other 5%; median ESR 18. CT abdomen and LAG were performed in 61% and 60% respectively. No pt had prior staging laparotomy. No pt received infradiaphragmatic RT. Central axis dose was 32 Gy-36 Gy. Univariate analysis was performed for prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival(OS). Outcome was assessed in favourable subsets as defined by: EORTC (v. favourable: CSIA, LP or NS histology, age < 40, female, no bulk, ESR < 50; favourable: CSI-II, age < 50, < 4 sites, no bulky mediastinal mass, ESR < 50 with no B symptoms or ESR < 30 with B symptoms); Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) (IA-IIA, LP or NS histology, ESR < 40, age < 50, no large mediastinal mass, no E lesion). Results: 261 pts completed RT, with 5% requiring treatment interruption for toxicity. Significant factors (P<0.05) for PFS were stage, performance status, histology, B symptoms, number of sites, ESR and bulk. Significant factors (P<0.05) for OS were age, performance status, histology and B symptoms. (The results of a multivariate analysis will be presented.) Results in our study population using published prognostic criteria (in %): Thirty-six percent progressed following RT: 8% in-field; 24% out of field only (including 10% in the paraaortic/splenic region alone); 4% marginal; Fifty-seven percent of relapsed pts remain progression free after subsequent salvage treatment. Two cases of acute leukaemia, 8 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 14 (non-skin) carcinomas occurred, of which 11 were in-field. Seventy pts have died. The cause was: HD 41%; other malignancy 20%; cardiovascular 17%; other 15

  3. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Braojos, Ines; Diaz Gestoso, Yadira; Franco Odio, Sonia; Samuel Gonzalez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  5. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stages I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of Waldeyer's ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Jingu, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Akasi, Yuko; Masuda, Koji; Komiyama, Sotaro; Kikuchi, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-four patients with stages I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) involving Waldeyer's ring treated between 1970 and 1987 were reviewed. Patients with stage II NHL were subdivided into stage II1 (limited type) and stage II2 (advanced type) from the state of neck nodes. Stage II1 was defined as involvement of unilateral cervical nodes less than 4 cm in diameter as well as Waldeyer's ring involvement. Other stage II cases were classified as stage II2. All 17 patients with stage I HNL were treated with radiation therapy alone. Their diseases were well controlled, and none of them died of causes related to the lymphoma. Among 14 patients with stage II1 NHL, the 5-year survival rate for the 9 patients treated with radiation therapy alone was 87.5%. Until 1982, 19 of 21 patients with stage II2 NHL treated with radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy (VEMP or COPP) died within 5 years mainly of disseminated diseases. Since 1983, CHOP had been used as the main treatment as well as radiotherapy for the 12 stage II2 NHL patients. So far, only 3 of them relapsed and 2 of them died of causes related to the lymphoma. Only 1 of these 12 patients was T-cell lymphoma compared to 7 of 9 stage II2 patients before 1982. This suggests that patients with stage I and those with limited stage II can be safely treated with radiotherapy. Also aggressive chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy should be used for patients with advanced stage II HNL involving Waldeyer's ring. (author)

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage II and III rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Song Yongwen; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao; Qian Tunan; Li Yexiong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy, compared with surgery alone for rectal cancer. Methods: From January 1994 to October 1997, 192 patients with stage II or III rectal cancer were treated by radical resection and postoperative radiotherapy (Group S + R) and 51 patients with the same stage lesions underwent surgery alone (Group S). The median dose of radiation was 50(32-62) Gy. Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank test were used for analysis. Results: The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 60.3% and 58.3%, respectively. The overall 5-year survival rate was 59.4% in Group S + R and 64.7% in Group S, and the 5-year disease-free survival rates were 57.0% and 66.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences between either group (P=0.601 and P=0.424). The disease-free survival was not significantly prolonged in Group S + R as compared with that of Group S. The local recurrence rate was evidently reduced in Group S + R (15.8% v 26.8%, P=0.043). Conclusion: Local recurrence is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rectal cancer. Postoperative radiotherapy, though reduces the incidence of local recurrence, does not improve the survival in the treatment of stage II and III diseases

  7. Detection of antibodies to both M. leprae PGL-I and MMP-II to recognize leprosy patients at an early stage of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Liu, Weijing; Jin, Yali; Yu, Meiwen; Jiang, Haiqin; Tamura, Toshiki; Maeda, Yumi; Makino, Masahiko

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies to phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I and major membrane protein (MMP)-II were evaluated for serodiagnosis of leprosy in Southwest China, and the role in predicting the occurrence of the disease in household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy was examined. Using PGL-I (natural disaccharide-octyl-bovine serum albumin) antigen-based diagnosis (IgM antibodies), we could detect 94.9% of multibacillary (MB) leprosy and 38.9% paucibacillary (PB) leprosy patients, whereas using MMP-II (IgG antibody), 88.1% of MB and 61.1% of PB patients were positive. By combining the 2 tests and considering either test positive as positive, 100% of MB patients and 72.2% of PB patients were found to test positive. Of the HHCs of leprosy, 28.3% and 30% had positive levels of PGL-I and MMP-II Abs, respectively. Seven out of 21 HHCs, who had high Ab titer to either antigen, developed leprosy during the follow-up period of 3 years. These data suggest that the measurement of both anti-PGL-I as well as anti-MMP-II antibodies could facilitate early detection of leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast carcinoma conservative treatment. Stages I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    From 1981 to 1988, 265 patients with breast cancer stages I and II (UICC-1987), were evaluated after conservative treatment with quadrantectomy plus axillectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. After surgical treatment, the patients were submitted to radiation therapy in the breast. One hundred and fifty six (58,8%) patients were submitted to adjuvant chemotherapy. The median clinical follow-up period was 42.8 months with a minimum of 24 and a maximum of 99 months. Six (2,3%) patients presented local recurrence and 48 (18,1%) presented distant metastasis. After five years the total survival rate was 89,7% and the disease free survival rate was 75% in the same period. The study did not show significant differences among the clinical stages classified after surgery and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not influence the results of the many stages. (author). 194 refs, 33 figs, 6 tabs

  9. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material...... were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  10. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This is the only occasion on which all four of ESA's Cluster II spacecraft will be on display together in Europe. Four Spacecraft, One Mission The unique event takes place near the end of the lengthy assembly and test programme, during which each individual spacecraft is being assembled in sequence, one after the other. Two have already completed their assembly and systems testing and are about to be stored in special containers at IABG prior to shipment to the Baikonur launch site in Kazakhstan next spring. In the case of the other two, flight models 5 and 8, installation of the science payloads has finished, but their exhaustive series of environmental tests at IABG have yet to begin. Following delivery to the launch site next April, the satellites will be launched in pairs in June and July 2000. Two Soyuz rockets, each with a newly designed Fregat upper stage, are being provided by the Russian-French Starsem company. This will be the first time ESA satellites have been launched from the former Soviet Union. Cluster II is a replacement for the original Cluster mission, which was lost during the maiden launch of Ariane 5 in June 1996. ESA, given the mission's importance in its overall strategy in the area of the Sun-Earth connection, decided to rebuild this unique project. ESA member states supported that proposal. On 3 April 1997, the Agency's Science Programme Committee agreed. Cluster II was born. European Teamwork Scientific institutions and industrial enterprises in almost all the 14 ESA member states and the United States are taking part in the Cluster II project. Construction of the eight Cluster / Cluster II spacecraft has been a major undertaking for European industry. Built into each 1200 kg satellite are six propellant tanks, two pressure tanks, eight thrusters, 80 metres of pipework, about 5 km of wiring, 380 connectors and more than 14 000 electrical contacts. All the spacecraft were assembled in the giant clean room at the Friedrichshafen plant of

  11. Evaluation of Oral Hygiene in Patients with Generalized Periodontitis of II Degree and Stage II Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Vivcharenko

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions. The level of oral hygiene in patients of both groups was low due to incorrect selection of personal hygiene products or their untimely replacement. In patients with generalized periodontitis of II degree and stage II hypertension, the level of oral hygiene was lower than in somatically healthy persons: the worse status of oral cavity hygiene – the more pronounced changes in the periodontal tissues. We can suppose that high blood pressure affects the status of the oral cavity, creates a higher risk and exacerbates the periodontal diseases.

  12. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C. Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC in younger (age < 50 populations, we examined demographic, clinicopathologic, and socioeconomic characteristics and treatment receipt in a population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute’s Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 (n=6,862. Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age < 50 and older (age 50–69, age ≥ 70 CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13% and Hispanic (15% than patients aged 50–69 years (11% and 10%, resp. and ≥70 years (7% each. A larger proportion of young white (41% and Hispanic (33% patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%. The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%. Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  13. Patterns of Sociodemographic and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Stages II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients by Age: Examining Potential Mechanisms of Young-Onset Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Sanoff, Hanna K; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Baron, John A; Lund, Jennifer L; Sandler, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. As a first step toward understanding the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in younger (age stages II and III CRC. Methods. Patients were sampled from the National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies in 1990/91, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 ( n = 6, 862). Tumor characteristics and treatment data were obtained through medical record review and physician verification. We compared sociodemographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment patterns of younger (age age 50-69, age ≥ 70) CRC patients. Results. Younger patients were more likely to be black (13%) and Hispanic (15%) than patients aged 50-69 years (11% and 10%, resp.) and ≥70 years (7% each). A larger proportion of young white (41%) and Hispanic (33%) patients had rectal tumors, whereas tumors in the right colon were the most common in young black patients (39%). The majority of younger patients received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although receipt of microsatellite instability testing was suboptimal (27%). Conclusion. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with young-onset CRC differ considerably by race/ethnicity, with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic patients diagnosed at the age of < 50 years.

  14. Stages of Huntington's Disease (HD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight: Dr. Rocio Gomez-Pastor Advocacy Huntington’s Disease Parity Act Affordable Care Act Social Security Administration Research ( ... affected gene is 50%. Inheritance is independent of gender. Genetic Testing & Family Planning People at-risk for ...

  15. Post orchiectomy management in stage II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, S.; Dixit, S.; Ramana Murthy, R.; Neema, J.P.; Vyas, R.K.; Baboo, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty eight patients with stage II A and twenty patients with stage II B testicular seminoma were treated at this institute between January 1982 and December 1988. The three year crude survival observed in this retrospective analysis was 82% and 75% respectively. Post orchiectomy infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy was the mainstay of the treatment. In stage II A, 4 patients were administered adjuvant chemotherapy as well. Prophylactic mediastinal irradiation (PMI) was not employed as a routine in this subgroup. Eight patients (28%) relapsed (mediastinal nodes - 4, pulmonary - 3, scrotal - 1). In stage II B, twelve patients were treated with primary abdominal radiotherapy and of them 4 were delivered PMI as well. Induction chemotherapy was administered in remaining 8 patients. Seven patients (35%) relapsed (pulmonary-4, mediastinal nodes-3). Mediastinal recurrence was noted only in those who were treated with abdominal radiotherapy alone. Though salvage chemotherapy proved successful in 5 of the seven patients (70%) with nodal relapse, none of the patients with extranodal relapse responded to subsequent chemotherapy. For stage II A abdominal radiotherapy alone is recommended and for stage II B induction chemotherapy is advised keeping radiotherapy reserved for residual mass. PMI as a routine in stage II testicular seminoma is not advocated as no survival benefit is observed. (author) 15 refs., 6 tabs

  16. Risk of recurrence in patients with colon cancer stage II and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bockelman, C.; Engelmann, Bodil E.; Kaprio, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adjuvant chemotherapy is established routine therapy for colon cancer (CC) patients with radically resected stage III and 'high-risk' stage II disease. The decision on recommending adjuvant chemotherapy, however, is based on data from older patient cohorts not reflecting improvements...

  17. [Value of transcutaneous staged dynamic oximetry of stage II arteritis of the leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grard, C; Desmytterre, J; Vinckier, L; Hatron, P Y; Roux, J P; Warembourg, H; Devulder, B

    1990-03-01

    The clinical and prognostic value of transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurements at rest has been established in Leriche Stage III and IV occlusive peripheral arterial disease but is controversial in Stage II because there is an overlap of transcutaneous pO2 (Tc pO2) values with those of normal subjects. The authors report the results of Tc pO2 measurements during exercise testing in a group of patients with Stage II occlusive arterial disease of the lower limbs. Seventy-eight patients with an average age of 53 years (range 40 to 65 years) whose claudication perimeter and site of pain had been carefully assessed and who had also recently undergone Doppler arterial examination and arteriography and 35 control subjects with an average age of 54 years (range 45 to 70 years) were studied. The Tc pO2 was continuously measured with a multimodular Kontron Supermon at 4 different sites simultaneously: precordium (reference probe), thigh, calf and foot in the dorsal recumbent position after 30 minutes rest, during a standardised exercise stress test at 50 watts and during the recovery phase. The results were expressed as ratio of tissue oxygenation (RTO): thigh, calf or foot Tc pO2/precordial Tc pO2 X 100 in order to take into account the patients cardiorespiratory status and adaptation to exercise. The RTO in normal subjects remained at the upper limits of the resting value throughout exercise and then returned slowly to basal values during the recovery phase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Two technicians apply insulation to S-II second stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Two technicians apply insulation to the outer surface of the S-II second stage booster for the Saturn V moon rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  19. Omicron space habitat—research stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doule, Ondřej; Šálený, Vratislav; Hérin, Benoît; Rousek, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The design presented in this paper is in response to the revolution in private space activities, the increasing public interest in commercial flights to space and the utilization of structures such as space hotels or private orbital habitats. The baseline for the Omicron design concept is the Russian Salyut derived space station module. Salyut was the first space station to orbit the Earth. Its unique design and technical features were what made the development of space stations Salyut 1-7, MIR and the International Space Station (ISS) Zwezda service module possible. Due to its versatility and the reliable operating launch vehicle Proton, this space module series has the potential to be adapted for space hotel development. This paper proposes a conceptual design of the space habitat called Omicron, with particular focus on interior design for the microgravity environment. The Omicron concepts address the needs of space tourism with a strong emphasis on the safety and comfort of the spaceflight participants. The Omicron habitat supports three inhabitants in nominal conditions (e.g., two passengers and one astronaut). The habitat provides a flexible interior, facilities and spaces dynamically transforming in order to accommodate various types of activities, which will be performed in an organically formed interior supporting spatial orientation and movement in microgravity. The future development potential of Omicron is also considered. The baseline version is composed solely of one rigid module with an inverted cupola for observations. An alternative version offers more space using an inflatable structure. Finally, a combination of multiple Omicron modules enables the creation of a larger orbital habitat. The Omicron's subsystems support a few days visit by trained passengers. The transport to the habitat would be provided e.g., by the Soyuz TMA spacecraft carried by the Soyuz launch vehicle in the early stage of Omicron's development, before a fully reusable

  20. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-26

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  2. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hnakayam@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Satoh, Hiroaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kurishima, Koichi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishikawa, Shigemi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokuuye, Koichi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  3. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non–small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4–85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1–91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non–small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  4. Excisional biopsy, auxillary node dissection and definitive radiotherapy for Stages I and II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.F.; Pajak, T.F.; Solin, L.J.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    From 1977 to 1982, 189 patients with clinical Stage I and II breast cancer underwent excisional biopsy and auxillary node dissection followed by definitive radiotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania. One hundred and nine patients had T 1 lesions and 80 had T 2 lesions. Histologically negative nodes were found in 136 patients (72%) and histologically positive nodes in 53 patients. Median follow-up from the completion of radiotherapy was 26 months. The four year actuarial disease free survival is 82% for pathologic Stage I and 70% for pathologic Stage II. Cosmesis was judged to be good to excellent in 90% and fair in 9%. Complications included arm edema (7%), symptomatic pneumonitis (1%), rib fractures (1%), pericarditis (1%) and pleural effusion (1%). Primary radiotherapy for Stages I and II breast cancer produces a local-regional control rate of 95% and good to excellent cosmesis in 90% of the patients. While these results are preliminary, they compare favorably with other reported series

  5. Hodgkin's disease part 1: pathology, staging, and management of early stage disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, Peter; Yahalom, Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 25 years there have been dramatic improvements in our understanding of the epidemiology, biology, natural history, and treatment of Hodgkins disease. Hodgkin's disease is one of the few cancers where both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have provided dramatic improvements in cure of this once uniformly fatal disease. Part 1 of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease will include a review of: 1) New Findings in epidemiology, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology of the Reed-Sternberg cell including association with Epstein-Barr virus; 2) Review of pathology including discussions of NS 1 vs NS2, and nodular LP subclassifications; 3) Recommendations for staging including the role of staging laparotomy in Hodgkin's disease; 4) Standard techniques for commonly used radiation therapy fields for Hodgkin's disease and 5) Treatment of early stage Hodgkin's disease including an overview on recent and current clinical trials

  6. Thrombocytosis portends adverse prognostic significance in patients with stage II colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Tianhua; Krzystanek, Marcin; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre

    2014-01-01

    of the 78 patients (6.4%) with stage II cancer showed thrombocytosis, and four of these patients showed early recurrence and/or metastatic disease, resulting in shortened survival (they died within one year after surgery). The incidence of thrombocytosis increased to 12.2% and 20.6%, respectively...

  7. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  8. Surgical treatment of advanced stage Freiberg disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Özkul

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Freiberg disesase is an avascular necrosis of the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal head and which kind of surgical option to be used is controversial in symptomatic patients. In this study the results of the advanced stage Freiberg’s disease patients, who were treated with surgery were evaluated. Methods: 12 patients (8 female, 4 male whose pain could not be solved with conservative method and underwent surgery (6 debridement, 3 osteotomy, 3 excision of the metatarsal head were included in this study. Themean age of the patients 19.1 (range 13- 31 and the mean follow-up 30.8(range 25-94 months. According to the Smillie classification 3 patients had type 5, 8 patients had type 4 and 1 patient had type 3 osteonecrosis. The results of the patients were evaluated according to Lesser Metatarsophalangeal-Interphalangeal Scale. Results: According to Lesser MetatarsophalangealInterphalangeal Scale 3 patients (%25 had excellent, 6 patients (%50 had good and 3 patients had poor results were obtained. 2 of 3 patients with poor results were type 5, and 1 patient was type 4 and all three patients underwent joint debridement. Conclusion:The method of surgical treatment of Freiberg disease determined according to the stage of the disease. Debridement alone in the treatment of patients with late stage is not enough, it should be combined with other methods.

  9. Implementation of the II. Stage decommissioning of A1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficher, T.

    2015-01-01

    Presentation is focused on the implementation of the II. stage decommissioning of A1 NPP. Introductory part focuses on brief characteristics of the power plant with a history of operation, basic technical parameters and actions that were made after operation. The next section describes the basic schedule for decommissioning, structure of management and implementation of the II. stage decommissioning of the A1 NPP and objectives of the individual stages. The last and largest part of the presentation is devoted to detailed description of the II. stage decommissioning of the A1 NPP, its individual tasks and verbal and visual description of the activities that were performed. Presented is decommissioning of the technology and construction of external objects NPP A1 including storage tanks for liquid RAW, next are presented activities carried out in the Main Production Unit - decommissioning of non-operating technologies in various places/rooms, management of waste arising from these activities, treatment of case of A1 long-term spent fuel storage and long-term spent fuel storage. The subsequent section is devoted to the management and handling of contaminated soil, concrete and construction waste, including management of VLLW. (authors)

  10. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Meningococcal disease to Pertussis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. West Nile virus disease - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  16. Brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Fujita, Minoru; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ito, Katsuhide

    2003-01-01

    In treatment choices of stage II (T2N0M0) tongue cancer, brachytherapy is less invasive and superior in function preservation, therefore its role is more important in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate treatment results and morbidity of brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. Between 1980 and 2001, 198 patients with stage II tongue cancer were treated with brachytherapy at Hiroshima University Hospital. Patient ages ranged from 21 to 89 years old (median: 62 years old). Patients were divided into three groups as follows: 119 patients younger than 65 years old (Non-Elderly group), 53 patients between 65 and 75 years old (Junior Elderly group), and 26 patients 75 years or older (Senior Elderly group). Radiotherapy was performed in 101 patients with brachytherapy alone, and in 97 patients with brachytherapy and external radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was also performed in 77 patients. Follow-up period ranged from 4 to 243 months (median: 55 months). The 5-year local control rate was 85% in the Non-Elderly group, 85% in the Junior Elderly group and 81% in the Senior Elderly group. There was no significant difference among these groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 85%, 81% and 70% respectively. The Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate than the other two groups (p=0.03). There was also a tendency of higher incidence of neck metastasis and low salvage rate by neck dissection in the Senior Elderly group. Although the Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate, the local control rate was similar to those of the other two groups. Brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. (author)

  17. The European Dioxin Emission Inventory. Stage II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quass, U.; Fermann, M.; Broeker, G.

    2001-07-01

    For Stage II of the European Dioxin Project the following objectives were set: - Amendment of existing emission data collected for most relevant emission sources in order to reduce uncertainties of emission estimates. Collecting first emission data from countries not yet performing dioxin emission measurement programs. Extending the inventory of dioxin emissions to ambient air produced in Stage I by a complementary study on emissions to land and water. Extending the regional scope of data collection to countries in Central Europe. The report of Stage II of the European Dioxin Project is presented in 3 Volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview on the background and approach of different activities carried out and on the results obtained. These results are put into a broader view regarding the dioxin reduction measures in Europe leading to conclusions and recommendation for future work. Volume 2 of the report contains a detailed presentation of the sub-projects carried out. The chapters of Volume 2 are structured in a similar manner and start with a short summary in order to allow for a fast cross-reading. In the case of the desk-top studies an overview of the main results or statements is given. Regarding emission measurements details on the experimental set-up and the facilities being investigated are presented. Volume 3 contains a re-evaluation of the dioxin emission inventory presented for the most relevant sources types in the Stage I report. New data gathered from the projects of Stage II as well as from independent activities in the European countries are considered for a revision of the 1995 emission estimates. Additionally, based on current trends and activities the PCDD/F emissions for the years 2000 and 2005 are estimated. Finally, an attempt is made to evaluate the PCDD/F emission reduction rates which might be possible to achieve by the year 2005 compared to 1985. (orig.)

  18. Endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka: Correlation of pathology with clinical stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunge, S; Ratnatunga, N V I; Abeysekera, T D J; Wazil, A W M; Selvarajah, M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDU) is endemic among the rural farming communities in several localities in and around the North Central region of Sri Lanka. This is an interstitial type renal disease and typically has an insidious onset and slow progression. This study was conducted to identify the pathological features in the different clinical stages of CKDU. This is a retrospective study of 251 renal biopsies identified to have a primary interstitial disease from regions endemic for CKDU. Pathological features were assessed and graded in relation to the clinical stage. The mean age of those affected by endemic CKDU was 37.3 ± 12.5 years and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The predominant feature of stage I disease was mild and moderate interstitial fibrosis; most did not have interstitial inflammation. The typical stage II disease had moderate interstitial fibrosis with or without mild interstitial inflammation. Stage III disease had moderate and severe interstitial fibrosis, moderate interstitial inflammation, tubular atrophy and some glomerulosclerosis. Stage IV disease typically had severe interstitial fibrosis and inflammation, tubular atrophy and glomerulosclerosis. The mean age of patients with stage I disease (27 ± 10.8 years) was significantly lower than those of the other stages. About 79.2%, 55%, 49.1% and 50% in stage I, II, III and IV disease respectively were asymptomatic at the time of biopsy.

  19. Endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka: Correlation of pathology with clinical stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Wijetunge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDU is endemic among the rural farming communities in several localities in and around the North Central region of Sri Lanka. This is an interstitial type renal disease and typically has an insidious onset and slow progression. This study was conducted to identify the pathological features in the different clinical stages of CKDU. This is a retrospective study of 251 renal biopsies identified to have a primary interstitial disease from regions endemic for CKDU. Pathological features were assessed and graded in relation to the clinical stage. The mean age of those affected by endemic CKDU was 37.3 ± 12.5 years and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The predominant feature of stage I disease was mild and moderate interstitial fibrosis; most did not have interstitial inflammation. The typical stage II disease had moderate interstitial fibrosis with or without mild interstitial inflammation. Stage III disease had moderate and severe interstitial fibrosis, moderate interstitial inflammation, tubular atrophy and some glomerulosclerosis. Stage IV disease typically had severe interstitial fibrosis and inflammation, tubular atrophy and glomerulosclerosis. The mean age of patients with stage I disease (27 ± 10.8 years was significantly lower than those of the other stages. About 79.2%, 55%, 49.1% and 50% in stage I, II, III and IV disease respectively were asymptomatic at the time of biopsy.

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadaban, Leigh; Rauscher, Garth; Aklilu, Mebea; Villenes, Dana; Freels, Sally; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-11-15

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colon cancer remains to be elucidated and its use varies between patients and institutions. Currently, clinical guidelines suggest discussing adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with high-risk stage II disease in the absence of conclusive randomized controlled trial data. To further investigate this relationship, the objective of the current study was to determine whether an association exists between overall survival (OS) and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients stratified by age and pathological risk features. Data from the National Cancer Data Base were analyzed for demographics, tumor characteristics, management, and survival of patients with stage II colon cancer who were diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with survival information through 2011. Pearson Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression were used to analyze disease and demographic data. Survival analysis was performed with the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Propensity score weighting was used to match cohorts. Among 153,110 patients with stage II colon cancer, predictors of receiving chemotherapy included age clinically relevant OS was associated with the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy in all patient subgroups regardless of high-risk tumor pathologic features (poor or undifferentiated histology, colon cancer evaluated to date, improved OS was found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy regardless of treatment regimen, patient age, or high-risk pathologic risk features. Cancer 2016;122:3277-3287. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  1. Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-17

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Sarcoma

  2. Ezrin expression combined with MSI status in prognostication of stage II colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Slik

    Full Text Available Currently used factors predicting disease recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer patients are not optimal for risk stratification. Thus, new biomarkers are needed. In this study the applicability of ezrin protein expression together with MSI status and BRAF mutation status were tested in predicting disease outcome in stage II colorectal cancer. The study population consisted of 173 stage II colorectal cancer patients. Paraffin-embedded cancer tissue material from surgical specimens was used to construct tissue microarrays (TMAs with next-generation technique. The TMA-slides were subjected to following immunohistochemical stainings: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, ezrin and anti-BRAF V600E antibody. The staining results were correlated with clinicopathological variables and survival. In categorical analysis, high ezrin protein expression correlated with poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.038. In univariate analysis patients having microsatellite instabile / low ezrin expression tumors had a significantly longer disease-specific survival than patients having microsatellite stable / high ezrin expression tumors (p = 0.007. In multivariate survival analysis, the presence of BRAF mutation was associated to poor overall survival (p = 0.028, HR 3.29, 95% CI1.14-9.54. High ezrin protein expression in patients with microsatellite stable tumors was linked to poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.01, HR 5.68, 95% CI 1.53-21.12. Ezrin protein expression is a promising biomarker in estimating the outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. When combined with microsatellite status its ability in predicting disease outcome is further improved.

  3. Cognitive impairment is associated with Hoehn and Yahr stages in early, de novo Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Mattia; De Micco, Rosa; Trojano, Luigi; De Stefano, Manuela; Baiano, Chiara; Passaniti, Carla; De Mase, Antonio; Russo, Antonio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Tessitore, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between motor impairment and cognitive deterioration has long been described in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the study was to compare cognitive performance of de novo PD patients in relation to the motor impairment severity according to Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stages. Forty de novo PD patients at HY stage I and 40 patients at HY stage II completed a standardized neuropsychological battery. A multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare cognitive performance between HY groups. Odds ratios (ORs) were employed to explore the risk of cognitive impairment between HY stages. Finally, the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was estimated for patients in HY stage I and II. Patients at HY stage I obtained better scores on neuropsychological tests than patients at HY stage II (p = 0.001). Univariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between HY stages on Rey's auditory verbal learning test -immediate recall (p cognitive impairment were greater for HY stage II than stage I group. MCI occurred in 7.5% of patients in HY stage I, and in 42.5% of patients in HY stage II. In de novo PD patients, the severity of motor impairment at the diagnosis is associated to cognitive deficits and higher risk of MCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adjuvant Therapy for Stage II Colorectal Cancer: Who and with What?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ki-Young Y; Kelsen, David

    2006-06-01

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage II colon adenocarcinoma remains controversial. The high surgical cure rate for patients with "low-risk" stage II colon cancer, ranging from 75% to 80%, and the available clinical trials and meta-analyses provide conflicting recommendations for or against adjuvant chemotherapy for this group of patients. For fit "high-risk" stage II patients with clinical obstruction or perforation at presentation, in which the 5-year survival rate is 60% to 70%, there is little controversy, as these patients are routinely treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Other potential high-risk factors, including high histologic grade, microsatellite instability, and loss of 18q, have yet to be validated in prospective trials. Patients with fewer than 12 regional lymph nodes identified in the surgical specimen have a statistically unclear risk of lymph node involvement. These patients may have stage III disease and should receive adjuvant therapy. The decision to use adjuvant chemotherapy to treat low-risk stage II colon cancer patients (no obstruction or perforation) should be an informed decision weighing the magnitude of a net 2% to 5% survival benefit, a 0.5% to 1.0% risk of mortality with chemotherapy in addition to 6 months of chemotherapy-related toxicities, other coexisting patient morbidities, and the anticipated life expectancy of each patient. As adjuvant chemotherapy is therapy addressing local or metastatic microscopic disease, and the effectiveness of systemic and biologically targeted therapy for advanced macroscopic colon cancer continues to improve rapidly, it remains to be determined by clinical trials whether therapies including newer agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab administered in the adjuvant setting may affect survival for stage II cancer patients.

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy for stage I/II seminoma: results for 212 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn S.; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Ago, C. Tetteh; Radwan, John S.; Dar, A. Rashid; Winquist, Eric W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage I and II seminoma treated at a regional cancer center was performed to assess the long term efficacy and toxicity associated with post operative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1950 and 1995, 212 patients seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre received adjuvant radiotherapy following orchiectomy for Stage I (169) and II (43) seminoma. Median follow-up for the group was 7.5 years. Results: Progression free, cause specific, and overall survival were 95%, 98%, and 95% at 5 years, and 94%, 98%, and 94% at 10 years respectively. An increased risk of failure was noted among patients with bulky Stage II disease. No other prognostic factors for relapse were identified. Late toxicity was uncommon with only 12/212 (6%) developing any late GI toxicity potentially attributable to radiotherapy. The incidence of second malignancies (excluding second testicular tumors) was 6/212 (actuarial:1%, 1%, 6% at 5,10,15 years respectively). There was a trend toward increased acute complications for patients treated with larger volumes of radiation. No prognostic factors associated with increased risk of late toxicity or second malignancy were identified, likely a consequence of the small number of these events. Conclusion: Survival and toxicity were comparable to that reported in the literature. Post-operative radiotherapy remains a safe and efficacious adjuvant treatment for Stage I and early Stage II seminoma

  6. Esophageal dysfunction in different stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Suttrup, J; Suntrup-Krueger, S; Siemer, M-L; Bauer, J; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Domagk, D; Dziewas, R; Warnecke, T

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a clinically relevant symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to pronounced reduction in quality of life and other severe complications. Parkinson's disease-related dysphagia may affect the oral and pharyngeal, as well as the esophageal phase of swallowing. To examine the nature and extend of esophageal dysphagia in different stages of PD and their relation to oropharyngeal dysfunction, we examined 65 PD patients (mean age 66.3±9.7 years, mean disease duration 7.9±5.8 years, mean Hoehn & Yahr [H&Y] stage 2.89±0.91) and divided into three groups (early [H&Y I+II; n=21], intermediate [H&Y III; n=25], and advanced stadium [H&Y IV+V; n=19]), using esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) to detect esophageal motor disorders. Oropharyngeal impairment was assessed using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Major esophageal motor disorders were detected in nearly one third of the PD patients. Minor impairment of the esophageal body was present in 95% of participants and throughout all disease stages with pathological findings especially in peristalsis and intrabolus pressure (IBP). The IBP was found to significantly increase in the advanced stadium. Although dysfunction of the upper and lower esophageal sphincters was observed in individual patients, alterations in these esophageal segments revealed no statistical significance compared with normative data. No clear association was found between the occurrence of oropharyngeal dysphagia and esophageal impairment. Esophageal body impairment in PD is a frequent phenomenon during all disease stages, which possibly reflects α-synucleinopathy in the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Symptoms of fatigue and depression in ischemic heart disease are driven by personality characteristics rather than disease stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Otto R F; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Van Domburg, Ron T

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of fatigue and depression are prevalent across stages of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined (i) the effect of both the IHD stage and type-D personality on fatigue and depressive symptoms at 12-month follow-up, and (ii) whether the effect of type-D personality on these symptoms...

  8. Radiation therapy for stage I and II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Aristei, C.; Maranzano, E.; Checcaglini, F.; Panizza, M.B.; Perrucci, E.; Bellucci, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    From june 1977 through june 1987, 46 patients (36 evaluable) affected by stage I and II non-bulky testicular seminoma were treated with postoperative telecobaltotherapy (TCT). In stage I seminomas, radiotherapy was extended to the omolateral iliac and the para-aortic areas (total dose: 30 Gy over 4 weeks). In stage II seminomas, the subdiaphragmatic lymph nodes were irradiated with 40-45 Gy over 5-6 weeks; after an interval of one month the subdiaphragmatic lymph nodes were irradiated again with a total dose of 25 Gy over 3.5 weeks. Minimal follow-up lasted two years and maximum ten years (average:5.5%) recurrences occurred, but salvage radiotherapy and salvage chemotherapy respectively allowed a complete permanent remission. One patient died from a different neoplasia with no evidence of testicular involvement. The 5-year actuarial survival is 96.6±3.4. In 20% of the patients the side effects were nausea and/or vomiting, easily controlled. No late complications were observed

  9. Evaluation of the I. Stage of decommissioning and implementation of the II. Stage of decommissioning of NPP V1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrasnova, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper author deals with following aspects: 1. Introduction of company Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, plc; 2. Evaluation of the I. stage of decommissioning and implementation of the II. Stage of decommissioning of NPP V1; (author)

  10. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages 4 and 5. ... Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate level and high urinary protein excretion at baseline are independent predictors of progression in stage 4 and 5 CKD. Keywords: Chronic kidney disease; End stage renal disease; Glomerular filtration rate; ...

  11. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  12. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  13. Breast carcinoma conservative treatment. Stages I and II; Tratamento conservador do carcinoma mamario. Estadios I e II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, C R

    1991-12-31

    From 1981 to 1988, 265 patients with breast cancer stages I and II (UICC-1987), were evaluated after conservative treatment with quadrantectomy plus axillectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. After surgical treatment, the patients were submitted to radiation therapy in the breast. One hundred and fifty six (58,8%) patients were submitted to adjuvant chemotherapy. The median clinical follow-up period was 42.8 months with a minimum of 24 and a maximum of 99 months. Six (2,3%) patients presented local recurrence and 48 (18,1%) presented distant metastasis. After five years the total survival rate was 89,7% and the disease free survival rate was 75% in the same period. The study did not show significant differences among the clinical stages classified after surgery and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not influence the results of the many stages. (author). 194 refs, 33 figs, 6 tabs.

  14. Breast carcinoma conservative treatment. Stages I and II; Tratamento conservador do carcinoma mamario. Estadios I e II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, C.R.

    1990-12-31

    From 1981 to 1988, 265 patients with breast cancer stages I and II (UICC-1987), were evaluated after conservative treatment with quadrantectomy plus axillectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. After surgical treatment, the patients were submitted to radiation therapy in the breast. One hundred and fifty six (58,8%) patients were submitted to adjuvant chemotherapy. The median clinical follow-up period was 42.8 months with a minimum of 24 and a maximum of 99 months. Six (2,3%) patients presented local recurrence and 48 (18,1%) presented distant metastasis. After five years the total survival rate was 89,7% and the disease free survival rate was 75% in the same period. The study did not show significant differences among the clinical stages classified after surgery and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not influence the results of the many stages. (author). 194 refs, 33 figs, 6 tabs.

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Lyme disease to Meningococcal - 2014In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases...

  16. 78 FR 34303 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline Vapor Recovery Program..., 2009, for the purpose of removing Stage II vapor control requirements for new and upgraded gasoline... Piping for Stage II Vapor Recovery, for all new or improved gasoline tanks. In addition, rule 15A-02D...

  17. Adjuvant therapy in stage I and stage II epithelial ovarian cancer. Results of two prospective randomized trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.C.; Walton, L.A.; Ellenberg, S.S.; Homesley, H.D.; Wilbanks, G.D.; Decker, D.G.; Miller, A.; Park, R.; Major, F. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    About a third of patients with ovarian cancer present with localized disease; despite surgical resection, up to half the tumors recur. Since it has not been established whether adjuvant treatment can benefit such patients, we conducted two prospective, randomized national cooperative trials of adjuvant therapy in patients with localized ovarian carcinoma. All patients underwent surgical resection plus comprehensive staging and, 18 months later, surgical re-exploration. In the first trial, 81 patients with well-differentiated or moderately well differentiated cancers confined to the ovaries (Stages Iai and Ibi) were assigned to receive either no chemotherapy or melphalan (0.2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day for five days, repeated every four to six weeks for up to 12 cycles). After a median follow-up of more than six years, there were no significant differences between the patients given no chemotherapy and those treated with melphalan with respect to either five-year disease-free survival or overall survival. In the second trial, 141 patients with poorly differentiated Stage I tumors or with cancer outside the ovaries but limited to the pelvis (Stage II) were randomly assigned to treatment with either melphalan (in the same regimen as above) or a single intraperitoneal dose of 32P (15 mCi) at the time of surgery. In this trial (median follow-up, greater than 6 years) the outcomes for the two treatment groups were similar with respect to five-year disease-free survival (80 percent in both groups) and overall survival (81 percent with melphalan vs. 78 percent with 32P; P = 0.48). We conclude that in patients with localized ovarian cancer, comprehensive staging at the time of surgical resection can serve to identify those patients (as defined by the first trial) who can be followed without adjuvant chemotherapy

  18. Nephrolithiasis-induced end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ounissi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Ounissi¹, T Gargueh², M Mahfoudhi¹, K Boubaker¹, H Hedri¹, R Goucha¹, E Abderrahim¹, F Ben Hamida¹, T Ben Abdallah¹, F El Younsi¹, H Ben Maiz³, A Kheder¹1Internal Medicine Department, 2Pediatric Department, 3Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, TunisiaIntroduction: Nephrolithiasis still remains a too frequent and underappreciated cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD.Methods and patients: Of the entire cohort of 7128 consecutive patients who started maintenance dialysis in our nephrology department between January 1992 and December 2006, a total of 45 patients (26 women, 19 men had renal stone disease as the cause of ESRD. The type of nephrolithiasis was determined in 45 cases and etiology in 42. The treatment and evolution of stone disease and patient’s survival were studied.Results: The overall proportion of nephrolithiasis related ESRD was 0.63%. The mean age was 48.4 years. Infection stones (struvite accounted for 40%, calcium stones, 26.67% (primary hyperparathyroidism:15.56%; familial hypercalciuria: 4.44%, unknown etiology: 6.66%, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, 17.78% and uric acid lithiasis in 15.56% of cases. The mean delay of the evolution of the stone renal disease to chronic renal failure was 85.8 months. The feminine gender, obesity and elevated alkaline phosphatases >128 IU/L were significantly correlated with fast evolution of ESRD. The median evolution to ESRD was 12 months. The normal body mass index (BMI, medical treatment of stone and primary hyperoxaluria type 1 were correlated with fast evolution to ESRD. All patients were treated by hemodialysis during a mean evolution of 60 months. Sixteen patients died. The patient's survival rate at 1, 3 and 5 years was 97.6, 92.8 and 69% respectively. Hypocalcemia, cardiopathy and normal calcium-phosphate product were significantly correlated with lower survival rate.Conclusion: Severe forms of nephrolithiasis remain an underestimated cause of

  19. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  20. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  1. Identification of miRNAs associated with recurrence of stage II colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Tobiasen, Heidi; Schepeler, Troels

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. Twenty-five percent of the patients radically treated for a stage II CRC (no lymph node or distant metastasis) later develop recurrence and dies from the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed or mutated in human...... target prediction and transcript profiling. Initially, miRNA over-expression in HCT116 cells was followed by transcriptional profiling of transfected cells using GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Three in silico predicted miRNA targets showing differential mRNA expression upon miRNA up-regulation were...... cancers, and function either as tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Additionally, they also appear to have both diagnostic and prognostic significance. The aim of the present study was to identify miRNAs associated with recurrence of stage II CRC, followed up by an investigation of how these potential...

  2. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yidong; Feng Qinfu; Lu Haizhen; Mao Yousheng; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Wang Mei; Zhao Jun; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Chen Dongfu; Liang Jun; Zhai Yirui; Wang Luhua; He Jie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  3. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  4. Radiotherapy alone for early stage Hodgkin's disease: a 16 year experience at the Royal Adelaide Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brein, P.

    1994-01-01

    The records of all patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's disease treated with radiotherapy alone at the Royal Adelaide Hospital between 1970 and 1986 were reviewed. The aim was to ensure the results were equivalent to the best reported series, particularly as treating such patients with chemotherapy alone has been shown to produce equivalent overall survival figures with improved relapse-free survival. There were 104 patients of whom 67 and undergone staging laparotomy. Fifty-seven patients were stage I and 47 stage II. Nine patients had B symptoms. Overall survival at 10 years was 83% with disease-specific survival being 86% and relapse-free survival 68%. These results compare favourably with those in the world literature. Multivariate analysis only revealed stage as an independent predictor of improved relapse-free survival. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Effect of anti-VEGF treatment on retinopathy of prematurity in Zone II Stage 3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Mei Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in Zone II Stage 3+. METHODS: Data was collected for ROP patients with Zone II Stage 3+ who received intravitreal ranibizumab injections between October 2014 and Janu­ary 2017 at the Department of Ophthalmology in our hospital. No prior laser or other intravitreal treatment was done. Prior to the intervention and at each follow-up visit, fundus examination was performed. Gestational age at birth, sex, birth weight, ROP zone, ROP stage, post menstrual age (PMA at treatment, and follow-up pe­riod were recorded. The final clinical status of the retina was evaluated for each patient. The primary outcome mea­sures included ROP recurrences requiring re-treatment, complete or incomplete peripheral vascularization. RESULTS: Eighty-six eyes of 46 premature infants with Zone II Stage 3+ ROP were enrolled in the study. The mean gestational age at birth was 28.18±1.67 (range: 25 to 33wk and the mean birth weight was 1070.57±226.85 (range: 720.00 to 1650.00 g. The mean PMA at treatment was 38.32±2.99 (range: 32.29 to 46.00wk. Seventy-one eyes (82.56% were treated success­fully with intravitreal ranibizumab as monotherapy. Fifteen eyes (17.44% developed recurrent disease. The mean interval between the treatment and retreatment was 5.96±3.22 (range: 1.86 to 11.71wk. All eyes vascularized into zone III at the end of the study and among them 62 eyes (72.09% achieved complete vascu­larization. CONCLUSION: Intravitreal ranibizumab injection is an effective treatment in Zone II Stage 3+ ROP patients. More patients with longer follow-up duration are necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment.

  6. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  7. Prognostic value of stem cell quantification in stage II colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Vaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a subset of tumor cells with capacity to self-renew and generate the diverse cells that make up the tumor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of CSCs in a highly homogeneous population of stage II colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred stage II colon cancer patients treated by the same surgical team between 1977 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. None of the patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Inmunohistochemistry expression of CD133, NANOG and CK20 was scored, using four levels: 50% positivity. Kaplan-Meier analysis and log rank test were used to compare survival. RESULTS: The average patient age was 68 years (patients were between 45-92 years of age and median follow up was 5.8 years. There was recurrent disease in 17 (17%; CD133 expression (defined by >10% positivity was shown in 60% of the tumors, in 95% for NANOG and 78% for CK20. No correlation was found among expression levels of CD133, NANOG or CK20 and relapse-free survival (RFS or overall survival (OS. However, a statistical significant correlation was found between established pathological prognostic factors and RFS and OS. CONCLUSIONS: Stem Cell quantification defined by CD133 and NANOG expression has no correlation with RFS or OS in this cohort of Stage II colon cancer.

  8. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  9. Relationship between stage II transport and number of chewing strokes as mastication progresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuichiro; Sugita, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichiro

    2013-10-02

    As mastication progresses, little is known about the occurrence of the stage II transport (oro-pharyngeal bolus transport). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx and the number of chewing strokes. Twenty-five clinical residents with natural dentitions were recruited. The subjects were asked to chew gummy jelly with their preferred rhythm and to swallow the bolus at their preferred timing. To investigate stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx, a transnasal endoscope was used. The number of chewing strokes was measured by electromyographic activity from the masseter muscle. The mean numbers of chewing strokes of pre-stage II transport and post-stage II transport were 29.8 and 8.1, respectively; the difference was significant (pchewing strokes of pre-stage II transport to that of post-stage II transport was 4.0 to 1.0. This study showed that stage II transport started at four-fifths of the way along the progress of mastication, and that stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx are related to the number of chewing strokes. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Treatment of early stage Hodgkin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1993-01-01

    indicate that we still do not definitively know whether or not the early addition of prophylactic chemotherapy improves survival. Arguments in favour of early chemotherapy are: that laparotomy may be avoided, that radiation fields and doses may perhaps be reduced, and that the stress of experiencing...... a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against early chemotherapy is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may be kept at a minimum. Recently, trials have been carried out...

  11. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Rodrigues Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Conclusions The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression.

  12. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  13. Use of a combination of CEA and tumor budding to identify high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Xue, Weicheng; Dou, Fangyuan; Peng, Yifan; Yao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Gu, Jin

    2017-07-24

    High-risk patients with stage II colon cancer may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but identifying this patient population can be difficult. We assessed the prognosis value for predicting tumor progression in patients with stage II colon cancer, of a panel of 2 biomarkers for colon cancer: tumor budding and preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Consecutive patients (N = 134) with stage II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery from 2000 to 2007 were included. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the association of CEA and tumor budding grade with 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). The prognostic accuracy of CEA, tumor budding grade and the combination of both (CEA-budding panel) was determined. The study found that both CEA and tumor budding grade were associated with 5-year DFS. The prognostic accuracy for disease progression was higher for the CEA-budding panel (82.1%) than either CEA (70.9%) or tumor budding grade (72.4%) alone. The findings indicate that the combination of CEA levels and tumor budding grade has greater prognostic value for identifying patients with stage II colon cancer who are at high-risk for disease progression, than either marker alone.

  14. 78 FR 58184 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ...] Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline Vapor... measures for new and upgraded gasoline dispensing facilities in the State. The September 18, 2009, SIP... .0953), entitled Vapor Return Piping for Stage II Vapor Recovery, for all new or improved gasoline tanks...

  15. SOX9 Expression Predicts Relapse of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Linnemann, Dorte; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of Sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9) in primary tumors could predict relapse of stage II colon cancer patients.144 patients with stage II primary colon cancer were retrospectively enrolledin the study. SOX9 expression...

  16. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  17. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis.

  18. Cost Evaluation of Haemodialysis for End Stage Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost Evaluation of Haemodialysis for End Stage Renal Disease Patients: Experience from Benin City, Nigeria. ... Annals of Biomedical Sciences ... Objectives: To assess the costs and use of haemodialysis in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital.

  19. End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Quality Initiative promotes ongoing CMS strategies to improve the quality of care provided to ESRD patients. This initiative...

  20. End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities...

  1. Second Stage (S-II) Arrives at Marshall Space Flight Center For Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The business end of a Second Stage (S-II) slowly emerges from the shipping container as workers prepare to transport the Saturn V component to the testing facility at MSFC. The Second Stage (S-II) underwent vibration and engine firing tests. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  2. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. Prognostic impact of interhospital variation in adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with Stage II/III colorectal cancer: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Kawai, K; Tanaka, T; Hata, K; Sugihara, K; Nozawa, H

    2018-05-12

    Clinical guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for high-risk patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer. However, chemotherapeutic administration rates differ significantly between hospitals. We assessed the prognostic benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with Stage IIb/c colorectal cancer, and the prognostic impact of interhospital variations in the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III colorectal cancer. We conducted a multicentre, retrospective study of 17 757 patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer treated between 1997 and 2008 in 23 hospitals in Japan. Hospitals were classified as high-rate (rate > 42.8%) or low-rate (rate ≤ 42.8%), chemotherapy prescribing clinics. The 5-year overall survival (OS) of patients with Stage II-III colorectal cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly higher than for those not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (85.7% vs 79.2%, P colorectal cancer (both P colorectal cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy, with patients who were treated in hospitals with high adjuvant chemotherapy rates demonstrating better prognoses. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Identification and Construction of Combinatory Cancer Hallmark-Based Gene Signature Sets to Predict Recurrence and Chemotherapy Benefit in Stage II Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shanwu; Tibiche, Chabane; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Trifiro, Mark; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen; Wang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) have been among the most challenging and controversial in oncology over the past 20 years. To develop robust combinatory cancer hallmark-based gene signature sets (CSS sets) that more accurately predict prognosis and identify a subset of patients with stage II CRC who could gain survival benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy. Thirteen retrospective studies of patients with stage II CRC who had clinical follow-up and adjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. Respective totals of 162 and 843 patients from 2 and 11 independent cohorts were used as the discovery and validation cohorts, respectively. A total of 1005 patients with stage II CRC were included in the 13 cohorts. Among them, 84 of 416 patients in 3 independent cohorts received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Identification of CSS sets to predict relapse-free survival and identify a subset of patients with stage II CRC who could gain substantial survival benefits from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Eight cancer hallmark-based gene signatures (30 genes each) were identified and used to construct CSS sets for determining prognosis. The CSS sets were validated in 11 independent cohorts of 767 patients with stage II CRC who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The CSS sets accurately stratified patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. Five-year relapse-free survival rates were 94%, 78%, and 45%, respectively, representing 60%, 28%, and 12% of patients with stage II disease. The 416 patients with CSS set-defined high-risk stage II CRC who received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy showed a substantial gain in survival benefits from the treatment (ie, recurrence reduced by 30%-40% in 5 years). The CSS sets substantially outperformed other prognostic predictors of stage 2 CRC. They are more accurate and robust for prognostic predictions and facilitate the identification of patients with stage

  6. Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature, which reflect the manifestations, diagnosis, and current treatments of the rare (orphan inherited disease glycogen storage disease type II or Pomp disease in children, as well as its classification. The infant form is shown to be most severe, resulting in death from cardiovascular or pulmonary failure generally within the first year of a child’s life. Emphasis is laid on major difficulties in the differential and true diagnosis of this severe disease. Much attention is given to the new pathogenetic treatment — genetically engineered enzyme replacement drug Myozyme®. The authors describe their clinical case of a child with the juvenile form of glycogen storage disease type II (late-onset Pompe disease. Particular emphasis is laid on the clinical symptoms of the disease and its diagnostic methods, among which the morphological analysis of a muscle biopsy specimen by light and electron microscopies, and enzyme and DNA diagnoses are of most importance. The proband was found to have significant lysosomal glycogen accumulation in the muscle biopsy specimen, reduced lymphocyte acid α-1,4-glucosidase activity to 4,2 nM/mg/h (normal value, 13,0—53,6 nM/mg/h, described in the HGMD missense mutation database from 1000 G>A p.Gly334er of the GAA in homozygous state, which verified the diagnosis of Pompe disease

  7. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  8. Extended Cancer Education for Longer-Term Survivors in Primary Care for Patients With Stage I-II Breast or Prostate Cancer or Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  9. Social Development Training Project. Stage I and Stage II. [The Granville Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Vivienne C., Ed.

    The book presents a training program developed at the Granville Work Preparation Centre in Australia, to teach mildly retarded adolescents basic social skills and competencies. The program is divided into two stages, with a total of 17 different skill areas. Stage 1 covers self-awareness, social/interpersonal skills, relaxation and behavioral self…

  10. Effectiveness of postoperative radiation therapy in stage IB cervical cancer with residual disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, J.; Perez-Tamayo, C.; Komaki, R.U.; Terada, K.; Roberts, J.A.; Morley, G.W.; Greenberg, M.; Mattingly, R.; Hopkins, M.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with stage IB cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and pelvic radiation therapy to approximately 5,090 rad. Patients were divided into two groups: group I, nine patients with involved parametria or positive margins at surgery; group II, 12 patients with metastatic pelvic lymph nodes. Patients in group I had an actuarial survival of 40% at 5 years and 20% at 10 years; patients in group II had an actuarial survival of 67% at 5 and 10 years (.01 < P < .05). The overall actuarial survival was 55% at 5 years and 43% at 10 years. Thus, patients with stage IB disease and involved parametrium or surgical margins do poorly. Alternative forms of therapy should be considered when this disease picture is clinically suspected preoperatively

  11. Prognostic importance of VEGF-A haplotype combinations in a stage II colon cancer population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, Sanne; Fredslund, Rikke; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients.......To investigate the prognostic effect of three VEGF-A SNPs, -2578, -460 and 405, as well as the corresponding haplotype combinations, in a unique population of stage II colon cancer patients....

  12. Tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II COPD patients: a pharmaeconomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: a secondary pre-specified analysis of the UPLIFT cohort demonstrated that the inclusion of tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II (moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is associated with stronger improvements of survival, quality of life, and exacerbation rate than those shown in the total cohort; in this subgroup, tiotropium furthermore induces a significant reduction in the rate of FEV1 decline.Objective: to adapt the Spiriva® model, originally built to evaluate cost-effectiveness of tiotropium inclusion in the general COPD population, to GOLD II patients.Methods: the Spiriva® model is a probabilistic Markov patient-level simulation developed over a lifetime horizon to compare outcomes associated with the inclusion of tiotropium in routine care (RC for COPD treatment with those obtained with RC alone. Patients are characterised by gender, age, height, smoking status and FEV1. Model structure and sources have been maintained unvaried, except for demographic characteristics, specific for GOLD II patients, as extrapolated from an Italian observational study, and tiotropium efficacy, based on the secondary analysis of GOLD II UPLIFT patients. As in the original model, only direct health care costs are considered.Results: patients treated with tiotropium on average (95% CI gain 0.70 (0.00/7.23 LYs or 0.77 (0.02/4.67 QALYs compared to RC. The incremental lifetime cost is € 3,520 (-6,391/26,686, meaning that the incremental cost required to gain a QALY (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio – ICER is equal to € 4,548. Sensitivity analysis shows that tiotropium has a 50% probability of being cost-effective for a willingness-to-pay (WTP around 4,600 €/QALY; 100% probability is achieved with a WTP of € 9,300.Conclusions: the adoption of a strategy based on the inclusion of tiotropium from the early COPD stages represents good value for money in Italy, as the ICER estimated for GOLD II

  13. Applying artificial intelligence to disease staging: Deep learning for improved staging of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Tampo, Hironobu; Arai, Yusuke; Inoue, Yuji; Kawashima, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Disease staging involves the assessment of disease severity or progression and is used for treatment selection. In diabetic retinopathy, disease staging using a wide area is more desirable than that using a limited area. We investigated if deep learning artificial intelligence (AI) could be used to grade diabetic retinopathy and determine treatment and prognosis. The retrospective study analyzed 9,939 posterior pole photographs of 2,740 patients with diabetes. Nonmydriatic 45° field color fundus photographs were taken of four fields in each eye annually at Jichi Medical University between May 2011 and June 2015. A modified fully randomly initialized GoogLeNet deep learning neural network was trained on 95% of the photographs using manual modified Davis grading of three additional adjacent photographs. We graded 4,709 of the 9,939 posterior pole fundus photographs using real prognoses. In addition, 95% of the photographs were learned by the modified GoogLeNet. Main outcome measures were prevalence and bias-adjusted Fleiss' kappa (PABAK) of AI staging of the remaining 5% of the photographs. The PABAK to modified Davis grading was 0.64 (accuracy, 81%; correct answer in 402 of 496 photographs). The PABAK to real prognosis grading was 0.37 (accuracy, 96%). We propose a novel AI disease-staging system for grading diabetic retinopathy that involves a retinal area not typically visualized on fundoscopy and another AI that directly suggests treatments and determines prognoses.

  14. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amany M; Sayd, Heba A; Hamza, Hesham M; Salem, Mohamed A

    2011-03-29

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15). Thirty patients (86%) presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66%) presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34%) presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%). The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively). Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%). Ten (28.5%) stage II (group A) and 25 (71.5%) stage III (group B). Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%), debulking in 6 (17%) and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%). A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months). The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  15. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Salem

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI, Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15. Thirty patients (86% presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66% presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34% presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%. The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively. Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%. Ten (28.5% stage II (group A and 25 (71.5% stage III (group B. Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%, debulking in 6 (17% and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%. A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months. The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  16. Organ preservation in stage II and III head and neck cancer utilizing alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, David B.; Vokes, Everett; Mittal, Bharat B.; Stenson, Kerstin; Kies, M.; Pelzer, H.; Nautiyal, Jaishanker; Kozloff, Mark; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Haraf, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase II trial was conducted to determine the efficacy and rate of organ preservation of alternate week concomitant chemoradiotherapy in stage II and III head and neck cancer. Methods: Forty-nine patients (10 stage II and 39 stage III) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region have been entered into a prospective phase II trial. Pretreatment evaluation included history and physical examination, computed tomography of the neck, bone scan, chest x-ray, panendoscopy and biopsy confirmation of malignancy. Therapy is given in 2 week cycles consisting of 5 days of concomitant chemoradiotherapy followed by a nine day break during which no treatment is given. Each cycle of treatment consists of 1.0 gm hydroxyurea P.O. every 12 hours for 6 days (11 doses per cycle) and 800mg/m 2 /d continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil along with concomitant radiation therapy (RT) administered in 1.8-2.0 Gy daily fractions for five days. This alternate week (week on/week off) schedule is continued for a total of 7 cycles resulting in an overall treatment time of 13 weeks and a total RT dose of 70 Gy. Extent of initial surgery included biopsy only (59.2%), minimal laser debulking (12.2%), and resection with or without neck dissection (28.6%). Results: The majority of patients are male (71.4%), with a median age of 61.3 years. Primary sites included oral cavity (16.3%), oropharynx (12.2%), larynx (57.1%), hypopharynx (8.1%), and nasopharynx (4.1%). T stage included T3 (32 patients, 65.3%), T2 (16 patients, 32.7%), and T1 (1 patient). N stage included N1 (17 patients, 34.7%), and N0 (32 patients, 65.3%). With a median follow-up of 27 months, the overall response rate is 100% (91.7 complete response, and 8.3% partial response). The 5 year actuarial local control, disease free survival, and overall survival is 90.1%, 88.3%, and 65.0%, respectively. One patient has failed with distant disease alone. Four patients had isolated local failures and (3(4)) were

  17. Outcome of radiotherapy for localized stage I E and II E nasal NK/T cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Yao Bo; Fang Hui; Liu Xinfan; Zhou Liqiang; Lv Ning; Yu Zihao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: With the optimal therapy remains unclear for nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, the aim of this study is to analyze the outcome of radiotherapy as primary treatment for localized stage I E and II E diseases. Methods: Between January. 1983 and December 2003, 105 patients with stage I E and II E primary nasal NK/T cell lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. According to the Ann Arbor Staging System, there were 83 stage I E and 22 stage II E. Stage I E was subdivided into limited stage I E confined to the nasal cavity (37 patients), or extensive stage I E with an extension beyond the nasal cavity (46 patients). Thirty-one patients received radiotherapy alone. Thirty-four patients were treated with radiotherapy followed by 2-4 cycles of chemotherapy. Thirty-seven patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and 3 with chemotherapy alone. Of 83 patients with stage I E disease, 26 were primarily treated with radiotherapy alone, 30 with. radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, and 27 with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Results: The five-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates (PIS) for all patients was 71% and 59%, respectively. The 5-year OS for stage I E and stage II E was 78% and 46% (P<0.01), while the 5-year PFS for stage I E and stage II E was 63% and 40%, respectively (P<0.01). Patients with limited stage I E had a better OS and PFS than those with extensive stage I E, with 5-year OS and PFS of 82% and 80% versus 75% and 45%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 91 (87%) patients after radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Initial radiotherapy resulted in a superior CR as compared to initial chemotherapy, with 54 of 65 (83%) patients achieving CR with initial radiotherapy, versus only 8 of 40 (20%) with initial chemotherapy. For 102 patients who received radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, the outcome of primary, treatment with radiotherapy alone was compared to that of CMT. Five-year OS and

  18. Segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy as treatment of stage II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Schlupp, W.R.; Cunha, L.S.M. da

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer with segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy has been described since decade 30. Many recent prospective and retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of this conservative management, particularly in stage I. There are still doubts in its use in stage II. (Author) [pt

  19. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-15

    In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using the Functional Assessment Short Test. Cognitive complaints were assessed using the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, the presence of comorbid personality disorders using the Standardized Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale and coping style using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders. Finally, they exhibited a trend towards using less adaptive coping styles. It cannot be omitted that some patients may have progressed from BD II to BD I. Most measures were based on patient self report. Overall, BD II was associated with a higher disease burden. Clinically, it is important to differentiate BD II from BD I and research wise, there is a need for tailoring and testing specific interventions towards BD II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  1. Survival Impact of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Masaoka Stage II to IV Thymomas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Hak Jae; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Yan, Jinchun; Liu, Qin; Patel, Shilpen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in stage II to IV thymomas, using systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods and Materials: A database search was conducted with EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Ovid from inception to August 2015. Thymic carcinomas were excluded, and studies comparing overall survival (OS) with and without PORT in thymomas were included. The hazard ratios (HRs) of OS were extracted, and a random-effects model was used in the pooled analysis. Results: Seven retrospective series with a total of 1724 patients were included and analyzed. Almost all of the patients underwent macroscopically complete resection, and thymoma histology was confirmed by the World Health Organization criteria. In the overall analysis of stage II to IV thymomas, OS was not altered with the receipt of PORT (HR 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-1.08). Although PORT was not associated with survival difference in Masaoka stage II disease (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.83-2.55), improved OS was observed with the addition of PORT in the discrete pooled analysis of stage III to IV (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.99). Significant heterogeneity and publication bias were not found in the analyses. Conclusions: From the present meta-analysis of sole primary thymomas, we suggest the potential OS benefit of PORT in locally advanced tumors with macroscopically complete resection, but not in stage II disease. Further investigations with sufficient survival data are needed to establish detailed treatment indications.

  2. Survival Impact of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Masaoka Stage II to IV Thymomas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Eunji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Jae, E-mail: khjae@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yan, Jinchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalian Medical University, Liaoning (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Liu, Qin [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Patel, Shilpen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in stage II to IV thymomas, using systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods and Materials: A database search was conducted with EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Ovid from inception to August 2015. Thymic carcinomas were excluded, and studies comparing overall survival (OS) with and without PORT in thymomas were included. The hazard ratios (HRs) of OS were extracted, and a random-effects model was used in the pooled analysis. Results: Seven retrospective series with a total of 1724 patients were included and analyzed. Almost all of the patients underwent macroscopically complete resection, and thymoma histology was confirmed by the World Health Organization criteria. In the overall analysis of stage II to IV thymomas, OS was not altered with the receipt of PORT (HR 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-1.08). Although PORT was not associated with survival difference in Masaoka stage II disease (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.83-2.55), improved OS was observed with the addition of PORT in the discrete pooled analysis of stage III to IV (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.99). Significant heterogeneity and publication bias were not found in the analyses. Conclusions: From the present meta-analysis of sole primary thymomas, we suggest the potential OS benefit of PORT in locally advanced tumors with macroscopically complete resection, but not in stage II disease. Further investigations with sufficient survival data are needed to establish detailed treatment indications.

  3. High prevalence of frailty in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Diederik; Kalf, Annette; Vogtlander, Nils; van Munster, Barbara C.

    Purpose Prognosis of the increasing number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is poor with high risk of functional decline and mortality. Frailty seems to be a good predictor for those patients that will not benefit from dialysis. Varying prevalences between populations are

  4. End Stage Renal Disease: Racial Differences | Chijioke | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The prevalence and aetiological of end stage renal disease (ESRD) differ from race to race and from location to location even among people of the same race. There is paucity of data on the comparison of ESDR in whites and blacks living in their native environment. The study was undertaken to retrospectively ...

  5. Correlation of clinical data, anatomical site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the colorectal cancer clinical data with respect to the anatomical location and stage of disease. Design: Retrospective observational study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and fifty three tumours were categorised as right colonic (RCC), left colonic ...

  6. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...

  7. Second Stage (S-II) Plays Key Role in Apollo missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph of the Saturn V Second Stage (S-II) clearly shows the cluster of five powerful J-2 engines needed to boost the Apollo spacecraft into earth orbit following first stage separation. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  8. Thrombocytosis portends adverse prognostic significance in patients with stage II colorectal carcinoma [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4k6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytosis portends adverse prognostic significance in many types of cancers including ovarian and lung carcinoma. In this study, we determined the prevalence and prognostic significance of thrombocytosis (defined as platelet count in excess of 400 × 103/μl in patients with colorectal cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of 310 consecutive patients diagnosed at our Institution between 2004 and 2013. The patients (48.7% male and 51.3% female had a mean age of 69.9 years (+/- 12.7 years at diagnosis. Thrombocytosis was found in a total of 25 patients, with a higher incidence in those with stage III and IV disease (14.4% of patients. Although the mean platelet count increased with the depth of tumor invasion (pT, its values remained within normal limits in the whole patient cohort. No patient with stage I cancer (n=57 had elevated platelet count at diagnosis. By contrast, five of the 78 patients (6.4% with stage II cancer showed thrombocytosis, and four of these patients showed early recurrence and/or metastatic disease, resulting in shortened survival (they died within one year after surgery. The incidence of thrombocytosis increased to 12.2% and 20.6%, respectively, in patients with stage III and IV disease. The overall survival rate of patients with thrombocytosis was lower than those without thrombocytosis in the stage II and III disease groups, but this difference disappeared in patients with stage IV cancer who did poorly regardless of their platelet count. We concluded that thrombocytosis at diagnosis indicates adverse clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients with stage II or III disease. This observation is especially intriguing in stage II patients because the clinical management of these patients is controversial. If our data are confirmed in larger studies, stage II colon cancer patients with thrombocytosis may be considered for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  9. Peripheral artery disease in type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Z.; Ahmed, S.M.; Bhutto, A.R.; Chaudhry, A.; Munir, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in type 2 diabetic patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Diabetes Clinic, Medical Unit III, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January to June 2010. Methodology:Three hundred and eighty seven (387) type II diabetic patients of either gender and any age were included. Patients with a previous history of trauma to the arterial vasculature, pregnancy and those who underwent in the study arterial graft procedures were excluded. Non-purposive convenient sampling technique was used to enroll patients in the study. PAD was diagnosed when ankle-brachial index (ABI) was less than 0.9. Ap-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 387 studied patients, 128 were males (33.1%) and 259 were females (66.9%). Mean age was 52.22 +- 6.39 years. PAD was detected in 152 9.671 (22 - 76) years in the entire cohort. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.38 +- (39.28%) of the total study subjects. Thirty-one of 128 male patients (24.22%) had PAD disease while 121 out of 259 female patients (46.71%) had evidence of PAD (p = 0.001). Hypertension was a significantly associated factor (p = 0.002). Conclusion: A high frequency of PAD was observed in the diabetic population particularly with hypertension and more prevalent in females. (author)

  10. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  11. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, Age <5 - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases, All Ages - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  16. NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  17. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I-II synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollamudi, Smitha V; Gelman, Rebecca S; Peiro, Gloria; Schneider, Lindsey; Connolly, James L; Schnitt, Stuart; Silver, Barbara; Harris, Jay R

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with early-stage SBBC can be safely and effectively treated with bilateral BCT. MATERIALS and METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of 26 patients with clinical Stage I-II SBBC treated between 1968-1989 with bilateral BCT. SBBC was defined as tumors diagnosed no more than one month apart, with both sides demonstrating invasive cancer. Maximum (max) clinical stage was based on the more advanced breast tumor. Median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 32-85 years); menopausal status was 6 pre-, 16 post-, 3 peri-, and 1 unknown at diagnosis. Median follow-up for surviving pts is 95 months (range, 68-157). Outcome was compared to 1325 pts with unilateral Stage I or II breast cancer, within the same age range, treated during the same time period. There were no significant differences in median age, median total dose, tumor size, estrogen receptor (ER) status, pathologic nodal status, and use of systemic therapy between the study population and the comparison group. Local recurrence (LR) was evaluated as true recurrence (TR, i.e., in the original tumor bed), marginal miss (MM, at the edge of the boost field), or elsewhere (E). Median total dose to the primary was 6100 cGy (range, 5000-7000). Pathology was available for review in 19 cases. Cytology (nuclear and cytoplasmic features) was similar in (7(19)) evaluable cases, and architecture (growth pattern, ie, papillary, solid) was similar in (5(19)) cases. The presence of either cytologic or architectural similarity was noted in(9(19)) cases. 7 of 19 pts who had axillary lymph node evaluation on at least one side had pathological confirmation of lymph node metastasis. Stage was the same in both breasts in 13 cases (10 Stage I, 3 Stage II); ER status data was complete in 11 pts, and the same in both primaries in 9 cases. Cosmetic results and complications after BCT were scored. Statistical significance was evaluated by use of the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: The 5-yr actuarial

  18. PTT functional recovery in early stage II PTTD after tendon balancing and calcaneal lengthening osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhault, Jean; Noël, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    The decision to offer surgery for Stage II posterior tibial tendon deficiency (PTTD) is a difficult one since orthotic treatment has been documented to be a viable alternative to surgery at this stage. Taking this into consideration we limited our treatment to bony realignment by a lengthening calcaneus Evans osteotomy and tendon balancing. The goal of the study was to clinically evaluate PTT functional recovery with this procedure. The patient population included 17 feet in 13 patients. Inclusion was limited to early Stage II PTTD flatfeet with grossly intact but deficient PTT. Deficiency was assessed by the lack of hindfoot inversion during single heel rise test. The surgical procedure included an Evans calcaneal opening wedge osteotomy with triceps surae and peroneus brevis tendon lengthening. PTT function at follow up was evaluated by an independent examiner. Evaluation was performed at an average of 4 (range, 2 to 6.3) years. One case presented postoperative subtalar pain that required subtalar fusion. Every foot could perform a single heel rise with 13 feet having active inversion of the hindfoot during elevation. The results of this study provide evidence of PTT functional recovery without augmentation in early Stage II. It challenges our understanding of early Stage II PTTD as well as the surgical guidelines recommending PTT augmentation at this specific stage.

  19. Radiation treatment of glottic squamous cell carcinoma, Stage I and II: analysis of factors affecting prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Gobitti, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Sartor, Giovanna; Caruso, Giuseppe; Grando, Giuseppe; Politi, Doriano; Gigante, Marco; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Trovo, Mauro G.; Barzan, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: At least in some European Countries, there is still considerable controversy regarding the choice between surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with early laryngeal-glottic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-six patients with laryngeal-glottic neoplasms, Stage I-II, were treated with radical radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy the patients were evaluated to determine the surgical procedure of choice. Either 66-68.4 Gy (33-38 fractions) or 63-65 Gy (28-29 fractions) of radiation therapy (RT) were administered. The overall disease free survival was determined for each subgroup of patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine significant prognostic variables. Results: Five- and 10-year overall survival rates were 83 and 72%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 6 years 204 patients are alive and disease free. No patient developed distant metastases. One patient died of a large local recurrence, 38 patients died of causes unrelated to their tumor, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. The multivariate analysis confirmed that performance status (PS), macroscopic presentation of the lesion, and persistence of dysphonia after radiotherapy are significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: According to the multivariate analysis, the patients with PS >80 and with exophytic lesions are eligible for radical RT. The surgical procedure proposed for each patient was not found to be an independent prognostic factor

  20. Treatment selection for stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Cooper, D.; Cox, E.B.; Kapp, D.S.; Farber, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Two treatment policies for the therapy of patients with Stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease are compared. From 1969-1976, 49 newly diagnosed and pathologically staged IIIA patients received total nodal irradiation (TNI) alone (no liver irradiation). Although actuarial survival was 80% at 5 years and 68% at 10 years, actuarial freedom from relapse was only 38% at 5 years. Accordingly, a new treatment policy was instituted in 1976. Patients with either CS IIIA disease, multiple splenic nodules, IIIA with a large mediastinal mass or III 2 , received combined modality therapy (combination chemotherapy and irradiation). All others received TNI. Thirty-six patients have been treated under the new program. The actuarial survival is 90% at 5 years and the relapse-free survival is 87%, suggesting the superiority of this approach. Complications from the treatments are discussed

  1. End stage renal disease among ceramic workers exposed to silica

    OpenAIRE

    Rapiti, E.; Sperati, A.; Miceli, M.; Forastiere, F.; Di, L; Cavariani, F.; Goldsmith, D. F.; Perucci, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether ceramic workers exposed to silica experience an excess of end stage renal disease. METHODS: On the basis of a health surveillance programme, a cohort of 2980 male ceramic workers has been enrolled during the period 1974-91 in Civitacastellana, Lazio, Italy. For each worker, employment history, smoking data, and x ray film readings were available. The vital status was ascertained for all cohort members. All 2820 people still alive and resident in the Lazio...

  2. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis for Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD, is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed 9 types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging.

  3. Compensatory Structural and Functional Adaptation after Radical Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma According to Preoperative Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Don Kyoung; Jung, Se Bin; Park, Bong Hee; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han-Yong; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated structural hypertrophy and functional hyperfiltration as compensatory adaptations after radical nephrectomy in patients with renal cell carcinoma according to the preoperative chronic kidney disease stage. We retrospectively identified 543 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1997 and 2012. Patients were classified according to preoperative glomerular filtration rate as no chronic kidney disease--glomerular filtration rate 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) or greater (230, 42.4%), chronic kidney disease stage II--glomerular filtration rate 60 to less than 90 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (227, 41.8%) and chronic kidney disease stage III--glomerular filtration rate 30 to less than 60 ml/minute/1.73 m(2) (86, 15.8%). Computerized tomography performed within 2 months before surgery and 1 year after surgery was used to assess functional renal volume for measuring the degree of hypertrophy of the remnant kidney, and the preoperative and postoperative glomerular filtration rate per unit volume of functional renal volume was used to calculate the degree of hyperfiltration. Among all patients (mean age 56.0 years) mean preoperative glomerular filtration rate, functional renal volume and glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume were 83.2 ml/minute/1.73 m(2), 340.6 cm(3) and 0.25 ml/minute/1.73 m(2)/cm(3), respectively. The percent reduction in glomerular filtration rate was statistically significant according to chronic kidney disease stage (no chronic kidney disease 31.2% vs stage II 26.5% vs stage III 12.8%, p kidney was not statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 17.3% vs stage III 16.5%, p=0.250). The change in glomerular filtration rate/functional renal volume was statistically significant (no chronic kidney disease 18.5% vs stage II 20.1% vs stage III 45.9%, p chronic kidney disease stage (p <0.001). Patients with a lower preoperative glomerular filtration rate had a smaller reduction in

  4. Tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Myung Jin; Moon, Min Hoan; Koh, Young Hwan; Im, Jung Gi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The medical records, chest radiographs, and CT scans of 42 patients with tuberculosis among 871 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease were reviewed. Patterns of initial chest radiographs were categorized as primary, postprimary, miliary, or atypical, according to the predominant radiologic findings. Chest radiographs and CT scans revealed pulmonary tuberculosis in 28 patients and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 15. The pattern of chest radiographs indicative of pulmonary tuberculosis was primary in 12 cases, postprimary in 11, miliary in one, demonstrated atypical infiltrates in three, and was normal in one. Tuberculosis involved the extrathoracic lymph nodes in six cases, the peritoneum in four, the spine in three, and the bone marrow in two. The primary pattern, seen in 12 patients, manifested as pleural effusion or segmental consolidation, and in ten of the twelve the former was dominant. The radiological pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis in end-stage renal disease is often primary, and extrapulmonary involvement is frequent

  5. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix stage IB and early stage II. Prognostic value of the histological tumor regression after initial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.; Le Floch, O.; Chauvet, B.; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A.; Bougnoux, P.

    1989-01-01

    In our center limited centro pelvic invasive carcinomas of the uterine cervix (less than 4 cm) are treated with brachytherapy and surgery. With these therapeutic modalities no residual carcinoma was observed for 80% of the patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our results with this treatment, and to evaluate the prognostic value of the pathological status of the cervix. From 1976 to 1987 we have treated 115 patients with these modalities. Staging system used was the FIGO classification modified for Stage II (divided in early Stage II and late Stage II). Patients were Stage IB (70 cases) and early Stage II (45 cases); 60 Gy were delivered with utero vaginal brachytherapy before any treatment. Six weeks later a radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed. Twenty-one patients with positive nodes received a pelvic radiotherapy (45 to 55 Gy). Local control rate was 97% (100% for Stage IB and 93% for early Stage II). Uncorrected 10-year actuarial survival rate was 96% for Stage IB and 80% for early Stage II patients. No treatment failure was observed for Stage IB patients. Ninety-two patients (80%) had no residual carcinoma in the cervix (group 1) and 23 patients (20%) had a residual tumor (group 2). The sterilization rate of the cervix was 87% for Stage IB tumors versus 69% for early Stage II, and was 82% for N- patients versus 68% for N+ patients. Ten year actuarial survival rate was 92% for group 1 and 78% for group 2 (p = 0, 1). Grade 3 complications rate was 6%. We conclude that brachytherapy + surgery is a safe treatment for limited centro pelvic carcinomas of the uterine cervix (especially Stage IB) and that pathological status of the cervix after brachytherapy is not a prognostic factor

  6. Alternative Dosing of Exemestane Before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage 0-II Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Stage 0 Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  7. Disease stage, but not sex, predicts depression and psychological distress in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Shimozaki, Steve

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression and anxiety significantly affect morbidity in Huntington's disease. Mice. models of Huntington's disease have identified sex differences in mood-like behaviours that vary across disease lifespan, but this interaction has not previously been explored in humans with Huntington......'s disease. However, among certain medical populations, evidence of sex differences in mood across various disease stages has been found, reflecting trends among the general population that women tend to experience anxiety and depression 1.5 to 2 times more than men. The current study examined whether...... disease stage and sex, either separately or as an interaction term, predicted anxiety and depression in Huntington's disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of REGISTRY data involving 453 Huntington's disease participants from 12 European countries was undertaken using the Hospital Anxiety...

  8. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  9. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  10. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  11. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having ≤10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  12. Title IV Quality Control Project, Stage II. Management Option II: Delivery System Quality Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    Stage Two of the Title IV Quality Control Project is an integrated study of quality in five related Federal financial aid programs for postsecondary students. Section 1 of the paper establishes a framework for defining quality improvements, in order to identify the types of changes that would tend to improve quality across all facets of the…

  13. Adherence to treatment guidelines and survival for older patients with stage II or III colon cancer in Texas from 2001 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Ning; Ho, Vivian; Ding, Minming; He, Weiguo; Niu, Jiangong; Yang, Ming; Du, Xianglin L; Zorzi, Daria; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Giordano, Sharon H

    2018-02-15

    Treatment guidelines for colon cancer recommend colectomy with lymphadenectomy of at least 12 lymph nodes for patients with stage I to stage III disease as surgery adherence (SA) and adjuvant chemotherapy for individuals with stage III disease. Herein, the authors evaluated adherence to these guidelines among older patients in Texas with colon cancer and the associated survival outcomes. Using Texas Cancer Registry data linked with Medicare data, the authors included patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer who were aged ≥66 years and diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. SA and adjuvant chemotherapy adherence rates to treatment guidelines were estimated. The chi-square test, general linear regression, survival probability, and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with adherence and survival. The rate of SA increased from 47.2% to 84% among 6029 patients with stage II or stage III disease from 2001 to 2011, and the rate of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 48.9% to 53.1% for patients with stage III disease during the same time period. SA was associated with marital status, tumor size, surgeon specialty, and year of diagnosis. Patient age, sex, marital status, Medicare state buy-in status, comorbidity status, and year of diagnosis were found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year survival probability for patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment was the highest at 87% for patients with stage II disease and was 73% for those with stage III disease. After adjusting for demographic and tumor characteristics, improved cancer cause-specific survival was associated with the receipt of stage-specific, guideline-concordant treatment for patients with stage II or stage III disease. The adherence to guideline-concordant treatment among older patients with colon cancer residing in Texas improved over time, and was associated with better survival outcomes. Future studies should be focused on identifying interventions to

  14. Does adjuvant systemic therapy with interferon-alpha for stage II-III melanoma prolong survival?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The experience with interferon-alpha in malignant melanoma resembles, to some degree, the experience with various kinds of adjuvant immunotherapeutic agents where 25 years of phase III trials of adjuvant therapy in stage II-IIII melanoma have not defined a standard therapy. Most trials failed to

  15. Early positron emission tomography response-adapted treatment in stage I and II hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    André, Marc P.E.; Girinsky, Théodore; Federico, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Patients who receive combined modality treatment for stage I and II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have an excellent outcome. Early response evaluation with positron emission tomography (PET) scan may improve selection of patients who need reduced or more intensive treatments. Methods We performed...

  16. Regulatory activity based risk model identifies survival of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Dong, Chuanpeng; Wang, Xing; Hou, Guojun; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Huilin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Liu, Lei

    2017-11-17

    Clinical and pathological indicators are inadequate for prognosis of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we utilized the activity of regulatory factors, univariate Cox regression and random forest for variable selection and developed a multivariate Cox model to predict the overall survival of Stage II/III colorectal carcinoma in GSE39582 datasets (469 samples). Patients in low-risk group showed a significant longer overall survival and recurrence-free survival time than those in high-risk group. This finding was further validated in five other independent datasets (GSE14333, GSE17536, GSE17537, GSE33113, and GSE37892). Besides, associations between clinicopathological information and risk score were analyzed. A nomogram including risk score was plotted to facilitate the utilization of risk score. The risk score model is also demonstrated to be effective on predicting both overall and recurrence-free survival of chemotherapy received patients. After performing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) between high and low risk groups, we found that several cell-cell interaction KEGG pathways were identified. Funnel plot results showed that there was no publication bias in these datasets. In summary, by utilizing the regulatory activity in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma, the risk score successfully predicts the survival of 1021 stage II/III CRC patients in six independent datasets.

  17. Low Expression of TBX4 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Patients with Stage II Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Zong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the expression of the T-box transcription factor 4 (TBX4, a tumor biomarker that was previously identified by proteomics, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and evaluate its clinical utility as a potential prognostic biomarkers for PDAC. The expression of TBX4 was detected in 77 stage II PDAC tumors by immunohistochemistry, and the results were analyzed with regard to clinicopathological characteristics and overall survival. Moreover, Tbx4 promoter methylation status in primary PDAC tumors and normal adjacent pancreas tissues was measured by bisulfite sequencing. Among 77 stage II PDAC tumors, 48 cases (62.3% expressed TBX4 at a high level. No significant correlation between TBX4 expression and other clinicopathological parameters, except tumor grade and liver metastasis recurrence, was found. The survival of patients with TBX4-high expression was significantly longer than those with TBX4-low expression (P = 0.010. In multivariate analysis, low TBX4 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with stage II PDAC. TBX4 promoter methylation status was frequently observed in both PDAC and normal adjacent pancreas. We conclude that a low level of TBX4 expression suggests a worse prognosis for patients with stage II PDAC. Down-regulation of the TBX4 gene in pancreas is less likely to be regulated by DNA methylation.

  18. Subjective emotional experience at different stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Siobhan; Péron, Julie; Biseul, Isabelle; Ory, Sophie; Philippot, Pierre; Drapier, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc

    2011-11-15

    Subjective emotional experience is thought to rely on a large cortical-subcortical network including orbitofrontal and cingulate frontostriatal circuits together with the mesolimbic dopaminergic system that modulates their activity. Parkinson's disease (PD) provides a model for exploring this issue. By using an original emotion induction procedure, the present study examined to what extent subjective experience of emotion of PD patients at different stages of the disease was modulated by emotion in the same way as healthy individuals. A battery of film excerpts was used to elicit different emotional feelings (happiness, anger, fear, sadness, disgust, and neutral) in 15 newly diagnosed PD patients, 18 patients with advanced PD and 15 matched controls. The newly diagnosed patients were examined in two conditions: "on" and "off" dopaminergic medication. Participants reported the intensity of their emotional feelings on a scale consisting of 10 emotional categories. Results indicated that PD patients at different stages of the disease did not significantly differ from the controls in the self-reported emotional experience to the presented film excerpts. Moreover, analyses conducted within the newly diagnosed PD group (on-dopa vs. off-dopa conditions) indicated that the patients' emotional reactivity to the presented film excerpts was not significantly modulated by dopaminergic medication. These results thus question the possible role of dopaminergic pathways in subjective emotional experience, at least in this sample and in the context of emotion induction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Degree of tendon degeneration and stage of rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Won Hyoung; Park, Ji Wan; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Eun

    2017-07-01

    While tendon degeneration has been known to be an important cause of rotator cuff disease, few studies have objectively proven the association of tendon degeneration and rotator cuff disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of tendon degeneration with respect to the stage of rotator cuff disease. A total of 48 patients were included in the study: 12 with tendinopathy, 12 with a partial-thickness tear (pRCT), 12 with a full-thickness tear (fRCT), and 12 as the control. A full-thickness supraspinatus tendon sample was harvested en bloc from the middle portion between the lateral edge and the musculotendinous junction of the tendon using a biopsy punch with a diameter of 3 mm. Harvested samples were evaluated using a semi-quantitative grading scale with 7 parameters after haematoxylin and eosin staining. There was no significant difference in age, gender, symptom duration, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade between the groups except for the global fatty degeneration index. All of the seven parameters were significantly different between the groups and could be categorized as follows: early responders (fibre structure and arrangement), gradual responder (rounding of the nuclei), after-tear responders (cellularity, vascularity, and stainability), and late responder (hyalinization). The total degeneration scores were not significantly different between the control (6.08 ± 1.16) and tendinopathy (6.67 ± 1.83) (n.s.). However, the score of pRCT group (10.42 ± 1.31) was greater than that of tendinopathy (P rotator cuff disease progresses from tendinopathy to pRCT, and then to fRCT. The degree of degeneration of tendinopathy was not different from that of normal but aged tendons, and significant tendon degeneration began from the stage of pRCT. The clinical relevance of the study is that strategies and goals of the treatment for rotator cuff disease should be specific to its stage, in order to prevent disease progression for tendinopathy and pRCT, as

  20. Development and independent validation of a prognostic assay for stage II colon cancer using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Richard D

    2011-12-10

    Current prognostic factors are poor at identifying patients at risk of disease recurrence after surgery for stage II colon cancer. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based prognostic assay using clinically relevant formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples.

  1. Relation between clinical findings and progression of cerebral cortical pathology in MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: proposed staging of cerebral cortical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yoshida, Mari

    2014-06-15

    In our pathologic observation of the cerebral cortex including the neocortex, hippocampus, and limbic cortex in 43 Japanese patients with MM1-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the earliest pathologic finding was spongiform change and next was gliosis. Subsequently, neuropil rarefaction appeared, followed by neuron loss. On the basis of these observations, we propose the following cortical pathologic staging: Stage I, spongiform change; Stage II, hypertrophic astrocytosis; Stage III, neuropil rarefaction; Stage IV, neuron loss; Stage V, status spongiosus; and Stage VI, large cavity formation. We also suggest a more simple staging classification: Stages I and II, mild; Stages III and IV, moderate; and Stages V and VI, severe involvement. Based on statistical analysis of the cases, strong correlation coefficients were obtained between the neocortical and limbic pathologic stage and both total disease duration and brain weight. We estimated that the first observation times of cortical hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images of magnetic resonance imaging, myoclonus, and periodic sharp wave complexes on the electroencephalogram approximately correspond to the early phase of Stage II of the neocortex. The time to reach the akinetic mutism state approximately corresponds to the middle phase of Stage II of the neocortex. Therefore, we think that approximate clinical manifestations at death, total disease duration, and brain weight can be estimated according to the pathologic stage of the neocortex or limbic cortex. Panencephalopathic-type pathology appeared approximately 12 months after disease onset, and this time approximately corresponds to the middle phase of Stage III of the neocortex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The significance of VEGF expression in stage II carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won; Choi, Yoon La; Huh, Seung Jae; Yoon, Sang Min; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to determine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to the VEGF expression in stage II cervical carcinoma patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. We enrolled 31 patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancer from 1995 to 2003 at Samsumg Medical Center and their paraffin block tissue samples were available for study. The median age of the patients was 65 years. The mean tumor size was 4.1 cm (range: 1.2 ∼8.2 cm). Seven patients (22.6%) were suspected of having pelvic lymph node metastasis. An external beam irradiation dose of 45-56.4 Gy was administered to the whole pelvis with a 15 MV linear accelerator, and an additional 24 Gy was given to point A by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. VEGF staining was defined as positive when more than 10% of the tumor cells were stained. The median follow-up duration was 58 months. A positive VEGF expression was observed in 21 patients (67.7%). There was no significant correlation between the VEGF expression and pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor size and the response of radiotherapy. During follow-up, 7 patients had recurrence. The complete response rate was not significant between the VEGF (-) and VEGF(+) tumors. However, the VEGF(+) tumors showed a significantly higher recurrence rate in comparison with the VEGF(-) tumors (ρ = 0.040). The three year disease-free survival rates were 100% and 66.7%, respectively, for patients with VEGF(-) or VEGF(+) tumor (ρ = 0.047). The VEGF expression was a significant factor for recurrence and disease-free survival. However, the significance of the VEGF expression is still controversial because of the various definitions of VEGF expression and the mismatches of the clinical data in the previous studies

  3. Diabetic nephropathy. Is end-stage renal disease inevitable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusky, R T

    1983-10-01

    The appearance of proteinuria in an insulin-dependent diabetic patient is an ominous sign. Proteinuria heralds the presence of diabetic nephropathy and early death, or chronic renal failure requiring dialysis or transplantation, in 50% of patients. The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is unknown. Adequate insulin administration is the most important preventive measure. Hypertension, if present, should be aggressively treated to delay progression of renal disease. Good nutrition, prompt treatment of urinary tract infections, and caution in the use of radiocontrast agents are other important preventive measures. Hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and transplantation are options for patients with end-stage renal disease. No matter which is selected, the patient may still have multiple amputations, blindness, congestive heart failure, infections, and uncontrolled glycemia. Advancements are being made, however, that promise a better future for insulin-dependent diabetics.

  4. End stage renal disease among ceramic workers exposed to silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapiti, E; Sperati, A; Miceli, M; Forastiere, F; Di Lallo, D; Cavariani, F; Goldsmith, D F; Perucci, C A

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate whether ceramic workers exposed to silica experience an excess of end stage renal disease. On the basis of a health surveillance programme, a cohort of 2980 male ceramic workers has been enrolled during the period 1974-91 in Civitacastellana, Lazio, Italy. For each worker, employment history, smoking data, and x ray film readings were available. The vital status was ascertained for all cohort members. All 2820 people still alive and resident in the Lazio region as in June 1994 were searched for a match in the regional end stage renal diseases registry, which records (since June, 1994) all patients undergoing dialysis treatment in public and private facilities of the region. Expected numbers of prevalent cases from the cohort were computed by applying the rate of patients on dialysis treatment by the age distribution of the cohort. A total of six cases was detected when 1.87 were expected (observed/expected (O/E) = 3.21; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.17 to 6.98). The excess risk was present among non-smokers (O = 2; O/E = 4.34) and smokers (O = 4; O/E = 2.83), as well as among workers without silicosis (O = 4; O/E = 2.78) and workers with silicosis (O = 2; O/E = 4.54). The risk was higher among subjects with 20 years. These results provide further evidence that exposure to silica dust among ceramic workers is associated with nephrotoxic effects.

  5. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-24

    Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Varicella to West Nile virus disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Varicella to West Nile virus disease - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000...

  7. Nuclear medicine and thyroid disease - part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterton, B.E.

    2005-01-01

    Part 1 of this article discussed the anatomy, physiology and basic pathology of the thyroid gland. Techniques of thyroid scanning and a few clinical examples are shown part II Copyright (2005) The Australian and New Zealand Society Of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. The expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 in predicting postoperative tumour progression in stages I-II colon cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Yao, Yunfeng; Xue, Weicheng; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Peng, Yifan; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of chemokine receptors in stage I/II colon cancer is unclear. We assessed the prognostic value of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CXCR4 in stage I/II colon cancer. 145 patients with stage I/II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery alone from 2000 to 2007 were investigated. Chemokine receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The associations between CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological variables were analysed using the χ2 test, and the relationships between chemokine receptors and a 5-year disease-free survival were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The high-expression rates of CXCR3 and CXCR4 were 17.9% (26/145) and 38.6% (56/145), respectively. There were no significant associations between the expressions of CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological factors including gender, age, tumour location, histological differentiation, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion and pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between low-expression groups and high-expression groups of CXCR3 and CXCR4. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum CEA and a number of retrieved lymph nodes, rather than chemokine receptors, were independent prognosticators. CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not independent prognosticators for stage I/II colon cancer after curative surgery.

  9. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns for disease duration and stage in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badoud, Simon [Geneva University Hospitals, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Fribourg, Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Fribourg (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Nicastro, Nicolas; Burkhard, Pierre R. [Geneva University Hospitals, Neurology Unit, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Garibotto, Valentina [University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University Hospitals, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Unit, Department of Medical Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Haller, Sven [University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Centre de Diagnostique Radiologique de Carouge, Geneva (Switzerland); Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To assess correlations between the degree of dopaminergic depletion measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and different clinical parameters of disease progression in Parkinson's disease (PD). This retrospective study included 970 consecutive patients undergoing {sup 123}I-ioflupane SPECT scans in our institution between 2003 and 2013, from which we selected a study population of 411 patients according to their clinical diagnosis: 301 patients with PD (69.4 ± 11.0 years, of age, 163 men) and 110 patients with nondegenerative conditions included as controls (72.7 ± 8.0 years of age, 55 men). Comprehensive and operator-independent data analysis included spatial normalization into standard space, estimation of the mean uptake values in the striatum (caudate nucleus + putamen) and voxel-wise correlation between SPECT signal intensity and disease stage as well as disease duration in order to investigate the spatiotemporal pattern of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration. To compensate for potential interactions between disease stage and disease duration, one parameter was used as nonexplanatory coregressor for the other. Increasing disease stage was associated with an exponential decrease in {sup 123}I-ioflupane uptake (R {sup 2} = 0.1501) particularly in the head of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001), whereas increasing disease duration was associated with a linear decrease in {sup 123}I-ioflupane uptake (p < 0.0001; R {sup 2} = 0.1532) particularly in the contralateral anterior putamen (p < 0.0001). We observed two distinct spatiotemporal patterns of posterior to anterior dopaminergic depletion associated with disease stage and disease duration in patients with PD. The developed operator-independent reference database of 411 {sup 123}I-ioflupane SPECT scans can be used for clinical and research applications. (orig.)

  10. Radiotherapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Masao; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1999-01-01

    Surgery has been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer in the early stage, while radiotherapy has become an effective alternative for medically inoperable patients and those who refuse surgery. We reviewed the records of 31 patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy between 1980 and 1997. There were 15 patients in stage I and 16 in stage II. The variables analyzed for influence on cause-specific survival and loco-regional control were: age, performance status, clinical stage, tumor size, tumor site, radiation field, radiation dose, and combination with chemotherapy. The overall and cause-specific 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years survival rates were 71% and 77%; 63% and 73%; 34% and 48%; and 17% and 32%, respectively. Five-year survival rate for patients with peripheral tumor in the lung was 72%, with 70% loco-regional control, while the 5-year survival rate of patients whose tumor originated in the central region was 20%, with 25% loco-regional control. These differences had marginal significance on univariate analysis (P=0.07), but only tumor site (central vs peripheral) showed marginal significant influence on cause-specific survival (P=0.08) and loco-regional control (P=0.07) on multivariate analysis. There were no fatal complications, including radiation-induced myelopathy. The present series showed satisfactory results with definitive radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer, with results similar to those in recent reports of radiotherapy. The only significant variable was that patients with peripheral tumors had a better prognosis than patients with central tumors. (author)

  11. Stage I and II malt lymphoma: results of treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Pintilie, Melania; Bezjak, Andrea; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Crump, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a distinct disease with specific clinical and pathologic features that may affect diverse organs. We analyzed our recent experience with Stage I/II MALT lymphoma presenting in the stomach and other organs to assess the outcome following involved field radiation therapy (RT). Patients and Methods: Seventy patients with Stage IE (62) and IIE (8) disease were treated between 1989 and 1998. Patients with transformed MALT were excluded. The median age was 62 years (range, 24-83 years), M:F ratio 1:2.2. Presenting sites included stomach, 15; orbital adnexa, 19; salivary glands, 15; thyroid, 8; lung, 5; upper airways, 3 (nasopharynx, 2; larynx, 1); urinary bladder, 3; breast, 1; and rectum, 1. Staging included site-specific imaging, CT abdomen in 66 patients (94%) and bone marrow biopsy in 54 (77%). Sixty-two patients received radiation therapy: 52 received RT alone, 7 received chemotherapy and RT, and 3 received antibiotics followed by RT. Median RT dose was 30 Gy (range, 17.5-35 Gy). Most frequently used RT prescriptions were 25 Gy (26 patients--18 orbit, 6 stomach, and 2 salivary glands), 30 Gy (23 patients), and 35 Gy (8 patients). Five patients had complete surgical excision of lymphoma and no other treatment (stomach 1, salivary 2, lung 2), whereas 2 patients with gastric lymphoma received antibiotics only. One patient refused treatment and was excluded from the analysis of treatment outcome, leaving 69 patients with a median follow-up of 4.2 years (range, 0.3-11.4 years). Results: A complete response was achieved in 66/69 patients, and 3 patients had partial response (2 lung, 1 orbit). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76%, and the overall survival was 96%. No relapses were observed in patients with stomach and thyroid lymphoma. The 5-year DFS for these patients was 93%, in contrast to 69% for patients presenting in other sites (p 0.006). Among the 5 patients treated with surgery only, 2

  12. Overexpression of the S100A2 protein as a prognostic marker for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUDA, TAIKI; ISHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; MOGUSHI, KAORU; OKAZAKI, SATOSHI; ISHIGURO, MEGUMI; IIDA, SATORU; MIZUSHIMA, HIROSHI; TANAKA, HIROSHI; UETAKE, HIROYUKI; SUGIHARA, KENICHI

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker related to recurrence in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Stage II and III CRC tissue mRNA expression was profiled using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and copy number profiles of 125 patients were generated using an Affymetrix 250K Sty array. Genes showing both upregulated expression and copy number gains in cases involving recurrence were extracted as candidate biomarkers. The protein expression of the candidate gene was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 161 patients. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was also examined. We identified 9 candidate genes related to recurrence of stage II and III CRC, whose mRNA expression was significantly higher in CRC than in normal tissue. Of these proteins, the S100 calcium-binding protein A2 (S100A2) has been observed in several human cancers. S100A2 protein overexpression in CRC cells was associated with significantly worse overall survival and relapse-free survival, indicating that S100A2 is an independent risk factor for stage II and III CRC recurrence. S100A2 overexpression in cancer cells could be a biomarker of poor prognosis in stage II and III CRC recurrence and a target for treatment of this disease. PMID:26783118

  13. Saturn V Second Stage (S-II) Ready for Static Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Two workers are dwarfed by the five J-2 engines of the Saturn V second stage (S-II) as they make final inspections prior to a static test firing by North American Space Division. These five hydrogen -fueled engines produced one million pounds of thrust, and placed the Apollo spacecraft into earth orbit before departing for the moon. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  14. Radiation therapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer in patients aged 75 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masaya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Katano, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1992, 32 patients aged 75 and older with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were given definitive radiation therapy. These patients did not undergo surgery because of old age, poor cardiac/pulmonary condition, or refusal to give consent. The mean age was 79 years, and 11 patients were over 80 years old. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients and adenocarcinoma in 7. The clinical T and N stage was T1N0 in 4 patients, T2N0 in 9, and T2N0 in 19. The total dose of radiation therapy given to each patient exceeded 60 Gy using 10-MV X-rays. The treatment was completed in all 32 patients without treatment-related complications. The 2- and 5-year overall actuarial survival rates were 40% and 16%, respectively. Eleven intercurrent deaths occurred, including 7 patients who died of heart disease. The 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 57% and 36%, respectively. None of the patients developed severe pneumonitis requiring hospitalization. All but three patients received radiation therapy on an inpatient basis. The mean duration of the hospital stay for initial treatment was 56 days, and mean ratio to total survival period (mean 739 days) was 8%. Although many elderly patients have concurrent medical complications such as heart disease and chronic pulmonary disease, the present study showed that elderly patients with clinical stage I-II NSCLC can expert a realistic probability of long-term survival with definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the acute stage of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Sakai, Tsuneo; Fujishima, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Uemura, Kenichi; Teramura, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with acute cerebrovascular disease were evaluated by both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The 17 patients with cerebral infarction (CI) were evaluated within 24 hours and the 13 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. All ICHs were detected in T2-weighted images and appeared as perifocal, ring-like areas of high signal intensity. T2-weighted images also demonstrated a ruptured aneurysm and an arteriovenous malformation. In T1-weighted images, all ICHs displayed high signal intensity, which paralleled the CT images and is characteristic of MR imaging with an ultra-low magnetic filed. These findings were obtained as early as 90 minutes from the onset of symptoms. In cases of CI, T2-weighted images obtained 3 - 7 hours after onset demonstrated the pathology more clearly than did CT. This study proved MR imaging useful in the evaluation of both ICH and CI in the acute stage. In addition, it was possible to differentiate ICH from CI in the acute stage by T2-weighted images alone. (author)

  16. Endometriosis: frequency and correlation between symptomatology and disease stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmud, G.; Akhtar, T.; Sadia, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of endometriosis in general gynecological and infertile women presenting to hospital and to correlate symptomatology and stage of disease. Fifty patients with diagnosis of endometriosis on laparoscopy were included in the study. The degree of pain symptoms was graded according to 1-4 point verbal rating scale designed by Biberoglu and Behrman. Endometriosis was staged according to Revised American Fertility Society (R-AFS) scoring on laparoscopy. Correlation coefficient-Spearman rank order correlation test was applied to analyze data. The frequency of endometriosis in infertile women was 24% (33) and in women with general gynecological complaints, it was 23% (17). There was a significant positive correlation between chronic pelvic pain and R-AFS scoring. Increasing severity of pelvic pain was also positively correlated with presence of endometrioma and complete obliteration of pouch of Douglas. No correlation between dysmenorrhoea and R-AFS scoring could be detected. Dysmenorrhoea was strongly and positively correlated with the presence of superficial implants. Dyspareunia was found to have positive correlation with R-AFS score and also with complete obliteration of pouch of Douglas. The frequency of endometriosis in infertile women was 24% (33) and in women with general gynecological complaints, it was 23% (17). Chronic pelvic pain and dyspareunia had strong positive correlation with R-AFS score while dysmenorrhoea had no such correlation. (author)

  17. Resistance Torque Based Variable Duty-Cycle Control Method for a Stage II Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Meipeng; Zheng, Shuiying

    2017-07-01

    The resistance torque of a piston stage II compressor generates strenuous fluctuations in a rotational period, and this can lead to negative influences on the working performance of the compressor. To restrain the strenuous fluctuations in the piston stage II compressor, a variable duty-cycle control method based on the resistance torque is proposed. A dynamic model of a stage II compressor is set up, and the resistance torque and other characteristic parameters are acquired as the control targets. Then, a variable duty-cycle control method is applied to track the resistance torque, thereby improving the working performance of the compressor. Simulated results show that the compressor, driven by the proposed method, requires lower current, while the rotating speed and the output torque remain comparable to the traditional variable-frequency control methods. A variable duty-cycle control system is developed, and the experimental results prove that the proposed method can help reduce the specific power, input power, and working noise of the compressor to 0.97 kW·m-3·min-1, 0.09 kW and 3.10 dB, respectively, under the same conditions of discharge pressure of 2.00 MPa and a discharge volume of 0.095 m3/min. The proposed variable duty-cycle control method tracks the resistance torque dynamically, and improves the working performance of a Stage II Compressor. The proposed variable duty-cycle control method can be applied to other compressors, and can provide theoretical guidance for the compressor.

  18. Definitive radiation therapy for medically inoperable patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, K.; Mitsuhashi, N.; Saito, Y.; Nakayama, Y.; Katano, S.; Furuta, M.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, T.; Niibe, H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of definitive radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment for medically inoperable patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: From 1976 through 1989, 84 patients with clinical stage I and II NSCLC were treated with definitive RT alone at Gunma University hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV X-rays using antero-posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 90 Gy (35 pts; 60-69 Gy, 39 pts; 70-74 Gy, 10 pts; ≥ 80 Gy) with once-daily standard fractionation. Results: The two and five-year survival rates were 74% and 31% for 28 patients with stage I disease, as compared with 40% and 19% for 56 patients with stage II respectively (p<0.05). Although there was no significant difference of survival rates by the histologic subtypes, in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma there were more long-term survivors. Fifty-three patients with tumors less than 5 cm in diameter had an infield progression rate of 14% at two years, in comparison with 38% of 31 patients with tumors greater than 5 cm (p<0.05). Overall distant failure occurred in 57% of the patients with smaller tumors and in 80% of the patients with larger tumors (p<0.05). The difference of survival rates for these two groups was statistically significant (p<0.005). Ten patients given a total dose of 80Gy or over had only 17% local progression at the time of last follow-up, however they had not been alive beyond three years because they developed pulmonary insufficiency due to severe stenosis of the proximal bronchus. For age and sex, there were no significant differences in survival, however, patients with performance status of 0-1 lived longer than those with a status of 2 or more (MST 24 versus 13 months; p=0.06). Conclusion: The tumor size was the most important factor not only for local control but also for distant failure. It was also suggested that the optimal radiation dose for medically inoperable stage I-II

  19. High clusterin expression correlates with a poor outcome in stage II colorectal cancers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-02-01

    The role of clusterin in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. Overexpression of cytoplasmic clusterin has been studied in aggressive colon tumors; however, no correlation between clusterin expression and survival in colorectal cancer has been identified to date. We assessed levels of clusterin expression in a group of stage II colorectal cancer patients to assess its utility as a prognostic marker. The study included 251 patients with stage II colorectal cancer. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry done and correlated with clinical features and long term outcome. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used with terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling probes and clusterin antibody to assess the degree of co localization. Percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining was higher in tumor compared with nonadjacent normal mucosa (P < 0.001). Within the stromal compartment, percentage cytoplamic staining and intensity was lower in tumor tissue compared with normal nonadjacent mucosa (P < or = 0.001). Survival was significantly associated with percentage epithelial cytoplasmic staining (P < 0.001), epithelial cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001), percentage stromal cytoplasmic staining (P = 0.002), and stromal cytoplasmic staining intensity (P < 0.001). Clusterin levels are associated with poor survival in stage II colorectal cancer.

  20. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  1. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  2. Autosomic dominant type II Osteopetrosis (Albers-Schonberg disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano, Angela R; Salamanca, Juan C; Ospino, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    The osteopetrosis type II or albers-schonberg disease is an infrequent disease secondary to the decrease in the bone resorption. The osteoclast is the principal cell involved in the disease. The osteopetrosis is characterized by few symptoms and it also has a benign course, but may further develop medullar insufficiency. We report a case of a young patient that initially shows, thrombocytopenia and bone pain with increase in the bone density, suggestive of osteopetrosis type II. The x ray exam was conclusive of osteopetrosis

  3. Does chemotherapy improve survival in high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael G.; Rischin, Danny; Porter, Ian; Walpole, Euan; Harvey, Jennifer; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The effectiveness of synchronous carboplatin, etoposide, and radiation therapy in improving survival was evaluated by comparison of a matched set of historic control subjects with patients treated in a prospective Phase II study that used synchronous chemotherapy and radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients were included in the analysis if they had disease localized to the primary site and nodes, and they were required to have at least one of the following high-risk features: recurrence after initial therapy, involved nodes, primary size greater than 1 cm, or gross residual disease after surgery. All patients who received chemotherapy were treated in a standardized fashion as part of a Phase II study (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group TROG 96:07) from 1997 to 2001. Radiation was delivered to the primary site and nodes to a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, and synchronous carboplatin (AUC 4.5) and etoposide, 80 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 1 to 3, were given in Weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10. The historic group represents a single institution's experience from 1988 to 1996 and was treated with surgery and radiation alone, and patients were included if they fulfilled the eligibility criteria of TROG 96:07. Patients with occult cutaneous disease were not included for the purpose of this analysis. Because of imbalances in the prognostic variables between the two treatment groups, comparisons were made by application of Cox's proportional hazard modeling. Overall survival, disease-specific survival, locoregional control, and distant control were used as endpoints for the study. Results: Of the 102 patients who had high-risk Stage I and II disease, 40 were treated with chemotherapy (TROG 96:07) and 62 were treated without chemotherapy (historic control subjects). When Cox's proportional hazards modeling was applied, the only significant factors for overall survival were recurrent disease, age, and the presence of residual disease. For

  4. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute⊕ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruijt Hans FM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC. In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0 will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs and/or micrometastases (MMs at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+ and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+ are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS. Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265

  5. The effect of laparoscopic surgery in stage II and III right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study compared the clinicopathological results among three groups divided by time sequence to evaluate the impact of introducing laparoscopic surgery on long-term oncological outcomes for right-sided colon cancer. Methods From April 1986 to December 2006, 200 patients who underwent elective surgery with stage II and III right-sided colon cancer were analyzed. The period for group I referred back to the time when laparoscopic approach had not yet been introduced. The period for group II was designated as the time when first laparoscopic approach for right colectomy was carried out until we overcame its learning curve. The period for group III was the period after overcoming this learning curve. Results When groups I and II, and groups II and III were compared, overall survival (OS did not differ significantly whereas disease-free survival (DFS in groups I and III were statistically higher than in group II (P = 0.042 and P = 0.050. In group III, laparoscopic surgery had a tendency to provide better long-term OS ( P = 0.2036 and DFS ( P = 0.2356 than open surgery. Also, the incidence of local recurrence in group III (2.6% was significantly lower than that in groups II (7.4% and I (12.1% ( P = 0.013. Conclusions Institutions should standardize their techniques and then provide fellowship training for newcomers of laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This technique once mastered will become the gold standard approach to colon surgery as it is both safe and feasible considering the oncological and technical aspects.

  6. The utility of serum CA-125 in predicting extra-uterine disease in apparent early-stage endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklin, James; Janda, Monika; Gebski, Val; Jobling, Thomas; Land, Russell; Manolitsas, Tom; McCartney, Anthony; Nascimento, Marcelo; Perrin, Lewis; Baker, Jannah F; Obermair, Andreas

    2012-08-15

    Surgical staging in early-stage uterine cancer is controversial. Preoperative serum CA-125 may be of clinical value in predicting the presence of extra-uterine disease in patients with apparent early-stage endometrial cancer. Between October 6, 2005, and June 17, 2010, 760 patients were enrolled in an international, multicentre, prospective randomized trial (LACE) comparing laparotomy with laparoscopy in the management of endometrial cancer apparently confined to the uterus. Of these, 657 patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma had a preoperative serum CA-125 value recorded. Multiple cross-validation analysis was undertaken to correlate preoperative serum CA-125 with stage of disease (Stage I vs. Stage II+) after surgery. Patients' median preoperative serum CA-125 was 14 U/ml. A cutoff point of 30 U/ml was associated with the smallest misclassification error, and using this cutoff, 98 patients (14.9%) had elevated CA-125 levels. Of those, 36 (36.7%) had evidence of extra-uterine disease. Of the 116 patients (17.7%) with evidence of extra-uterine disease, 31.0% had an elevated CA-125 level. On univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis, only preoperative CA-125 level, but no other preoperative clinical characteristics were found to be associated with extra-uterine spread of disease. Utilizing a cutoff point of 30 U/ml achieved a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 31.0, 88.5, 36.7 and 85.7%, respectively. Elevated CA-125 above 30 U/ml in patients with apparent early-stage disease is a risk factor for the presence of extra-uterine disease and may assist clinicians in the management of patients with clinical Stage I endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  7. Result of Radiation Therapy for Stage I, II Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done for 69 patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated from May 1981 to December 1990, in the Department of Radiadtion Oncology, Korea University Hospital. We used Ann Arbor Staging system and Working Formulation for histological classification. Forty-three patients(43/69, 62.3%) were Stage I and 26 patients (26/69, 37.7%) were Stage II, and B symptom was found in 10.1%(7/69). Local control rate for all patients was 88.4%(61/69), with 80% (12/15) for nodal lymphoma and 90.7%(49/54) for extra nodal lymphoma. The total failure rate was 34.8%(24/69). Five of 24 (20.8%) patients who were failed developed local failure only, 12.5%(3/24) local failure with distant failure, and distant failure only were found in 66.7%(16/24). Between nodal lymphoma and extra nodal lymphoma, there was no significant survival difference, but extra nodal lymphoma showed higher incidence

  8. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  9. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  10. 5-YEAR SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS WITH STAGE II UTERINE CANCER DEPENDING ON MORPHOLOGIC FEATURES OF TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. A. Mustafina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective data of treatment results of 109 patients with rarely observed stage II uterine cancer, admitted to N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center from 1980 to 2000 is analyzed. Correlation of overall 5-year survival rates of stage IIA and IIB uterine can- cer patients with a number of tumor morphologic features is studied. The influence of some non-elucidated morphologic features of stage IIA and IIB uterine cancer such as the degree of cellular anaplasia, the depth of tumor invasion into the uterine neck, lymho- vascular invasion into the myometrium and uterine neck, microscopic vessels density in the area of the most extensive invasion, the presence of necrotic areas in the tumor tissue on long-term treatment results are analyzed.

  11. Treatment outcome, body image, and sexual functioning after orchiectomy and radiotherapy for Stage I-II testicular seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Hop, Wim C.J.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Slob, A. Koos

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Orchiectomy followed by infradiaphragmatic irradiation is the standard treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma in The Netherlands. Because body image and sexual functioning can be affected by treatment, a retrospective study was carried out to assess treatment outcome, body image, and changes in sexuality after orchiectomy and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical charts of 166 patients with Stage I-II testicular seminoma were reviewed. A questionnaire on body image and current sexual functioning regarding the frequency and quality of erections, sexual activity, significance of sex, and changes in sexuality was sent to 157 patients (at a mean of 51 months after treatment). Results: Seventy-eight percent (n=123, mean age 42 years) completed the questionnaire. During irradiation, almost half of patients experienced nausea and 19% nausea and vomiting. Only 3 patients had disease relapse. After treatment, about 20% reported less interest and pleasure in sex and less sexual activity. Interest in sex, erectile difficulties, and satisfaction with sexual life did not differ from age-matched healthy controls. At the time of the survey, 17% of patients had erectile difficulties, a figure that was significantly higher than before treatment, but which correlated also with age. Twenty percent expressed concerns about fertility, and 52% found their body had changed after treatment. Cancer treatment had negatively influenced sexual life in 32% of the patients. Conclusions: Orchiectomy with radiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for Stage I-II testicular seminoma. Treatment-induced changes in body image and concerns about fertility were detected, but the sexual problems encountered did not seem to differ from those of healthy controls, although baseline data are lacking

  12. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  13. Impact of chronic kidney disease stage on lower-extremity arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Brian F; Richard, Raveesh D; Bowen, Thomas R; Perkins, Robert M; Graham, Jove H; Foltzer, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis is commonly associated with poor outcomes after joint replacement surgery. The goal of this study was to evaluate postoperative complications in patients with less advanced chronic kidney disease undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients who underwent THA or TKA between 2004 and 2011 with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed via an electronic medical record. The authors compared 377 patients who had stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease with 402 patients who had stage 3 chronic kidney disease. No significant differences in 90-day readmission or revision rates were found between the stage 1 to 2 and stage 3 patient groups. For patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, the overall mortality rate was greater than that in patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease. However, when adjusted for comorbid disease, no significant increases were seen in joint infection, readmission, or early revision between patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease vs patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. The overall incidence of infection was high (3.5%) but far less than reported for patients with end-stage renal disease, dialysis, and kidney transplant. In conclusion, patients with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease may have a higher than expected rate of prosthetic joint infection (3.5%) after total joint arthroplasty. Patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease are at higher risk for postoperative mortality compared with those with lesser stages of kidney disease. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  15. Carcinoma microsatellite instability status as a predictor of benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Sun, Yan; Huang, Xin-En; Yu, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Jian-Nong; Zhou, Xin; Li, Dong-Zheng; Guan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancers with high microsatellite-instable have clinical and pathological features that differentiate them from microsatellite-stable or low- frequency carcinomas, which was studied rarely in stage II rectal cancer, promoting the present investigation of the usefulness of microsatellite-instability status as a predictor of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil in stage II rectal cancer. Data of 460 patients who underwent primary anterior resection with a double stapling technique for rectal carcinoma at a single institution from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively collected. All patients experienced a total mesorectal excision (TME) operation. Survival analysis were analyzed using the Cox regression method. Five-year rate of disease-free survival (DFS) was noted in 390 (84.8%) of 460 patients with stage II rectal cancer. Of 460 tissue specimens, 97 (21.1%) exhibited high-frequency microsatellite instability. Median age of the patients was 65 (50-71) and 185 (40.2%) were male. After univariate and multivariate analysis, microsatellite instability (p= 0.001), female sex (pchemotherapy (pchemotherapy, those cancers displaying high-frequency microsatellite instability had a better 5-year rate of DFS than tumors exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability (HR, 13.61 [95% CI, 1.88 to 99.28]; p= 0.010), while in 259 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, there was no DFS difference between the two groups (p= 0.145). Furthermore, patients exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability who received adjuvant chemotherapy had a better 5-year rate of DFS than patients did not (HR, 5.16 [95% CI, 2.90 to 9.18]; pchemotherapy and gender. Fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy benefits patients of stage II rectal cancer with microsatellite-stable or low microsatellite-instable, but not those with high microsatellite- instable. Additionally, free of adjuvant chemotherapy, carcinomas with high microsatellite

  16. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingguang Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]. The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001 than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response.

  17. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skirnisdottir Ingiridur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Methods Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. Results The most significant differences (p  Conclusions The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome.

  18. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess...... stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. CONCLUSIONS: Later stages...

  19. Epidemiological Transition of End-Stage Kidney Disease in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ismaili, Faisal; Al Salmi, Issa; Al Maimani, Yaqoub; Metry, Abdul Massiah; Al Marhoobi, Humood; Hola, Alan; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2017-01-01

    The number of persons receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) is estimated at more than 2.5 million worldwide, and is growing by 8% annually. Registries in the developing world are not up to standards compared to the United States Renal Data System (USRDS). Herein we examine the causes, progression, and magnitude of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) over 3 decades in Oman. We examined ESKD data from 1983 to 2013. Data from 1998 to 2013 were obtained through an Information Management System. Data before 2008 were collected from patients' files. A questionnaire based on USRDS form 2728 was completed by nephrologists once a citizen reached ESKD. A total of 4066 forms were completed, with a response rate of 90% (52% male). The mean (SD) age was 50.1 (14.0) years. By 31 December 2013, there were 2386 patients alive on RRT, of whom 1206 were on hemodialysis (50.5%), 1080 were living with a functioning kidney transplant (45.3%), and 100 were receiving peritoneal dialysis (4.2%). The incidence of ESKD on RRT was 21, 75, and 120 per million population in 1983, 2001, and 2013, respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of ESKD was 49, 916, and 2386 in 1983, 2001, and 2013 respectively. Among patients with ESKD on RRT, a progressive rise was seen in diabetic nephropathy, with 5.8%, 32.1%, and 46% in 1983, 2001, and 2013 respectively. The incidence and prevalence of ESKD has increased progressively over last 30 years. This is anticipated to continue at an even higher rate in view of the progressive rise in noncommunicable diseases. Continuous improvement in registries is required to improve capturing of ESKD patients for providing accurate data to health authorities, and enhancing public awareness of the magnitude, future trends, treatments, and outcomes regarding ESKD.

  20. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Healthy Subject; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC

  1. Health-related quality of life across all stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Daniel; Karlsson, Linda; Eklund, Oskar; Dieperink, Hans; Honkanen, Eero; Melin, Jan; Selvig, Kristian; Lundberg, Johan

    2017-12-01

    A limited number of studies have assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Results to date have been conflicting and studies have generally focused on patients with later stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess HRQoL in ADPKD across all stages of the disease, from patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) to patients with end-stage renal disease. A study involving cross-sectional patient-reported outcomes and retrospective clinical data was undertaken April-December 2014 in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Patients were enrolled into four mutually exclusive stages of the disease: CKD stages 1-3; CKD stages 4-5; transplant recipients; and dialysis patients. Overall HRQoL was generally highest in patients with CKD stages 1-3, followed by transplant recipients, patients with CKD stages 4-5 and patients on dialysis. Progressive disease predominately had an impact on physical health, whereas mental health showed less variation between stages of the disease. A substantial loss in quality of life was observed as patients progressed to CKD stages 4-5. Later stages of ADPKD are associated with reduced physical health. The value of early treatment interventions that can delay progression of the disease should be considered. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  2. Survival and Complication Rate of Radiation Therapy in Stage I and II Carcinoma of uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Sun Young; Cho, Heung Lea; Sohn, Seung Chang

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To analyze survival rate and late rectal and bladder complication for patients with stage with stage I and II carcinoma of uterine cervix treated by radiation alone or combined with chemotherapy. Materials and Methods : Between November 1984 and December 1993, 127 patients with stage I and II carcinoma of uterine cervix treated by radiation alone or combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy. Retrospective analysis for survival rate was carried out on eligible 107 patients and review for complication was possible in 91 patients. The median follow-up was 47 months (range 3-118) and the median age of patients was 56 years (range 31-76). 26 patients were stage IB by FIGO classification. 40 were stage IIA and 41 were stage IIB. 86 cases were treated by radiation alone and 21 were treated by radiation and chemotherapy. 101 patients were treated with intracavitary radiation therapy (ICRT), of these, 80 were received low dose rate (LDR) ICRT and 21 were received high dose rate (HDR) ICRT. Of the patients who received LDR ICRT, 63 were treated by 1 intracavitary insertion and 17 were underwent 2 insertions. And we evaluated the external radiation dose and midline shield. Results : Acturial survival rate at 5 years was 92% for stage IB, 75% for stage IIA, 53% for stage IIB and 69% in all patients. Grade 1 rectal complications were developed in 20 cases(22%), grade 2 were in 22 cases (24%), 22 cases (24%) of grade 1 urinary complications and 17 cases (19%) of grade 2 urinary complications were observed But no patients had severe complications that needed surgical management or admission care. Maximum bladder dose for the group of patients with urinary complications was higher than that for the patients without urinary complications(7608cGy v 6960cGy, p<0.01). Maximum rectal dose for the group of patients with rectal complications was higher than that for the patients without urinary complications (7041cGy v 6269cGy, p<0.01). While there was no significant

  3. Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wendy; Palidis, Dimitrios J; Spering, Miriam; McKeown, Martin J

    2016-10-01

    Visual impairments are frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) and impact normal functioning in daily activities. Visual contrast sensitivity is a powerful nonmotor sign for discriminating PD patients from controls. However, it is usually assessed with static visual stimuli. Here we examined the interaction between perception and eye movements in static and dynamic contrast sensitivity tasks in a cohort of mildly impaired, early-stage PD patients. Patients (n = 13) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 12) viewed stimuli of various spatial frequencies (0-8 cyc/deg) and speeds (0°/s, 10°/s, 30°/s) on a computer monitor. Detection thresholds were determined by asking participants to adjust luminance contrast until they could just barely see the stimulus. Eye position was recorded with a video-based eye tracker. Patients' static contrast sensitivity was impaired in the intermediate spatial-frequency range and this impairment correlated with fixational instability. However, dynamic contrast sensitivity and patients' smooth pursuit were relatively normal. An independent component analysis revealed contrast sensitivity profiles differentiating patients and controls. Our study simultaneously assesses perceptual contrast sensitivity and eye movements in PD, revealing a possible link between fixational instability and perceptual deficits. Spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity profiles may represent an easily measurable metric as a component of a broader combined biometric for nonmotor features observed in PD.

  4. Phase II trial of the regulatory T cell-depleting agent, denileukin diftitox, in patients with unresectable stage IV melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telang, Sucheta; Gragg, Hana; Clem, Brian F; McMasters, Kelly M; Miller, Donald M; Chesney, Jason; Rasku, Mary Ann; Clem, Amy L; Carter, Karen; Klarer, Alden C; Badger, Wesley R; Milam, Rebecca A; Rai, Shesh N; Pan, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    We previously found that administration of an interleukin 2/diphtheria toxin conjugate (DAB/IL2; Denileukin Diftitox; ONTAK) to stage IV melanoma patients depleted CD4 + CD25 HI Foxp3 + regulatory T cells and expanded melanoma-specific CD8 + T cells. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy of DAB/IL2 in an expanded cohort of stage IV melanoma patients. In a single-center, phase II trial, DAB/IL2 (12 μg/kg; 4 daily doses; 21 day cycles) was administered to 60 unresectable stage IV melanoma patients and response rates were assessed using a combination of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. After DAB/IL2 administration, 16.7% of the 60 patients had partial responses, 5% stable disease and 15% mixed responses. Importantly, 45.5% of the chemo/immuno-naïve sub-population (11/60 patients) experienced partial responses. One year survival was markedly higher in partial responders (80 ± 11.9%) relative to patients with progressive disease (23.7 ± 6.5%; p value < 0.001) and 40 ± 6.2% of the total DAB/IL2-treated population were alive at 1 year. These data support the development of multi-center, randomized trials of DAB/IL2 as a monotherapy and in combination with other immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of stage IV melanoma. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00299689

  5. Effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy with mindfulness in end-stage renal disease hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Bo Kyung; Oh, Yun Kyu; Choi, Jung-Seok; Song, Jiyoun; Lim, Ahyoung; Lee, Jung Pyo; An, Jung Nam; Choi, Hee-Jeong; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Jun-Young; Lim, Chun Soo

    2018-03-01

    Many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) experience depression. Depression influences patient quality of life (QOL), dialysis compliance, and medical comorbidity. We developed and applied a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program including mindfulness meditation for ESRD patients undergoing HD, and measured changes in QOL, mood, anxiety, perceived stress, and biochemical markers. We conducted group CBT over a 12-week period with seven ESRD patients undergoing HD and suffering from depression. QOL, mood, anxiety, and perceived stress were measured at baseline and at weeks 8 and 12 using the World Health Organization Quality of Life scale, abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF), the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Biochemical markers were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. The Temperament and Character Inventory was performed to assess patient characteristics before starting group CBT. The seven patients showed significant improvement in QOL, mood, anxiety, and perceived stress after 12 weeks of group CBT. WHOQOL-BREF and the self-rating scales, BDI-II and BAI, showed continuous improvement across the 12-week period. HAM-D scores showed significant improvement by week 8; PSS showed significant improvement after week 8. Serum creatinine levels also improved significantly following the 12 week period. In this pilot study, a CBT program which included mindfulness meditation enhanced overall mental health and biochemical marker levels in ESRD patients undergoing HD.

  6. A mid-term follow-up of Koutsogiannis’ osteotomy in adult-acquired flatfoot stage II and “early stage III”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvinius Camilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Koutsogiannis’ osteotomy has been widely described to treat adult-acquired flatfoot. However, few articles describe its midterm follow-up. Our aim was to study clinical and radiological outcomes at least one year after surgery and to analyze whether a combined procedure on the medial soft tissue affected these outcomes. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of 30 feet of patients who underwent a Koutsogiannis’ osteotomy due to adult-acquired flatfoot stage II and “early stage III”: a stage III acquired flatfoot without any important structural deformities. The parameters studied were additional medial soft tissue procedures, clinical outcome through the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and midfoot score as well as complications and radiological measurements. Results: Sixteen cases were “early stage III” and 14 stage II. Thirteen patients underwent an associated posterior tibial tendon (PTT revision: in three cases an end-to-end suture was possible, seven cases needed a FDL transposition, and three underwent synovectomy. Statistically significant improvement was found in the AOFAS score although no significant changes were seen radiologically. No additional benefit was found with the revision of the posterior tibial tendon. As to clinical and radiological results, no differences were found between stage II and “early stage III”. Five cases presented a mild dysesthesia but only one patient needed neurolysis. Conclusions: We consider the Koutsogiannis’ osteotomy to be a safe and effective procedure to reduce pain in patients with stage II and “early stage III” adult-acquired flatfoot.

  7. Comparative Analysis between preoperative Radiotherapy and postoperative Radiotherapy in Clinical Stage I and II Endometrial Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Chung, Eun Ji; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Woo Cheol; Chang, Sei Kyung; Oh, Young Taek; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain the optical treatment method in patients with endometrial carcinoma(clinical stage FIGO I, II) by comparative analysis between preoperative radiotherapy(pre-op R) and postoperative radiotherapy(post-op RT). Materials and Methods : A retrospective review of 62 endometrial carcinoma patients referred to the Yonsei Cancer Center for radiotherapy between 1985 and 1991 was undertaken. Of 62 patients, 19 patients(Stage I; 12 patients, Stage II; 7 patients) received pre-op RT before TAH(Total Abdominal Hysterectomy) and BSO(Bilateral Salphingoophorectomy) (Group 1) and 43 patients( Stage 1; 32 patients, Stage 2; 11 patients) received post-op RT after TAH and BSO (Group 2). Pre-op irradiation was given 4-6 weeks prior to surgery and post-op RT was administered on 4-5 weeks following surgery. All patients exept 1 patient(Group2; ICR alone) received external irradiation. Seventy percent(13/19) of pre-op RT group and 54 percent(23/42) of post-op RT group received external pelvic irradiation and intracavitary radiation therapy(ICR). External radiation dose was 39.6-55Gy(median 45Gy) in 5-6 week through opposed AP/PA fields or 4-field box technique treating daily, five days per week, 180cGy per fraction. ICR doses were prescribed to point A(20-39.6 Gy, median 39Gy) in Group 1 and 0.5cm depth from vaginal surface (18-30 Gy, median 21Gy) in Group2. Results : The overall 5 year survival rate was 95%. No survival difference between pre-op and post-op RT group.(89.3% vs 97.7%, p>0.1) There was no survival difference by stage, grade and histology between two groups. The survival rate was not affected by presence of residual tumor of surgical specimen after pre-op RT in Group 1(p>0.1), but affected by presence of lymph node metastasis in post-op RT group(p<0.5). The complication rate of pre-op RT group was higher than post-op RT.(16% vs 5%) Conclusion : Post-op radiotherapy offers the advantages of accurate surgical-pathological staging and low complication rate

  8. Recovery in stages I and II of thermal and fission neutron irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Redman, J.K.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of initial dose and irradiation doping upon the recovery of Mo was studied for the markedly different types of damage produced by thermal and fission neutrons. The features of the Stage I recovery commonly seen for several fcc metals can be identified, including a I/sub D/ peak at 40 0 K. The typical dose-dependent behavior of a I/sub E/ subpeak was observed at approximately 47 0 K, and evidence for free interstitial migration is further supported by irradiation doping results. Stage II shows a first-order peak at 120 0 K in which the population percentage increases with increasing initial dose in opposite fashion to fcc impurity detrapping peaks. (auth)

  9. Percutaneous coronary revascularization in patients with formerly "refractory angina pectoris in end-stage coronary artery disease" – Not "end-stage" after all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattab Ahmed A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with refractory angina pectoris in end-stage coronary artery disease represent a severe condition with a higher reduction of life-expectancy and quality of life as compared to patients with stable coronary artery disease. It was the purpose of this study to invasively re-evaluate highly symptomatic patients with formerly diagnosed refractory angina pectoris in end-stage coronary artery disease for feasible options of myocardial revascularization. Methods Thirty-four Patients formerly characterized as having end stage coronary artery disease with refractory angina pectoris were retrospectively followed for coronary interventions. Results Of those 34 patients 21 (61.8% were eventually revascularized with percutaneous interventional revascularization (PCI. Due to complex coronary morphology (angulation, chronic total occlusion PCI demanded an above-average amount of time (66 ± 42 minutes, range 25–206 minutes and materials (contrast media 247 ± 209 ml, range 50–750 ml; PCI guiding wires 2.0 ± 1.4, range 1–6 wires. Of PCI patients 7 (33.3% showed a new lesion as a sign of progression of atherosclerosis. Clinical success rate with a reduction to angina class II or lower was 71.4% at 30 days. Surgery was performed in a total of8 (23.5% patients with a clinical success rate of 62.5%. Based on an intention-to-treat 2 patients of originally 8 (25% demonstrated clinical success. Mortality during follow-up (1–18 months was 4.8% in patients who underwent PCI, 25% in patients treated surgically and 25% in those only treated medically. Conclusion The majority of patients with end-stage coronary artery disease can be treated effectively with conventional invasive treatment modalities. Therefore even though it is challenging and demanding PCI should be considered as a first choice before experimental interventions are considered.

  10. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  11. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  12. Dream features in the early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, Paulo; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Few studies have investigated the relation between dream features and cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD), although vivid dreams, hallucinations and cognitive decline have been proposed as successive steps of a pathological continuum. Our objectives were therefore to characterize the dreams of early stage PD and to study the relation between dream characteristics, cognitive function, motor status, depression, dopaminergic treatment, and the presence of REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and hallucinations. Dreams of 19 male PD patients and 21 matched control subjects were classified according to Hall and van de Castle system. h statistics was used to compare the dream content between patients and controls. We tested the relation between patients' dreams characteristics and cognitive function (Frontal assessment battery (FAB) and Mini-Mental State Examination tests) depression (Beck depression inventory), motor function (UPDRS), dopaminergic treatment, the presence of RBD (according to clinical criteria) and hallucinations, using general linear model statistics. Patients and controls differed only on FAB scores. Relevant differences in the Hall and van de Castle scale were found between patient's dreams and those of the control group, regarding animals, aggression/friendliness, physical aggression, befriender (higher in the patient group) and aggressor and bodily misfortunes (lower in the patient group) features. Cognitive and particularly frontal dysfunction had a significant influence on the frequency of physical aggression and animal related features, while dopaminergic doses, depressive symptoms, hallucinations and RBD did not. We found a pattern of dream alteration characterized by heightened aggressiveness and the presence of animals. These were related to more severe frontal dysfunction, which could be the origin of such changes.

  13. Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with End -Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfahani S.T

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to define the prevalence of the upper Gastrointestinal (GI lesions, dyspeptic symptoms, H.pylori infection, and the impact of duration of dialysis on upper GI symptoms and lesions of children with End-stage renal disease. We studied 69 children with ESRD who were under regular hemodialysis therapy in our department. The age of the patients were between 4-18 years (mean: 11.3. 57(82.6% of 69 patients had GI symptoms and 12(17.4% were symptom free, the prevalence of each symptom in 57 symptomatic children was as follows: anorexia 48(84.2%, nausea/vomiting 39 (68.4%, belching/heartburn 20(35%, abdominal distention 15(26.3%, and epigastric pain 8(14%. 65(92.4% of 69 patients with ESRD had pathologic lesions and the most common lesion was gastritis .There was no case of gastric angiodysplasia in our patients. 15(21.7% of 69 patients had H. pylori infection. The prevalence of H.pylori infection in non-uremic children with upper GI symptoms is about 27% in our pediatric gastroenterology department, so there was no significant difference in prevalence of H.pylori infection between uremic and non-uremic children in our study (p value = 0.4735. There was no significant relationship between duration of dialysis and dyspeptic symptoms or upper GI lesions (p values were 0.8775 and 0.7435, respectively. Conclusions: Upper GI disorders are very common in children with ESRD, even when they have no upper GI symptoms, the most common lesion is gastritis. The prevalence of H.pylori infection is not different between children with ESRD and non-uremic children with upper GI symptoms, and duration of hemodialysis therapy has no significant effect on prevalence of GI symptoms and lesions.

  14. Management of stage I and II A/B avascular necrosis of femoral head with core decompression autologous cancellous bone grafting and platelet rich plasma factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head is a progressive disease that generally affects patients in the third through fifth decades of life; if left untreated, it leads to complete deterioration of the hip joint. Treatments range from simple decompression of the femoral head, to bone grafting of the involved area, or by using a vascularized fibular graft with varying degree of success. In most instances, the disease progresses further causing secondary arthritis. We present a study of management of early stage AVN (stage I and II A/B of Ficat Arlet classification with core decompression autologous cancellous bone grafting along with platelet rich plasma. Aims: To evaluate the results of the above modality in the management of AVN of the hip. Settings and Design: This prospective study of 30 cases was done during the period of 2011-2013. Materials and Methods: Patients with stage I and II A/B were treated with the above modality and were followed up for 1-year. The results were evaluated on the basis of progression or remission of the disease by radiographic studies, preoperative and postoperative Harris hip score (HHS, age and sex distribution. Statistical Analysis Used: Primer software for calculating the statistical data was used and paired t-test was applied to all the data. Results: Show males were more affected than females and average age group of presentation in stage I and II was 29 years (22-55. The most common cause was idiopathic followed by steroid use. Average preoperative HHS was 56.80 and postoperative HHS was 79.73. 60% (18 showed remission of the disease (radiographically compared to preoperative stage at 1-year follow-up, in 30% (9 disease did not progress further and 10% (3 progressed and required arthroplasty. Conclusion: Management of stage I and II A/B AVN of femur showed good satisfactory results in terms of disease remission and prevention of the further progress of the disease by the above method at 1

  15. Molecular Differentiation of Risk for Disease Progression: Delineating Stage-Specific Therapeutic Targets for Disease Management in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worsham, Maria J; Raju, Usha; Chase, Gary; Lu, Mei

    2004-01-01

    .... The aim of this research is to 1a: identify an informative set of specific genetic alterations that underlie the pathogenesis of disease progression to serve as targets for management of disease at the earliest stages and 1b...

  16. Molecular Differentiation of Risk for Disease Progression: Delineating Stage-Specific Therapeutic Targets for Disease Management in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worsham, Maria J; Raju, Usha; Lu, Mei

    2006-01-01

    .... The aim of this research is to 1a: identify an informative set of specific genetic alterations that underlie the pathogenesis of disease progression to serve as targets for management of disease at the earliest stages and 1b...

  17. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  18. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  19. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  20. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  1. Misdiagnosis of Addison's disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Hayri Sipahioglu, Murat; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare disorder in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In patients, the diagnosis of Addison's disease is difficult in clinical practice because most of the clinical findings of this disease are similar to those of the renal failure. We present a 51-year-old male patient, who underwent hemodialysis therapy for 8 years, diagnosed with Addison's disease after having myalgia, skin hyperpigmentation, weight loss, sweating, and nausea for the past few weeks. The physical examination was completely normal except for muscle weakness, hyperpigmentation on labial mucosa and skin in a patient. The laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoglycemia. Serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, and ACTH stimulation test results were consistent with Addison's disease. Adrenal computerized tomography revealed bilateral atrophic glands. Additionally, it was found that elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titer were positive. Our purpose is to emphasize that physicians should be alert to the potential for additional different conditions particularly in terms of adrenal failure in patients with ESRD.

  2. Statistical inference for extended or shortened phase II studies based on Simon's two-stage designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junjun; Yu, Menggang; Feng, Xi-Ping

    2015-06-07

    Simon's two-stage designs are popular choices for conducting phase II clinical trials, especially in the oncology trials to reduce the number of patients placed on ineffective experimental therapies. Recently Koyama and Chen (2008) discussed how to conduct proper inference for such studies because they found that inference procedures used with Simon's designs almost always ignore the actual sampling plan used. In particular, they proposed an inference method for studies when the actual second stage sample sizes differ from planned ones. We consider an alternative inference method based on likelihood ratio. In particular, we order permissible sample paths under Simon's two-stage designs using their corresponding conditional likelihood. In this way, we can calculate p-values using the common definition: the probability of obtaining a test statistic value at least as extreme as that observed under the null hypothesis. In addition to providing inference for a couple of scenarios where Koyama and Chen's method can be difficult to apply, the resulting estimate based on our method appears to have certain advantage in terms of inference properties in many numerical simulations. It generally led to smaller biases and narrower confidence intervals while maintaining similar coverages. We also illustrated the two methods in a real data setting. Inference procedures used with Simon's designs almost always ignore the actual sampling plan. Reported P-values, point estimates and confidence intervals for the response rate are not usually adjusted for the design's adaptiveness. Proper statistical inference procedures should be used.

  3. Neuropsychological dysfunction in patients suffering from end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, W. David; Jefferson, Angela L.; Bolduc, Tara; Elliott, Jennifer B.; Ferro, Nikola M.; Broshek, Donna K.; Barth, Jeffrey T.; Robbins, Mark K.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined the neuropsychological sequelae associated with end-stage pulmonary disease. Neuropsychological data are presented for 47 patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were being evaluated as potential candidates for lung transplantation. Although patients exhibited a diversity of neurocognitive deficits, their highest frequencies of impairment were found on the Selective Reminding Test (SRT). Specifically, over 50% of the patients completing the SRT exhibited impaired immediate free recall and consistent long-term retrieval deficits, while more than 44% of these individuals displayed deficient long-term retrieval. Deficient SRT long-term storage strategies, cued recall, and delayed recall were exhibited by between 26% and 35% of these patients, while more than 32% of this sample displayed elevated numbers of intrusion errors. Over 31% of the patients completing the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) failed to achieve the expected number of categories on this measure, while more than 23% of these individuals demonstrated elevated numbers of perseverative errors and total errors. Clinically notable frequencies of impairment (greater than 20% of the sample) were also found on the Trail Making Test (TMT): Part B and the Wechsler Memory Scale-R (WMS-R) Visual Reproduction II subtest. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) personality assessments indicated that patients were experiencing a diversity of somatic complaints and that they may have been functioning at a reduced level of efficiency. These findings are discussed in light of patients’ end-stage COPD and factors possibly contributing to their neuropsychological test performances. Implications for clinical practice and future research are also included. PMID:14589783

  4. Effect of disease stage on progression of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Michael F; Hu, Julia

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine sulfate retinopathy can progress after the drug is stopped. It is not clear how this relates to the stage of retinopathy or whether early screening with modern imaging technology can prevent progression and visual loss. To determine the relationship between progression of retinopathy and the severity of disease using objective data from optical coherence tomography and assess the value of early screening for the toxic effects of hydroxychloroquine. Clinical findings in patients with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy were monitored with repeated anatomical and functional examinations for 13 to 40 months after the drug was stopped in a referral practice in a university medical center. Eleven patients participated, with the severity of toxic effects categorized as early (patchy parafoveal damage shown on field or objective testing), moderate (a 50%-100% parafoveal ring of optical coherence tomography thinning but intact retinal pigment epithelium), and severe (visible bull's-eye damage). Visual acuity, white 10-2 visual field pattern density plots, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-density optical coherence tomography cross sections, thickness (from cube diagrams), and ellipsoid zone length. Visual acuity and visual fields showed no consistent change. Fundus autofluorescence showed little or no change except in severe cases in which the bull's-eye damage expanded progressively. Optical coherence tomography cross sections showed little visible change in early and moderate cases but progressive foveal thinning (approximately 7 μm/y) and loss of ellipsoid zone (in the range of 100 μm/y) in severe cases, which was confirmed by quantitative measurements. The measurements also showed some foveal thinning (approximately 4 μm/y) and deepening of parafoveal loss in moderate cases, but the breadth of the ellipsoid zone remained constant in both early and moderate cases. A few cases showed a suggestion of ellipsoid zone improvement. Patients with

  5. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going ...

  6. Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinkley KE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katy E Trinkley,1 S Michelle Nikels,2 Robert L Page II,1 Melanie S Joy11Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD.Methods: A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013 was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors.Results: Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients.Conclusion: Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the

  7. Cytokine Signature in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Romana Alves Rios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis is a modality of blood filtration in which accumulated toxins and water are removed from the body. This treatment is indicated for patients at the end stage of renal disease. Vascular access complications are responsible for 20–25% of all hospitalizations in dialyzed patients. The occurrence of thrombosis in the vascular access is a serious problem that may severely compromise or even make the hemodialysis impossible, which is vital for the patient. The aim of this study was to investigate inflammatory profile in patients undergoing hemodialysis as well as the association between these alterations and vascular access thrombosis. A total of 195 patients undergoing hemodialysis have been evaluated; of which, 149 patients had not experienced vascular access thrombosis (group I and 46 patients had previously presented this complication (group II. Plasma levels of cytokines including interleukin (IL- 2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured by cytometric bead array. Our results showed that patients with previous thrombotic events (group II had higher levels of the IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ when compared to those in group I. Furthermore, a different cytokine signature was detected in dialyzed patients according to previous occurrences or not of thrombotic events, suggesting that elevated levels of T-helper 1 and T-helper 2 cytokines might, at least in part, contribute to this complication.

  8. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  9. Mortality prediction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease comparing the GOLD 2007 and 2011 staging systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Joan B; Lamprecht, Bernd; Ramírez, Ana S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no universal consensus on the best staging system for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although documents (eg, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] 2007) have traditionally used forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) for staging, clin...

  10. A scoring system based on artificial neural network for predicting 10-year survival in stage II A colon cancer patients after radical surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wu; Lu, Shi-Xun; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Li, Pei-Xing; Yun, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20% patients with stage II A colon cancer will develop recurrent disease post-operatively. The present study aims to develop a scoring system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for predicting 10-year survival outcome. The clinical and molecular data of 117 stage II A colon cancer patients from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were used for training set and test set; poor pathological grading (score 49), reduced expression of TGFBR2 (score 33), over-expression of TGF-β (score 45), MAPK (score 32), pin1 (score 100), β-catenin in tumor tissue (score 50) and reduced expression of TGF-β in normal mucosa (score 22) were selected as the prognostic risk predictors. According to the developed scoring system, the patients were divided into 3 subgroups, which were supposed with higher, moderate and lower risk levels. As a result, for the 3 subgroups, the 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 16.7%, 62.9% and 100% (P < 0.001); and the 10-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 16.7%, 61.8% and 98.8% (P < 0.001) respectively. It showed that this scoring system for stage II A colon cancer could help to predict long-term survival and screen out high-risk individuals for more vigorous treatment. PMID:27008710

  11. A scoring system based on artificial neural network for predicting 10-year survival in stage II A colon cancer patients after radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian-Hong; Fang, Yu-Jing; Li, Cai-Xia; Ou, Qing-Jian; Jiang, Wu; Lu, Shi-Xun; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Li, Pei-Xing; Yun, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De Sen

    2016-04-19

    Nearly 20% patients with stage II A colon cancer will develop recurrent disease post-operatively. The present study aims to develop a scoring system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for predicting 10-year survival outcome. The clinical and molecular data of 117 stage II A colon cancer patients from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were used for training set and test set; poor pathological grading (score 49), reduced expression of TGFBR2 (score 33), over-expression of TGF-β (score 45), MAPK (score 32), pin1 (score 100), β-catenin in tumor tissue (score 50) and reduced expression of TGF-β in normal mucosa (score 22) were selected as the prognostic risk predictors. According to the developed scoring system, the patients were divided into 3 subgroups, which were supposed with higher, moderate and lower risk levels. As a result, for the 3 subgroups, the 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 16.7%, 62.9% and 100% (P < 0.001); and the 10-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 16.7%, 61.8% and 98.8% (P < 0.001) respectively. It showed that this scoring system for stage II A colon cancer could help to predict long-term survival and screen out high-risk individuals for more vigorous treatment.

  12. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kazuki; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Akihito; Inukai, Michio; Yamakawa, Toshiki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Taketoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okajima, Masazumi

    2016-01-01

    Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were eligible. Patients were treated with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) for 3 months followed by capecitabine (2,500 mg/m 2 on days 1-14 every 3 weeks) for 3 months. Primary end points were frequency and the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as evaluated using the physician-based Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE) grading and the patient-based scale, self-reported Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire. Ninety-one patients were enrolled and 86 patients assessed. Eighty-four percent of patients completed the planned oxaliplatin-based therapy for 3 months, and 63% of patients completed all treatments for the full 6 months. Overall incidences of grade 3 or 4 peripheral sensory or motor neuropathy according to the CTCAE were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Regarding the peripheral sensory neuropathy, the proportion of Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (grade C-E) and CTCAE (grade 2-4) at months 1.5/3/6 were 11.3/22.1/29.4% and 5.3/4.4/11.3%, respectively (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.47). A sequential approach to adjuvant chemotherapy with 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine was tolerated by patients and associated with a low incidence of neuropathy.

  13. Objective malignancy grading of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Stereologic estimates of mean nuclear size are of prognostic value, independent of clinical stage of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekarl, M; Bæk-Hansen, T; Henrik-Nielsen, R

    1995-01-01

    a projection microscope and a simple test system in fields of vision systematically selected from the whole tumor area of one routine section, five quantitative histopathologic variables were estimated: the mean nuclear volume, the mean nuclear profile area, the density of nuclear profiles, the volume fraction...... of nuclei to tissue, and the number of mitotic profiles per 10(3) nuclear profiles. For each patient, information was recorded regarding sex, age at diagnosis, and clinical stage of disease.RESULTS: Single-factor analyses showed that a favorable prognosis was associated with early clinical stages (Stages I...... and II) and young age (P stage, age, and mean nuclear...

  14. Objective malignancy grading of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Stereologic estimates of mean nuclear size are of prognostic value, independent of clinical stage of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekarl, M; Bæk-Hansen, T; Henrik-Nielsen, R

    1995-01-01

    a projection microscope and a simple test system in fields of vision systematically selected from the whole tumor area of one routine section, five quantitative histopathologic variables were estimated: the mean nuclear volume, the mean nuclear profile area, the density of nuclear profiles, the volume fraction...... of nuclei to tissue, and the number of mitotic profiles per 10(3) nuclear profiles. For each patient, information was recorded regarding sex, age at diagnosis, and clinical stage of disease. RESULTS: Single-factor analyses showed that a favorable prognosis was associated with early clinical stages (Stages I...... and II) and young age (P stage, age, and mean nuclear...

  15. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  16. Blood transfusion and survival after surgery for Stage I and II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, K.; Kolodziejski, L.

    1993-01-01

    The records of 690 Stage I and II breast cancer patients (31% of them with transfusions), who underwent mastectomy with axillary dissection were examined whether perioperative blood transfusion might be detrimental to survival. The overall 5- and 1-year survival rates for 477 patients who had not received transfusions were 75% and 63% respectively, compared with 66% and 49% for those who had transfusions (p=0.005). There was no significant difference between the group in any other of the most important prognostic factors. An analysis of the subpopulation of patients with favorable prognostic factors yielded similar results. A multivariate analysis indicated that blood transfusion was one of the four variables significantly related to survival. (author)

  17. Clinical Benefits of Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease in the Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Koike, Makoto; Sato, Kota; Kono, Syoichiro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Nakano, Yumiko; Abe, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefits of memantine, depending on the baseline cognitive and affective conditions in real world dementia clinics, have not been completely examined. We performed the "Okayama Memantine Study II (OMS II)" to retrospectively evaluate the clinical effects of memantine monotherapy (n = 38) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients using seven batteries to assess dementia at the baseline, at 3, 6, and 12 months. Additionally, we divided 163 AD patients treated with memantine into two subgroups depending on the baseline cognitive score of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE): the MMSE OMS II showed that memantine monotherapy improved BPSD until 12 months. The higher baseline cognitive subgroup (MMSE ≥15) and the worse baseline BPSD subgroup were expected to show better effects with memantine.

  18. Hospital-level Variation in Utilization of Surgery for Clinical Stage I-II Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Mulvihill, Sean J; Skarda, David E; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Stoddard, Gregory J; Ott, Mark J; Firpo, Matthew A; Scaife, Courtney L

    2017-07-11

    To (1) evaluate rates of surgery for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) identify predictors of not undergoing surgery, (3) quantify the degree to which patient- and hospital-level factors explain differences in hospital surgery rates, and (4) evaluate the association between adjusted hospital-specific surgery rates and overall survival (OS) of patients treated at different hospitals. Curative-intent surgery for potentially resectable PDAC is underutilized in the United States. Retrospective cohort study of patients ≤85 years with clinical stage I-II PDAC in the 2004 to 2014 National Cancer Database. Mixed effects multivariable models were used to characterize hospital-level variation across quintiles of hospital surgery rates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of adjusted hospital surgery rates on OS. Of 58,553 patients without contraindications or refusal of surgery, 63.8% underwent surgery, and the rate decreased from 2299/3528 (65.2%) in 2004 to 4412/7092 (62.2%) in 2014 (P < 0.001). Adjusted hospital rates of surgery varied 6-fold (11.4%-70.9%). Patients treated at hospitals with higher rates of surgery had better unadjusted OS (median OS 10.2, 13.3, 14.2, 16.5, and 18.4 months in quintiles 1-5, respectively, P < 0.001, log-rank). Treatment at hospitals in lower surgery rate quintiles 1-3 was independently associated with mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (1.01, 1.21), HR 1.08 (1.02, 1.15), and HR 1.09 (1.04, 1.14) for quintiles 1-3, respectively, compared with quintile 5] after adjusting for patient factors, hospital type, and hospital volume. Quality improvement efforts are needed to help hospitals with low rates of surgery ensure that their patients have access to appropriate surgery.

  19. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skirnisdottir, Ingiridur; Mayrhofer, Markus; Rydåker, Maria; Åkerud, Helena; Isaksson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II) serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. The most significant differences (p < 0.01) in Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) were identified in two relatively small regions of chromosome 19; 8.0-8,8 Mbp (19 genes) and 51.5-53.0 Mbp (37 genes). Thus, 56 genes on chromosome 19 were potential candidate genes associated with clinical outcome. LOH at 19q (51-56 Mbp) was associated with shorter disease-free survival and was an independent prognostic factor for survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. In particular LOH on chromosome 19q (51-56 Mbp) was significantly (p < 0.01) associated with loss of TP53 function. The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome

  20. Baseline characteristics of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 and stage 4 in spain: the MERENA observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain information on cardiovascular morbidity, hypertension control, anemia and mineral metabolism based on the analysis of the baseline characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study of patients with stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney diseases (CKD. Methods Multicenter study from Spanish government hospital-based Nephrology outpatient clinics involving 1129 patients with CKD stages 3 (n = 434 and 4 (n = 695 defined by GFR calculated by the MDRD formula. Additional analysis was performed with GFR calculated using the CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault formula. Results In the cohort as a whole, median age 70.9 years, morbidity from all cardiovascular disease (CVD was very high (39.1%. In CKD stage 4, CVD prevalence was higher than in stage 3 (42.2 vs 35.6% p 300 mg/day was present in more than 60% of patients and there was no significant differences between stages 3 and 4 CKD (1.2 ± 1.8 and 1.3 ± 1.8 g/day, respectively. A majority of the patients had hemoglobin levels greater than 11 g/dL (91.1 and 85.5% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively p Conclusion This study provides an overview of key clinical parameters in patients with CKD Stages 3 and 4 where delivery or care was largely by nephrologists working in a network of hospital-based clinics of the Spanish National Healthcare System.

  1. Esophageal dysfunction in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttrup, I; Suttrup, J; Suntrup-Krueger, S; Siemer, M-L; Bauer, J; Hamacher, C; Oelenberg, S; Domagk, D; Dziewas, R; Warnecke, T

    BACKGROUND: Dysphagia is a clinically relevant symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to pronounced reduction in quality of life and other severe complications. Parkinson's disease-related dysphagia may affect the oral and pharyngeal, as well as the esophageal phase of swallowing.

  2. [Etiological analysis of 264 cases with chronic kidney disease stage 2 to 5 in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qianfan; Shen, Qian; Xu, Hong; Sun, Li; Tang, Xiaoshan; Fang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Haimei; Zhai, Yihui; Bi, Yunli; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    To study and summarize the etiology of children patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 to 5 seen in Children's Hospital of Fudan University from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013. By complying with the NKF-K/DOQI guidelines, we collected data of 264 cases of children patients with CKD stage 2-5 from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 in the medical record system of Children's Hospital of Fudan University. And we retrospectively analyzed their age and CKD stage at first diagnosis, primary diseases, complications, etc. In the collected 264 cases, 52 cases (19.7%) were diagnosed at stage 2, 67 (25.4%) at stage 3, 52 (19.7%) at stage 4 and 93 (35.2%) at stage 5. For disease causes, 116 cases (43.9%) had congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), 61 cases (23.1%) had glomerular disease, 15 (5.7%) had hereditary kidney disease, 14 (5.3%) had other diseases and in 58 cases (22.0%) the causes of disease were unknown. In the group with age between 0 and 3.0 and 3.1 and 6.0 years, 57.1% (24 cases) and 60.0% (30 cases) had primary disease with CAKUT. In the group with age older than 10 years, 49.2% (30 cases) had primary disease with glomerular disease and 32.0% (32 cases) with unknown causes. The major cause of CKD stage 2-5 in children in our hospital during the last ten years was CAKUT (43.9%), followed by glomerular disease (23.1%). The primary diseases of CKD were significantly different between the 2 age groups. CAKUT was more common in infants and preschool children while for adolescents, glomerular disease was the major cause.

  3. Effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy with mindfulness in end-stage renal disease hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyung Sohn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD undergoing hemodialysis (HD experience depression. Depression influences patient quality of life (QOL, dialysis compliance, and medical comorbidity. We developed and applied a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT program including mindfulness meditation for ESRD patients undergoing HD, and measured changes in QOL, mood, anxiety, perceived stress, and biochemical markers. Methods : We conducted group CBT over a 12-week period with seven ESRD patients undergoing HD and suffering from depression. QOL, mood, anxiety, and perceived stress were measured at baseline and at weeks 8 and 12 using the World Health Organization Quality of Life scale, abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. Biochemical markers were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. The Temperament and Character Inventory was performed to assess patient characteristics before starting group CBT. Results : The seven patients showed significant improvement in QOL, mood, anxiety, and perceived stress after 12 weeks of group CBT. WHOQOL-BREF and the self-rating scales, BDI-II and BAI, showed continuous improvement across the 12-week period. HAM-D scores showed significant improvement by week 8; PSS showed significant improvement after week 8. Serum creatinine levels also improved significantly following the 12 week period. Conclusion : In this pilot study, a CBT program which included mindfulness meditation enhanced overall mental health and biochemical marker levels in ESRD patients undergoing HD.

  4. Radiotherapy for primary localized (stage I and II) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunaba, Kohji; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Okada, Norihiko; Amagasa, Teruo; Enomoto, Shoji; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of primary localized (Stage I: 24 cases and Stage II: 13 cases) non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) of the oral cavity. Methods and Materials: In total, 37 patients (27 male, 10 female) with primary localized NHL of the oral cavity have been treated with radiotherapy alone (23 cases) or radiation with chemotherapy (14 cases). The age range was 29 to 86 years (median: 65). Clinical and treatment variables with potential prognostic significance for survival were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Of the 37 patients, 31 (84%) had intermediate-grade lymphomas and six (14%) had high-grade lymphomas. Four patients showed necrotic ulcer in the central portion of the hard palate. Results: The 5-year actuarial survival rate for all cases was 73%. The 5-year survival rates for intermediate-grade and high-grade lymphoma were 85% and 14%, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were histologic grade of malignancy (p = 0.02) and central necrotic ulcer in the tumor (p = 0.02). Chemotherapy did not improve survival (p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that radiotherapy alone may be approved as the treatment for localized oral NHL with no ulceration and intermediate histology. However, patients with high-grade lymphoma and/or necrotic ulcer are difficult to cure with radiation alone and aggressive treatment should be advocated to improve survival

  5. Stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.; Coste, A.; Martin, M.; Levy, C.; Raynal, M.; Pavlovitch, J.M.; Peynegre, R.; Perquin, B.; Bourgeois, J.P. le

    1991-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 233 evaluable patients with stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by definitive brachytherapy. Minimum follow-up is 3 years. Treatment of the neck was chosen by a multidisciplinary team, according to age, medical status and availability for follow-up. One hundred and ten patients (47 percent) underwent elective neck dissection (END), 28 (25 percent) had positive nodes and received neck irradiation post-operatively. One hundred and twenty-three patients (53 percent) were regularly followed up only, with therapeutic neck dissection (TND) reserved for cases of node relapses. In the END group, there were 19 neck relapses (17 percent): 12/60 (20 percent) in patients with mobile tongue carcinoma and 7/50 (14 percent) in patients with floor of the mouth carcinoma. Salvage treatment was successful in 13-21 (62 percent) cases. Ten-year survival is 37 percent for the END-group and 31 percent for the TND group. Tumour stage and infiltration into underlying tissues increased the probability of neck relapse and death. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that patients treated in the TND group had a higher probability of death than patients treated in the END group (p<0.04). (author). 30 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  6. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  7. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  8. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification

  9. A study of the impact of disease burden in quality of life of people with pre-End-Stage and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Georgiadou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a common chronic disease accompanied by severe complications. It is the leading cause of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD requiring management either by haemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD. The chronicity of the disease, and its complications, affects the psychological, family and social life of the patients and their Quality of Life (QoL. Aim: of the present study was to estimate the disease burden of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN during pre-ESRD and during End-Stage Renal Disease. Methods: A sample of 103 patients with DN treated at the General Hospital of Veria were studied during May and June 2016. The study was conducted using the Dialysis Symptoms Index (DSI for the assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD symptom load and the European Quality of Life (EuroQol questionnaire for assessing the QoL of patients in the Renal Outpatient Clinic, Haemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Unit. Results: It was found that the Renal Replacement Method (HD or PD, the presence of DM and CKD’s stage affect significantly the patients’ self-assessment regarding painful symptoms of DN. Furthermore, the above factors have major impact on some aspects of patients’ QoL, such as mobility and self-care. Conclusions: Pre-End Stage patients experience more severe painful symptoms of DN compared to patients on Renal Replacement Therapies.

  10. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage III with special reference to tumour burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Nissen, N I

    1988-01-01

    143 patients with Hodgkin's disease stage III (65 PS III, 78 CS III) were treated with radiotherapy alone (33 patients), combination chemotherapy alone (56 patients), or radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy (54 patients). They were followed till death or from 7 to 191 months. Prognostic fac...... regarding early stage disease to the effect that tumour burden is the single most important prognostic factor in Hodgkin's disease....

  11. Optimization of treatment of children with 3 stage Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobikov, S.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    147 children younger than 15 years suffering from the 3rd stage of Hodgkins children is performed using gamma therapeutic Rocus type devices and betatron (B5M-25) and linear accelerator (LUEh-25) of 15-27.5 MeV energy electrons. Immediate and delayed treatment results are evaluated. Unfavourable clinical factors effecting the recurrence frequency are revealed. Inconsistence of supporting chemotherapy in the reduction of the number of recurrents is confirmed

  12. COPD stage and risk of hospitalization for infectious disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Lange, Peter; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    .24 to 1.56], and 2.21 [95% CI, 1.84 to 2.64], respectively; p=0.001). In subgroup analysis, the increased risk was associated with lower and upper respiratory tract infections, pyothorax, and tuberculosis, but not with influenza, sepsis, skin infections, urinary tract infections, diarrheal disease......BACKGROUND: Respiratory tract infections are a frequent complication of COPD, but little is known about the incidence, association, and risk of infectious diseases related to impaired lung function. METHODS: Participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study had lung function measured at baseline......, or other infectious diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of obstructive lung disease is a significant predictor of IDH caused by respiratory tract infections, but not of hospitalizations due to infections outside the respiratory system....

  13. Changes of serum cortisol and plasma angiotensin-II (AT-II) levels in patients with open chest surgery during peri-operative stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunyun; Tian Runhua; Zhao Huiyuan; Li Xiaoqin; Wang Ling

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the systemic stress reaction in patients with open chest surgery through measurement of the changes of serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels during peri-operative stage. Methods: Serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels were measured with RIA in 35 patients underwent open chest surgery both before and after the operative procedure. Results: The serum level of cortisol and plasma levels of AT-II were significantly higher after operation than those before operation ( P < 0.05 ). Also, the systolic pressure and heart rate were increased significantly (P<0.05). The post-operative heart rate was significantly positively correlated with both cortisol and AT-II levels (P<0.05). Conclusion: Stress reaction is evident in patients after open chest surgery with increase of serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels. The stress reaction, if excessive, should be properly dealt with. (authors)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Nigrostriatal System: Biomarkers of Parkinson’s Disease Stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopes, Lucie; Grolez, Guillaume; Moreau, Caroline; Lopes, Renaud; Ryckewaert, Gilles; Carrière, Nicolas; Auger, Florent; Laloux, Charlotte; Petrault, Maud; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Bordet, Regis; Defebvre, Luc; Jissendi, Patrice; Delmaire, Christine; Devos, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD); R2* values reflect iron content related to high levels of oxidative stress, whereas volume and/or shape changes reflect neuronal death. We sought to assess iron overload in the nigrostriatal system and characterize its relationship with focal and overall atrophy of the striatum in the pivotal stages of PD. Methods Twenty controls and 70 PD patients at different disease stages (untreated de novo patients, treated early-stage patients and advanced-stage patients with L-dopa-related motor complications) were included in the study. We determined the R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus, together with striatal volume and shape analysis. We also measured R2* in an acute MPTP mouse model and in a longitudinal follow-up two years later in the early-stage PD patients. Results The R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly higher in de novo PD patients than in controls. Early-stage patients displayed significantly higher R2* values in the substantia nigra (with changes in striatal shape), relative to de novo patients. Measurements after a two-year follow-up in early-stage patients and characterization of the acute MPTP mouse model confirmed that R2* changed rapidly with disease progression. Advanced-stage patients displayed significant atrophy of striatum, relative to earlier disease stages. Conclusion Each pivotal stage in PD appears to be characterized by putative nigrostriatal MRI biomarkers: iron overload at the de novo stage, striatal shape changes at early-stage disease and generalized striatal atrophy at advanced disease. PMID:27035571

  15. Improved Survival With Radiation Therapy in Stage I-II Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Matthew W., E-mail: matthew.jackson@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rusthoven, Chad G.; Jones, Bernard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kamdar, Manali [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is an uncommon lymphoma for which trials are few with small patient numbers. The role of radiation therapy (RT) after standard immunochemotherapy for early-stage disease has never been studied prospectively. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to evaluate PMBCL and the impact of RT on outcomes. Methods and Materials: We queried the SEER database for patients with stage I-II PMBCL diagnosed from 2001 to 2011. Retrievable data included age, gender, race (white/nonwhite), stage, extranodal disease, year of diagnosis, and use of RT as a component of definitive therapy. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) estimates, univariate (UVA) log-rank and multivariate (MVA) Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. Results: Two hundred fifty patients with stage I-II disease were identified, with a median follow-up time of 39 months (range, 3-125 months). The median age was 36 years (range, 18-89 years); 61% were female; 76% were white; 45% had stage I disease, 60% had extranodal disease, and 55% were given RT. The 5-year OS for the entire cohort was 86%. On UVA, OS was improved with RT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.446, P=.029) and decreased in association with nonwhite race (HR 2.70, P=.006). The 5-year OS was 79% (no RT) and 90% (RT). On MVA, white race and RT remained significantly associated with improved OS (P=.007 and .018, respectively). The use of RT decreased over time: 61% for the 67 patients whose disease was diagnosed from 2001 to 2005 and 53% in the 138 patients treated from 2006 to 2010. Conclusion: This retrospective population-based analysis is the largest PMBCL dataset to date and demonstrates a significant survival benefit associated with RT. Nearly half of patients treated in the United States do not receive RT, and its use appears to be declining. In the absence of phase 3 data, the use of RT should be strongly considered for its survival benefit in early-stage

  16. Primary localized stages I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the nasopharynx: a retrospective 17-year single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Mozaffari, Mohammad Amin Nazer; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to define the natural history, clinicopathological findings, prognostic factors, and treatment outcome of 43 patients with localized stages I and II primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the nasopharynx, followed up in a single institution over a 17-year period. Forty-three (13 women and 30 men) consecutive patients with localized stages I (N = 12) and II (N = 31) primary nasopharyngeal NHL were treated in our institution between 1990 and 2007. The pathologic reports were classified according to the International Working Formulation (N = 22) or Revised European-American Lymphoma classification (N = 21). The vast majority of patients (88%) were managed with a sequential combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Chemotherapy mainly consisted of 4-8 (median 6) cycles of CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone). Involved-field radiation therapy with a median dose of 44 Gy was delivered to the primary site and entire cervical lymph nodes. The median age of the patients was 53 years (range, 6 to 86 years). The majority of the patients (70%) had high-grade histology. B-cell types represented 67% of the cases, among which diffuse large B cell was the most common histological subtype. After a median follow-up of 70 months, the 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival were 58.8% and 70.6%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, age less than or equal to 30 years (hazard ratio (HR) = 5.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.69-16.76), elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (HR = 3.69, 95% CI = 1.43-9.51), and modified International Prognostic Index with more than or equal to two risk factors (HR = 17.99, 95% CI = 2.32-139.30) retained statistical significance. Our limited data suggest that primary nasopharyngeal NHL tends to have aggressive histology and unfavorable clinical course with poor outcome, despite a considerably localized disease at the time of presentation and high

  17. The prognostic value of microRNA-126 and microvessel density in patients with stage II colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Kjær-Frifeldt, Sanne; Morgenthaler, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in malignant tumour growth and the metastatic process. We analysed the prognostic value of two angiogenesis parameters, microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) and microvessel density (MVD), in a population based cohort of patients operated for stage II colon cancer...... estimate was not associated with either RF-CSS, p = 0.49, or OS, p = 0.94.CONCLUSION: The current population based study of patients operated for stage II colon cancer demonstrated correlations between several prognostic unfavourable characteristics and miRNA-126 and argues for a possible prognostic impact...

  18. End stage renal disease in French Guiana (data from R.E.I.N registry): South American or French?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochemont, Dévi Rita; Meddeb, Mohamed; Roura, Raoul; Couchoud, Cécile; Nacher, Mathieu; Basurko, Célia

    2017-06-30

    End-Stage renal disease (ESRD) causes considerable morbidity and mortality, and significantly alters patients' quality of life. There are very few published data on this problem in the French Overseas territories. The development of a registry on end stage renal disease in French Guiana in 2011 allowed to describe the magnitude of this problem in the region for the first time. Using data from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network registry (R.E.I.N). Descriptive statistics on quantitative and qualitative variables in the registry were performed on prevalent cases and incident cases in 2011, 2012 and 2013. French Guiana has one of the highest ESRD prevalence and incidence in France. The two main causes of ESRD were hypertensive and diabetic nephropathies. The French Guianese population had a different demographic profile (younger, more women, more migrants) than in mainland France. Most patients had at least one comorbidity, predominantly (95.3%) hypertension. In French Guiana dialysis was initiated in emergency for 71.3% of patients versus 33% in France (p < 0.001). These first results give important public health information: i) End stage renal disease has a very high prevalence relative to mainland France ii) Patients have a different demographic profile and enter care late in the course of their renal disease. These data are closer to what is observed in the Caribbean or in Latin America than in Mainland France.

  19. Predictive value of PET-CT for pathological response in stages II and III breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García-Esquinas, Marta A; Arrazola García, Juan; García-Sáenz, José A; Furió-Bacete, V; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel E; Ortega Candil, Aída; Cabrera Martín, María N; Carreras Delgado, José L

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively study the value of PET-CT with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response of locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients. A written informed consent and approval were obtained from the Ethics Committee. PET-CT accuracy in the prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC was studied in primary tumors and lymph node metastasis in 43 women (mean age: 50 years: range: 27-71 years) with histologically proven breast cancer between December 2009 and January 2011. PET-CT was performed at baseline and after NAC. SUV(max) percentage changes (ΔSUV(max)) were compared with pathology findings at surgery. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to discriminate between locoregional pCR and non-pCR. In patients not achieving pCR, it was investigated if ΔSUV(max) could accurately identify the residual cancer burden (RCB) classes: RCB-I (minimal residual disease (MRD)), RCB-II (moderate RD), and RCB-III (extensive RD). pCR was obtained in 11 patients (25.6%). Residual disease was found in 32 patients (74.4%): 16 (37.2%) RCB-I, 15 (35.6%) RCB-II and 2 (4.7%) RCB-III. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 90.9%, 90.6%, and 90.7%, respectively. Specificity was 94.1% in the identification of a subset of patients who had either pCR or MRD. Accuracy of ΔSUV(max) in the locoregional disease of stages II and III breast cancer patients after NAC is high for the identification of pCR cases. Its specificity is potentially sufficient to identify a subgroup of patients who could be managed with conservative surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  20. Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease stage III with special reference to tumour burden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Nissen, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    of lymphographically involved regions), histologic subtype, B-symptoms, number of involved regions, mediastinal involvement, pretreatment ESR, sex, age, laparotomy, and substage were examined in multivariate analysis. With regard to disease-free survival, total tumour burden (intraabdominal and peripheral...... regarding early stage disease to the effect that tumour burden is the single most important prognostic factor in Hodgkin's disease....

  1. Cognitive impairment in early-stage non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Helle Cecilie Viekilde; Løkkegaard, A; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) are common. PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing PDD. Knowledge of cognition in early-stages PD is essential in understanding and predicting the dementia process....

  2. Technical aspects of renal denervation in end-stage renal disease patients with challenging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Alessio; Da Ros, Valerio; Morosetti, Daniele; Onofrio, Silvia D; Rovella, Valentina; Di Daniele, Nicola; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We describe our preliminary experience with percutaneous renal denervation in end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension and challenging anatomy, in terms of the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this procedure. Four patients with end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension (mean hemodialysis time, 2.3 years) who had been taking at least four antihypertensive medications underwent percutaneous renal denervation. Renal artery eligibility included the absence of prior renal artery interventions, vessel stenosis renal denervation is a feasible approach for end-stage renal disease patients with resistant hypertension with encouraging short-term preliminary results in terms of procedural efficacy and safety.

  3. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48 were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non

  4. Hypertension, end-stage renal disease and mesangiocapillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methamphetamine abuse has risen dramatically in South Africa. The chronic effects of abuse on the kidneys and blood pressure have not been documented. This study reviewed patients referred for evaluation of kidney disease and/or hypertension, who had been abusing methamphetamines. Methods: The ...

  5. Hepatitis C: What Happens in End-Stage Liver Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015. Chopra S. Clinical manifestations and natural history of hepatitis C virus infection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 27, 2015. March 25, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hepatitis-c/expert-answers/hepatitis-c/FAQ-20058533 . Mayo ...

  6. Palliative care in end-stage valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jill M; Cooper, Stephanie; Kirkpatrick, James N

    2017-08-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD), particularly aortic valve disease, is prevalent with increasing incidence. When surgery is not possible, or when risks outweigh benefits, percutaneous treatment options may offer effective alternatives. However, procedures may not always go as planned, and frail patients or those whose symptoms are caused by other comorbidities may not benefit from valve intervention at all. Significant effort should be made to assess frailty, comorbidities and patient goals prior to intervention. Palliative care (PC) should play a critical role in the care of patients with severe valve disease. PC is specialised medical care that aims to optimise health-related quality of life by managing symptoms and clarifying patient values and goals of care. It should be implemented at the time of diagnosis and continue throughout the disease course. Because of the paucity of studies dedicated to the provision of PC to patients with advanced VHD, further research is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Micro satellite instability in colorectal cancer stage II. Hospital Central de las fuerzas armadas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Valle, A; Santander G; Camejo, N; Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: micro satellite instability (MSI) is a good prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC) located. Its value as a predictive marker against adjuvant treatment of chemotherapy (CT) has been shown fluoropyrimidine in various publications. The MSI occurs in 15% of colorectal tumors and sporadic in 90% of tumors in the context of colorectal cancer syndrome hereditary nonpolyposis. In Uruguay there are no studies about this phenomenon. Objective: To determine the incidence of micro satellite instability in a sample of patients using the Hospital Central de las fuerzas armadas oncology service, association with a compatible family history and the histological features of the tumors associated therewith. Methods: The medical records of patients were analyzed with CRC diagnosed stage II between 01/2001 and 12/2009. Data of the patients were analyzed which had complete histology and evolution. Results: 30/52 patients (57.6%) were analyzed. 40% had a detected MSI by kits for Pcr (polymerase chain reaction) to D2S123, D5S250, D17S346, BAT25 and BAT26 according to the Bethesda criteria. In those patients they filed a MSI: the median age was 70 years; 58.3% male. No patient had a family history consistent with HNPCC. 5.6% (3) they received Adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Regarding tumor characteristics: 75% (9) were T3, and T4 were 25% (3); 8.3% histologic grade I (1) II 58.3% (7) 8.3% III (1) without Data 33% (6). This tumor lymphocyte infiltration was reported in 25% (3), absent 33.3% (4), not reported in 41.6% (5). Conclusions: This is the first analysis of these characteristics carried out in Uruguay. The same has been detected MSI percentage higher than reported in the literature International. In either case a compatible family history met HNPCC

  8. The white band disease type II pathogen in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L Gil-Agudelo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The white band disease type I (WBD-I epizootic event of the early 1980’s resulted in significant changes in the structure and composition of coral communities throughout the wider Caribbean. The disease decimated populations of acroporid corals throughout their geographic distribution and it is still affecting the surviving and recovering populations of these corals in a number of localities in the wider Caribbean. The putative pathogen for this syndrome (WBD-I was never identified. A second pattern of white band was described later as white band type II (WBD-II. A potential pathogen named Vibrio charchariae was identified but Koch’s postulates were never fulfilled. In this work, we present results of a preliminary approach to confirm the identity of the pathogen of WBD-II. During the fall months of 2004, samples of Acropora cervicornis with signs of WBD-II were collected from a small population in Mario reef, an isolated patch reef off La Parguera, southwest coast of Puerto Rico. Bacteria extracted from these samples were isolated in TCBS agar, grown in Glycerol Seawater agar, and then used to inoculate separated, healthy-looking colonies of the same population in the same reef. Isolation, culture, and inoculations of bacteria were conducted under controlled conditions within hours of collection, and no microorganisms that were not already in the reef community were introduced with these experiments. Some of the newly inoculated colonies developed the disease signs within 24 hr. These were subsequently sampled and bacterial re-isolated to be identified, thus complying with the first steps to fulfill Koch ’s postulates for this disease. Rates of advance of the disease signs varied between 0.5 and 2 cm/day. Preliminary analyses indicated that the potential cause of WBD-II is a Vibrio species very close to Vibrio harveyi, a synonymy of V. charchariae. All inoculated coral colonies that developed the signs of WBD-II, behaved as the naturally

  9. Tumors with unmethylated MLH1 and the CpG island methylator phenotype are associated with a poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Liu, Yanliang; Li, Kai; Wan, Weiwei; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kerner, Zachary; Baylin, Stephen B; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-12-27

    We previously developed a novel tumor subtype classification model for duodenal adenocarcinomas based on a combination of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and MLH1 methylation status. Here, we tested the prognostic value of this model in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Tumors were assigned to CIMP+/MLH1-unmethylated (MLH1-U), CIMP+/MLH1-methylated (MLH1-M), CIMP-/MLH1-U, or CIMP-/MLH1-M groups. Age, tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, and mucin production differed among the four patient subgroups, and CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors were more likely to have lymphovascular invasion and mucin production. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among the four groups. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status was predictive of both DFS and OS, and DFS and OS were shortest in CIMP+/MLH1-U stage II CRC patients. These results suggest that tumor subtype classification based on the combination of CIMP and MLH1 methylation status is informative in stage II CRC patients, and that CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors exhibit aggressive features and are associated with poor clinical outcomes.

  10. Estimating the adjuvant chemotherapy effect in elderly stage II and III colon cancer patients in an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Cha, In-Ho; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Roh, Jae Kyung; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been known as a standard treatment for patients with resected colon cancer. However, in elderly colon cancer patients, the characteristics of patients are heterogeneous with regard to life expectancy and comorbidities. Thus, with regard to the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer, it is difficult to extrapolate data of clinical trials from the younger into the older general population. Data for 382 elderly colon cancer patients were analyzed: 217 in Stage II and 165 in Stage III. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy was evaluated in elderly colon cancer patients after a match by the propensity score method. For matched patients with Stage II colon cancer, there was no significant efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in the risk of death during all follow-up periods (P-value, 0.06-0.37). Though there was a tendency that the adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the death rate during the follow-up periods, it was not statistically significant. In the case of Stage III, the adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly effective in matched patients for 5-year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.90) and overall survival (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.94). Adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients with Stage II colon cancer is not effective, whereas elderly patients with Stage III with adjuvant chemotherapy appear to have a better survival rate in the general population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Clinical significance of determination of serum insulin-like growth factor II levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Changming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of the changes of serum insulinlike growth factor II (IGF-II) levels in patients with chronic obstruive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods: The serum IGF-II levels was determined with radioimmunoassay in 60 patients with COPD and 30 controls. Results: The serum IGF-II levels in patients with COPD were significantly higher than those in controls (0.65 ± 0.22μg/L vs 0.51±0.18μg/L, P<0.01). There were no significant differences among the levels in patients of different stages (stages I, II, III). Levels of IGF-II were significantly higher in patients succumbed to the dis- ease than those in patients recoverd (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD, especially in those succumbed. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of 99Tcm-trodat-1 SPECT/CT imaging in the diagnosis of parkinson's disease in early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohua; Tai Jian; Zhang Fuhai; Xiao Qian; Jia Qiang; Dong Feng

    2004-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a selective loss of dopamine in the striatum with age. At present, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is mainly remained in clinical standard. According to the clinical symptoms and the response to DOPA treatment, it is not difficult to diagnose typical PD. But it is difficult to diagnose early stage PD, which lacks the typical clinical symptoms and signs. A 99Tcm -labeled tropane derivative that binds to dopamine transporter with high selectivity is [2- [ [2- [ [ [3- (4-chlorophenyl)- 8-methyl- 8-azabicyclo [3,2,1 ] oct-2-yl]methyl] (2-mercaptoethyl)amino] eth yl]amino]ethanethiolato(3-)-N2,N2',S2,S2'] oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)] (TRODAT-1). Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical application of 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 SPECT/CT imaging in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) in early stage. Methods: Twenty-four patients with early-stage idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited. For all patients, the severity was assessed by the Hoehnand Yahrscale. Twenty-four early stage PD patients (15 Hoehn Yahr stage I and 9 Hoehn Yahr stage II), eight advanced PD patients and ten healthy volunteers (five men, five women) were studied by 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 SPECT/CT imaging. 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 was prepared from a lyophilized kit. Brain SPECT imaging was performed 2 hours after injection, using GE Discovery VH equipped with FanBeam collimators. Data were obtained using energy window of 20% centered on 140 KEV for 99Tcm. The brain SPECT data were acquired after Hawkeye CT acquisition. Regions of interest were delineated over the striata and the cerebella, and the ratios of striatum-to-cerebellum (ST/CB) were calculated. Specific uptake in the striatum and its subregions, including the putamen and caudate nucleus, was calculated and compared with that of the other side as well as that of healthy volunteers. Results: Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging of the 10 healthy volunteers showed

  13. Epidemiological Transition of End-Stage Kidney Disease in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al Ismaili

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: The incidence and prevalence of ESKD has increased progressively over last 30 years. This is anticipated to continue at an even higher rate in view of the progressive rise in noncommunicable diseases. Continuous improvement in registries is required to improve capturing of ESKD patients for providing accurate data to health authorities, and enhancing public awareness of the magnitude, future trends, treatments, and outcomes regarding ESKD.

  14. The drama of the continuous increase in end-stage renal failure in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlík, I; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, G; Ritz, E

    1998-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus has become the leading cause of end-stage renal failure in many countries of Western Europe. In all European countries, even in those with a relatively low prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, the number of patients with type II diabetes mellitus admitted for renal replacement therapy has recently increased continuously. Survival and medical rehabilitation of patients with type II diabetes on renal replacement therapy is significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients. It is obvious that in order to stem the tide, intense efforts are necessary (i) to inform the medical community about the renal risk of type II diabetes and the striking effectiveness of preventive measures, (ii) to provide better care for diabetic patients, and (iii) to reduce the high prevalence of diabetes in the population by modification of the Western life style.

  15. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Streets and stages: urban renewal and the arts after World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, Julia L

    2010-01-01

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in Manhattan and the revitalization of the Brooklyn Academy of Music in Brooklyn offer insights into the intersection of arts and urbanization after World War II. This intra-city comparison shows the aggrandizing pull of the international arena in the shaping of Lincoln Center and the arts it featured in contrast to the local focus and debate that transformed how BAM fit into its Brooklyn neighborhood. The performing arts, bound as they are to a moment fused in space and time, reveal the making of place within grandiose formal buildings as well as outside on the streets that surround them—and it is, perhaps, that tensile connection between stages and streets that informs the relevancy of both the institution and the arts it features. At a time when the suburbs pulled more and more people, the arts provided a counterforce in cities, as magnet and stimulus. The arts were used as compensation for the demolition and re-building of a neighborhood in urban renewal, but they also exposed the more complex social dynamics that underpinned the transformation of the mid-20th century American city from a segregated to a multi-faceted place.

  17. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  18. Prevalence, predictors, and survival in pulmonary hypertension related to end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Hasseriis; Iversen, Martin Jes; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, prognostic importance, and factors that predict the presence and degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed with right heart catheterization (RHC) in patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain unclear....

  19. Impact of end stage kidney disease on costs and outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Goyal

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: The presence of end stage kidney disease in hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection is associated with higher mortality, a longer length of stay, and a higher cost of hospitalization.

  20. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peritoneal dialysis (PD) in India has made renal replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with ... Keywords: Peritoneal dialysis, End stage renal disease, Renal replacement therapy ..... adherence to the dialysis program is often poor.

  1. Comparison of VATS and Robotic Approaches For Clinical Stage I and II NSCLC Using the STS Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Brian E.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Kim, Sunghee; Cerfolio, Robert J.; Park, Bernard J.; Farivar, Alexander S.; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W.; Burfeind, William R.; Block, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data from selected centers show that robotic lobectomy (RL) is safe, effective and has comparable 30-day mortality to video assisted lobectomy (VATS). However, widespread adoption of RL is controversial. We used the STS-GTS-Database to evaluate quality metrics for these two minimally invasive lobectomy techniques. Methods A database query for primary clinical stage I or II NSCLC at high volume centers from 2009 to 2013 identified 1,220 RLs and 12,378 VATS. Quality metrics evaluated included operative morbidity, 30-day mortality and nodal upstaging (NU), defined as cN0 to pN1. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate NU. Results RL patients were older, less active, less likely to be an ever smoker, and had higher BMI (all p<0.05). They were also more likely to have coronary heart disease or hypertension (all p<0.001) and to have had preoperative mediastinal staging (p<0.0001). RL operative times were longer (median 186 vs 173 min, p<0.001); all other operative parameters were similar. All postoperative outcomes were similar including complications and 30-day mortality (RL 0.6% vs VATS 0.8%, p=0.4). Median length of stay was 4 days for both, but a higher proportion of RLs stayed < 4 days: 48% vs 39%, p<0.001. NU overall was similar (p=0.6), but with trends favoring VATS in the cT1b group, and RL in the cT2a group. Conclusions RL patients had more co-morbidities and RL operative times were longer, but quality outcome measures including complications, hospital stay, 30-day mortality, and NU suggest RL and VATS are equivalent. PMID:27209613

  2. PARTIAL SPLENECTOMY IN CHILDREN - AN ALTERNATIVE FOR SPLENECTOMY IN THE PATHOLOGICAL STAGING OF HODGKINS-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, HJ; TAMMINGA, RYJ; TIMENS, W

    1994-01-01

    Background: The more accurate staging of Hodgkin's disease in children is achieved with a staging laparotomy and splenectomy. A disadvantage of the splenectomy is the high risk for an overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis (OPSI). Therefore, the partial splenectomy was introduced as an alternative to

  3. Legg-Perthes-Calve disease: staging by MRI using gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducou le Pointe, H. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Haddad, S. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Silberman, B. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Filipe, G. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Monroc, M. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France)); Montagne, J.P. (Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-one patients (26 hips) with typical signs of Legg-Perthes-Calve (LPC) disease on plain radiographs were explored by MRI. Patients were imaged with a 0.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium-enhanced spinecho MR images were obtained after nonenhanced T1-weighted (spin-echo) and T2[sup *]-weighted (gradient-echo) images. Four different areas were identified in the femoral epiphysis (necrosis, regenerative, cartilaginous and normal fatty bone tissue). The histological evolution of LPC is well described by Catterall and others. Comparing their descriptions with out MR findings, we suggest classification ofLPC into five phases: necrosis: regeneration, reconstruction, reossification and sequelae. (orig.)

  4. Dependence of the sacroiliac indices of the X-ray stage of ankylosing spondylitis (Behterev's disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlychkov, Kh.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 241 patients (482 sacroiliac indices) in different X-ray stage of the disease were studied and the data obtained were correlated with the sacroiliac indices in a control group of 104 normal subjects (208 sacroiliac indices). Sacroiliac indices were obtained by quantitative examination of the zones of interest of the sacroiliac joints and the sacrum, 3 hours after intravenous injection of 99 sup(m)Tc-pyrophosphate in indicator activities of 1.85 MBq/kg. The sacroiliac index levels increased with advancing X-ray stage of the disease within the I-III stage span; in the IV-th X-ray stage there was obvious decrease in these values. There appeared to exist statistically significant differences in the sacroiliac index values during all X-ray stages of the disease, as compared to the data obtained in the control group of healthy individuals (P<0.001). The significance level of the differences between neighbouring stages was low. Peak percentage of negative findings was observed in the zero stage (14.3) and in stage IV (11.7). The high percentage of positive findings in zero stage patients (15.7 per cent) is an evidence of the major sensitivity of quantitative scintigraphy in comparison with X-ray method of examination. (author)

  5. Confidence interval estimation of the difference between two sensitivities to the early disease stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tuochuan; Kang, Le; Hutson, Alan; Xiong, Chengjie; Tian, Lili

    2014-03-01

    Although most of the statistical methods for diagnostic studies focus on disease processes with binary disease status, many diseases can be naturally classified into three ordinal diagnostic categories, that is normal, early stage, and fully diseased. For such diseases, the volume under the ROC surface (VUS) is the most commonly used index of diagnostic accuracy. Because the early disease stage is most likely the optimal time window for therapeutic intervention, the sensitivity to the early diseased stage has been suggested as another diagnostic measure. For the purpose of comparing the diagnostic abilities on early disease detection between two markers, it is of interest to estimate the confidence interval of the difference between sensitivities to the early diseased stage. In this paper, we present both parametric and non-parametric methods for this purpose. An extensive simulation study is carried out for a variety of settings for the purpose of evaluating and comparing the performance of the proposed methods. A real example of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is analyzed using the proposed approaches. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. CT diagnosis of appendicitis. Usefulness for staging of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Sugimura, Kazurou

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine signs and indexes useful for differentiating grades of appendicitis (catarrhal, phlegmonous, gangrenous). We assessed CT findings of 98 cases of appendicitis retrospectively. Nonenhanced CT scans were obtained in 83 cases and enhanced scans in 15 cases. No patients were given oral or colon contrast media. Each examination was performed from the level of the diaphragm to the pubic symphysis with 10 mm or 7 mm slice thickness and intervals. All images were examined for CT signs of appendicitis and the diameter and appearance of the appendix. We statistically analyzed the results and white blood cell count. We detected an abnormal appendix in 88 cases. Two CT signs identified and their sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, included fat stranding around the appendix (92.2%, 81.8%, 90.9%) and indistinct wall of the appendix (63.9%, 94.2%, 81.8%). The diameter of the appendix differed significantly among the three grades (p=0.0008). The appearance of the appendix could be divided into 5 types, which exhibited correlation with the grades, although white blood cell count did not (p=0.1988). Fat stranding and indistinct wall, and appendix diameter and CT appearances provided useful signs and indexes for staging of appendicitis. (author)

  7. Evolution of overall CT in the staging of patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurizi Enrici, R.; Capua, A.; Osti, M.F.; Sarra, R.; Tombolini, V.; Anselmo, A.P.; Campodonico, F.

    1991-01-01

    From 1983 through 1989, 141 untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease underwent CT of the abdomen. They subsequently underwent staging laparotomy plus splenectomy and multiple biopsies of liver and lymph nodes, at the Institute of Radiology and Hematology, University 'La Sapienza', Rome. CT results were compared with surgical findings to evaluate CT sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy. The cases from this series were divided into two groups depending on the characteristics of the CT scanners employed. From 1983 to 1985, 78 patients were examined with 3nd-generation CT units; from 1986 to 1989, 63 patients underwent CT performed with 3rd-generation scanner. The results from the two groups were analyzed according to these parameters. A total number of 622 biopsies were performed, of spleen, liver and lymph nodes. CT sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were: 22.9% (group I) vs 43.7% (group II), 83.1% vs 92%, and 68.4% vs 81.2% for lymph nodes; 28.1% vs 36.3%, 93.5% vs 98%, and 66.7% vs 87.3% for the spleen, and 12.5% vs 42.8%, 97.1% vs 98.2% and 88.5% vs 92.1% for the liver. Our results demonstrate an obvious increase in reliability with newer units, even though a high percentage of false-negatives were still observed in our series, which caused understaging in 19.4% of cases vs 24.4 in group I

  8. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruella, Marco [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruna, Riccardo [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Di Russo, Anna [Radiation Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Magni, Michele [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Daniele [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Passera, Roberto [Division of Nuclear Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Corradini, Paolo [Division of Haematology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Parvis, Guido [Division of Haematology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio [Division of Haematology, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona (Italy); Ladetto, Marco [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Tarella, Corrado, E-mail: corrado.tarella@gmail.com [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Hemato-Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Devizzi, Liliana [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  9. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Bruna, Riccardo; Di Russo, Anna; Magni, Michele; Caracciolo, Daniele; Passera, Roberto; Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo; Corradini, Paolo; Parvis, Guido; Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio; Ladetto, Marco; Ricardi, Umberto; Tarella, Corrado; Devizzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m"2, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  10. Urine biomarkers in the early stages of diseases: current status and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jian; Gao, Youhe

    2018-02-01

    As a noninvasive and easily available biological fluid, the urine is becoming an important source for disease biomarker study. Change is essential for the usefulness of a biomarker. Without homeostasis mechanisms, urine can accommodate more changes, especially in the early stages of diseases. In this review, we summarize current status and discuss perspectives on the discovery of urine biomarkers in the early stages of diseases. We emphasize the advantages of urine biomarkers compared to plasma biomarkers for the diagnosis of diseases at early stages, propose a urine biomarker research roadmap, and highlight a novel membrane storage technique that enables large-scale urine sample collection and storage efficiently and economically. It is anticipated that urine biomarker studies will greatly promote early diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and prognosis of a variety of diseases, and provide strong support for translational and precision medicine.

  11. Could semiquantitative FDG analysis add information to the prognosis in patients with stage II/III breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy); Ghiotto, Cristina; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Medical Oncology 2 Unit, Padua (Italy); Saibene, Tania; Michieletto, Silvia; Fernando, Bozza [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Breast Unit, Padua (Italy); Orvieto, Enrico [University Hospital of Padua, Department of Pathology, Padua (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    We investigated whether maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and whole-body (WB) SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could improve prognostic stratification in patients with stage II/III breast cancer (BC). We prospectively enrolled 99 consecutive women (median age 50 years, range 27 - 77 years) with pathologically proven stage II/III BC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were measured in all malignant lesions. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to test for relationships among WB SUVmax, WB MTV, WB TLG, and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), after adjustment for age, and histopathological and immunohistochemical features (oestrogen/progesterone and HER2 expression, proliferation index and grade). The median values of WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were 16.2 (range 1.5 - 33.1), 14 cm{sup 3} (range 0.03 - 708.6 cm{sup 3}) and 62.5 (0.06 - 3869.4), respectively. All WB semiquantitative values were higher in patients with higher TNM stage, although not significantly (all p > 0.05). The median follow-up for surviving patients was 30 months, with a range of 13 - 45 months. Both PFS and OS of patients with low WB SUVmax, WB MTV and WB TLG were longer than that of patients with high WB values for progression, although not statistically significant. However, stratifying the patients in accordance with the stage of disease, both PFS and OS were significantly lower in patients with high WB TLG and stage III than in patients with stage II (p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, WB MTV and WB TLG were independent prognostic factors for PFS (hazard ratio 1.004, 95 % confidence interval 1.002 - 1.006, p < 0.001, and hazard ratio 1.001, 95 % confidence interval 1.000 - 1.001, p = 0.011, respectively). The addition of WB TLG to clinical data may provide a more detailed

  12. Outcome for stage II and III rectal and colon cancer equally good after treatment improvement over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Joern, Fischer; Hellmich, Gunter; Gunter, Hellmich; Jackisch, Thomas; Thomas, Jackisch; Puffer, Erik; Erik, Puffer; Zimmer, Jörg; Jörg, Zimmer; Bleyl, Dorothea; Dorothea, Bleyl; Kittner, Thomas; Thomas, Kittner; Witzigmann, Helmut; Helmut, Witzigmann; Stelzner, Sigmar; Sigmar, Stelzner

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the outcome for stage II and III rectal cancer patients compared to stage II and III colonic cancer patients with regard to 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival, and local and combined recurrence rates over time. This prospective cohort study identified 3,355 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and treated in our colorectal unit between 1981 and 2011, for investigation. The study was restricted to International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stages II and III. Postoperative mortality and histological incomplete resection were excluded, which left 995 patients with colonic cancer and 726 patients with rectal cancer for further analysis. Five-year CSS rates improved for colonic cancer from 65.0% for patients treated between 1981 and 1986 to 88.1% for patients treated between 2007 and 2011. For rectal cancer patients, the respective 5-year CSS rates improved from 53.4% in the first observation period to 89.8% in the second one. The local recurrence rate for rectal cancer dropped from 34.2% in the years 1981-1986 to 2.1% in the years 2007-2011. In the last decade of observation, prognosis for rectal cancer was equal to that for colon cancer (CSS 88.6 vs. 86.7%, p = 0.409). Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer has continued to improve over the last three decades. After major changes in treatment strategy including introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant (radio)chemotherapy, prognosis for stage II and III rectal cancer is at least as good as for stage II and III colonic cancer.

  13. Evaluation of functional changes in the evolutionary stages of Parkinson's disease: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Feitoza do Nascimento

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Parkinson's disease is one of the fastest growing neurological disorders in the world and is considered to be predominantly a motor disorder, classified as neurodegenerative, chronic and extrapyramidal, characterized by tremors, muscular rigidity, postural balance deficit and bradykinesia. Objective : To analyze the functional changes presented by Parkinson's disease patients in the different evolutionary stages of the disease. Methods : The sample included 30 patients of both genders, aged between 51 and 75 years, with clinical diagnoses of Parkinson's disease in different evolutionary stages, undergoing physiotherapy in the Pernambuco Parkinson Association. The patients were evaluated through the Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS. Results : The results highlighted an increase in the presence and severity of the changes presented by the Parkinson's disease patients, according to the evolution of the stages of the disease, especially considering aspects relating to motor activity and activities of daily living, including changes related to speech, swallowing, the ability to get dressed, personal hygiene, turning in bed and arising from a chair, occurrence of falls, posture, gait, postural stability and the presence of bradykinesia/hypokinesia. Conclusion : It is believed that the classification of the evolutionary stage of patients through the Hoehn and Yahr Scale and the registration of functional change through the UPDRS are useful for the development of the physiotherapy treatment plan.

  14. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study

  15. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Indonesia's general population and coronary heart disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Veld, W.M. van der; Srisayekti, W.; Becker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the validity and determines the cut-off point for the Beck Depression Inventory-II (the BDI-II) among Indonesians. The Indonesian version of the BDI-II (the Indo BDI-II) was administered to 720 healthy individuals from the general population, 215 Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

  16. End-stage renal disease and its treatment in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Milanés, Carmen Luisa; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2002-09-01

    In Venezuela there are 3234 new cases (132 per million population [pmp]) requiring renal replacement therapy each year, and only 40% of these are admitted to the different modalities of dialysis. In the year 2000, there were 195 patients pmp in chronic hemodialysis (4700 patients). Diabetes, glomerular diseases, and hypertension account for more than 60% of the patients in chronic dialysis. Gross mortality in hemodialysis is around 20%, and cardiovascular causes are the primary cause of death (39.5%). Hospital admission in the dialysis patients amounts to 4.6 days/patient/year. Rehabilitation is inadequate. Only 45% of the dialysis patients report normal home or work activities. Transplantation in Venezuela has a general graft survival rate of 83% at 1 year (90% for living related grafts) and 50% (64% for living related grafts) at 10 years. Future tendencies include emphasis in preventive strategies, including early detection and treatment of diabetes and hypertension, as well as efforts to increase the rate of renal transplantation.

  17. Researching of cardos activity for chronic heart failure treatment in case of concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepurina N.G.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: comparative investigation of cardos (antibodies to angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT., C-terminal fragment, diovan (Valsartan or both drug combination effects (changing of clinical picture, physical exertion tolerance and quality of life for treatment chronic heart failure (CHF patients. Methods. 12-month open-label randomized research was performed. CHF patients (NYHA Class l-ll, n=30 with concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis were randomized (10 patients in each group for 6-month treatment by cardos (group I, average dose 1,8g/day, diovan (group II, average dose 80mg/dayorboth drug combination (group III, cardos 1,8g/day and diovan 80mg/day. CHD basic treatment was prescribed for all patients. In a 6-month drug crossover between groups I and I was performed, group III was divided into 2 subgroups (subgroup IIIA— cardos, subgroup NIB — diovan followed by next 6-month treatment. Results. Long-term treatment by cardos has improved functional class (NYHA of CHF patients with concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis. cardos, diovan and both drug combination have demonstrated improvement of physical exertion tolerance, quality of life and patient clinical status during 6-min walking test. Conclusion. Cardos and diovan have shown the same efficacy. Cardos can be used as real alternative in case of ARA administration necessity

  18. Cortical hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in Parkinson's disease is extensive: probably even at early disease stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, Mallar; Jonsdottir, Kristjana Yr

    2010-01-01

    independent samples of PD patients. We compared SPECT CBF images of 32 early-stage and 33 late-stage PD patients with that of 60 matched controls. We also compared PET FDG images from 23 late-stage PD patients with that of 13 controls. Three different normalization methods were compared: (1) GM normalization...

  19. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Aim In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional...... level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Methods Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using...... Inventory for Stressful Situations. Results In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders...

  20. A two-stage meta-analysis identifies several new loci for Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, V.; Nalls, M.A.; Bras, J.M.; Hernandez, D.; Sharma, M.; Sheerin, U.M.; Saad, M.; Simon-Sanchez, J.; Schulte, C.; Lesage, S.; Sveinbjornsdottir, S.; Amouyel, P.; Arepalli, S.; Band, G.; Barker, R.A.; Bellinguez, C.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Berendse, H.W.; Berg, D; Bhatia, K.P.; Bie, R.M. de; Biffi, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Bonin, M.; Brockmann, K.; Brooks, J.; Burn, D.J.; Charlesworth, G.; Chen, H.; Chinnery, P.F.; Chong, S.; Clarke, C.E.; Cookson, M.R.; Cooper, J.M.; Corvol, J.C.; Counsell, J.; Damier, P.; Dartigues, J.F.; Deloukas, P.; Deuschl, G.; Dexter, D.T.; Dijk, K.D. van; Dillman, A.; Durif, F.; Durr, A.; Edkins, S.; Evans, J.R.; Foltynie, T.; Freeman, C.; Gao, J.; Gardner, M.; Gibbs, J.R.; Goate, A.; Gray, E.; Guerreiro, R.; Gustafsson, O.; Harris, C.; Hellenthal, G.; Hilten, J.J. van; Hofman, A.; Hollenbeck, A.; Holton, J.L.; Hu, M.; Huang, X.; Huber, H; Hudson, G.; Hunt, S.E.; Huttenlocher, J.; Illig, T.; Jonsson, P.V.; Langford, C.; Lees, A.J.; Lichtner, P.; Limousin, P.; Lopez, G.; McNeill, A.; Moorby, C.; Moore, M.; Morris, H.A.; Morrison, K.E.; Mudanohwo, E.; O'Sullivan, S.S; Pearson, J.; Pearson, R.; Perlmutter, J.; Petursson, H.; Pirinen, M.; Polnak, P.; Post, B.; Potter, S.C.; Ravina, B.; Revesz, T.; Riess, O.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rizzu, P.; Ryten, M.; Sawcer, S.J.; Schapira, A.; Scheffer, H.; Shaw, K.; Shoulson, I.; Sidransky, E.; Silva, R. de; Smith, C.; Spencer, C.C.; Stefansson, H.; Steinberg, S.; Stockton, J.D.; Strange, A.; Su, Z.; Talbot, K.; Tanner, C.M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, A.; Tison, F.; Trabzuni, D.; Traynor, B.J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vandrovcova, J.; Velseboer, D.; Vidailhet, M.; Vukcevic, D.; Walker, R.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weale, M.E.; Wickremaratchi, M.; Williams, N.; Williams-Gray, C.H.; Winder-Rhodes, S.; Stefansson, K.; Martinez, M.; Donnelly, P.; Singleton, A.B.; Hardy, J.; Heutink, P.; Brice, A.; Gasser, T.; Wood, N.W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study

  1. A Two-Stage Meta-Analysis Identifies Several New Loci for Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plagnol, Vincent; Nalls, Michael A.; Bras, Jose M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Amouyel, Philippe; Arepalli, Sampath; Band, Gavin; Barker, Roger A.; Bellinguez, Celine; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Guenther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Duerr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Freeman, Colin; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gustafsson, Omar; Harris, Clare; Hellenthal, Garrett; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pearson, Richard; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Petursson, Hjoervar; Pirinen, Matti; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; de Silva, Rohan; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, Francois; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Vukcevic, Damjan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Weale, Michael E.; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefansson, Kari; Martinez, Maria; Donnelly, Peter; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study focused on the set

  2. KRAS as a predictor of poor prognosis and benefit from postoperative FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Tan, Shuyun; Kim, George P; Dou, Ruoxu; Chen, Dianke; Cai, Yue; Fu, Xinhui; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The KRAS gene frequently mutates in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigated the prognostic and predictive role of KRAS mutation in patients with stage II or III CRC. A consecutive cohort of patients with stage II or III CRC from a single center database was studied. The association between KRAS status, adjuvant FOLFOX therapy, and 3-year disease-free survival (3-y DFS) was analyzed. Of our 433 patients, 166 (38.3%) exhibited the KRAS mutation. Among the 190 patients who did not receive adjuvant therapy, those with KRAS mutation tumors had a worse 3-y DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.924; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.078-3.435; P = 0.027). Among patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, KRAS mutation was not correlated with worse 3-y DFS (HR, 1.083; 95% CI, 0.618-1.899; P = 0.781). Adjuvant chemotherapy improved 3-y DFS only among patients with KRAS mutant tumors (78.0% vs 69.2%) on multivariate analysis adjusted for age, stage, grade, site, vessel invasion, and carcinoembryonic antigen level (HR, 0.454; 95% CI, 0.229-0.901; P = 0.024). In contrast, there was no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in the KRAS wild-type group (84.3% vs 82.0%). KRAS mutation indicates poor prognosis. FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy benefits patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer with KRAS mutant tumors and is worth further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of Early Stage Non-Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’sDisease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Gümüş

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In this study, our purpose is, in the early stage of PD, examining the frequency of occurrence of non-motor symptoms and discussing the effects of morbidity of disease. METHODS: Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Neurology outpatient clinic in the study, which is followed by the United Kingdom Brain Bank criteria for Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease diagnosis and clinical staging according to Hoehn Yahr stages 1 and 2 of the 80 patients were studied. RESULTS: Cases, an increase in UPDRS scores were significantly higher non-motor symptoms. CONCLUSION: Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease can often go unnoticed. Symptomatic treatment is an important part of the success. Therefore, PH and the non-motor symptoms, early detection is important to treat them in accordance with

  4. Detection of relapse in early stage Hodgkin's disease: role of routine follow up studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrey, Margaret J.; Poen, Joseph C.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the costs and benefits of an established practice of routine follow-up in a cohort of patients treated with radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined patterns of follow-up and methods of relapse detection among 709 patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-II Hodgkin's disease treated with sub-total lymphoid irradiation (STLI) or total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) between 1969-1994. We determined the probability of relapse detection for each of 7 routine follow up procedures, compared their relative costs, and determined the impact of each procedure on the likelihood of overall survival following salvage therapy. Results: Relapse has occurred in 157 patients (22%) at a median 1.9 years (range 0-13 years) following treatment. 133 relapses (85%) occurred during the first 5 years of follow. Detailed information concerning the method of relapse detection was available on 107 patients. These 107 patients form the basis of this analysis. Relapse was identified by history (Hx) alone in 55% of patients, physical exam (PE) in 14%, chest x-ray (CXR) in 23% and abdominal x-ray (KUB) in 7%. Only one relapse (1%) was identified by a routine laboratory study - erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The rate of relapse detection was highest for a combination of history and physical exam (78/10,000 exams) followed by CXR (26/10,000 exams), KUB (10/10,000 exams) and ESR (1/10,000 tests). Complete blood count (CBC) and serum chemistries were never the primary factor in detecting HD relapse. Radiographs accounted for greater than 60% of charges while laboratory studies and physician charges accounted for approximately 20% each. The projected charges (1994 dollars) of relapse detection by routine follow up Hx and PE was [dollar]10,600 compared with [dollar]68,200 for CXR, [dollar]141,800 for KUB and [dollar]156,400 for ESR. 10 year actuarial survival following salvage therapy was 65% overall, 65% for patients in whom

  5. An integrative review of the methodology and findings regarding dietary adherence in end stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kelly; Mullan, Judy; Mansfield, Kylie

    2017-10-23

    Dietary modification is an important component of the management of end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The diet for ESKD involves modifying energy and protein intake, and altering sodium, phosphate, potassium and fluid intake. There have been no comprehensive reviews to date on this topic. The aims of this integrative review were to (i) describe the methods used to measure dietary adherence (ii) determine the rate of dietary adherence and (iii) describe factors associated with dietary adherence in ESKD. The Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched using the search terms 'adherence' and 'end stage kidney disease'. Of the 787 potentially eligible papers retrieved, 60 papers of 24,743 patients were included in this review. Of these papers, 44 reported the rate of dietary adherence and 44 papers described factors associated with adherence. Most of the evidence regarding dietary adherence is derived from studies of hemodialysis patients (72% of patients). The most common method of measuring dietary adherence in ESKD was subjective techniques (e.g. food diaries or adherence questionnaires). This was followed by indirect methods (e.g. serum potassium, phosphate or interdialytic weight gain). The weighted mean adherence rate to ESKD dietary recommendations was 31.5% and 68.5% for fluid recommendations. Adherence to protein, sodium, phosphate, and potassium recommendations were highly variable due to differences in measurement methods used, and were often derived from a limited evidence base. Socioeconomic status, age, social support and self-efficacy were associated with dietary adherence. However, factors such as taste, the impact of the diet on social eating occasions; and dietetic staffing also appear to play a role in dietary adherence. Dietary adherence rates in people with ESKD are suboptimal. Further research is required on dietary adherence in patients with ESKD from different social, educational, economic and ethnic groups. This research may identify other

  6. Detection of relapse in early stage Hodgkin's disease: role of routine follow up studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrey, Margaret J; Poen, Joseph C; Hoppe, Richard T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To examine the costs and benefits of an established practice of routine follow-up in a cohort of patients treated with radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined patterns of follow-up and methods of relapse detection among 709 patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-II Hodgkin's disease treated with sub-total lymphoid irradiation (STLI) or total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) between 1969-1994. We determined the probability of relapse detection for each of 7 routine follow up procedures, compared their relative costs, and determined the impact of each procedure on the likelihood of overall survival following salvage therapy. Results: Relapse has occurred in 157 patients (22%) at a median 1.9 years (range 0-13 years) following treatment. 133 relapses (85%) occurred during the first 5 years of follow. Detailed information concerning the method of relapse detection was available on 107 patients. These 107 patients form the basis of this analysis. Relapse was identified by history (Hx) alone in 55% of patients, physical exam (PE) in 14%, chest x-ray (CXR) in 23% and abdominal x-ray (KUB) in 7%. Only one relapse (1%) was identified by a routine laboratory study - erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The rate of relapse detection was highest for a combination of history and physical exam (78/10,000 exams) followed by CXR (26/10,000 exams), KUB (10/10,000 exams) and ESR (1/10,000 tests). Complete blood count (CBC) and serum chemistries were never the primary factor in detecting HD relapse. Radiographs accounted for greater than 60% of charges while laboratory studies and physician charges accounted for approximately 20% each. The projected charges (1994 dollars) of relapse detection by routine follow up Hx and PE was [dollar]10,600 compared with [dollar]68,200 for CXR, [dollar]141,800 for KUB and [dollar]156,400 for ESR. 10 year actuarial survival following salvage therapy was 65% overall, 65% for patients in whom

  7. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 47 and MSI-L/MSS = 314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H = 58 and MSI-L/MSS = 857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p = 0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p = 0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. © 2015 UICC.

  8. Expression of PAT and NPT II proteins during the developmental stages of a genetically modified pepper developed in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Si Myung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ryu, Tae Hun; Suh, Seok Cheol; Cho, Hyun Suk

    2010-10-27

    Estimation of the protein levels introduced in a biotechnology-derived product is conducted as part of an overall safety assessment. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyze phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) protein expression in a genetically modified (GM) pepper plant developed in Korea. PAT and NPT II expression levels, based on both dry weight and fresh weight, were variable among different plant generations and plant sections from isolated genetically modified organism (GMO) fields at four developmental stages. PAT expression was highest in leaves at anthesis (11.44 μg/gdw and 2.17 μg/gfw) and lowest in roots (0.12 μg/gdw and 0.01 μg/gfw). NPT II expression was also highest in leaves at anthesis (17.31 μg/gdw and 3.41 μg/gfw) and lowest in red pepper (0.65 μg/gdw and 0.12 μg/gfw). In pollen, PAT expression was 0.59-0.62 μg/gdw, while NPT II was not detected. Both PAT and NPT II showed a general pattern of decreased expression with progression of the growing season. As expected, PAT and NPT II protein expression was not detectable in control pepper plants.

  9. 2-Hexadecynoic acid inhibits plasmodial FAS-II enzymes and arrests erythrocytic and liver stage Plasmodium infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Deniz; Sanabria, David; Lauinger, Ina L; Tarun, Alice; Herman, Rob; Perozzo, Remo; Zloh, Mire; Kappe, Stefan H; Brun, Reto; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2010-11-01

    Acetylenic fatty acids are known to display several biological activities, but their antimalarial activity has remained unexplored. In this study, we synthesized the 2-, 5-, 6-, and 9-hexadecynoic acids (HDAs) and evaluated their in vitro activity against erythrocytic (blood) stages of Plasmodium falciparum and liver stages of Plasmodium yoelii infections. Since the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (PfFAS-II) has recently been shown to be indispensable for liver stage malaria parasites, the inhibitory potential of the HDAs against multiple P. falciparum FAS-II (PfFAS-II) elongation enzymes was also evaluated. The highest antiplasmodial activity against blood stages of P. falciparum was displayed by 5-HDA (IC(50) value 6.6 μg/ml), whereas the 2-HDA was the only acid arresting the growth of liver stage P. yoelii infection, in both flow cytometric assay (IC(50) value 2-HDA 15.3 μg/ml, control drug atovaquone 2.5 ng/ml) and immunofluorescence analysis (IC(50) 2-HDA 4.88 μg/ml, control drug atovaquone 0.37 ng/ml). 2-HDA showed the best inhibitory activity against the PfFAS-II enzymes PfFabI and PfFabZ with IC(50) values of 0.38 and 0.58 μg/ml (IC(50) control drugs 14 and 30 ng/ml), respectively. Enzyme kinetics and molecular modeling studies revealed valuable insights into the binding mechanism of 2-HDA on the target enzymes. All HDAs showed in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC(50) values 3.7-31.7 μg/ml), Trypanosoma cruzi (only 2-HDA, IC(50) 20.2 μg/ml), and Leishmania donovani (IC(50) values 4.1-13.4 μg/ml) with generally low or no significant toxicity on mammalian cells. This is the first study to indicate therapeutic potential of HDAs against various parasitic protozoa. It also points out that the malarial liver stage growth inhibitory effect of the 2-HDA may be promoted via PfFAS-II enzymes. The lack of cytotoxicity, lipophilic nature, and calculated pharmacokinetic properties suggests that 2-HDA could be a useful compound to

  10. 2-Hexadecynoic Acid Inhibits Plasmodial FAS-II Enzymes and Arrest Erythrocytic and Liver Stage Plasmodium Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Deniz; Sanabria, David; Lauinger, Ina L.; Tarun, Alice; Herman, Rob; Perozzo, Remo; Zloh, Mire; Kappe, Stefan H.; Brun, Reto; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2010-01-01

    Acetylenic fatty acids are known to display several biological activities, but their antimalarial activity has remained unexplored. In this study, we synthesized the 2-, 5-, 6-, and 9-hexadecynoic acids (HDAs) and evaluated their in vitro activity against erythrocytic (blood) stages of Plasmodium falciparum and liver stages of P. yoelii infections. Since the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (PfFAS-II) has recently been shown to be indispensable for liver stage malaria parasites, the inhibitory potential of the HDAs against multiple P. falciparum FAS-II (PfFAS-II) elongation enzymes was also evaluated. The highest antiplasmodial activity against blood stages of P. falciparum was displayed by 5-HDA (IC50 value 6.6. μg/ml), whereas the 2-HDA was the only acid arresting the growth of liver stage P. yoelii infection, in both flow cytometric assay (IC50 value 2-HDA 15.3 μg/ml, control drug atovaquone 2.5 ng/ml) and immunofluorescense analysis (IC50 2-HDA 4.88 μg/ml, control drug atovaquone 0.37 ng/ml). 2-HDA showed the best inhibitory against the PfFAS-II enzymes PfFabI and PfFabZ with IC50 values of 0.38 and 0.58 μg/ml (IC50 control drugs 14 and 30 ng/ml) respectively. Enzyme kinetics and molecular modeling studies revealed valuable insights into the binding mechanism of 2-HDA on the target enzymes. All HDAs showed in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 values 3.7–31.7 μg/ml), Trypanosoma cruzi (only 2-HDA, IC50 20.2 μg/ml), and Leishmania donovani (IC50 values 4.1–13.4 μg/ml) with generally low or no significant toxicity on mammalian cells. This is the first study to indicate therapeutic potential of HDAs against various parasitic protozoa. It also points out that the malarial liver stage growth inhibitory effect of the 2-HDA may be promoted via PfFAS-II enzymes. The lack of cytotoxicity, lipophilic nature and calculated pharmacokinetic properties suggest that 2-HDA could be a useful compound to study the interaction of fatty

  11. Incidence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to stage in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Tamer; Yazar, Hülya Olgun; Zayimoğlu, Emel; Çankaya, Soner

    2018-05-12

    In this study, the aim was to identify the incidence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to disease stage among idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients and collect data to illuminate precautions related to reducing the disease load. The study was completed with 166 patients divided by stage according to modified Hoehn and Yahr (HYR) criteria and 249 healthy volunteers aged from 18 to 39 and 68 to 75 years met the inclusion criteria. In our prospective and cross-sectional study, patients with IPD according to "UK Brain Bank" diagnostic criteria had the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and HYR scales applied. The patient and control groups had skeletal muscle mass index (SMMI), muscle power, and physical performance assessed. Diagnosis of sarcopenia used the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) diagnostic criteria. In our study, in parallel with the increase in disease stage among IPD patients, the incidence of sarcopenia (led by severe sarcopenia) and dynapenia was high compared to that among the control group of the same age. In the early stages of chronic progressive diseases like IPD, identification of sarcopenia and dynapenia is important considering the limitations of disease-preventive effects in treatments applied after diagnosis.

  12. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  13. Cerebral perfusion in the predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik; Benedictus, Marije R.; Prins, Niels D.; Scheltens, Philip; Kuijer, Joost P.A.; Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Teunissen, Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate arterial spin-labelling (ASL) cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data were obtained from 177 patients with subjective complaints, mild cognitive impairment and AD from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. AD stages were based on diagnosis and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ) and total-tau (tau). General-linear-models were used to assess relationships between AD stages and total and regional CBF, correcting for age and sex. Decreasing CBF was related to more advanced AD stages in all supratentorial regions (p for trend < 0.05). Post-hoc testing revealed that CBF was lower in AD compared to controls and stage-1 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and normal tau) in temporal and parietal regions, and compared to stage-2 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and tau) in temporal regions. CBF values of stage-2 predementia patients were numerically in between those of stage-1 predementia patients and AD. The continuing decrease of CBF along the continuum of AD indicates the potential of ASL-CBF as a measure for disease progression. (orig.)

  14. Cerebral perfusion in the predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimercenter Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benedictus, Marije R.; Prins, Niels D.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Teunissen, Charlotte E. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    To investigate arterial spin-labelling (ASL) cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data were obtained from 177 patients with subjective complaints, mild cognitive impairment and AD from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. AD stages were based on diagnosis and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers amyloid-β (Aβ) and total-tau (tau). General-linear-models were used to assess relationships between AD stages and total and regional CBF, correcting for age and sex. Decreasing CBF was related to more advanced AD stages in all supratentorial regions (p for trend < 0.05). Post-hoc testing revealed that CBF was lower in AD compared to controls and stage-1 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and normal tau) in temporal and parietal regions, and compared to stage-2 predementia patients (i.e. abnormal Aβ and tau) in temporal regions. CBF values of stage-2 predementia patients were numerically in between those of stage-1 predementia patients and AD. The continuing decrease of CBF along the continuum of AD indicates the potential of ASL-CBF as a measure for disease progression. (orig.)

  15. Effect of a Shortened Duration of FOLFOX Chemotherapy on the Survival Rate of Patients with Stage II and III Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Woong Bae; Hong, Kwang Dae; Kim, Jung-Sik; Joung, Sung-Yup; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung-Wook

    2018-01-01

    FOLFOX chemotherapy is widely used as an adjuvant treatment for advanced colon cancer. The duration of adjuvant chemotherapy is usually set to 6 months, which is based on a former study of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin chemotherapy. However, the FOLFOX regimen is known to have complications, such as peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to compare the survival rates and complications experienced by patients receiving either 4 or 6 months of FOLFOX chemotherapy. Retrospective data analysis was performed for stage II and III patients who underwent radical resection of colon cancer. We compared the 5-year survival rates and the occurrence of complications in patients who completed only 8 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy with patients who completed 12 cycles of chemotherapy. Among 188 patients who underwent adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer, 83 (44.1%) completed 6 months of FOLFOX chemotherapy and 64 (34.0%) patients discontinued after 4 months of chemotherapy. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates did not show a significant difference. Patients in the 6-month group had peripheral neuropathy more frequently (p = 0.028). Five-year overall and disease-free survival were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Large-scale prospective studies are necessary for the analysis of complications and survival rates. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Microsatellite instability is associated with reduced disease specific survival in stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, H M; Ryan, E; Balasubramanian, I; Kennelly, R; Geraghty, R; Sclafani, F; Fennelly, D; McDermott, R; Ryan, E J; O'Donoghue, D; Hyland, J M P; Martin, S T; O'Connell, P R; Gibbons, D; Winter, Des; Sheahan, K

    2016-11-01

    Up to 15% of colorectal cancers exhibit microsatellite instability (MSI), where errors in replication go unchecked due to defects in the mismatch repair system. This study aimed to determine survival in a large single-centre series of 1250 consecutive colorectal cancers subjected to universal MSI testing. Clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer identified on prospectively maintained colorectal and pathology databases at St. Vincent's University Hospital from 2004 to May 2012 were examined. Mismatch repair (MMR) status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier curves, the log-rank test and Cox regression were used to associate survival with clinical and pathological characteristics. Of the 1250 colorectal cancers in the study period, 11% exhibited MSI (n = 138). Patients with MSI tumours had significantly lower rates of lymph node and distant metastases (MSI N+ rate: 24.8% compared with MSS N+ rate: 46.2%, p colon cancer. However, patients with Stage III MSI colon cancers had a worse DSS than those with MSS tumours. Stage III MSI tumours exhibited higher rates of lymphovascular invasion and perineural invasion than Stage I/II MSI tumours. MSI is associated with a reduced risk of nodal and distant metastases, with an improved DSS in Stage I/II colon cancer. However, when MSI tumours progress to Stage III these patients had worse outcomes and pathological features. New strategies for this cohort of patients may be required to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Prognostic significance of the PC10 index for patients with stage II and III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Irie, Toshiyuki; Nozawa, Kumiko; Nakajima, Kotaro [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, Atsushi [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Watanabe, Teruo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Pathology; Tanaka, Naomi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1999-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody PC10 is used for immunohistochemical staining of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The percentage of PC10-positive cancer cells is defined as the PC10 index. We evaluated the relationship between the PC10 index in pretreatment endoscopic biopsies and the prognoses of 47 patients with Stage II-III oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy. The patients with a PC10 index >40% had significantly poorer prognoses than the other patients (p=0.0007). Proportional hazards model analysis indicated that only the PC10 index was a prognostic factor (p=0.0009). The patient group of complete responders showed significantly lower PC10 indices compared to patients with a partial response or no change (p=0.049). The PC10 index can be a good predictive indicator of the prognosis in patients with Stage II-III oesophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. The prognostic importance of miR-21 in stage II colon cancer: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Frifeldt, S.; Hansen, T. F.; Nielsen, B. S.

    2012-01-01

    that increasing miR-21 expression levels were significantly correlated to decreasing RF-CSS. Further investigations of the clinical importance of miR-21 in the selection of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients are merited. British Journal of Cancer (2012) 107, 1169-1174. doi:10.1038/bjc.2012.365 www......BACKGROUND: Despite several years of research and attempts to develop prognostic models a considerable fraction of stage II colon cancer patients will experience relapse within few years from their operation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic importance of miRNA-21 (mi......-free cancer-specific survival (RF-CSS): HR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.15-1.60; P importance and was found to be significantly related to poor RF-CSS: HR 1.41; 95% CI: 1.19-1.67; P

  19. Biomechanical Analysis of Cuboid Osteotomy Lateral Column Lengthening for Stage II B Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haichao; Ren, Haoyang; Li, Chunguang; Xia, Jiang; Yu, Guangrong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose . To investigate the effect of cuboid osteotomy lateral column lengthening (LCL) for the correction of stage II B adult-acquired flatfoot deformity in cadaver. Methods . Six cadaver specimens were loaded to 350 N. Flatfoot models were established and each was evaluated radiographically and pedobarographically in the following conditions: (1) intact foot, (2) flatfoot, and (3) cuboid osteotomy LCL (2, 3, 4, and 5 mm). Results . Compared with the flatfoot model, the LCLs showed significant correction of talonavicular coverage on anteroposterior radiographs and talus-first metatarsal angle on both anteroposterior and lateral radiographs ( p stage II B adult-acquired flatfoot deformity with a 3 mm lengthening in cadavers.

  20. The Role of Angiotensin II in Parietal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Crescent Formation in Glomerular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Paola; Novelli, Rubina; Rota, Cinzia; Gagliardini, Elena; Ruggiero, Barbara; Rottoli, Daniela; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) is a devastating disease with rapidly progressive deterioration in kidney function, which, histologically, manifests as crescent formation in most glomeruli. We previously found that crescents derive from the aberrant proliferation and migration of parietal epithelial cells (PECs)/progenitor cells, and that the angiotensin (ang) II/ang II type-1 (AT 1 ) receptor pathway may participate, together with the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 axis, in the development of those lesions. Herein, we elucidated sequential events and cellular and molecular interactions occurring during crescentic lesion onset and evolution. By analyzing kidney biopsy specimens of patients with extracapillary GN, divided according to the grade of glomerular lesions, we found that the accumulation of macrophages expressing matrix metalloproteinase-12 started manifesting in glomeruli affected by early-stage lesions, whereas AT 1 receptor expression could not be detected. In glomeruli with advanced lesions, AT 1 receptor expression increased markedly, and the up-regulation of SDF-1, and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 7, was documented on podocytes and PECs, respectively. In vitro studies were instrumental to demonstrating the role of ang II in inducing podocyte SDF-1 production, which ultimately activates PECs. The present findings support the possibility that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment might limit PEC activation and reduce the frequency and extension of crescents in extracapillary GN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Cuboid Osteotomy Lateral Column Lengthening for Stage II B Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity: A Cadaveric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haichao; Ren, Haoyang; Li, Chunguang; Xia, Jiang; Yu, Guangrong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of cuboid osteotomy lateral column lengthening (LCL) for the correction of stage II B adult-acquired flatfoot deformity in cadaver. Methods. Six cadaver specimens were loaded to 350?N. Flatfoot models were established and each was evaluated radiographically and pedobarographically in the following conditions: (1) intact foot, (2) flatfoot, and (3) cuboid osteotomy LCL (2, 3, 4, and 5?mm). Results. Compared with the flatfoot model, the LCLs showed significant...

  2. Management Trends and Outcomes for Stage I to II Mantle Cell Lymphoma Using the National Cancer Data Base: Ascertaining the Ideal Treatment Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pai, Sarah S. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Balasubramani, Goundappa K. [Department of Epidemiology, Epidemiology Data Center, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare, albeit aggressive subset of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, resulting in varied treatment approaches. Given the paucity of data defining the optimal management for early-stage MCL, we conducted an analysis using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to identify practice patterns and outcomes. Methods and Materials: The NCDB was queried for patients with stage I to II MCL diagnosed from 1998 to 2012 receiving chemotherapy (CT) or radiation therapy (RT), or both (CT+RT). Univariate and multivariable analyses for factors associated with treatment selection were completed using logistic regression. Propensity scores with inverse probability treatment weighting (IPTW) were calculated based on the conditional probability of receiving CT+RT. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards modeling with IPTW adjustment were conducted for the survival analyses. Results: In total, 2539 patients were identified. The key characteristics were as follows: 69% were male, 71% were aged ≥60 years, 28% had extranodal involvement, and 51% had stage I disease. Of the 2539 patients, 70% underwent CT, 11% underwent RT, and 19% underwent CT+RT. The use of CT+RT decreased from 23.1% to 14.1% in 1998 to 2002 and 2010 to 2012 (P<.001). CT+RT usage was lower for patients with the following characteristics: age ≥60 years, female sex, stage II disease, and the presence of B symptoms. With a median follow-up period of 42.8 months, the unadjusted 3-year overall survival estimates for patients receiving CT, RT, or CT+RT were 67.8%, 72.4%, and 79.8%, respectively (P<.001). After correcting for indication bias through IPTW-adjusted modeling, CT+RT reduced the risk of overall mortality compared with monotherapy (hazard ratio 0.65, P=.029). Conclusions: Although uncommon, patients with stage I-II MCL can have favorable outcomes. Despite a continued decline in the usage of consolidative RT, combined modality therapy improves survival in this cohort compared

  3. Management Trends and Outcomes for Stage I to II Mantle Cell Lymphoma Using the National Cancer Data Base: Ascertaining the Ideal Treatment Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Beant S.; Vargo, John A.; Pai, Sarah S.; Balasubramani, Goundappa K.; Beriwal, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare, albeit aggressive subset of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, resulting in varied treatment approaches. Given the paucity of data defining the optimal management for early-stage MCL, we conducted an analysis using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to identify practice patterns and outcomes. Methods and Materials: The NCDB was queried for patients with stage I to II MCL diagnosed from 1998 to 2012 receiving chemotherapy (CT) or radiation therapy (RT), or both (CT+RT). Univariate and multivariable analyses for factors associated with treatment selection were completed using logistic regression. Propensity scores with inverse probability treatment weighting (IPTW) were calculated based on the conditional probability of receiving CT+RT. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards modeling with IPTW adjustment were conducted for the survival analyses. Results: In total, 2539 patients were identified. The key characteristics were as follows: 69% were male, 71% were aged ≥60 years, 28% had extranodal involvement, and 51% had stage I disease. Of the 2539 patients, 70% underwent CT, 11% underwent RT, and 19% underwent CT+RT. The use of CT+RT decreased from 23.1% to 14.1% in 1998 to 2002 and 2010 to 2012 (P<.001). CT+RT usage was lower for patients with the following characteristics: age ≥60 years, female sex, stage II disease, and the presence of B symptoms. With a median follow-up period of 42.8 months, the unadjusted 3-year overall survival estimates for patients receiving CT, RT, or CT+RT were 67.8%, 72.4%, and 79.8%, respectively (P<.001). After correcting for indication bias through IPTW-adjusted modeling, CT+RT reduced the risk of overall mortality compared with monotherapy (hazard ratio 0.65, P=.029). Conclusions: Although uncommon, patients with stage I-II MCL can have favorable outcomes. Despite a continued decline in the usage of consolidative RT, combined modality therapy improves survival in this cohort compared

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer: influence of care structures' characteristics on a controversial clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Eléonore; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Guilhot, Jean-Noel; Matysiak, Michel; Vermorel, Michel; Roblin, Xavier

    2007-11-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer is a controversial practice and is not recommended by the French Consensus Conference outside of therapeutic trial. To assess, within a well-defined population, the influence of hospital characteristics in this practice. In the Rhône-Alpes region (10% of the French population), 534 patients presenting with colon cancer stage II were operated on in 81 hospitals in the year 2000. The influence of hospital characteristics on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy was assessed using a multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 19.5% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Younger age, T4 tumour, hospital volume lower than 20 colon cancer surgeries [odds ratio (OR) 2.96; Pclinical complications at diagnosis were independently associated with higher rates of chemotherapy. On the other hand, a number of examined lymph nodes lower than recommendations did not have any influence on chemotherapy use. Hospital characteristics had independently influenced the practice of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer. The more important institutional factor was the hospital procedure volume. The decisions of the multidisciplinary committees appeared at times paradoxical; a more comprehensive evaluation of this practice is needed.

  5. Clinical profile of haemodialysis patients with diabetic nephropathy leading to end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazzaz, Z.J.; Dhafar, K.O.; Tashkandi, M.A.; Farooq, M.U.

    2010-01-01

    To know the characteristics of the diabetic patients on regular dialysis at Al-noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The data had been collected retrospectively from 13-11-2005 to 12-12-2005 from the diabetic patients directly those were on dialysis due to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and from their files. The total study subjects were 51 with mean age of Diabetics was (55.2 years +-7.9) showing male predominance 31(60.8%). All were Saudies. The mean duration of Diabetes mellitus and dialysis were (16.8years) and (22 months), respectively. The mean age of start of Diabetes mellitus and dialysis was (37.4 years) and (53.5 years). The mean duration of onset of diabetes to dialysis was (16.1 years). Out of the total, 29(56.9%) were non-smoker. Patients with family history of diabetes with other associated illnesses were 23(45%) followed by 15(29.4%) had family history of only diabetes. Type II diabetics were 40(78.4%). Regarding metabolic profile, patients with high blood glucose level were 10(19.6%) while 3(5.9%), 50(98%) and 18(35.3%) patients had high cholesterol, low density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, respectively. Maximum number of patients were in sixth decade of life. Up to three fourth patients had family history of diabetes. Most of the subjects had only diabetic nephropathy. Maximum patients had high low density lipoprotein level. (author)

  6. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy

  7. Intensified Multifactorial Intervention in Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria Reduces End Stage Renal Disease and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oellgaard, Jens; Gæde, Peter; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -label trial. Duration of the intervention was 8 years, where after all patients were recommended intensified treatment. Total follow-up of up to 21 years of 24 hour urinary albumin excretion rate and GFR (51Cr-EDTA-clearance) assessed at 6 study visits. Information on end stage renal disease (ESRD......) and mortality was obtained from national registries. Outcome measures were progression to macroalbuminuria (>300 mg/24h), decline-rates of GFR and progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Results: Progression to macroalbuminuria was reduced in the original intensive-therapy group with a hazard...

  8. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod

    2017-01-01

    and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register...... were age (p = .001), diabetes (p = .017) and active endocarditis (p = .012). CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference in mortality was found between patients in hemo- or peritoneal dialysis. However, we observed that patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have two times higher...

  9. Efficacy of biofeedback on quality of life in stages I and II pelvic organ prolapse: A Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Taghvadoost, Neda; Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Forogh, Bijan; Bazazbehbahani, Roxana; Raissi, Gholam Reza

    2017-08-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a prevalent disorder which seriously affects the sufferer's quality of life. The main goal of this study was to evaluate biofeedback impact on quality of life in women with mild to moderate POP. 40 females in stages I and II POP were allocated into 2 groups. One group received pelvic floor muscle exercise and lifestyle advice in addition to biofeedback twice a week for 4 weeks, while the other received a lifestyle advice sheet and pelvic floor muscle exercise without biofeedback. A valid Persian version of P-QOL questionnaire was applied to assess the patients̕ quality of life at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 weeks follow up. Pressure biofeedback and Physical examination were also performed in order to determine pelvic floor muscle strength and staging of the prolapse, respectively. Collected data were analyzed by mixed ANOVA test using SPSS 22. Biofeedback improved the quality of life in seven of nine P-QOL domains. However, it had no significant impact either on pelvic floor muscle strength or on the stage of the prolapse. Biofeedback could be considered as a non-invasive treatment leading to quality of life promotion in women with stages I and II POP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined chemo-radiation therapy to adult patients with B-cell lymphoma in stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    155 adult patients with B-lymphoma in stage I and II who were treated in National Cancer Center Hospital between 1975 and 1986 were analyzed for treatment outcome. 5-year survival rates were about 66 % in these patients and almost equal in the patients treated with radiation alone, doxorubicin-containing combination chemotherapy alone, or combined chemoradiation therapy. However, when analysis was limited to patients in stage I, patients treated with chemotherapy alone seemed to have better survival rate than those treated with radiation alone. In the patients who were in stage III or more and had bulky mass more than 10 cm in diameter, small residual tumor was sometimes detected by restaging procedure after achieving apparent remission by multi-drug chemotherapy. In these patients, additional radiation therapy was quite usefull to eradicate residual tumor cell to cure. (author)

  11. Hodgkin's disease: problems of staging. [/sup 67/Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, D.L. Jr.; Kinnealey, A.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1978-08-01

    The preferred histopathological classification of Hodgkin's disease (HD) is suggested by Lukes and Butler as modified at the Rye Symposium; the histologic subtypes are highly reproducible and correlate well with the anatomic sites of involvement, clinical stage, and survival. The accuracy of the bipedal lymphangiogram, /sup 67/gallium scan, and ultrasonography in predicting abdominal involvement by HD is 90 percent, 50 percent, and 88 percent, respectively. Staging laparotomy remains the most accurate method of detecting intra-abdominal disease and has added immensely to new concepts in the management of HD. These concepts suggest that patients with nodal disease limited to the celiac axis or upper para-aortic areas (substage III/sub 1/) or pathologic stage (PS) III/sub S+N-/A, when treated with extended field radiotherapy alone have survival rates comparable to PS IIA patients. In contrast, patients in PS IIIA with lower abdominal nodal disease (substage III/sub 2/), regardless of splenic involvement, have a prognosis comparable to PS IV disease. Thus, there may only be two stages of HD, those curable with extended mantle or smaller radiotherapy fields alone, and those requiring chemotherapy with or without supplemental radiotherapy.

  12. Association Between Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbal Therapy and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Mao, Jun J; Sun, Lingyun; Yang, Lin; Li, Jie; Hao, Yingxu; Li, Huashan; Hou, Wei; Chu, Yuping; Bai, Yu; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jinwan; Shen, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Jianping; Yang, Yufei

    2017-11-01

    Chinese cancer patients often use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) herbal medicine during or after active cancer treatments. However, little is known about how TCM herbal medicine impacts cancer outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate the association between TCM herbal therapy and survival outcomes in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer. We conducted an eight-center prospective cohort study in China among patients who had undergone radical resection for stage II and III colorectal cancer. All patients received comprehensive conventional treatments according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, and follow-up visits were conducted over five years. We defined high exposure as a patient's use of TCM individualized herbs for more than one year, ascertained via clinical interviews. The primary outcome was disease-free survival (DFS), with overall survival (OS) as a secondary outcome. Between April 2007 and February 2009, we enrolled 312 patients into the cohort; 166 (53.2%) met the definition of high exposure to TCM herbs. Adjusting for covariates, high exposure to TCM was associated with both better DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39 to 0.98) and OS (HR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.14 to 0.68). In subgroup exploratory analysis, the effects demonstrated that the differences in outcomes were statistically significant in patients who had received chemotherapy. Longer duration of TCM herbal use is associated with improved survival outcomes in stage II and III colorectal cancer patients in China. More research is needed to evaluate the effects and underlying mechanisms of herbal medicine on colorectal cancer outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Skin denervation and its clinical significance in late-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Chao; Wu, Vin-Cent; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Wang, Yi-Mei; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Lin, Yea-Huey; Lin, Whei-Min; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the skin innervation and its clinical significance in late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Case series. National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Forty consecutive nondiabetic patients with late-stage CKD (14 female and 26 male; mean [SD] age, 60.7 [12.3] years), including 2 cases with stage 3 CKD, 6 with stage 4 CKD, and 32 with stage 5 CKD, ie, end-stage kidney disease. Clinical evaluation of neurological deficits, nerve conduction study, autonomic function tests, and a 3-mm-diameter skin biopsy specimen taken from the distal leg. Quantitation of epidermal innervation, parameters of nerve conduction study, R-R interval variability, and sympathetic skin response. Clinically, 21 patients (52.5%) were symptomatic with paresthesia over the limbs or autonomic symptoms. The intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density was markedly reduced in patients with CKD compared with age- and sex-matched controls (mean [SD], 2.8 [2.0] vs 8.6 [2.8] fibers/mm; P Skin denervation was observed in 27 patients (67.5%). Fifteen patients (37.5%) had abnormalities on nerve conduction studies, and 29 patients (72.5%) had abnormal results on autonomic function tests. By analysis with multiple regression models, the IENF density was negatively correlated with the duration of renal disease (P = .02). Additionally, the R-R interval variability at rest was linearly correlated with the IENF density (P = .02) and the absence of sympathetic skin responses at the soles was associated with reduced IENF density (P = .03). Small-fiber sensory and autonomic neuropathies constitute the major form of neuropathy in late-stage CKD. Furthermore, skin denervation was associated with the duration of renal disease.

  14. Pediatric differentiated thyroid carcinoma in stage I: risk factor analysis for disease free survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Nobuyuki; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Ito, Koichi; Sugino, Kiminori; Mimura, Takashi; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Kitagawa, Wataru; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Hirakawa, Shohei

    2009-01-01

    To examine the outcomes and risk factors in pediatric differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients who were defined as TNM stage I because some patients develop disease recurrence but treatment strategy for such stage I pediatric patients is still controversial. We reviewed 57 consecutive TNM stage I patients (15 years or less) with DTC (46 papillary and 11 follicular) who underwent initial treatment at Ito Hospital between 1962 and 2004 (7 males and 50 females; mean age: 13.1 years; mean follow-up: 17.4 years). Clinicopathological results were evaluated in all patients. Multivariate analysis was performed to reveal the risk factors for disease-free survival (DFS) in these 57 patients. Extrathyroid extension and clinical lymphadenopathy at diagnosis were found in 7 and 12 patients, respectively. Subtotal/total thyroidectomy was performed in 23 patients, modified neck dissection in 38, and radioactive iodine therapy in 10. Pathological node metastasis was confirmed in 37 patients (64.9%). Fifteen patients (26.3%) exhibited local recurrence and 3 of them also developed metachronous lung metastasis. Ten of these 15 achieved disease-free after further treatments and no patients died of disease. In multivariate analysis, male gender (p = 0.017), advanced tumor (T3, 4a) stage (p = 0.029), and clinical lymphadenopathy (p = 0.006) were risk factors for DFS in stage I pediatric patients. Male gender, tumor stage, and lymphadenopathy are risk factors for DFS in stage I pediatric DTC patients. Aggressive treatment (total thyroidectomy, node dissection, and RI therapy) is considered appropriate for patients with risk factors, whereas conservative or stepwise approach may be acceptable for other patients

  15. The sensitivity of auxiliary examinations in different stages of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-jiao JIANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the sensitivity of auxiliary examinations in different periods of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. Methods The clinical data of 53 sCJD patients were retrospectively analyzed including the different stages of skull diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI, 24-hour ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG, 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET-CT and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein. When calculating the sensitivity of an auxiliary examination, the diagnostic criteria were defined by combining the specific clinical manifestations with two or more positive results of other auxiliary examinations. Results There were 24, 53 and 22 sCJD patients, respectively, met the criterion of early (E, middle (M and later (L stage of disease (some patients fit 2 or 3 stages. The sensitivity of DWI (E: 58.3%, M: 85.4%, L: 94.7%, EEG (E: 45.8%, M: 62.7%, L: 77.8%, 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid (E: 11.1%, M: 52.9% and PET-CT (E: 80%, M: 100% increased gradually with disease progression. The sensitivity of PET-CT was higher than the other auxiliary examinations for E and M stages; no PET-CT was conducted in L stage. High signal regions mainly distributed in the cortex in E and M stages, but in L stage, no significant difference was found on the distribution of high signal regions between cortex and basal ganglia. Conclusions The sensitivities of the auxiliary examinations were different for sCJD patients in different stages. Reexaminations in different periods may improve the sensitivity for sCJD diagnosis. The sensitivity of PET-CT was high, and the combination of PET-CT and other auxiliary examinations may play a key role in the diagnosis of sCJD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.15

  16. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients: progression markers of mild to moderate stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Raissa Carla; Zonta, Marise Bueno; Araújo, Ana Paula Serra de; Israel, Vera Lúcia; Teive, Hélio A G

    2017-08-01

    To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson's disease patients from mild to moderate stages. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p life was related to stigma (p = 0.043), greater impairment in cognition (p = 0.002), mobility (p = 0.013) and for daily living activities (p = 0.05), and was considered more significant in men, married, older individuals, and those with a longer time of disease. The quality of life worsening markers at the moderate stage were related to stigma, worsening of cognition, and to greater impairment in mobility and daily living activities.

  17. Radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease: Australasian patterns of care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Michael; Boyages, John; Crennan, Elizabeth; Davis, Sidney; Fisher, Richard J; Hook, Carolyn; Johnson, Neva; Joseph, David; Liew, Kuen H; Morgan, Graeme; O' Brien, Peter; Pendlebury, Sue; Pratt, Gary; Quong, George; Thornton, Deborah; Walker, Quenten; Wallington, Margaret; Trotter, Grant

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: Analysis of treatment outcome for Stage I-IIA supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated solely by irradiation in Australia and New Zealand. Methods and Materials: Patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease only who were treated by irradiation alone with curative intent between 1969 to 1988 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand contributed patient data to the study. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were recorded. Disease-free interval, survival, and complications were analyzed. Results: Eight hundred and twenty patients were reviewed. The median age was 29 years. There were 437 men and 383 women. The distribution of 310 clinically staged patients was 170 stage IA, 5 IB, and 135 IIA. Five hundred and ten patients received laparotomies, and pathologic staging was as follows: IA 214, IB 13, IIA 283. The 10-year acturial disease-free rate was 69% and overall survival rate was 79%. Increasing age, male sex, higher number of involved sites, the use of involved field irradiation, no staging laparotomy, and earlier year of treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse and lower survival. Actuarial 10-year survival following recurrence was 48%. Acute complications requiring interruption to treatment occurred in 46 patients (6%), but < 1% had their treatment permanently suspended. Actuarial complication rates at 10 years were: cardiac 2%, pulmonary 3% and thyroid 5%. There were 44 second malignancies including 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3 leukemias, 7 lung, and 6 breast cancers. Mean delay to the development of a second cancer was 6 years. The 10-year actuarial rate of second malignancy was 5%. Conclusions: The Australasian experience of early stage Hodgkin's disease is consistent with the results in the published literature and confirms that irradiation produces a high cure rate with minimal toxicity.

  18. Radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease: Australasian patterns of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Michael; Boyages, John; Crennan, Elizabeth; Davis, Sidney; Fisher, Richard J.; Hook, Carolyn; Johnson, Neva; Joseph, David; Liew, Kuen H.; Morgan, Graeme; O'Brien, Peter; Pendlebury, Sue; Pratt, Gary; Quong, George; Thornton, Deborah; Walker, Quenten; Wallington, Margaret; Trotter, Grant

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of treatment outcome for Stage I-IIA supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated solely by irradiation in Australia and New Zealand. Methods and Materials: Patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease only who were treated by irradiation alone with curative intent between 1969 to 1988 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand contributed patient data to the study. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were recorded. Disease-free interval, survival, and complications were analyzed. Results: Eight hundred and twenty patients were reviewed. The median age was 29 years. There were 437 men and 383 women. The distribution of 310 clinically staged patients was 170 stage IA, 5 IB, and 135 IIA. Five hundred and ten patients received laparotomies, and pathologic staging was as follows: IA 214, IB 13, IIA 283. The 10-year acturial disease-free rate was 69% and overall survival rate was 79%. Increasing age, male sex, higher number of involved sites, the use of involved field irradiation, no staging laparotomy, and earlier year of treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse and lower survival. Actuarial 10-year survival following recurrence was 48%. Acute complications requiring interruption to treatment occurred in 46 patients (6%), but < 1% had their treatment permanently suspended. Actuarial complication rates at 10 years were: cardiac 2%, pulmonary 3% and thyroid 5%. There were 44 second malignancies including 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3 leukemias, 7 lung, and 6 breast cancers. Mean delay to the development of a second cancer was 6 years. The 10-year actuarial rate of second malignancy was 5%. Conclusions: The Australasian experience of early stage Hodgkin's disease is consistent with the results in the published literature and confirms that irradiation produces a high cure rate with minimal toxicity

  19. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontillo, Claudia; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Schanstra, Joost P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CKD273 is a urinary biomarker, which in advanced chronic kidney disease predicts further deterioration. We investigated whether CKD273 can also predict a decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to ... threshold (P = 0.086). Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target....

  1. Cognitive rehabilitation for elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive rehabilitation including tasks of cognitive training on performance of everyday activities in elderly people with early-stage Alzheimer?s disease. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three elderly people (15 men, 28 women) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer?s disease who had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 18 or above were randomly assigned to two groups: the cognitive rehabilitation group (experimental) and co...

  2. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Petschow

    Full Text Available Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels.13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ and higher (E = 640 mJ target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale.No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson's disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson's disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex.Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson's disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease with [18F]PET in Mild and Asymptomatic Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Drzezga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With longer life expectancy, dementia based on the age-related Alzheimers’ disease (AD has turned into one of the most prevalent disorders of older age, representing a serious medical and socio-economic issue. There has been growing interest in early diagnosis of this disease, particularly regarding the initiation of new treatment strategies ahead of the onset of irreversible neuronal damage. It is accepted that the pathologic changes underlying AD appear in the brain years to decades before the symptomatic stages. Consequently, clinical measures of cognitive impairment, as used for definition of dementia, will not allow early diagnosis of AD-pathology in the mild or asymptomatic stages. Thus, a need for complementary sensitive biomarkers is apparent. Brain imaging markers are among the most promising candidates for this diagnostic challenge. Particularly, [18F]FDG PET as a marker of regional neuronal function has been demonstrated to represent a most sensitive and specific method for early identification of AD-pathology and thus for prediction of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT, even in the mild and asymptomatic stages. Currently, systematic data of comparable quality are hardly available for any other imaging procedure. The purpose of this article is to describe the typical findings of [18F]FDG PET in different stages of AD and to demonstrate its value for early and reliable diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly ahead of the stage of dementia of the Alzheimer’s type.

  4. Interleukin-4 receptor alpha overexpression in human bladder cancer correlates with the pathological grade and stage of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Bharat H; Leland, Pamela; Lababidi, Samir; Varrichio, Frederick; Puri, Raj K

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα) is overexpressed on a variety of human cancers and can serve as target for IL-4 immunotoxin comprised of IL-4 and a mutated Pseudomonas exotoxin. However, its expression and association with grade and clinical stage of bladder cancer has not been studied. IL-4Rα expression was examined in human bladder cancer cell lines, mouse xenografts, and biopsy specimens at mRNA and protein levels by real-time RT-PCR and IHC/ISH techniques. We also examined the effect of IL-4 on proliferation and invasion of bladder carcinoma cell lines. For tissue microarray (TMA) results, we analyzed the precision data using exact binomial proportion with exact two-sided P-values. We used Cochran–Armitage Statistics with exact two-sided P-values to examine the trend analysis of IL-4Rα over grade or stage of the bladder cancer specimens. The influence of age and gender covariates was also analyzed using multiple logistic regression models. IL-4Rα is overexpressed in five bladder cancer cell lines, while normal bladder and human umbilical vein cell lines (HUVEC) expressed at low levels. Two other chains of IL-4 receptor complex, IL-2RγC and IL-13Rα1, were absent or weakly expressed. IL-4 modestly inhibited the cell proliferation, but enhanced cell invasion of bladder cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Bladder cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice also maintained IL-4Rα overexpression in vivo. Analysis of tumor biopsy specimens in TMAs revealed significantly higher IL-4Rα immunostaining (≥2+) in Grade 2 (85%) and Grade 3 (97%) compared to Grade 1 tumors (0%) (P ≤ 0.0001). Similarly, 9% stage I tumors were positive for IL-4Rα (≥2+) compared to 84% stage II (P ≤ 0.0001) and 100% stages III–IV tumors (P ≤ 0.0001). IL-13Rα1 was also expressed in tumor tissues but at low levels and it did not show any correlation with the grade and stage of disease. However, the IL-2RγC was not

  5. Lack of miRNA misregulation at early pathological stages in Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita eReinhardt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Late onset neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health concern as the population in many countries ages. Both frequent diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD, 14% incidence for 80-84 year old Europeans or Parkinson disease (PD, 1.4% prevalence for > 55 years old share, with other low-incidence neurodegenerative pathologies such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs, 0.01% prevalence and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD, 0.02% prevalence, a lack of efficient treatment in spite of important research efforts. Besides significant progress, studies with animal models have revealed unexpected complexities in the degenerative process, emphasizing a need to better understand the underlying pathological mechanisms. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small regulatory non-coding RNAs, have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. The current data supporting a role of miRNAs in PD, tauopathies, dominant ataxias and FTLD will first be discussed to emphasize the different levels of the pathological processes which may be affected by miRNAs. To investigate a potential involvement of miRNA dysregulation in the early stages of these neurodegenerative diseases we have used Drosophila models for 7 diseases (PD, 3 FTLD, 3 dominant ataxias that recapitulate many features of the human diseases. We performed deep sequencing of head small RNAs after 3 days of pathological protein expression in the fly head neurons. We found no evidence for a statistically significant difference in miRNA expression in this early stage of the pathological process. In addition, we could not identify small non coding CAG repeat RNAs (sCAG in polyQ disease models. Thus our data suggest that transcriptional deregulation of miRNAs or sCAG is unlikely to play a significant role in the initial stages of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. NOFBX Single-Stage-to-Orbit Mars Ascent Vehicle Engine, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continuation of our research and development of a Nitrous Oxide Fuel Blend (NOFBXTM) Single-Stage-to-Orbit (SSTO) monopropellant propulsion system for...

  7. A deformation-based morphometry study of patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, P; Østergaard, Karen; Cumming, P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) utilized primarily voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and investigated mostly patients with moderate- to late-stage disease. We now use deformation-based morphometry (DBM), a method...... purported to be more sensitive than VBM, to test for atrophy in patients with early-stage PD. METHODS: T1-weighted MRI images from 24 early-stage PD patients and 26 age-matched normal control subjects were compared using DBM. Two separate studies were conducted, where two minimally-biased nonlinear...... intensity-average were created; one for all subjects and another for just the PD patients. The DBM technique creates an average population-based MRI-average in an iterative hierarchical fashion. The nonlinear transformations estimated to match each subject to the MRI-average were then analysed. RESULTS...

  8. Periodic Peritoneal Dialysis in End Stage Renal Disease: Is it Still ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... replacement therapy out of reach of many patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Repeated puncture PD although inferior to HD biochemically, is easily and freely available across Rajasthan, India, and is simple to perform, and does not require sophisticated machines, thus making it an attractive option for dialysis ...

  9. Complexity Analysis of Resting-State MEG Activity in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez, C.; Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Stam, C.J.; Abasolo, D.; Berendse, H.W.; Hornero, R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze resting-state brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were recorded with a 151-channel whole-head radial gradiometer MEG system in 18 early-stage

  10. Advanced glycation end-products and skin autofluorescence in end-stage renal disease : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsov, Stefan; Graaff, Reindert; van Oeveren, Wim; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J.

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in its end stage, is marked by extremely high cardiovascular rates of morbidity and mortality; hemodialysis patients have a five-fold shorter life expectancy than healthy subjects of the same age. In CKD the metabolic products that accumulate in the body are

  11. Hodgkin disease of stage 4 from the national institute of oncology of Rabat-Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouhout, A.; Kebdani, T.; Hassouni, K.; Kanouni, L.; Assabane, A.; Kabbaj, H.; Rami, K.; Benjaafer, N.; Elgueddari, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    In spite of an improvement of the global survival rate in the order of 10 to 15% during the last thirty years, only 40% to 60% of patients with the hodgkin disease at 3B and 4 stages are living at ten years from the international data bases. (N.C.)

  12. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Steffen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on occurrence and risk factors for pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are sparse. Methods: This was a nationwide population-based study assessing occurrence and risk factors for PCP among patients with ESRD and population controls over a 21...

  13. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  14. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... develop and test innovative health care payment and service delivery models that show promise of reducing... test innovative payment and service delivery models that reduce spending under Medicare, Medicaid or...] Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for...

  15. Effect of folic acid on methionine and homocysteine metabolism in end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.; van Guldener, C.; ter Wee, P.M.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; van der Meer, K.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background. The pathogenesis of hyperhomocysteinemia in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unclear. Folic acid lowers, but does not normalize, the plasma homocysteine level in patients with ESRD, but its effect on whole body metabolism of homocysteine is unknown. Methods We studied the effect of 3

  16. Vitamin D and Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease: A New Paradigm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Joffe, Preben; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor agonists (VDRA) are currently recommended for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in stage 5 CKD. They are considered to be contraindicated in the presence of low or normal (for a dialysis patient) levels of PTH due to the risk of developing adynamic bone disease...

  17. Incidence and predictors of end-stage renal disease in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosselmann, Helle; Gislason, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Background- Renal dysfunction is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF), but whether this dysfunction progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unknown. Therefore, we examined incidence and predictors of ESRD in outpatients with HF. Methods and Results- Patients with systolic ...

  18. Survival prognostic value of morphological and metabolic variables in patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domachevsky, L. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva (Israel); Groshar, D.; Bernstine, H. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Galili, R. [Lady Davis-Carmel Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Haifa (Israel); Saute, M. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important, as patients with resectable disease and poor prognostic variables might benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate SUVmax, SUVmax ratio, CT volume (CTvol), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolisis (TLG) as survival prognostic markers. In addition, we defined two variables; MTV x SUVmax (MTVmax) and CTvol x SUVmax (CTvolmax) and assessed whether they can be used as prognostic markers. Patients with stage I-II NSCLC who underwent 18 F FDG PET/CT and surgery were evaluated. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the association between variables and survival. Similar analysis was performed in cases with no lymph node (LN) involvement. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included (at the end of the study, 140 patients were alive). SUVmax with a cut-off value of 8.2 was significant survival prognostic factor regardless of LN involvement (P = 0.012). In cases with no LN involvement, SUVmax and CTvol (≥7.1 ml) were significant survival prognostic factors with P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively. SUVmax may be a useful prognostic variable in stage I-II NSCLC while morphologic tumour volume might be useful in cases with no lymph node involvement. (orig.)

  19. Serum insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Lijun; Ji Naijun; Fan Bifu; Wang Chengyao; Mei Yibin; Chen Donghai; Li Fuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) levels in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were measured with RIA in 90 CHD patients and 40 controls. Results: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were significantly higher in CHD patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were significantly higher in the patients complicated with myocardial infarction (MI) than those in patients without this complication (t=2.831, t=2.328, both P 0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were increased in CHD patients, most markedly in those complicated with MI. (authors)

  20. [Sense of smell, physiological ageing and neurodegenerative diseases: II. Ageing and neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusari, A; Molina, J A

    The sense of smell, which was once studied because of its biological and evolutionary significance, is today one of the centres of interest in research on normal and pathological ageing. The latest scientific developments point to an inversely proportional relationship between age and olfactory sensitivity. In certain neurodegenerative diseases this sensory decline is one of the first symptoms of the disorder and is correlated with the progression of the disease. In this work we are going to review the scientific knowledge on loss of sense of smell in ageing and in neurodegenerative diseases, with special attention given to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A survey of studies that have examined the olfactory deficits in ageing and in some neurodegenerative diseases offers conclusive results about the presence of these impairments in the early stages of these disorders and even among healthy elderly persons. Although a number of causes contribute to these sensory losses in physiological ageing, a common neurological foundation has been proposed for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nevertheless, despite certain initial similarities, the olfactory deficits shown in these disorders seem to be qualitatively different.

  1. Treatment results of Stage I and II oral tongue cancer with interstitial brachytherapy: maximum tumor thickness is prognostic of nodal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Kanji; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Fujita, Minoru; Akagi, Yukio; Ito, Katsuhide

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic importance of T classification and maximum tumor thickness (MTT) on the treatment results of Stage I and II oral tongue cancer treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1981 and December 1993, 173 cases were eligible for this retrospective analysis. Of 173 patients, 75 were classified as Stage I and 98 as Stage II: maximum tumor length ranged from 6 to 40 mm. MTT, which ranged from 2 to 38 mm, was measured with ultrasonography and/or palpation. Brachytherapy was performed with iridium hairpins or radium needles following external irradiation in 66 patients, or exclusively in 107 patients. Results: The 5-year local recurrence rates were Stage I, 7%; Stage II, 22%; MTT < 8 mm, 8%; and MTT ≥ 8 mm, 28%. The 5-year regional recurrence rates were Stage I, 15%; Stage II, 29%; MTT < 8 mm, 18%; and MTT ≥ 8 mm, 31%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence rates of the patients with Stage I and MTT < 8 mm of the brachytherapy only group were significantly better than those of Stage II and MTT ≥ 8 mm (5% and 6% vs. 16% and 24%). The 5-year regional recurrence rates of the patients with Stage I and MTT < 8 mm of the brachytherapy-only group were significantly better than those of Stage II and MTT ≥ 8 mm (14% and 16% vs. 34% and 46%). There was no significant difference in the 5-year regional recurrence rates between the two groups of Stage I and Stage II, MTT < 8 mm. However, there was a significant difference in the 5-year regional recurrence rates between the two groups of MTT ≥ 8 mm (p < 0.005). Conclusions: For patients with Stage I and II oral tongue cancer, tumor thickness as well as T classification were prognostic for nodal metastasis and prognosis. Patients with MTT ≥ 8 mm are more likely to fail in the neck region. These findings suggest that MTT should be considered along with T stage in determining strategies for Stage I and II oral tongue cancer

  2. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke during active stages of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. L.; Lindhardsen, J.; Ahlehoff, O.

    2014-01-01

    patients with new-onset IBD and 236 275 age- and sex-matched controls. Poisson regression analyses with continuously updated covariates were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of AF and stroke. Disease activity stages of flare (new disease activity), persistent activity, and remission were...... defined by corticosteroid prescriptions, IBD hospital admissions, and biological treatment. Inflammatory bowel disease patients had a mean age of 43.9 years, 53.9 were women, and mean follow-up was 6.8 years. Among IBD patients, 685 had AF and 549 had a stroke, corresponding to incidence rates per 1000...

  3. What is the impact of chronic kidney disease stage and cardiovascular disease on the annual cost of hospital care in moderate-to-severe kidney disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kent, Seamus; Schlackow, Iryna; Lozano-Kuehne, Jingky; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Haynes, Richard; Gray, Alastair; Cass, Alan; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Herrington, William; Mihaylova, Borislava; de Zeeuw, Dick; Navis, Gerjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reliable estimates of the impacts of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, with and without cardiovascular disease, on hospital costs are needed to inform health policy. Methods: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized trial prospectively collected information on kidney

  4. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  5. Serum Ionized Calcium Quantification for Staging Canine Periodontal Disease: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel Carreira, L; Daniela, Dias; Pedro, Azevedo

    2015-06-01

    Periodontal diseases (PD) are infectious, inflammatory, progressive diseases of the oral cavity affecting people and dogs. PD takes 2 forms: gingivitis and periodontitis. Diagnosing or staging PD can be achieved only with dental x-rays and periodontal probing, both of which require the use of general anesthesia in dogs. This study aimed to determine whether serum ionized calcium ([iCa(2+)]) levels can be useful in preliminary PD staging in dogs. A sample of 40 dogs (n = 40) was divided into 4 groups (n = 10 each) based on the following PD stages: G1 (gingivitis), G2 (initial periodontitis), G3 (moderate periodontitis), and G4 (severe periodontitis). The groups were then subjected to [iCa(2+)] quantification. Statistically significant differences were observed between PD stages and [iCa(2+)] for all stages except G3 and G4. Therefore, this parameter can be used as an additional tool to establish and monitor preliminary PD status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  7. Primary chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation for patients with stage II larger than 3 CM or locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, E.; Lefranc, J.P.; Blondon, J.; Deniaud, E.; Buffat, L.; Benmiloud, M.; Laugier, A.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    possibility of breast conservative treatment : tumor size (p = 0.0003) and tumoral response after induction chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, overall survival and disease-free survival were significantly influenced by tumor size (< 6 cm vs ≥ 6 cm in diameter, p=0.046 and 0.047, respectively), histological grade (grade 1 and 2 vs grade 3, p=0.0066 and 0.01, respectively), clinical stage (stage II and III vs stage IV, p=0.0017 and 0.004, respectively), tumor response to induction chemotherapy (p=0.027 and 0.0042, respectively) and tumor response after induction chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation (p = 0.025 and 0.0042, respectively). In multivariate analysis, two factors had significant impact on overall survival and disease free-survival : tumor response after chemotherapy (p=0.012 and 0.0024, respectively) and clinical stage (p=0.0009 and 0.0052, respectively). Arm lymphedema was noted in 11% of the patients treated with axillary dissection and in 4% without axillary dissection. Limitation of shoulder movements was noted in 6% after mastectomy and axillary dissection and in 2% after wide excision and axillary dissection. None of patients developed congestive heart failure, extended pulmonary fibrosis, brachial plexopathy or rib fracture. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 67% of patients after wide excision and radiotherapy and in 75% of patients treated by radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by preoperative-dose irradiation may permit the selection of some patients with locally advanced breast cancer or stage II more than 3 cm in diameter for conservative treatment. However, the impact of this treatment modality on long term survival remains to be established

  8. Prognostic implication of serum hepatocyte growth factor in stage II/III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyori; Youk, Jeonghwan; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Tae-Yong; Min, Ahrum; Ham, Hye-Seon; Cho, Seongcheol; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Han Suk; Han, Wonshik; Park, In Ae; Kim, Tae-You; Noh, Dong-Young; Im, Seock-Ah

    2016-03-01

    In stage II/III breast cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a standard treatment. Although several biomarkers are used to predict prognosis in breast cancer, there is no reliable predictive biomarker for NAC success. Recently, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cMet signaling pathway demonstrated to be involved in breast cancer tumor progression, and its potential as a biomarker is under active investigation. In this study, we assessed the potential of serum HGF as a prognostic biomarker for NAC efficacy. Venous blood samples were drawn from patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer and treated with NAC in Seoul National University Hospital from August 2004 to November 2009. Serum HGF level was determined using an ELISA system. We reviewed the medical records of the patients and investigated the association of HGF level with patients' clinicopathologic characteristics. A total of 121 female patients (median age = 45 years old) were included. Median level of HGF was 934 pg/ml (lower quartile: 772, upper quartile: 1145 pg/ml). Patients with higher HGF level than median value were significantly more likely to have clinically detectable regional node metastasis (p = 0.017, Fisher's exact test). Patients with complete and partial response according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition criteria tended to have higher HGF level (p = 0.105 by t test). Patients with an HGF level higher than the upper quartile value had longer relapse-free survival than the other patients (106 vs. 85 months, p = 0.008). High serum HGF levels in breast cancer patients are associated with clinically detectable regional node metastasis and, paradoxically, with longer relapse-free survival in stage II/III breast cancer.

  9. Homovanillic acid in CSF of mild stage Parkinson's disease patients correlates with motor impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Olivola, Enrica; Galati, Salvatore; Cerroni, Rocco; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Hainsworth, Atticus H; Saviozzi, Valentina; Fedele, Ernesto; Liguori, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), several efforts have been spent in order to find biochemical parameters able to identify the progression of the pathological processes at the basis of the disease. It is already known that advanced PD patients manifesting dyskinesia are featured by the high homovanillic acid (HVA)/dopamine (DA) ratio, suggesting the increased turnover of DA in these patients. Less clear is whether similar changes affect mild and moderate stages of the disease (between 1 and 2.5 of Hoehn & Yahr -H&Y- stage). Hence, here we tested whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of DA and its major metabolites, either 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) or HVA, correlate with motor performance in mild and moderate PD patients. CSF samples were collected after 2 days of anti-PD drugs washout, via lumbar puncture (LP) performed 130 min following administration of oral levodopa (LD) dose (200 mg). LP timing was determined in light of our previous tests clarifying that 2 h after oral LD administration CSF DA concentration reaches a plateau, which was un-respective of PD stage or duration. DA, DOPAC and HVA were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in a group of 19 patients, distributed in two groups on the basis of the H&Y stage with a cut-off of 1.5. In these PD patients, HVA was correlated with DOPAC (R = 0,56, p motor impairment. More importantly, HVA correlated with motor impairment measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Score -III (UPDRS) (R = 0.61; p motor impairment. Therefore, we suggest the potential use of measuring the CSF HVA level as a possible biomarker of PD stage changes in order to monitor the effectiveness of PD-modifying pharmacological therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase II study of ipilimumab in adolescents with unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geoerger, Birgit; Bergeron, Christophe; Gore, Lia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma in adults; however, little information on the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in younger patients is available. METHODS: Patients aged 12 to <18 years with previously treated or untreated, unresectable stage III or IV mal...

  11. Screening for a Chronic Disease: A Multiple Stage Duration Model with Partial Observability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Thomas A; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy P

    2016-08-01

    We estimate a dynamic multi-stage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, while the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

  12. Phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials: proposal of a two-stage Bayesian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    We propose a new design for phase I (or phase II) dose-ranging clinical trials aiming at determining a dose of an experimental treatment to satisfy safety (respectively efficacy) requirements, at treating a sufficiently large number of patients to estimate the toxicity (respectively failure) probability of the dose level with a given reliability, and at stopping the trial early if it is likely that no dose is safe (respectively efficacious). A two-stage design was derived from the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM), with implementation of Bayesian criteria to generate stopping rules. A simulation study was conducted to compare the operating characteristics of the proposed two-stage design to those reached by the traditional CRM. Finally, two applications to real data sets are provided.

  13. The second stage of a Titan II rocket is lifted for mating at the launch tower, Vandenberg AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    At the launch tower, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., the second stage of a Titan II rocket is lifted to vertical. The Titan will power the launch of a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. A network-based predictive gene-expression signature for adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in stage II colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bangrong; Luo, Liping; Feng, Lin; Ma, Shiqi; Chen, Tingqing; Ren, Yuan; Zha, Xiao; Cheng, Shujun; Zhang, Kaitai; Chen, Changmin

    2017-12-13

    The clinical benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) is controversial. This study aimed to explore novel gene signature to predict outcome benefit of postoperative 5-Fu-based therapy in stage II CRC. Gene-expression profiles of stage II CRCs from two datasets with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy (training dataset, n = 212; validation dataset, n = 85) were analyzed to identify the indicator. A systemic approach by integrating gene-expression and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was implemented to develop the predictive signature. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards model were used to determine the survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. Experiments with shRNA knock-down were carried out to confirm the signature identified in this study. In the training dataset, we identified 44 PPI sub-modules, by which we separate patients into two clusters (1 and 2) having different chemotherapeutic benefit. A predictor of 11 PPI sub-modules (11-PPI-Mod) was established to discriminate the two sub-groups, with an overall accuracy of 90.1%. This signature was independently validated in an external validation dataset. Kaplan-Meier curves showed an improved outcome for patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy in Cluster 1 sub-group, but even worse survival for those in Cluster 2 sub-group. Similar results were found in both the training and the validation dataset. Multivariate Cox regression revealed an interaction effect between 11-PPI-Mod signature and adjuvant therapy treatment in the training dataset (RFS, p = 0.007; OS, p = 0.006) and the validation dataset (RFS, p = 0.002). From the signature, we found that PTGES gene was up-regulated in CRC cells which were more resistant to 5-Fu. Knock-down of PTGES indicated a growth inhibition and up-regulation of apoptotic markers induced by 5-Fu in CRC cells. Only a small proportion of stage II CRC patients could benefit from adjuvant therapy. The 11-PPI-Mod as

  14. Justification of a dose of diuretics in antihypertensive treatment of patients with essential hypertension stage II-III

    OpenAIRE

    Plesh, I. A.; Boreyko, L. D.; Slyvka, N. O.; Kshanovska, G. I.

    2017-01-01

    "Pressor natriuresis" coefficient in  ratio of daily urinary sodium excretion (ENadob) by means of  electrometric method using ionselective electrodes (SINO - 005) to average of median arterial pressure (MAPdob) a day  and character of circadian rhytm, by the method of daily monitoring of blood pressure (hardware «Solvaig») to optimize the dose of a diuretic in combined antihypertensive treatment was determened іn 65 patients with essential  hypertension (EH II-III stage and 26 control (normo...

  15. Angiotensin II, hypertension and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesmann, M.; Roelofs, M.; Lugt, R. Van Der; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced

  16. Surgical resection of locally advanced primary transverse colon cancer--not a worse outcome in stage II tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Changchien, Chung-Rong; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Fan, Chung-Wei; Tang, Reiping; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Tasi, Wen-Sy; You, Yau-Tong; You, Jeng-Fu; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chiang, Jy-Ming

    2011-07-01

    In locally advanced primary transverse colon cancer, a tumor may cause perforation or invade adjacent organs. Extensive resection is the best choice of treatment, but such procedures must be weighed against the potential survival benefits. This study was performed to identify the clinicopathological features and treatment outcomes of such tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the database of the Colorectal Cancer Registry of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between February 1995 and December 2005. Patients with colon cancer sited between the hepatic and splenic flexure that involved an adjacent organ without distant metastasis were defined as having locally advanced transverse colon cancer. A total of 827 patients who underwent surgery for transverse primary colon cancer were enrolled in the study. Stage II and stage III colon cancer were diagnosed in 548 patients. Thirty-two (5.8%) patients were diagnosed with locally advanced tumors. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage III, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL, a tumor with perforation or obstruction, and the presence of a locally advanced tumor were significant prognostic factors for both overall and cancer-specific survival. Postoperative morbidity rates differed significantly between the locally advanced and non-locally advanced tumor groups (22.7% vs. 12.3%, P transverse colon tumors (P = 0.21). Surgical resection of locally advanced transverse colon tumors resulted in a higher morbidity and mortality than that of non-locally advanced tumors, but the benefit of extensive surgery in the case of locally advanced tumors cannot be underestimated. Furthermore, this benefit is more pronounced in the case of stage II tumors.

  17. Perioperative Management of a Child with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome of the Jehovah's Witness Faith Presenting for Hybrid Comprehensive Stage II Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppiah, Sathappan; Mckee, Christopher; Hodge, Ashley; Galantowicz, Mark; Tobias, Joseph; Naguib, Aymen

    2016-09-01

    Over the years, there has been a growing recognition of the potential negative sequelae of allogeneic blood products on postoperative outcomes following cardiac surgery. In addition, followers of the Jehovah's Witness (JW) faith have a religious restriction against receiving blood or blood components. Advances in perioperative care, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and surgical technique have minimized the need for allogeneic blood products. Specific blood conservation strategies include maximizing the preoperative hematocrit and coagulation function as well as intraoperative strategies, such as acute normovolemic hemodilution and adjustments of the technique of CPB. We report a 7-month-old patient whose parents were of the JW faith who underwent a comprehensive stage II procedure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome without exposure to blood or blood products during his hospital stay. Perioperative techniques for blood avoidance are discussed with emphasis on their application to infants undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

  18. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of cortical lipids from preclinical to severe stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gónzalez de San Román, E; Manuel, I; Giralt, M T; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Puertas, R

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of patients worldwide. Previous studies have demonstrated alterations in the lipid composition of lipid extracts from plasma and brain samples of AD patients. However, there is no consensus regarding the qualitative and quantitative changes of lipids in brains from AD patients. In addition, the recent developments in imaging mass spectrometry methods are leading to a new stage in the in situ analysis of lipid species in brain tissue slices from human postmortem samples. The present study uses the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS), permitting the direct anatomical analysis of lipids in postmortem brain sections from AD patients, which are compared with the intensity of the lipid signal in samples from matched subjects with no neurological diseases. The frontal cortex samples from AD patients were classified in three groups based on Braak's histochemical criteria, ranging from non-cognitively impaired patients to those severely affected. The main results indicate a depletion of different sulfatide lipid species from the earliest stages of the disease in both white and gray matter areas of the frontal cortex. Therefore, the decrease in sulfatides in cortical areas could be considered as a marker of the disease, but may also indicate neurochemical modifications related to the pathogenesis of the disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypercoagulability in end-stage liver disease: prevalence and its correlation with severity of liver disease and portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ashish; Karachristos, Andreas; Bromberg, Michael; Daly, Ellen; Maloo, Manoj; Jain, Ashok Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Contrary to well-recognized bleeding diathesis in chronic liver disease, thrombotic events can occur in these patients due to reduction or loss of synthesis of anticoagulant proteins. Forty-seven consecutive patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) were investigated for activity of protein C, protein S, antithrombin, and factor V Leiden mutation. Forty-two (89.4%) patients had low levels of at least 1 while 33 (70.2%) patients were deficient for all anticoagulant proteins studied. Forty-six (97.9%) patients were negative for factor V Leiden mutation. The deficiencies were more marked in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and patients with model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15. Six (12.8%) patients had portal vein thrombosis (PVT), and all had diminished protein S activity. In conclusions, deficiency of anticoagulant proteins occur in early phase of chronic liver disease. The severity of deficiency is proportional to the severity of liver disease. Despite the high prevalence of hypercoagulability, the incidence of PVT is low. Further studies with larger cohort of patients are needed to support these conclusions and to study other associated factors.

  1. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT.

  2. CASSAVA BREEDING II: PHENOTYPIC CORRELATIONS THROUGH THE DIFFERENT STAGES OF SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Joaqui Barandica

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Breeding cassava relies on a phenotypic recurrent selection that takes advantage of the vegetative propagation of this crop. Successive stages of selection (single row trial- SRT; preliminary yield trial – PYT; advanced yield trial – AYT; and uniform yield trials UYT, gradually reduce the number of genotypes as the plot size, number of replications and locations increase. An important feature of this scheme is that, because of the clonal, reproduction of cassava, the same identical genotypes are evaluated throughout these four successive stages of selection. For this study data, from 14 years (more than 30,000 data points of evaluation in a sub-humid tropical environment was consolidated for a meta-analysis. Correlation coefficients for fresh root yield (FRY, dry matter content (DMC, harvest index (HIN and plant type score (PTS along the different stages of selection were estimated. DMC and PTS measured in different trials showed the highest correlation coefficients, indicating a relatively good repeatability. HIN had an intermediate repeatability, whereas FRY had the lowest value. The association between HIN and FRY was lower than expected, suggesting that HIN in early stages was not reliable as indirect selection for FRY in later stages. There was a consistent decrease in the average performance of clones grown in PYTs compared with the earlier evaluation of the same genotypes at SRTs. A feasible explanation for this trend is the impact of the environment on the physiological and nutritional status of the planting material and/or epigenetic effects. The usefulness of HIN is questioned. Measuring this variable takes considerable efforts at harvest time. DMC and FRY showed a weak positive association in SRT (r= 0.21 but a clearly negative one at UYT (r= -0.42. The change if the relationship between these variables is the result of selection. In later stages of selection, the plant is forced to maximize productivity on a dry weight basis

  3. Definitive radiotherapy alone over 60 Gy for patients unfit for combined treatment to stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Su Ssan; Jeong, Yuri; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Wonsik; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are frequently treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone, due to poor performance status or underlying disease. We investigated the effectiveness of RT over 60 Gy administered alone to NSCLC patients who were unfit or rejecting for combination treatment. From April 2002 to July 2010, 83 patients with stage II-III NSCLC, aged over 60 years, treated by RT alone with a curative aim were analyzed. Radiation was targeted to the primary tumor and clinically involved lymph nodes. A total dose of 66 Gy in 30 fractions (2.2 Gy/fraction) was delivered once daily (5 fractions weekly). One month after completing RT, initial tumor responses were evaluated. Median age of patients was 73 years (range, 60 – 82 years). The median survival time was 18.6 months (range, 2–135). The actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 3 years were 39 % and 23 %, and cause-specific survival rate at 2 and 3 years were 57 % and 47 %, respectively. When primary tumor was controlled, the 2- and 3-year CSS were 56 % and 45 %, but 32 % and 23 % in those patients with local failure, respectively (P = 0.017). Additionally, the local control rate was associated with the initial tumor response (P = 0.01). No patient experienced grade 4+ toxicity. For stage II-III NSCLC patients aged over 60 years and unfit or rejecting for combination treatment, RT alone showed promising result. Long-term disease control can be expected if an early tumor response to radiation is achieved, which could result in improved overall survival rates

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II: European recommendations for the diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of a rare disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpa, Maurizio; Almássy, Zsuzsanna; Beck, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a rare, life-limiting, X-linked recessive disease characterised by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Consequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leads to pathological changes in multiple body systems. Age at onset, signs and symp......Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a rare, life-limiting, X-linked recessive disease characterised by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Consequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leads to pathological changes in multiple body systems. Age at onset, signs...... paediatricians, specialist nurses, otorhinolaryngologists, orthopaedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, cardiologists, pneumologists, anaesthesiologists, neurologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, psychologists, social workers, homecare companies and patient societies. Take...

  5. A comparison of non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in the initial stage of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Harry K.W. [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Center of Excellence in Hip Disorders, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Kaste, Sue [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Dempsey, Molly; Wilkes, David [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A prognostic indicator of outcome for Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCP) is needed to guide treatment decisions during the initial stage of the disease (stage 1), before deformity occurs. Radiographic prognosticators are applicable only after fragmentation (stage II). We investigated pre- and postcontrast MRI in depicting stage I femoral head involvement. Thirty children with stage I LCP underwent non-contrast coronal T1 fast spin-echo (FSE) and corresponding postcontrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences to quantify the extent of femoral head involvement. Three pediatric radiologists and one pediatric orthopedic surgeon independently measured central head involvement. Interobserver reliability of percent head involvement using non-contrasted MR images had intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.72. Postcontrast MRI improved interobserver reliability (ICC 0.82). Qualitatively, the area of involvement was more clearly visible on contrast-enhanced MRI. A comparison of results obtained by each observer using the two MRI techniques showed no correlation. ICC ranged from -0.08 to 0.03 for each observer. Generally, greater head involvement was depicted by contrast compared with non-contrast MRI (Pearson r = -0.37, P = 0.04). Pre- and postcontrast MRI assess two different components of stage I LCP. However, contrast-enhanced MRI more clearly depicts the area of involvement. (orig.)

  6. The Total Artificial Heart in End-Stage Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chet R; Morales, David L S

    2017-01-01

    The development of durable ventricular assist devices (VADs) has improved mortality rates and quality of life in patients with end stage heart failure. While the use of VADs has increased dramatically in recent years, there is limited experience with VAD implantation in patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD), despite the fact that the number of patients with end stage CHD has grown due to improvements in surgical and medical care. VAD use has been limited in patients with CHD and end stage heart failure due to anatomic (systemic right ventricle, single ventricle, surgically altered anatomy, valve dysfunction, etc.) and physiologic constraints (diastolic dysfunction). The total artificial heart (TAH), which has right and left sided pumps that can be arranged in a variety of orientations, can accommodate the anatomic variation present in CHD patients. This review provides an overview of the potential use of the TAH in patients with CHD.

  7. [Working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of studies demonstrated that some forms of memory for music are spared in dementia, but only few studies have investigated patients with early stages of dementia. In this pilot-study we tested working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with a newly created test. The test probed working memory using 7 gradually elongated tone-lines and 6 chords which were each followed by 3 similar items and 1 identical item. The participants of the study, namely 10 patients with MCI, 10 patients with early stage AD and 23 healthy subjects were instructed to select the identical tone-line or chord. Subjects with MCI and early AD showed significantly reduced performance than controls in most of the presented tasks. In recognizing chords MCI- participants surprisingly showed an unimpaired performance. The gradual increase of the impairment during the preclinical phase of AD seems to spare this special ability in MCI.

  8. Role of low protein diet in management of different stages of chronic kidney disease - practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat V; Patel, Zamurrud M

    2016-10-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem and more so in India. With limited availability and high cost of therapy, barely 10 % of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases get treatment in India. Therefore, all possible efforts should be made to retard progression of CKD. This article reviews the role of low protein diet (LPD) in management of CKD subjects and suggests how to apply it in clinical practice. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. However, its role in human subjects with CKD is perceived to be controversial based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study. We believe that beneficial effect of LPD could not be appreciated due to shorter duration of follow-up in the MDRD study. Had the study been continued longer, it may have been possible to appreciate beneficial effect of LPD. It is our contention that in all cases of CKD that are slowly progressive, LPD can significantly retard progression of CKD and delay the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be able to apply LPD for a long period, it is important to prescribe LPD at earlier stages (1,2,3) of CKD and not at late stage as recommended by KDIGO guidelines. Many clinicians are concerned about worsening nutritional status and hence reluctant to prescribe LPD. This actually is true for patients with advanced CKD in whom there is spontaneous decrease in calorie and protein intake. In our experience, nutritional status of patients in early stages (1,2,3) of CKD is as good as that of healthy subjects. Prescribing LPD at an early stage is unlikely to worsen status. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. Even in human subjects, there is enough evidence to suggest that LPD retards progression of CKD in carefully selected subjects. It should be prescribed to those with good appetite, good nutritional status and a slowly

  9. Lithium chloride inhibits early stages of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fu-Rong; Xie, Yin-Li; Liu, Ze-Zhong; Shao, Jun-Jun; Li, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Yong-Guang; Chang, Hui-Yun

    2017-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, swine, and sheep. FMD vaccine is the traditional way to protect against the disease, which can greatly reduce its occurrence. However, the use of FMD vaccines to protect early infection is limited. Therefore, the alternative strategy of applying antiviral agents is required to control the spread of FMDV in outbreak situations. As previously reported, LiCl has obviously inhibition effects on a variety of viruses such as transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), infectious bronchitis coronavirus (IBV), and pseudorabies herpesvirus and EV-A71 virus. In this study, our findings were the first to demonstrate that LiCl inhibition of the FMDV replication. In this study, BHK-21 cell was dose-dependent with LiCl at various stages of FMDV. Virus titration assay was calculated by the 50% tissue culture infected dose (TCID 50 ) with the Reed and Muench method. The cytotoxicity assay of LiCl was performed by the CCK8 kit. The expression level of viral mRNA was measured by RT-qPCR. The results revealed LiCl can inhibit FMDV replication, but it cannot affect FMDV attachment stage and entry stage in the course of FMDV life cycle. Further studies confirmed that the LiCl affect the replication stage of FMDV, especially the early stages of FMDV replication. So LiCl has potential as an effective anti-FMDV drug. Therefore, LiCl may be an effective drug for the control of FMDV. Based on that, the mechanism of the antiviral effect of LiCl on FMDV infection is need to in-depth research in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The role of the amygdala during emotional processing in Huntington's disease: from pre-manifest to late stage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sarah L; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Begeti, Faye; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Lazar, Alpar S; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Hampshire, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Deficits in emotional processing can be detected in the pre-manifest stage of Huntington's disease and negative emotion recognition has been identified as a predictor of clinical diagnosis. The underlying neuropathological correlates of such deficits are typically established using correlative structural MRI studies. This approach does not take into consideration the impact of disruption to the complex interactions between multiple brain circuits on emotional processing. Therefore, exploration of the neural substrates of emotional processing in pre-manifest HD using fMRI connectivity analysis may be a useful way of evaluating the way brain regions interrelate in the period prior to diagnosis. We investigated the impact of predicted time to disease onset on brain activation when participants were exposed to pictures of faces with angry and neutral expressions, in 20 pre-manifest HD gene carriers and 23 healthy controls. On the basis of the results of this initial study went on to look at amygdala dependent cognitive performance in 79 Huntington's disease patients from a cross-section of disease stages (pre-manifest to late disease) and 26 healthy controls, using a validated theory of mind task: "the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test" which has been previously been shown to be amygdala dependent. Psychophysiological interaction analysis identified reduced connectivity between the left amygdala and right fusiform facial area in pre-manifest HD gene carriers compared to controls when viewing angry compared to neutral faces. Change in PPI connectivity scores correlated with predicted time to disease onset (r=0.45, pneural networks underlying social cognition and emotional processing can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis in Huntington's disease. Connectivity between the amygdala and other brain regions is impacted by the disease process in pre-manifest HD and may therefore be a useful way of identifying participants who are approaching a clinical diagnosis

  11. Correlation between hindfoot joint three-dimensional kinematics and the changes of the medial arch angle in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Xu, Jian; Wang, Yue; Lin, Xiang-Jin; Ma, Xin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the correlation between the kinematics of the hindfoot joint and the medial arch angle change in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot three-dimensionally under loading. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 12 healthy feet and 12 feet with stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot were taken both in non- and full-body-weight-bearing condition. The CT images of the hindfoot bones were reconstructed into three-dimensional models with Mimics and Geomagic reverse engineering software. The three-dimensional changes of the hindfoot joint were calculated to determine their correlation to the medial longitudinal arch angle. The medial arch angle change was larger in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot compared to that in healthy foot under loading. The rotation and translation of the talocalcaneal joint, the talonavicular joint and the calcanocuboid joint had little influence on the change of the medial arch angle in healthy foot. However, the eversion of the talocalcaneal joint, the proximal translation of the calcaneus relative to the talus and the dorsiflexion of talonavicular joint could increase the medial arch angle in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot under loading. Joint instability occurred in patients with stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot under loading. Limitation of over movement of the talocalcaneal joint and the talonavicular joint may help correct the medial longitudinal arch in stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction flatfoot. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multi-stage subunit vaccine development against Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Johne’s disease in ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers

    paratuberculosis provide only partial protection and interfere with diagnostic tests for JD and surveillance for bovine TB. In contrast, recombinant subunit vaccines can be designed to be used without compromising control of bTB and Map. Taking advantage of data from mouse TB studies, and early Map vaccination...... in macrophages. The disease progression is very slow with neonatal animals being the most susceptible to infection, but without development of detectable IFN-γ responses for months after infection and rarely with clinical disease before the second or third year of life. Available whole cell vaccines against......- and field-studies we developed a vaccine with a single recombinant fusion protein comprising four acute-stage antigens (Ags) and one latent-stage Ag formulated in adjuvant (FET-vaccine). In post-exposure vaccination of calves and goats with necropsy 8-12 months post inoculation, we determined...

  13. Local and regional irradiation and brief reduced-dose chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin'n lymphoma (stage IE, IIE) of Waldeyer's ring with adult diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Shikama, Naoto; Gomi, Koutarou; Izuno, Itaru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kiyono, Kunihiro

    1997-01-01

    Usually, the middle-aged patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and concomitant other adult diseases can not be tolerable for intensive chemotherapy. Then we introduced a new regimen composed of radiation for local and surrounding lymph node areas, and brief reduced-dose chemotherapy into treatment for such patients. Thirty-eight patients with Stage I E or Stage II E non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring were a core of this study. Histopathologically they were diagnosed as diffuse intermediate grade. In addition, they suffered from other adult diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cereblovascular disorders, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver diseases, etc. They were treated by the combined modality composed of reduced-dose chemotherapy (70%-ACOP: 2 cycles or 70%-MACOP-B: 8 weeks) and regional lymph node irradiation (30 Gy) puls boost irradiation (10 Gy) to involved area (total 40 Gy). No relapses were observed in the radiation field, the 5-year disease-free survival rate and cause-specific survival rate for all patients were 85.7% and 91.4%, respectively. There were no differences of the 5-year disease-free survival rate between stage I E and II E , among the pathological subtypes, among the complications and etc. The regimen composed of regional lymph node irradiation (30 Gy) puls boost irradiation (10 Gy) to involved area (total 40 Gy) and reduced-dose chemotherapy (70%-dose ACOP, 70%-dose MACOP-B) is a safe and useful approach to treatment for diffuse intermediate grade of B cell lymphoma in middle-aged patients having other adult diseases. (author)

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of Cuboid Osteotomy Lateral Column Lengthening for Stage II B Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity: A Cadaveric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of cuboid osteotomy lateral column lengthening (LCL for the correction of stage II B adult-acquired flatfoot deformity in cadaver. Methods. Six cadaver specimens were loaded to 350 N. Flatfoot models were established and each was evaluated radiographically and pedobarographically in the following conditions: (1 intact foot, (2 flatfoot, and (3 cuboid osteotomy LCL (2, 3, 4, and 5 mm. Results. Compared with the flatfoot model, the LCLs showed significant correction of talonavicular coverage on anteroposterior radiographs and talus-first metatarsal angle on both anteroposterior and lateral radiographs (p<.05. Compared with the intact foot, the above angles of the LCLs showed no significant difference except the 2 mm LCL. In terms of forefoot pressure, medial pressure of the 2 mm LCL (p=.044 and lateral pressure of the 3, 4, and 5 mm LCLs showed statistical differences (p<.05, but lateral pressure of the 3 mm LCL was not more than the intact foot as compared to the 4 and 5 mm LCLs, which was less than medial pressure. Conclusion. Cuboid osteotomy LCL procedure avoids damage to subtalar joint and has a good effect on correction of stage II B adult-acquired flatfoot deformity with a 3 mm lengthening in cadavers.

  15. Markers, Cofactors and Staging Systems in the Study of HIV Disease Progression: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Portela

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at providing a comprehensive review of markers, cofactors and staging systems used for HIV disease, focusing on some aspects that nowadays could even be considered historical, and advancing in current issues such as the prognostic value of viral load measurements, viral genotypic and phenotypic characterization, and new HIV disease treatment protocols. CD4+ cell values, combined with the new viral markers mentioned are promising as a parsimonious predictor set for defining both severity and progression. An adequate predictor of patient resource use for planning purposes still needs to be defined

  16. Asymptomatic pontine and extra-pontine lesions in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kanwar Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic demyelination syndrome leading to central pontine/extra-pontine myelinolysis (CPM/EPM occurs mainly in patients with history of alcohol abuse, malnourishment, following liver transplantation and less commonly, in association with other systemic diseases. Asymptomatic CPM/EPM is rare. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD who develop CPM/EPM are usually symptomatic with florid neurologic manifestations. Herein, we present a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis who was incidentally detected to have pontine and extra-pontine lesions suggestive of myelinolysis without any neurologic signs or symptoms.

  17. T1-weighted MR images in radiographic stage of fragmentation of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumasaka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kishimoto, Harumasa; Higashihara, Tokuro (Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan)); Harada, Koshi; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-04-01

    Seven femoral heads of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) in radiographic stage of fragmentation were examined in 6 boys by MRI. Characteristic appearances of capital epiphysis and the surrounding cartilaginous structures can be seen. These were proved by four indices for measurement of cartilaginous contour. Cartilaginous contour of epiphysis is enlarged with crescent like deformity resulting from deformity of growth plate. Characteristic layers or honeycomb pattern of extremely low and intermediate signal intensity can be seen. (author).

  18. T1-weighted MR images in radiographic stage of fragmentation of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumasaka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kishimoto, Harumasa; Higashihara, Tokuro; Harada, Koshi; Kozuka, Takahiro.

    1991-01-01

    Seven femoral heads of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) in radiographic stage of fragmentation were examined in 6 boys by MRI. Characteristic appearances of capital epiphysis and the surrounding cartilaginous structures can be seen. These were proved by four indices for measurement of cartilaginous contour. Cartilaginous contour of epiphysis is enlarged with crescent like deformity resulting from deformity of growth plate. Characteristic layers or honeycomb pattern of extremely low and intermediate signal intensity can be seen. (author)

  19. Impact of end stage kidney disease on costs and outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinav Goyal; Kshitij Chatterjee; Sujani Yadlapati; Janani Rangaswami

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of end stage kidney disease (ESKD) on the outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including complications of infection, length of hospital stay, overall mortality, and healthcare burden. Methods: The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database created by the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) was used, covering the years 2009 through 2013. Manufacturer-provided sampling weights were used to produce national estimates. Results: All-c...

  20. Effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy with mindfulness in end-stage renal disease hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Kyung Sohn; Yun Kyu Oh; Jung-Seok Choi; Jiyoun Song; Ahyoung Lim; Jung Pyo Lee; Jung Nam An; Hee-Jeong Choi; Jae Yeon Hwang; Hee-Yeon Jung; Jun-Young Lee; Chun Soo Lim

    2018-01-01

    Background : Many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) experience depression. Depression influences patient quality of life (QOL), dialysis compliance, and medical comorbidity. We developed and applied a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program including mindfulness meditation for ESRD patients undergoing HD, and measured changes in QOL, mood, anxiety, perceived stress, and biochemical markers. Methods : We conducted group CBT over a 12-week period...

  1. End-stage renal disease and survival in people with diabetes: a national database linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S.; Fletcher, E.H.; Brady, I.; Looker, H.C.; Levin, D.; Joss, N.; Traynor, J.P.; Metcalfe, W.; Conway, B.; Livingstone, S.; Leese, G.; Philip, S.; Wild, S.; Halbesma, N.; Sattar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing prevalence of diabetes worldwide is projected to lead to an increase in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT).Aim: To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of ESRD and requirement for RRT among people with diabetes in a nationwide study and to report associated survival.Methods: Data were extracted and linked from three national databases: Scottish Renal Registry, Scottish Care Initiative-Diabetes Collaboration...

  2. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial – the PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30 % of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22 - ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  3. Neoadjuvant FOLFOX 4 versus FOLFOX 4 with Cetuximab versus immediate surgery for high-risk stage II and III colon cancers: a multicentre randomised controlled phase II trial--the PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Mehdi; Rullier, Anne; Luciani, Alain; Bonnetain, Franck; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Sarran, Antony; Monges, Geneviève; Trillaud, Hervé; Le Malicot, Karine; Leroy, Karen; Sobhani, Iradj; Bardier, Armelle; Moreau, Marie; Brindel, Isabelle; Seitz, Jean François; Taieb, Julien

    2015-07-10

    In patients with high risk stage II and stage III colon cancer (CC), curative surgery followed by adjuvant FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy has become the standard of care. However, for 20 to 30% of these patients, the current curative treatment strategy of surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy fails either to clear locoregional spread or to eradicate distant micrometastases, leading to disease recurrence. Preoperative chemotherapy is an attractive concept for these CCs and has the potential to impact upon both of these causes of failure. Optimum systemic therapy at the earliest possible opportunity may be more effective at eradicating distant metastases than the same treatment given after the delay and immunological stress of surgery. Added to this, shrinking the primary tumor before surgery may reduce the risk of incomplete surgical excision, and the risk of tumor cell shedding during surgery. PRODIGE 22--ECKINOXE is a multicenter randomized phase II trial designed to evaluate efficacy and feasibility of two chemotherapy regimens (FOLFOX-4 alone and FOLFOX-4 + Cetuximab) in a peri-operative strategy in patients with bulky CCs. Patients with CC deemed as high risk T3, T4 and/or N2 on initial abdominopelvic CT scan are randomized to either colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy (control arm), or 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX-4 (for RAS mutated patients). In RAS wild-type patients a third arm testing FOLFOX+ cetuximab has been added prior to colectomy. Patients in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms will receive postoperative treatment for 4 months (8 cycles) to complete their therapeutic schedule. The primary endpoint of the study is the histological Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) as defined by Ryan. The secondary endpoints are: treatment strategy safety (toxicity, primary tumor related complications under chemotherapy, peri-operative morbidity), disease-free and recurrence free survivals at 3 years, quality of life, carcinologic quality and

  4. Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase in setting of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Masood, Umair; Khan, Babar; Chawla, Kunal; Manocha, Divey

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level is a rare phenomenon. This is especially true in patient with end-stage renal disease as lipase and amylase are renally excreted. Literature review reveals previous case report of pancreatitis with normal lipase and amylase level, however, none of them occurred in the setting of end-stage renal disease. Our case is the first such reported case of pancreatitis in such setting. Here we report a 30year old male with past medical history of end-stage renal disease who presented in emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Laboratory work up revealed normal lipase and amylase level. However, radiological work up was consistent with pancreatitis. This case report highlight the importance of taking the overall clinical picture rather than laboratory work up to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Furthermore, this should also serve an important reminder for clinicians to further investigate where clinical suspicion for pancreatitis is high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computerised tomography in the staging of Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnicombe, Sarah J.; Reznek, Rodney H.

    2003-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen major changes in the imaging investigation and subsequent management of patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL); accurate staging is vital for prognostication and treatment in both, and particularly in HD. The choice of imaging modality for staging depends on its accuracy, impact on clinical decision-making, and availability. Modern CT scanners fulfil most of the desired criteria. The advent of CT scanning, along with the development of ever more effective chemotherapeutic regimens, has resulted in the virtual demise of bipedal lymphangiography (LAG) as a staging tool in patients with lymphoma. It has rendered superfluous a battery of other tests that were in routine use. This contribution reviews the evidence for the use of CT in preference to LAG. CT accurately depicts nodal enlargement above and below the diaphragm, has variable sensitivity for intra-abdominal visceral involvement and is generally outstanding in depicting the extent of disease, especially extranodal extension. Despite the advances in CT technology, there are still areas where CT performs less well (e.g. disease in normal-sized lymph nodes, splenic and bone marrow infiltration). The influence of technical factors, such as the use of intravenous contrast medium, is discussed. In some instances, CT is not the imaging modality of choice and the place of newer techniques such as MRI and endoscopic ultrasound will be reviewed. (orig.)

  6. Surgery of abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with coronary artery disease. Simultaneous or two staged operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Narisawa, Takashi; Mori, Takanobu; Masuda, Mikio; Kishi, Daijirou; Suzuki, Takashi; Takaba, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) was evaluated by noninvasive examination in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. A simultaneous operation or a 2-staged operation was performed depending on the seriousness of the condition when both diseases were combined. A total of 36 patients underwent elective repair of AAA between 1996 and 2001. Coronary angiography (CAG) was performed only in patients with suspected CAD by dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy. Significant CAD was found in 8 patients. Simultaneous operation was performed in 4 patients, and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) was performed in all cases of simultaneous operation. In 4 patients receiving 2-staged operations, 1 standard coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 1 OPCAB and 2 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCA) were performed prior to AAA surgery. Twenty-eight patients underwent only AAA operation. Though there were no incidents of perioperative myocardial infarction or cardiac related deaths in this group, 2 patients died due to other causes (hemorrhage and duodenal perforation). In the 8 patients associated with CAD, 1 patient died of myonephrotic metabolic syndrome (MNMS) after simultaneous operation. The other 7 patients revived their social function soon of the discharge. Dipyridamole cardiac scintigraphy was considered to be an effective examination for evaluation of CAD in AAA patients. There was no need to perform CAG in all AAA patients. The policy of choosing simultaneous operation or 2-staged operation according to the seriousness of the 2 diseases seemed to be appropriate. (author)

  7. The Coagulation Profile of End-Stage Liver Disease and Considerations for Intraoperative Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkin, Katherine T; Colquhoun, Douglas A; Nemergut, Edward C; Huffmyer, Julie L

    2018-01-01

    The coagulopathy of end-stage liver disease results from a complex derangement in both anticoagulant and procoagulant processes. With even minor insults, cirrhotic patients experience either inappropriate bleeding or clotting, or even both simultaneously. The various phases of liver transplantation along with fluid and blood product administration may contribute to additional disturbances in coagulation. Thus, anesthetic management of patients undergoing liver transplantation to improve hemostasis and avoid inappropriate thrombosis in the perioperative environment can be challenging. To add to this challenge, traditional laboratory tests of coagulation are difficult to interpret in patients with end-stage liver disease. Viscoelastic coagulation tests such as thromboelastography (Haemonetics Corporation, Braintree, MA) and rotational thromboelastometry (TEM International, Munich, Germany) have helped to reduce transfusion of allogeneic blood products, especially fresh frozen plasma, but have also lead to the increased use of fibrinogen-containing products. In general, advancements in surgical techniques and anesthetic management have led to significant reduction in blood transfusion requirements during liver transplantation. Targeted transfusion protocols and pharmacologic prevention of fibrinolysis may further aid in the management of the complex coagulopathy of end-stage liver disease.

  8. Radiotherapy for stage I Hodgkin's disease: 20 years experience at St Bartholomew's Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, T.S.; Wrigley, P.F.M.; Murray, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and one consecutive patients with newly diagnosed stage I Hodgkin's disease (HD) received treatment at St Bartholomew's Hospital, between 1968 and 1987, with a median follow-up of 12 years. Actuarial analysis predicts 78% to be alive and without relapse of Hodgkin's disease at 15 years. Ninety evaluable patients received either mantle or inverted 'Y' radiotherapy. Histology at presentation was nodular sclerosing (39), lymphocytic predominant (27) or mixed cellularity (24). The presenting site was neck (78), axilla (6) groin (4) and mediastinum (2). Complete remission was achieved in all evaluable patients, the actuarial proportion in remission being 75% at 15 years. Factors predictive of a prolonged remission were pathological staging versus clinical staging and lymph node size < 3 cm. Actuarial overall survival in these 90 patients was 75% at 15 years. Relapse of HD has occurred in 18 patients. Second remission was achieved in 15/18. The actuarial rate of second remission and survival was 40% at 10 years. Sixteen patients have died, 7 of Hodgkin's disease, 7 of unrelated causes and 2 of second malignancy. A further 3 patients who developed second malignancy are still alive. At 15 years the actuarial mortality related to HD was 12%. These results confirm the importance of long follow up to assess the efficacy of primary therapy. (author)

  9. Subcortical grey matter changes in untreated, early stage Parkinson's disease without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Mi; Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Kim, Min-Jik; Jang, Ji-Wan; Suh, Sang-Il; Koh, Seong-Beom; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Previous MRI studies have investigated cortical or subcortical grey matter changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), yielding inconsistent findings between the studies. We therefore sought to determine whether focal cortical or subcortical grey matter changes may be present from the early disease stage. We recruited 49 untreated, early stage PD patients without dementia and 53 control subjects. Voxel-based morphometry was used to evaluate cortical grey matter changes, and automated volumetry and shape analysis were used to assess volume changes and shape deformation of the subcortical grey matter structures, respectively. Voxel-based morphometry showed neither reductions nor increases in grey matter volume in patients compared to controls. Compared to controls, PD patients had significant reductions in adjusted volumes of putamen, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus (corrected p grey matter and clinical variables representing disease duration and severity. Our results suggest that untreated, early stage PD without dementia is associated with volume reduction and shape deformation of subcortical grey matter, but not with cortical grey matter reduction. Our findings of structural changes in the posterolateral putamen and ventromedial putamen/nucleus accumbens could provide neuroanatomical basis for the involvement of motor and limbic striatum, further implicating motor and non-motor symptoms in PD, respectively. Early hippocampal involvement might be related to the risk for developing dementia in PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dilation of Malignant Strictures in Endoscopic Ultrasound Staging of Esophageal Cancer and Metastatic Spread of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M. Hancock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dilation of malignant strictures in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS staging of esophageal cancer is safe, but no data exists regarding the subsequent development of metastases. Aim. Compare the rates of metastases in esophageal cancer patients undergoing EUS staging who require esophageal dilation in order to pass the echoendoscope versus those who do not. Methods. We reviewed consecutive patients referred for EUS staging of esophageal cancer. We evaluated whether dilation was necessary in order to pass the echoendoscope, and for the subsequent development of metastases after EUS at various time intervals. Results. Among all patients with similar stage (locally advanced disease, defined as T3, N0, M0 or T1-3, N1, M0, there was no difference between the dilated and nondilated groups in the rates of metastases at 3 months (14% versus 10%, =1.0, 6 months (28% versus 20%, =0.69, 12 months (43% versus 40%, =1.0, or ever during a mean followup of 15 months (71% versus 55%, =0.48. Conclusions. Dilation of malignant strictures for EUS staging of esophageal cancer does not appear to lead to higher rates of distant metastases.

  11. Foot segmental motion and coupling in stage II and III tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Maarten; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Wuite, Sander; Roels, Charlotte; Staes, Filip; Deschamps, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Classification systems developed in the field of posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction omit to include dynamic measurements. Since this may negatively affect the selection of the most appropriate treatment modality, studies on foot kinematics are highly recommended. Previous research characterised the foot kinematics in patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction. However, none of the studies analysed foot segmental motion synchrony during stance phase, nor compared the kinematic behaviour of the foot in presence of different posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stages. Therefore, we aimed at comparing foot segmental motion and coupling in patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction grade 2 and 3 to those of asymptomatic subjects. Foot segmental motion of 11 patients suffering from posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stage 2, 4 patients with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction stage 3 and 15 asymptomatic subjects was objectively quantified with the Rizzoli foot model using an instrumented walkway and a 3D passive motion capture system. Dependent variables were the range of motion occurring at the different inter-segment angles during subphases of stance and swing phase as well as the cross-correlation coefficient between a number of segments. Significant differences in range of motion were predominantly found during the forefoot push off phase and swing phase. In general, both patient cohorts demonstrated a reduced range of motion compared to the control group. This hypomobility occurred predominantly in the rearfoot and midfoot (pfoot which should be considered in the decision making process since it may help explaining the success and failure of certain conservative and surgical interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Uranium resources inventory on systematic prospection stage at Jumbang II Sector West Kalimantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subiantoro, Lilik; Paimin; Suripto; Widito, P.; Marzuki, Anang

    2002-01-01

    Some uranium occurrences have been discovered as mineralized outcrops and soils at Jumbang II sector. The aim of this investigation is to find the mineralization characteristic, geometric and distribution and resources estimation. The investigation method is systematic topographic, geologic, and radiometric mapping and identification of uranium on the geological aspect. At Jumbang II have been identified four mineralization zones within total area 8.56 hectare. The mineralization zones consist of quartzite rock associations. The quartzite is characterized by the existence of some mineralized veins. The veins contain uraninite and secondary uranium mineral autunite and gummite, and it also contains monazite, tourmaline, biotite, feldspar, quartz, zircon, and some ore minerals. The ore minerals consist of molybdenite, pyrrhotite, magnetite, pyrite, hematite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite and arsenopyrite. Uranium content of quartzite is about 28 ppm to 18,500 ppm U (A zone), 1,125.9 ppm U (B zone) and 515 ppm U (C and D zone). The lateral and vertical ore distributions are locally. The mineralization is veins type and is controlled by intersection WNW-ESE, NNE-EEW structure direction, which was vertical to sub vertical fractures. Resources potential within 80-m depth is 3,106.893 tons U metal

  13. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex-Plant part II: Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper very briefly describes criticality investigations for nuclear weapon dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. The investigations performed were for pit staging, and build on previous criticality calculations for single pits. The KENO and MCNP computer models were used for pit and container combinations. Scenarios were based on administrative limits and actual or potential physical conditions in the facilities. Essentially all of the pit configurations modeled were subcritical by a substantial amount. It was concluded that a critical configuration involving pit/container combinations is not credible

  14. Socioeconomic status and subclinical coronary disease in the Whitehall II epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Steptoe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are pronounced socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease, but the extent to which these primarily reflect gradients in underlying coronary artery disease severity or in the clinical manifestation of advanced disease is uncertain. We measured the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES as indexed by grade of employment and coronary artery calcification (CAC in the Whitehall II epidemiological cohort, and tested the contribution of lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors in accounting for this association.CAC was assessed in 528 asymptomatic men and women aged 53-76 years, stratified into higher, intermediate and lower by grade of employment groups. Lifestyle (smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, physical activity, biological (blood pressure, lipids, fasting glucose, inflammatory markers and psychosocial factors (work stress, financial strain, social support, depression, hostility, optimism were also measured. Detectable CAC was present in 293 participants (55.5%. The presence of calcification was related to lifestyle and biological risk factors, but not to grade of employment. But among individuals with detectable calcification, the severity of CAC was inversely associated with grade of employment (p = 0.010, and this relationship remained after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Compared with the higher grade group, there was a mean increase in log Agatston scores of 0.783 (95% C.I. 0.265-1.302, p = 0.003 in the intermediate and 0.941 (C.I. 0.226-1.657, p = 0.010 in the lower grade of employment groups, after adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors.Low grade of employment did not predict the presence of calcification in this cohort, but was related to the severity of CAC. These findings suggest that lower SES may be particularly relevant at advanced stages of subclinical coronary artery disease, when calcification has developed.

  15. Socioeconomic status and subclinical coronary disease in the Whitehall II epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Katie; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Marmot, Michael G; Lahiri, Avijit

    2010-01-25

    There are pronounced socioeconomic disparities in coronary heart disease, but the extent to which these primarily reflect gradients in underlying coronary artery disease severity or in the clinical manifestation of advanced disease is uncertain. We measured the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) as indexed by grade of employment and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in the Whitehall II epidemiological cohort, and tested the contribution of lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors in accounting for this association. CAC was assessed in 528 asymptomatic men and women aged 53-76 years, stratified into higher, intermediate and lower by grade of employment groups. Lifestyle (smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, physical activity), biological (blood pressure, lipids, fasting glucose, inflammatory markers) and psychosocial factors (work stress, financial strain, social support, depression, hostility, optimism) were also measured. Detectable CAC was present in 293 participants (55.5%). The presence of calcification was related to lifestyle and biological risk factors, but not to grade of employment. But among individuals with detectable calcification, the severity of CAC was inversely associated with grade of employment (p = 0.010), and this relationship remained after controlling for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Compared with the higher grade group, there was a mean increase in log Agatston scores of 0.783 (95% C.I. 0.265-1.302, p = 0.003) in the intermediate and 0.941 (C.I. 0.226-1.657, p = 0.010) in the lower grade of employment groups, after adjustment for demographic, lifestyle, biological and psychosocial factors. Low grade of employment did not predict the presence of calcification in this cohort, but was related to the severity of CAC. These findings suggest that lower SES may be particularly relevant at advanced stages of subclinical coronary artery disease, when calcification has developed.

  16. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuruta A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Atsushi Tsuruta,1,* Kazuki Yamashita,2,* Hiroaki Tanioka,3 Akihito Tsuji,4,5 Michio Inukai,6 Toshiki Yamakawa,7 Tomoki Yamatsuji,8 Masanori Yoshimitsu,9 Kazuhiro Toyota,10 Taketoshi Yamano,11 Takeshi Nagasaka,12 Masazumi Okajima13 On behalf of the Japan Southwest Oncology Group (JSWOG 1Department of Digestive Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, 2Department of Surgery, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Okayama Rosai Hospital, Okayama, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, 5Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University Hospital, Kagawa, 6Department of Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital, Okayama, 7Department of Surgery, Kagawa Prefectural Central Hospital, Takamatsu, 8Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, 9Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Asa Hospital, Hiroshima, 10Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Higashihirosima Medical Center, Higashihiroshima, 11Department of Surgery, Kurashiki Medical Center, 12Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, 13Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients and methods: Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were

  17. Improving prediction of Alzheimer’s disease using patterns of cortical thinning and homogenizing images according to disease stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Coupé, Pierrick; García-Lorenzo, Daniel

    Predicting Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in individuals with some symptoms of cognitive decline may have great influence on treatment choice and guide subject selection in trials on disease modifying drugs. Structural MRI has the potential of revealing early signs of neurodegeneration in the human brain...... and may thus aid in predicting and diagnosing AD. Surface-based cortical thickness measurements from T1-weighted MRI have demonstrated high sensitivity to cortical gray matter changes. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using patterns of cortical thickness measurements for predicting AD...... of conversion from MCI to AD can be improved by learning the atrophy patterns that are specific to the different stages of disease progression. This has the potential to guide the further development of imaging biomarkers in AD....

  18. Rituximab in relapsing Graves' disease, a phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, Karen A.; Toes, Rene E.; Sepers, Jan; Pereira, Alberto M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for Graves' disease, consisting of medical therapy or radioiodine are unsatisfactory, because of limited efficacy and adverse events. Interventions aimed at the underlying autoimmune pathogenesis of Graves' disease may be worthwhile to explore. We therefore performed a

  19. Bone radioisotope scanning: usefulness in the evaluation and observation of patients with breast cancer in clinical stage II, III, IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano P, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The clinical records of 420 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer well documented by the pathological anatomy in clinical stage II, III and IV were reviewed. In each one of them has been done at least a bone scanning during the diagnosis. In 52 cases carried out sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 and in some cases it was necessary to administer Samarium-153 EDTMP as palliative therapy of bone pain. The presence of secondary gamma-graphic focuses was 0/84 cases (0%) in clinical stage II, 54/265 cases (20%) in III and 41/91 cases (45%) in IV. The one focus appeared in 6.7% of the cases. In 7 of the 52 cases that received sericeous dosages of CA 15-3 were detected secondary osseous lesions, and 5 of them presented a marker elevation. The bone scanning has shown in many cases the presence of getters focuses in singular places of skeleton, urinary excretory system or mammary tissue. The gamma rays from Sm-153 allowed us to get some appropriate basal views post-therapy of the secondary lesions. The results show that the great incidence of secondary lesions in the skeleton occurred in cases of stages III and IV unlike other countries. The serial repetition of the radioisotope scanning. The presence of one focus in the skeleton of a patient with a well-known neoplasia makes us to do a careful evaluation of the focus nature. The presence of tracer accumulation in the kidney, ureter and bladder allows us to infer the pathology of excretory system that is the first evidence of its presence in many cases. (author). 71 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Echocardiography Criteria for Structural Heart Disease in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Initiating Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, LaTonya J; Negrotto, Sara M; Onuigbo, Macaulay; Scott, Christopher G; Rule, Andrew D; Norby, Suzanne M; Albright, Robert C; Casey, Edward T; Dillon, John J; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pislaru, Sorin V; Best, Patricia J M; Villarraga, Hector R; Lin, Grace; Williams, Amy W; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2016-03-15

    Cardiovascular disease among hemodialysis (HD) patients is linked to poor outcomes. The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative Workgroup proposed echocardiographic (ECHO) criteria for structural heart disease (SHD) in dialysis patients. The association of SHD with important patient outcomes is not well defined. This study sought to determine prevalence of ECHO-determined SHD and its association with survival among incident HD patients. We analyzed patients who began chronic HD from 2001 to 2013 who underwent ECHO ≤1 month prior to or ≤3 months following initiation of HD (n = 654). Mean patient age was 66 ± 16 years, and 60% of patients were male. ECHO findings that met 1 or more and ≥3 of the new criteria were discovered in 87% and 54% of patients, respectively. Over a median of 2.4 years, 415 patients died: 108 (26%) died within 6 months. Five-year mortality was 62%. Age- and sex-adjusted structural heart disease variables associated with death were left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.48; confidence interval [CI]: 1.20 to 1.83) and right ventricular (RV) systolic dysfunction (HR: 1.68; CI: 1.35 to 2.07). An additive of higher death risk included LVEF ≤45% and RV systolic dysfunction rather than neither (HR: 2.04; CI: 1.57 to 2.67; p = 0.53 for test for interaction). Following adjustment for age, sex, race, diabetic kidney disease, and dialysis access, RV dysfunction was independently associated with death (HR: 1.66; CI 1.34 to 2.06; p < 0.001). SHD was common in our HD study population, and RV systolic dysfunction independently predicted mortality. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of serum insulinlike growth factor II levels in coronary heart disease patient and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Bifu; Ji Naijun; Mei Yibin; Wang Chengyao; Zhao Junfei; Guan Lihua; Gao Meiying; Li Jiangao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes and clinical significance of serum insulinlike growth factor II (IGF II) levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: The serum IGF II levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 68 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and 30 controls with only mild non-cardiac diseases. Results: Compared with the controls, the serum IGF II level in CHD patients were increased significantly (0.66 ± 0.13 μg/L vs 0.51 ± 0.11 μg/L; t = 5.506, p 0.05). Level in patients dies in hospital (n = 9) were much higher than those in patients recovered (n = 59) (t = 2.402, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF II levels seems to be related to the seriousness of CHD; the actual mechanism remains to be defined

  2. Harvesting policy for a delayed stage-structured Holling II predator-prey model with impulsive stocking prey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jianjun; Meng Xinzhu; Chen Lansun

    2009-01-01

    A predator-prey model with a stage structure for the predator, which improves the assumption that each individual predator has the same ability to capture prey, is proposed by Wang et al. [Wang W, Mulone G, Salemi F, Salone V. Permanence and stability of a stage-structured predator-prey model. J Math Anal Appl 2001;262:499-528]. It is assumed that immature individuals and mature individuals of the predator are divided by a fixed age and that immature predators do not have the ability to attack prey. We do economic management behavior for Wang model [Wang et al., 2001] by continuous harvesting on predator and impulsive stocking on prey. Then, a delayed stage-structured Holling type II predator-prey model with impulsive stocking prey and continuous harvesting predator is established. It is also assumed that the predating products of the predator is only to increase its bearing ability. We obtain the sufficient conditions of the global attractivity of predator-extinction boundary periodic solution and the permanence of the system. Our results show that the behavior of impulsive stocking prey plays an important role for the permanence of the system, and provide tactical basis for the biological resource management. Further, the numerical analysis is also inserted to illuminate the dynamics of the system.

  3. Treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (stage I, II) of the elderly : usefulness of local and regional irradiation and brief reduced-dose chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Izuno, Itaru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Sasaki, Shigeru; Gomi, Koutarou; Kiyono, Kunihiro; Takizawa, Masaomi; Sone, Shusuke

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the usefulness and safety of a new treatment regimen consisting of irradiation to the involved area and adjacent lymph-node area, and reduced-dose chemotherapy for elderly patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Materials and Methods: The core of this study was 38 elderly patients older than 65 years old with intermediate or high grade NHL, and concomitantly suffering from some other geriatric disease. They received involved-area irradiation (40 Gy), adjacent lymph-node irradiation (30 Gy), and reduced-dose chemotherapy (50-70 % ACOP 2 cycles or 70 % MACOP-B 4 weeks). Results: The completion rate of the treatment regimen was 100 %. The 5-year local control rate was 98 %. The 5-year disease free survival rate and the 5-year cause-specific survival rate for all patients were 70 % and 82 %, respectively. No treatment deaths were observed, and the rate of serious complications arising from the treatment was 3 %. Conclusion: Chemotherapy with a dose reduced to 50% or 70% of that prescribed in the original ACOP or MACOP-B, and irradiation to both the involved area and the adjacent lymph-node area are useful for treating elderly patients with Stage I, II intermediate B-cell NHL, who are at the same time suffering from some other geriatric disease

  4. End-stage renal disease in Nigeria: An overview of the epidemiology and the pathogenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Odubanjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity of information on the magnitude of the burden of renal disease in our environment. Obtaining accurate data is hampered by the poor socioeconomic status of most patients with lack of access to specialized care in tertiary institutions, where most of the data is generated. The incidence of chronic renal failure (CRF and end-stage renal disease (ESRD in any specified area is known to be influenced by the prevalence of specific disease entities resulting in CRF. Hypertension, glomerulonephritis (GN, sickle cell disease, quartan malaria nephropathy, urinary tract schistosomiasis and other parasite-related forms of chronic GN are known to contribute significantly to the incidence of CRF in Nigeria. As is the situation in other parts of the world, diabetic nephropathy appears to be of increasing importance in the causation of ESRD in Nigeria. Even though the underlying cause of renal disease can often not be treated, extensive studies in experimental animals and preliminary studies in humans suggest that progression in chronic renal disease may largely be due to secondary factors, attention to which may be important in the prevention and/or control of renal disease.

  5. Quality of life in Parkinson’s disease patients: progression markers of mild to moderate stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissa Carla Moreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson’s disease patients from mild to moderate stages. Methods The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. Results The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p < 0.004, need for assistance with hygiene (p = 0.02, greater freezing frequency (p = 0.042, bradykinesia (p = 0.031, greater intensity of the resting tremor (p = 0.035 and “pill rolling” (p = 0.001. The decline in quality of life was related to stigma (p = 0.043, greater impairment in cognition (p = 0.002, mobility (p = 0.013 and for daily living activities (p = 0.05, and was considered more significant in men, married, older individuals, and those with a longer time of disease. Conclusions The quality of life worsening markers at the moderate stage were related to stigma, worsening of cognition, and to greater impairment in mobility and daily living activities.

  6. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia: advanced disease stages and death. A step to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl-Schmid, J; Richard-Devantoy, S; Grimmer, T; Förstl, H; Jox, R

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the living and care situation in advanced behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), to describe symptoms and findings in advanced bvFTD, and to evaluate somatic comorbidities and circumstances of death. Standardized interviews were conducted with family caregivers of 83 patients with bvFTD. Forty-four percent of the patients were already deceased at the time of the interview. At the time of the interview or death, respectively, 47% of the patients lived in a nursing home. The median time between symptom onset and nursing home admission was 5.0 ± 5.5 years. In moderate and severe dementia stages almost all patients suffered from severe disabilities including impairment of language, gait, swallowing, and of the ability to care for themselves. Sixteen percent of the patients had got enteral tube feeding. Comorbid somatic diseases were diagnosed in 46% of the patients. Twenty-three percent of the deceased patients had been admitted into a hospital before death. Cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease, mostly pneumonia, were the most frequent causes of death. Advanced bvFTD is characterized by severe cognitive impairment and physical disabilities. BvFTD leads to a premature death. Our findings stress the importance of strategies that maximize patient comfort in advanced disease stages and allow for a peaceful death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic.

  8. Political, social and technical risks in the last stages of disease eradication campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Christopher J M

    2015-09-01

    Eradication of a disease is one of the greatest gifts any generation can give to subsequent ones, but most attempts have failed. The biggest challenges occur in the final stages of eradication and elimination campaigns. These include falling public support as a disease becomes less common; the emergence of groups who do not support eradication; spiralling costs; and the evolution of drug, vaccine or insecticide resistance. Mass campaigns become less effective as the disease fragments and modelling becomes less reliable. Optimism bias is the biggest risk to any eradication campaign and the long endgame must be planned for from the beginning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in End-Stage Renal Disease: No Longer a Matter for Surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mario; Elli, Francesca; Carugo, Stefano; Ciceri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia and vitamin D deficiency are the main factors involved in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). Moreover, the skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone is not only a high-turnover bone accompanying SHPT, but may also play a crucial role in the onset of low-turnover bone disease in uremia. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that other hormones play a key role in this disease, such as fibroblast growth factor 23, Klotho and sclerostin. SHPT causes both bone-associated and non-skeletal consequences, including cardiovascular calcifications. Furthermore, vitamin D and calcium (Ca)-containing phosphate binders may increase Ca load. Anyway, the rate of parathyroidectomy in end-stage renal disease has greatly decreased during the last decade. Is there any room left for surgeons? © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Medical management of moyamoya disease and recurrent stroke in an infant with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Esra; Utine, Eda; Unal, Sule; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Oğuz, Kader Karli; Cetin, Mualla; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alanay, Yasemin

    2012-10-01

    We report an infant diagnosed with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II at age 8 months, who experienced cerebrovascular morbidities related to this entity. Molecular analysis identified c.2609+1 G>A, intron 14, homozygous splice site mutation in the pericentrin gene. At age 18 months, she developed recurrent strokes and hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography showed abnormal gyral pattern, cortical acute infarcts, bilateral stenosis of the internal carotid arteries and reduced flow on the cerebral arteries, consistent with moyamoya disease. In Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II, life expectancy is reduced because of high risk of stroke secondary to cerebral vascular anomalies (aneurysms, moyamoya disease). Periodic screening for vascular events is recommended in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II every 12-18 months following diagnosis. Our patient was medically managed with low molecular weight heparin followed with aspirin prophylaxis, in addition to carbamazepine and physical rehabilitation. We report an infant with moyamoya disease and recurrent stroke presenting 10 months after diagnosis (at age 18 months), and discuss the outcome of nonsurgical medical management. The presented case is the second youngest case developing stroke and moyamoya disease.

  11. A retrospective study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical hysterectomy versus radical hysterectomy alone in patients with stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatori E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eriko Takatori, Tadahiro Shoji, Anna Takada, Takayuki Nagasawa, Hideo Omi, Masahiro Kagabu, Tatsuya Honda, Fumiharu Miura, Satoshi Takeuchi, Toru Sugiyama Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Iwate, Japan Objective: In order to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC for stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma with a bulky mass, we retrospectively compared patients receiving NAC followed by radical hysterectomy (RH; NAC group with patients who underwent RH without NAC (Ope group. Patients and methods: The study period was from June 2002 to March 2014. The subjects were 28 patients with a stage II bulky mass in the NAC group and 17 such patients in the Ope group. The chi-square test was used to compare operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, use of blood transfusion, and time from surgery to discharge between the two groups. Moreover, the log-rank test using the Kaplan–Meier method was performed to compare disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS between the groups. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, or use of blood transfusion. However, the time from surgery to discharge was 18 days (14–25 days in the NAC group and 25 days (21–34 days in the Ope group; the patients in the NAC group were discharged earlier (P=0.032. The hazard ratio for DFS in the NAC group as compared with that in the Ope group was 0.36 (95% CI 0.08–0.91, and the 3-year DFS rates were 81.2% and 41.0%, respectively (P=0.028. Moreover, the hazard ratio for OS was 0.39 (95% CI 0.11–1.24, and the 3-year OS rates were 82.3% and 66.4%, respectively (P=0.101. Conclusion: NAC with cisplatin and irinotecan was confirmed to prolong DFS as compared with RH alone. The results of this study suggest that NAC might be a useful adjunct to surgery in the treatment of stage II squamous

  12. The patient, disease status, and treatment options for prostate cancer: stages B1 and B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, H.W.

    1983-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma palpably confined to the prostate is clinically defined as stage B. Although potentially curable in many, if not most, instances, there is no disputing that the optimal management of patients with stage B neoplasms is one of the most uncertain and controversial issues in modern urologic oncology. The present uncertainty can be related to three major factors: 1) competing causes of death in patients commonly older than 50 years of age; 2) the variable and unpredictable natural course of localized prostatic cancer as reflected by the three, at least in part, independent variables of growth rate, metastatic potential, and therapeutic responsiveness; and 3) the multiplicity and effectiveness of a variety of treatments in producing effects on the tumor favorable to the patient. The relative effectiveness of different treatments has been and remains clouded by a constantly changing array of clinical staging techniques, selection criteria for treatment, and definitions of response, and by the general absence of satisfactory control data. Experiences with patients receiving no treatment, various forms of irradiation, and radical excision have indicated a general similarity in at least 10-year survival rates and clinically manifest local failure rates among comparable substages of stage B prostatic cancer. Since suitable control data are lacking, one may conclude that a variety of treatments offer similar prospects of benefit or that none of the treatments is producing significant beneficial effect and that survivals are a consequence of the natural history of stage B disease. A Possibility that has yet to be evaluated is that different treatments produce benefit in different segments of the stage B prostatic cancer population, and the challenge today is to recognize and define such neoplasms that may respond most appropriately to one form of therapy or another

  13. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON PREOPERATIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION WITH CAPECITABINE IN STAGE II/III CARCINOMA OF RECTUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Kuttappan Soman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fluorouracil (5-FU based chemoradiotherapy represents the standard treatment option for the preoperative treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Capecitabine is an oral precursor of 5-FU with the advantage of delivering the chemotherapy in an outpatient setup. NSABP R-04 & a German phase 3 trial by Hofheinz et al showed that Capecitabine was equivalent to 5-FU. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate pathological response (PR, clinical & surgical outcomes of stage II & III patients treated with chemoradiation with Capecitabine. The secondary objective was to evaluate toxicity and compliance to treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS This single arm prospective study included 35 patients with stages II & III adenocarcinoma of rectum who after evaluation were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent Capecitabine. Toxicities were graded using RTOG scoring criteria. Clinical response was assessed after EBRT completion, and patients were referred for surgery after 4-6 weeks. Pathologic response and completeness of resection were assessed from the histopathology report. RESULTS Growth located within 5 cm from anal verge was seen in 24 (68.5% patients and 6 were inoperable upfront. All patients completed the intended preoperative treatment and 88.6% did not have any toxicity related break in RT. Clinical response was seen in 80% of patients after Chemoradiation. Out of 35 treated 80% of them underwent surgery. APR was performed in 64.2% and 35.7% had LAR. Out of 6 upfront inoperable patients, 3 were converted to operable. Out of 23 APR cases, 7 were converted to anterior resection (30.4%, p=0.046. 96% of operated patients had an R0 resection, including all the 3 upfront inoperable patients. Minimal pathologic response was seen in 89.2% of patients and 7.14% had complete pathologic response. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities. Only 2.9% had a Grade 3 event. 45.7% had maximum of Grade 1 events and 48.6% had maximum of Grade 2

  14. Motor-cognitive dual-task deficits in individuals with early-mid stage Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Nora E; Hamana, Katy; Kelson, Mark; Rosser, Anne; Busse, Monica; Quinn, Lori

    2016-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) results in a range of cognitive and motor impairments that progress throughout the disease stages; however, little research has evaluated specific dual-task abilities in this population, and the degree to which they may be related to functional ability. The purpose of this study was to a) examine simple and complex motor-cognitive dual-task performance in individuals with HD, b) determine relationships between dual-task walking ability and disease-specific measures of motor, cognitive and functional ability, and c) examine the relationship of dual-task measures to falls in individuals with HD. Thirty-two individuals with HD were evaluated for simple and complex dual-task ability using the Walking While Talking Test. Demographics and disease-specific measures of motor, cognitive and functional ability were also obtained. Individuals with HD had impairments in simple and complex dual-task ability. Simple dual-task walking was correlated to disease-specific motor scores as well as cognitive performance, but complex dual-task walking was correlated with total functional capacity, as well as a range of cognitive measures. Number of prospective falls was moderately-strongly correlated to dual-task measures. Our results suggest that individuals with HD have impairments in cognitive-motor dual-task ability that are related to disease progression and specifically functional ability. Dual-task measures appear to evaluate a unique construct in individuals with early to mid-stage HD, and may have value in improving the prediction of falls risk in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectrum of bone marrow changes in patients of chronic kidney disease (stage iii, iv and v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, R.K.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.Q.; Arshad, U.

    2017-01-01

    To see the various hematological changes in the bone marrow of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III, IV and V. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study.Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in the department of haematology (Pathology), Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration was one year, from Mar 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Patients of both sexes and all age groups with CKD stage III, IV and V were included in this study. Patients' histories were recorded. Complete blood counts, bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy were done and evaluated microscopically. Mean blood counts of the patients in three groups of CKD were compared. Frequencies of various bone marrow (BM) findings in patients of CKD were calculated. Results: Out of 57 patients, 41 (71.9%) were males while 16 (28%) were females. Mean age was 60 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean hemoglobin, mean white cell count and mean platelets count of the patients in three groups of CKD. Reactive changes due to underlying CKD and inflammation were the most frequent findings in the BM of the patients. Conclusion: Anaemia of mild to moderate severity and reactive changes in the BM are the most frequent haematological findings encountered in patients suffering from advanced stage CKD. Since CKD is predominantly a disease of the elderly so it is not rare to find the co-morbidities including plasmacytosis, malignancies and their effects on the BM in patients of CKD. (author)

  16. Fetal Origins of Life Stage Disease: A Zebrafish Model for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years, affects 35% of adults, and costs the U.S. healthcare industry >$200 billion annually. The chemical environment in the womb may cause susceptibility to different life-stage and life-long metabolic diseases including obesity. The challenge is to understand if exposures during developmentally sensitive windows impact life-stage disease, such as obesity, by increasing adipose tissue mass. In vitro models lack the integrated systems approach needed to assess adipose development, while mammalian models are impractical in a screen of thousands of chemicals. Therefore, an obesogen screening method was developed to interrogate bioactivity using a full systems approach, in a vertebrate zebrafish model with complete metabolic activity, at a time when the full signaling repertoire is expressed and active, to optimally examine how chemical dose and duration impact life-stage adipose mass. A time-line for adipose depot formation was mapped in zebrafish 6−14 days post fertilization (dpf) using the lipophilic dye, Nile Red, in combination with fluorescent microscopy. Those time points were then used to investigate the impact of embryonic tributyltin chloride (TBT, a known obesogen) exposure (10nM daily renewal, 0−5dpf) on adipose mass. Fluorescent microscopy revealed adipose depots that were larger and appeared 2 days earlier in TBT treated compared to contro

  17. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  18. [Clinical stages of patients with Alzheimer disease treated in specialist clinics in Spain. The EACE study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alom Poveda, J; Baquero, M; González-Adalid Guerreiro, M

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic paradigm of Alzheimer disease (AD) is changing; there is a trend toward diagnosing the disease in its early stages, even before the complete syndrome of dementia is apparent. The clinical stage at which AD is usually diagnosed in our area is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical stages of AD patients at time of diagnosis. Multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study. Patients with probable AD according to NINCDS-ARDRA criteria, attended in specialist clinics in Spain, were included in the study. We recorded the symptom onset to evaluation and symptom onset to diagnosis intervals and clinical status of AD (based on MMSE, NPI questionnaire, and CDR scale). Participants in this study included 437 specialists representing all of Spain's autonomous communities and a total of 1,707 patients, of whom 1,694 were included in the analysis. Mean MMSE score was 17.6±4.8 (95% CI:17.4-17.9). Moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE between 10 and 20) was detected in 64% of the patients, and severe cognitive impairment (MMSEde Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with end-stage kidney disease on hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Louis L; Warming, Peder E; Nielsen, Ture L

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in hemodialysis patients with spirometry and to examine the effects of fluid removal by hemodialysis on lung volumes. Patients ≥18 years at two Danish hemodialysis centers were included....... Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1 /FVC ratio were measured with spirometry before and after hemodialysis. The diagnosis of COPD was based on both the GOLD criteria and the lower limit of normal criteria. There were 372 patients in treatment at the two...... centers, 255 patients (69%) completed spirometry before dialysis and 242 of these (65%) repeated the test after. In the initial test, 117 subjects (46%) had airflow limitation indicative of COPD with GOLD criteria and 103 subjects (40.4%) with lower limit of normal criteria; COPD was previously diagnosed...

  20. The importance of accurate measurement of aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenwalla, Sherna F; Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; Leone, Francesca M T; Burton, James O; McCann, Gerry P

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A key driver in this pathology is increased aortic stiffness, which is a strong, independent predictor of CV mortality in this population. Aortic stiffening is a potentially modifiable biomarker of CV dysfunction and in risk stratification for patients with CKD and ESRD. Previous work has suggested that therapeutic modification of aortic stiffness may ameliorate CV mortality. Nevertheless, future clinical implementation relies on the ability to accurately and reliably quantify stiffness in renal disease. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an indirect measure of stiffness and is the accepted standard for non-invasive assessment of aortic stiffness. It has typically been measured using techniques such as applanation tonometry, which is easy to use but hindered by issues such as the inability to visualize the aorta. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging now allow direct measurement of stiffness, using aortic distensibility, in addition to PWV. These techniques allow measurement of aortic stiffness locally and are obtainable as part of a comprehensive, multiparametric CV assessment. The evidence cannot yet provide a definitive answer regarding which technique or parameter can be considered superior. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of non-invasive methods that have been used to assess aortic stiffness, the key studies that have assessed aortic stiffness in patients with renal disease and why these tools should be standardized for use in clinical trial work.

  1. CD133 expression is not an independent prognostic factor in stage II and III colorectal cancer but may predict the better outcome in patients with adjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Jung, So Young; Kim, Ik-Yong; Oh, Sung Soo; Choi, EunHee; Chang, Sei Jin; Kang, Tae Young; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are notorious for their capacity of tumor progression, metastasis or resistance to chemo-radiotherapy. However, the undisputed role of cancer stem marker, CD133, in colorectal cancers (CRCs) is not clear yet. We assessed 271 surgically-resected stage II and III primary CRCs with (171) and without (100) adjuvant therapy after surgery. CD133 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and real-time RT-PCR. CD133 promoter methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The CD133 IHC expression was significantly correlated with mRNA expression (p=0.0257) and inversely correlated with the promoter methylation (p=0.0001). CD133 was expressed more frequently in rectal cancer (p=0.0035), and in moderately differentiated tumors (p=0.0378). In survival analysis, CD133 expression was not significantly correlated with overall survival (OS) (p=0.9689) as well as disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.2103). However, CD133+ tumors were significantly associated with better OS in patients with adjuvant therapy compared to those without adjuvant therapy (p<0.0001, HR 0.125, 95% CI 0.052-0.299). But the patients with CD133- tumors did not show any significant difference of survival according to adjuvant therapy (p=0.055, HR 0.500, 95% CI 0.247-1.015). In stage II and III CRCs, CD133 IHC expression may signify the benefit for adjuvant therapy although it is not an independent prognostic factor

  2. Role of 10-Gy boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery for stage I-II breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, Masafumi; Uchida, Nobue; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    According to the Guidelines for breast-conserving therapy of the Japanese Breast Cancer Society, the surgical margin is ''negative'' when the minimum distance between the tumor edge and the margin of the resected specimen is more than 5 mm. The value of boost radiation for early breast cancer with a 5-mm negative margin remains unclear. A total of 137 patients with stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery between July 1987 and August 2002. All of the patients had negative margins according to the Japanese guidelines. Their median age was 50 years and the median follow-up period was 62 months. The entire ipsilateral breast was irradiated to a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions). Then an additional 10 Gy (5 fractions) was given to 79 patients, using 6- to 12-MeV electrons (boost group), while 58 patients (no-boost group) received no further radiation. Factors influencing local recurrence were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. For the entire population, the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence rates were 96.0%, 96.8%, 94.2%, and 1.67%, respectively. Boost radiation reduced local recurrence, but the improvement was not significant (P=0.070). Univariate and multivariate analyses failed to detect any factors that were significantly associated with local control. There were no severe complications in either group and there were no differences between the groups in the cosmetic outcome. Boost radiation can be performed for stage I-II breast cancer with negative margins (Japanese guidelines), and showed a tendency to decrease local recurrence. A large randomized controlled study is necessary to establish final conclusions. (author)

  3. Thyroid Function in Women after Multimodal Treatment for Breast Cancer Stage II/III: Comparison With Controls From a Population Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinertsen, Kristin Valborg; Cvancarova, Milada; Wist, Erik; Bjoro, Trine; Dahl, Alv A.; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A possible association between thyroid diseases (TD) and breast cancer (BC) has been debated. We examined prevalence and development of TD in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC compared with women from a general population. Secondarily, we explored the impact of two different radiotherapy (RT) techniques (standardized field arrangements vs. computed tomography [CT]-based dose planning) on TD in BC patients examined 35-120 months after primary BC treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 403 BC patients completed a questionnaire about TD and had blood samples taken for analyses of thyroid function. All had undergone postoperative RT with or without (2%) adjuvant systemic treatment. The results in the BC patients were compared with a cancer-free, age-matched control group from a general population (CGr). Results: There was higher prevalence of self-reported hypothyroidism in the BC patients as compared with the CGr (18% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). The raised prevalence was predominantly due to a substantial increase in the development of hypothyroidism after BC diagnosis, whereas the prevalence of hypothyroidism before BC diagnosis was similar to that observed in the CGr. Patients treated with CT-based RT showed a trend for increased post-BC development of hypothyroidism as compared with those treated with standardized field arrangements (p = 0.08). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is significantly increased in women after multimodal treatment for Stage II/III BC. Radiation to the thyroid gland may be a contributing factor. BC patients should be routinely screened for hypothyroidism.

  4. The cost-effectiveness of using chronic kidney disease risk scores to screen for early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O; Hoerger, Thomas J; Simpson, Siobhan K; Leib, Alyssa; Burrows, Nilka R; Shrestha, Sundar S; Pavkov, Meda E

    2017-03-13

    Better treatment during early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may slow progression to end-stage renal disease and decrease associated complications and medical costs. Achieving early treatment of CKD is challenging, however, because a large fraction of persons with CKD are unaware of having this disease. Screening for CKD is one important method for increasing awareness. We examined the cost-effectiveness of identifying persons for early-stage CKD screening (i.e., screening for moderate albuminuria) using published CKD risk scores. We used the CKD Health Policy Model, a micro-simulation model, to simulate the cost-effectiveness of using CKD two published risk scores by Bang et al. and Kshirsagar et al. to identify persons in the US for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria. Alternative risk score thresholds were tested (0.20, 0.15, 0.10, 0.05, and 0.02) above which persons were assigned to receive screening at alternative intervals (1-, 2-, and 5-year) for follow-up screening if the first screening was negative. We examined incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), incremental lifetime costs divided by incremental lifetime QALYs, relative to the next higher screening threshold to assess cost-effectiveness. Cost-effective scenarios were determined as those with ICERs less than $50,000 per QALY. Among the cost-effective scenarios, the optimal scenario was determined as the one that resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. ICERs ranged from $8,823 per QALY to $124,626 per QALY for the Bang et al. risk score and $6,342 per QALY to $405,861 per QALY for the Kshirsagar et al. risk score. The Bang et al. risk score with a threshold of 0.02 and 2-year follow-up screening was found to be optimal because it had an ICER less than $50,000 per QALY and resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. This study indicates that using these CKD risk scores may allow clinicians to cost-effectively identify a broader population for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria

  5. Single Stage Silicone Border Molded Closed Mouth Impression Technique-Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E G R

    2011-09-01

    Functioning of a complete denture depends to a great extent on the impression technique. Several impression techniques have been described in the literature since the turn of this century when Greene [Clinical courses in dental prothesis, 1916] brothers introduced the first scientific system of recording dental impression. Advocates of each technique have their own claim of superiority over the other. The introduction of elastomeric impression materials [Skinner and Cooper, J Am Dent Assoc 51:523-536, 1955] has made possible new techniques of recording impression for complete denture construction. These rubber like materials are of two types; one has a polysulfide base and is popularily known as polysulfide rubber (Thiokol and Mercaptan). The other variety has a silicone base known as silicone rubber or silicone elastomer. Silicone elastomers are available in four different consistencies; a thin easy flowing light bodied material,a creamy medium bodied material, a highly viscous heavy bodied material and a kneadable putty material. This paper describes an active closed mouth impression technique with one stage border molding using putty silicone material as a substitute for low fusing compound.

  6. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    The University of Minnesota Grid-ICES was divided into four identifiable programs in order to study the feasibility of each of the parts of the ICES independently. The total program involves cogeneration, fuel conversion, fuel substitution, and energy conservation by system change. This Phase II report substantiates the theory that the Basic Grid ICES is not only energy-effective, but it will become cost effective as unit operating costs adjust to supply and demand in the 1980's. The Basic Program involves the cogeneration of steam and electricity. The University of Minnesota has been following an orderly process of converting its Central Heating Plant from gas-oil to 100% coal since 1973. The first step in the transition is complete. The University is presently 100% on coal, and will begin the second step, the test burning of low Btu Western coal during the spring, summer, and fall, and high Btu Eastern coal during the high thermal winter period. The final step to 100% Western coal is planned to be completed by 1980. In conjunction with the final step a retired Northern States Power generating plant has been purchased and is in the process of being retrofitted for topping the existing plant steam output during the winter months. The Basic Plan of ICES involves the add-on work and expense of installing additional boiler capacity at Southeast Steam and non-condensing electric generating capability. This will permit the simultaneous generation of electricity and heat dependent upon the thermal requirements of the heating and cooling system in University buildings. This volume presents an overview of the Community and the ICES. (MCW)

  7. Vitamin status and needs for people with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L; Kopple, Joel D

    2011-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often experience a decline in their nutrient intake starting at early stages of CKD. This reduction in intake can affect both energy-producing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, as well as vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Knowledge of the burden and bioactivity of vitamins and their effect on the health of the patients with CKD is very incomplete. However, without sufficient data, the use of nutritional supplements to prevent inadequate intake may result in either excessive or insufficient intake of micronutrients for people with CKD. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding vitamin requirements for people with stages 3, 4, or 5 CKD who are not receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disease severity and staging of obesity: a rational approach to patient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, M B; Velusamy, S; Aylwin, S J B

    2014-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity places ever-increasing cost demands on healthcare systems. One million individuals are eligible for bariatric surgery in the UK, and yet less than 6000 bariatric procedures are performed annually. Bariatric surgery reverses or improves almost all the medical and psychosocial co-morbidities associated with obesity. Although the BMI is a simple method to estimate adiposity at a population level, it is relatively inaccurate within an individual and provides little-to-no indication of overall health status or disease severity. Staging systems overcome the inherent limitations of BMI and allow highly informed decision-making for an individual. At a societal level, this helps to identify those most likely to gain and maximise economic benefit. This review summarises the co-morbidities associated with obesity and the evidence for their improvement following surgery. The rationale for new staging criteria and appropriate patient selection are discussed.

  9. Relationship between Disease Activity and Circulating Level of Collagen II C-Telopeptide Fragments in Papain Induced Osteoarthritis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Majeed Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive degeneration of articular cartilage leading to failure in functional mobility of joints. It is characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular changes in histology of cartilage. Different biological markers are used as indicators to precisely predict the stage of cartilage destruction of joints in OA patients and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of drugs used for OA. The present research was chalked out to establish relationship between disease activity and serum level of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II in experimentally induced OA rat model. Out of 30 male Wistar rats, 25 were used to induce OA by injecting papain (10mg/0.5mL of 0.05M sodium acetate in right knee joints whereas five (control were injected with sterile normal saline solution on day 0. Blood samples (5mL each were collected on weekly basis up to 28th days of post papain injection. Sera were separated and subjected to perform ELISA for estimating CTX-II fragments as cartilage biomarker (CartiLaps ® ELISA kit in experimental groups. Maximum level of CTX–II (pg/mL (40.44±3.07 was observed in sera samples of day 14 post papain injection followed by days 21 (40.22±2.01, 28 (36.82±3.81, 7 (34.48±4.17, 1 (15.08±4.22 and day 0 (2.55±0.10. The early changes in serum CTX-II from day 0 to 14 showed significant association with cartilage damage. Later on, no significant difference was observed in CTX-II level on day 14, 21 and 28 post papain injection. It is concluded that elevation in serum CTX-II level was concomitant with the onset of disease and degradation of cartilage. Moreover, CTX-II is a sensitive diagnostic biomarker to monitor joint disorder severity in papain induced OA rat experimental model on different days. These findings may be used as base line for early diagnosis of disease and initiation of therapy for successful outcome.

  10. Behavioural research in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; van Dijk, Sandra; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Falzon, Louise; Thong, Melissa; Dekker, Friedo W

    2010-10-01

    To suggest a behavioural research agenda for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) based on a concise review of seven stages of psychosocial research, a literature review, and current behavioural research in other chronic somatic diseases. Historical behavioural ESRD research was classified. The specialized register of the Cochrane Behavioral Medicine Field was also checked, and additional papers were selected by screening reference lists and related behavioural science journals, to identify promising areas for future research. The top-five topics identified via the literature search pertain to (1) psychological aspects and interventions, (2) adaptation, coping, and depression, (3) exercise, (4) counseling and education, and (5) compliance. 'Illness and treatment beliefs', 'sexuality', 'suicide', 'family support', and 'self-management interventions', were identified on the basis of research in other chronic illnesses as topics for future research. Regarding theory, the Common-Sense Model (CSM) was judged to offer useful theoretical perspectives; regarding methods, qualitative methods can be a valuable addition to quantitative research methods. Illness beliefs, treatment beliefs, and self-management behaviours are promising concepts in the assessment and clinical care of ESRD-patients. Cognitive-behavioural treatments appear to have potential and should be specified and elaborated for specific categories and problems of ESRD-patients. This research agenda is in line with moves towards patient-centred disease-management to improve the quality of medical care for ESRD-patients. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hematopoietic cytokines as therapeutic players in early stages Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eFarmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a devastating age related neurodegenerative disease that is believed to have a lengthy prodromal state. It is critical to find methods of interfering with the progression of this early degenerative stage by inducing compensatory recovery processes to slow or prevent the eventual clinical symptoms. The current perspective article argues that immune system signalling molecules represent such a promising therapeutic approach. Two cytokines of interest are granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and erythropoietin (EPO. These hematopoietic cytokines have been protective in models of stroke, neuronal injury, and more recently PD. It is our belief that these trophic cytokines can be used not only for cell protection but also regeneration. However, success is likely dependent on early intervention. This paper will outline our perspective on the development of novel trophic recovery treatments for PD. In particular, we present new data from our lab suggesting that EPO and GM-CSF can foster neural re-innervation in a mild or partial lesion PD model that could be envisioned as reflecting the early stages of the disease.

  12. Cephalometric evaluation of the effects of the Twin Block appliance in subjects with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion amongst different cervical vertebral maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Aisha; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the cephalometric changes in skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue variables induced by Clark's Twin Block (CTB) in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and to compare these changes in different cervical vertebral maturation stages. Pre- and post-treatment/observation lateral cephalograms of 53 Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patients and 60 controls were compared to evaluate skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue changes. Skeletal maturity was assessed according to cervical vertebral maturation stages. Pre- and post-treatment/observation mean changes and differences (T2-T1) were compared by means of Wilcoxon sign rank and Mann-Whitney U-tests, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between different cervical stages were performed by means of Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test (p ≤ 0.05) . When compared with controls, there was a significant reduction in ANB angle (p cervical stages (p cervical stages (p cervical stages, significant differences were found for SNA, SNB and UI-SN angles and overjet. . The Twin-Block along with the normal craniofacial growth improves facial esthetics in Class II, Division 1 malocclusion by changes in underlying skeletal and dentoalveolar structures. The favorable mandibular growth occurs during any of the cervical vertebral maturation stages, with more pronounced effect during CS-3 stage.

  13. SPECT neuroimaging and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Vassilakos, Pavlos; Messinis, Lambros; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Constantoyannis, Costantinos

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated differences and associations between cortical perfusion, nigrostriatal dopamine pathway and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We recruited 53 non-demented PD patients divided into four groups according to the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging system and 20 healthy controls who were used in the comparison of the neuropsychological findings. Each patient underwent two separate brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies (perfusion and dopamine transporter binding) as well as neuropsychological evaluation. Perfusion images of each patient were quantified and compared with a normative database provided by the NeuroGam software manufacturers. Mean values obtained from the cortical areas and neuropsychological measures in the different groups were also compared by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for disease duration and educational level. We found cognitive deficits especially in the late PD stages (HY 3, 4 and 5) compared to the early stages (HY 1 and 2) and associations between cognitive decrements and cortical perfusion deterioration mainly in the frontal and posterior cortical areas. Compared with controls, PD patients showed impairments of cognition and cerebral perfusion that increased with clinical severity. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the performance on the phonemic fluency task and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left frontal lobe. Dopamine transporter binding in the left caudate nucleus significantly correlated with blood flow in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not with measures of executive functions. There are significant cognitive and perfusion deficits associated with PD progression, implying a multifactorial neurodegeneration process apart from dopamine depletion in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). (orig.)

  14. Understanding the management of early-stage chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Tom; Protheroe, Joanne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care is recognised to have an important role in the delivery of care for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is evidence that CKD management is currently suboptimal, with a range of practitioner concerns about its management. Aim To explore processes underpinning the implementation of CKD management in primary care. Design and setting Qualitative study in general practices participating in a chronic kidney disease collaborative undertaken as part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs and practice nurses (n = 21). Normalisation Process Theory provided a framework for generation and analysis of the data. Results A predominant theme was anxiety about the disclosure of early-stage CKD with patients. The tensions experienced related to identifying and discussing CKD in older people and patients with stage 3A, embedding early-stage CKD within vascular care, and the distribution of work within the practice team. Participants provided accounts of work undertaken to resolve the difficulties encountered, with efforts having tended to focus on reassuring patients. Analysis also highlighted how anxiety surrounding disclosure influenced, and was shaped by, the organisation of care for people with CKD and associated long-term conditions. Conclusion Offering reassurance alone may be of limited benefit, and current management of early-stage CKD in primary care may miss opportunities to address susceptibility to kidney injury, improve self-management of vascular conditions, and improve the management of multimorbidity. PMID:22520910

  15. SPECT neuroimaging and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Vassilakos, Pavlos [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Patras (Greece); Messinis, Lambros; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Neurology, Neuropsychology Section, Patras (Greece); Kefalopoulou, Zinovia; Constantoyannis, Costantinos [University of Patras Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Patras (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    The present study investigated differences and associations between cortical perfusion, nigrostriatal dopamine pathway and neuropsychological functions in different stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We recruited 53 non-demented PD patients divided into four groups according to the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging system and 20 healthy controls who were used in the comparison of the neuropsychological findings. Each patient underwent two separate brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies (perfusion and dopamine transporter binding) as well as neuropsychological evaluation. Perfusion images of each patient were quantified and compared with a normative database provided by the NeuroGam software manufacturers. Mean values obtained from the cortical areas and neuropsychological measures in the different groups were also compared by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for disease duration and educational level. We found cognitive deficits especially in the late PD stages (HY 3, 4 and 5) compared to the early stages (HY 1 and 2) and associations between cognitive decrements and cortical perfusion deterioration mainly in the frontal and posterior cortical areas. Compared with controls, PD patients showed impairments of cognition and cerebral perfusion that increased with clinical severity. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the performance on the phonemic fluency task and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left frontal lobe. Dopamine transporter binding in the left caudate nucleus significantly correlated with blood flow in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not with measures of executive functions. There are significant cognitive and perfusion deficits associated with PD progression, implying a multifactorial neurodegeneration process apart from dopamine depletion in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). (orig.)

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  17. (131)I treatment in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A J M; Vázquez, R G; Cuenca, J I C; Brocca, M A M; Castilla, J; Martínez, J M M; González, E N

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) is a cornerstone in the treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). In patients on haemodialysis due to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), it must be used cautiously, considering the renal clearance of this radionuclide. Also, the safety of the procedure and subsequent long-term outcome is still not well defined. In 2001, we described a dosimetric method and short-term results in three patients, with a good safety profile. We hypothesize that our method is safe in a long-term scenario without compromising the prognosis of both renal and thyroid disease. Descriptive-retrospective study. A systematic search was carried out using our clinical database from 2000 to 2014. DTC and radioiodine treatment while on haemodialysis. peritoneal dialysis. Final sample n=9 patients (n=5 males), age 48 years (median age 51 years males, 67 years female group); n=8 papillary thyroid cancer, n=1 follicular thyroid cancer; n=5 lymph node invasion; n=1 metastatic disease. Median RAI dose administered on haemodialysis 100mCi. 7.5 years after radioiodine treatment on haemodialysis, n=7 deemed free of thyroid disease, n=1 persistent non-localised disease. No complications related to the procedure or other target organs were registered. After 3.25 years, n=4 patients underwent successful renal transplantation; n=4 patients did not meet transplantation criteria due to other conditions unrelated to the thyroid disease or its treatment. One patient died due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (free of thyroid disease). Radioiodine treatment during haemodialysis is a long-term, safe procedure without worsening prognosis of either renal or thyroid disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. What is the impact of chronic kidney disease stage and cardiovascular disease on the annual cost of hospital care in moderate-to-severe kidney disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Seamus; Schlackow, Iryna; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable estimates of the impacts of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, with and without cardiovascular disease, on hospital costs are needed to inform health policy. METHODS: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized trial prospectively collected information on kidney...... disease progression, serious adverse events and hospital care use in a cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. In a secondary analysis of SHARP data, the impact of participants' CKD stage, non-fatal cardiovascular events and deaths on annual hospital costs (i.e. all hospital admissions, routine...... dialysis treatments and recorded outpatient/day-case attendances in United Kingdom 2011 prices) were estimated using linear regression. RESULTS: 7,246 SHARP patients (2,498 on dialysis at baseline) from Europe, North America, and Australasia contributed 28,261 years of data. CKD patients without diabetes...

  19. The impact of radiotherapy dose and other treatment-related and clinical factors on in-field control in stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Lynch, James W.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess local (in-field) disease control, identify potential prognostic factors, and elucidate the optimal radiotherapy dose in various clinical settings of Stage I and II nonHodgkin's lymphoma (non-CNS). Materials and Methods: A total of 285 consecutive patients with Stage I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with curative intent, including 159 with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 126 with combined-modality therapy (CMT). Of these, 72 patients had low-grade lymphomas (LGL), 92 had intermediate or high-grade lymphomas (I/HGL), and 21 had unclassified lymphomas. Clinical and treatment variables with potential prognostic significance for in-field disease control, freedom from relapse (FFR), and absolute survival (AS) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial AS rates were 73%, 46%, and 33% for patients with LGL and 64%, 44%, and 18% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. The 5-, 10-, and 20-year actuarial FFR rates were 62%, 59%, and 49% for patients with LGL and 66%, 57%, and 57% for patients with I/HGL, respectively. Significant prognostic factors identified by the multivariate analysis were age, tumor size, and histology for AS; tumor size and treatment for FFR; and only tumor size for in-field disease control. There were 95 total failures, with only 12 occurring infield. Most failures (65%) were in contiguous unirradiated sites. All 4 in-field failures in patients with LGL occurred after RT doses 6 cm, and 4 with less than a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy. Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that the overwhelming problem in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is not in-field failure but, rather, failure in contiguous unirradiated sites. A dose of 20-25 Gy may be sufficient for small-volume LGL of the orbit. A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for LGL in general, as well as for patients with nonbulky (≤ 6 cm) I/HGL treated with CMT who have a CR. However, patients with I

  20. Screening for cerebrovascular disease in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): an evidence-based proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Luke D; Robertson, Fergus; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2013-04-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (OMIM 210720) is a rare autosomal recessive condition frequently associated with early-onset cerebrovascular disease. Presymptomatic detection and intervention could prevent the adverse consequences associated with this. We reviewed published cases of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II to ascertain prevalence and characteristics of cerebrovascular disease and use these data to propose an evidence-based approach to cerebrovascular screening. Of 147 cases identified, 47 had cerebrovascular disease (32%), including occlusive arteriopathy (including moyamoya) and cerebral aneurysmal disease. Occlusive disease occurred in younger individuals, and progression can be both rapid and clinically silent. A reasonable screening approach would be magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the cervical and intracranial circulation at diagnosis, repeated at yearly intervals until 10 years, and every 2 years thereafter, unless clinical concerns occur earlier. At present it would appear that this needs to be life-long. Families and professionals should be alerted to the potential significance of neurologic symptoms and measures should be taken to maintain good vascular health in affected individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Renal Failure in Patients with End Stage Liver Disease and its Impact on Clinical Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M. O.; Shafqat, F.; Dar, F. S.; Salih, M.; Khokhar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of renal failure (RF) in the patients of end stage liver disease (ESLD), to determine the causes of RF in these patients and its impact on patient's outcome. Study Design: Descriptive, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from May 2011 to March 2013. Methodology: A total of 523 patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) were evaluated, renal failure (RF) and its causes were recognized in these patients according to established criteria. Outcome of these patients was assigned as reversal of RF or mortality. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Chi-square test was used for comparing proportions and t-test was used for comparing mean values. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Out of 523 patients, 261 (49.9%) had RF. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was the most common presentation seen in 160 (61%) patients. Hypovolemia and infections were the most frequent causes of RF. Mortality was significantly higher in the patients with RF, when compared to the patients without RF (31% vs. 4.5%, p < 0.001). Reversal of RF was seen in 98 (37%) of the affected patients. Reversal was more common in the patients with hypovolemia. The mortality was higher in the patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) and infections. Conclusion: Renal failure in the end stage liver disease is an important prognostic factor. Etiology of RF is the key factor in patients' outcome. Patients of ESLD with RF had higher mortality. Majority of the cases of RF were reversible in patients of ESLD coming in the setup. (author)

  2. Management of postural sensory conflict and dynamic balance control in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G C; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P P

    2011-10-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to affect postural control, especially in situations needing a change in balance strategy or when a concurrent task is simultaneously performed. However, few studies assessing postural control in patients with PD included homogeneous population in late stage of the disease. Thus, this study aimed to analyse postural control and strategies in a homogeneous population of patients with idiopathic advanced (late-stage) PD, and to determine the contribution of peripheral inputs in simple and more complex postural tasks, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic tasks. Twenty-four subjects with advanced PD (duration: median (M)=11.0 years, interquartile range (IQR)=4.3 years; Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS): M "on-dopa"=13.5, IQR=7.8; UPDRS: M "off-dopa"=48.5, IQR=16.8; Hoehn and Yahr stage IV in all patients) and 48 age-matched healthy controls underwent static (SPT) and dynamic posturographic (DPT) tests and a sensory organization test (SOT). In SPT, patients with PD showed reduced postural control precision with increased oscillations in both anterior-posterior and medial-lateral planes. In SOT, patients with PD displayed reduced postural performances especially in situations in which visual and vestibular cues became predominant to organize balance control, as was the ability to manage balance in situations for which visual or proprioceptive inputs are disrupted. In DPT, postural restabilization strategies were often inefficient to maintain equilibrium resulting in falls. Postural strategies were often precarious, postural regulation involving more hip joint than ankle joint in patients with advanced PD than in controls. Difficulties in managing complex postural situations, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic situations might reflect an inadequate sensory organization suggesting impairment in central information processing. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  4. Stage of change and motivation to healthier lifestyle in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centis, Elena; Moscatiello, Simona; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Bellentani, Stefano; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Calugi, Simona; Petta, Salvatore; Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Marchesini, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    Healthy diet and physical activity are the treatment cornerstones of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); their effectiveness is however limited by difficulties in implementing lifestyle changes. We aimed at determining the stage of change and associated psychological factors as a prerequisite to refine strategies to implement behavior changes. We studied 138 consecutive NAFLD patients (73% male, age 19-73 years). The diagnosis was confirmed by liver biopsy in 64 cases (steatohepatitis, 47%). All cases completed the validated EMME-3 questionnaire, consisting of two parallel sets of instruments (for diet and physical activity, respectively) and providing stages of change according to transtheoretical model. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with stages making behavioral changes more demanding. The individual profiles were variable; for diet, no cases had precontemplation as prevalent stage of change (highest score in individual profiles); 36% had contemplation. For physical activity, 50% were classified in either precontemplation or contemplation. Minor differences were recorded in relation to associated metabolic complications or steatohepatitis. Logistic regression identified male sex (odds ratio, 4.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.69-12.08) and age (1.70; 1.20-2.43 per decade) as the independent parameters predicting precontemplation or contemplation for diet. No predictors were identified for physical activity. NAFLD cases have scarce readiness to lifestyle changes, particularly with regard to physical activity. Defining stages of change and motivation offers the opportunity to improve clinical care of NAFLD people through individual programs exploiting the powerful potential of behavioral counseling, an issue to be tested in longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for Hirschsprung′s disease : Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras R Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary single-stage pull-through for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD has been reported to give comparable surgical outcomes to staged operations with less morbidity. Herein, we present our experience with single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure for management of HD. Patients and Methods: This was a review of 48 cases of HD who underwent single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure without a protective colostomy. Results: The age at surgery ranged from 6 months to 10 years (median - 9 months, mean - 2.3 years. The average weight of the child was 7.2 kg (range, 4.9-22 kg. 38 (79.2% patients had classical rectosigmoid HD, the rest being long segment HD (the proximal most level being the splenic flexure. The average duration of surgery was 175 minutes (range, 130-245 minutes. The average blood loss was 45 ml. The average hospital stay was 7.2 days (range: 6-10 days. The major postoperative complications (n=3 included postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, anastomotic leak and persistent constipation due to residual aganglionosis. Each required a re-exploration. Minor complications included surgical site infection (n=3 and post-operative enterocolitis (n=3, which were managed conservatively. Six patients had constipation for a limited period post-operatively. All patients have a satisfactory functional outcome and normal development and growth. Conclusions: For HD, we recommend that single-stage Modified Duhamel procedure should be the preferred approach in view of its low morbidity, satisfactory functional outcome and avoidance of stoma, multiple surgeries and economic benefit in view of decreased hospital stay.

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